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Subject: 1741: The Year In Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 12/14/13 at 11:56 am

"Messiah" is an English-language oratorio composed in 1741 by George Frideric Handel, with a scriptural text compiled by Charles Jennens from the King James Bible, and from the Psalms included with the Book of Common Prayer. It was first performed in Dublin on 13 April 1742 and received its London premiere nearly a year later. After an initially modest public reception, the oratorio gained in popularity, eventually becoming one of the best-known and most frequently performed choral works in Western music.

Part 2 of the "Messiah" closes with the chorus "Hallelujah", in the key of D major with trumpets and timpani. This chorus is often performed out of context, especially around Christmas and Easter. The choir introduces in homophony a characteristic simple motif on the word, playing with the interval of a second, which re-appears throughout the piece. Several lines from the Book of Revelation (Revelation 19:6,16, Revelation 11:15) are treated differently, as in a motet, but unified by "Hallelujah" as a conclusion or as a countersubject in a fugal section. The line "for the Lord God omnipotent reigneth" is sung by all voices, first in unison, then in imitation with Hallelujah-exclamations interspersed. The second line "The kingdom of this world" is sung in a four part setting like a chorale. The third idea "and he shall reign for ever and ever" starts as a fugue on a theme with bold leaps, reminiscent in sequence of Philipp Nicolai's Lutheran chorale Wachet auf. As a countersubject, the words "for ever – and ever" assume the rhythm of the Hallelujah-motif. The final acclamation "King of Kings ..." is sung on one note, energized by repeated calls "Hallelujah" and "for ever – and ever", raised higher and higher, up to a rest full of tension and a final solemn "Hallelujah".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C3TUWU_yg4s

Subject: Re: 1741: The Year In Music

Written By: 80sfan on 12/14/13 at 3:21 pm

Coooooooool, karma!

Subject: Re: 1741: The Year In Music

Written By: Katluver on 12/14/13 at 3:26 pm


"Messiah" is an English-language oratorio composed in 1741 by George Frideric Handel, with a scriptural text compiled by Charles Jennens from the King James Bible, and from the Psalms included with the Book of Common Prayer. It was first performed in Dublin on 13 April 1742 and received its London premiere nearly a year later. After an initially modest public reception, the oratorio gained in popularity, eventually becoming one of the best-known and most frequently performed choral works in Western music.

Part 2 of the "Messiah" closes with the chorus "Hallelujah", in the key of D major with trumpets and timpani. This chorus is often performed out of context, especially around Christmas and Easter. The choir introduces in homophony a characteristic simple motif on the word, playing with the interval of a second, which re-appears throughout the piece. Several lines from the Book of Revelation (Revelation 19:6,16, Revelation 11:15) are treated differently, as in a motet, but unified by "Hallelujah" as a conclusion or as a countersubject in a fugal section. The line "for the Lord God omnipotent reigneth" is sung by all voices, first in unison, then in imitation with Hallelujah-exclamations interspersed. The second line "The kingdom of this world" is sung in a four part setting like a chorale. The third idea "and he shall reign for ever and ever" starts as a fugue on a theme with bold leaps, reminiscent in sequence of Philipp Nicolai's Lutheran chorale Wachet auf. As a countersubject, the words "for ever – and ever" assume the rhythm of the Hallelujah-motif. The final acclamation "King of Kings ..." is sung on one note, energized by repeated calls "Hallelujah" and "for ever – and ever", raised higher and higher, up to a rest full of tension and a final solemn "Hallelujah".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C3TUWU_yg4s


Thanks for sharing---that's a wonderful piece of music.

Subject: Re: 1741: The Year In Music

Written By: Howard on 12/14/13 at 4:05 pm

I was looking it up and to my surprise there was no songs in 1741.

Subject: Re: 1741: The Year In Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 12/14/13 at 4:15 pm

The Goldberg Variations, BWV 988, is a work for harpsichord by Johann Sebastian Bach, consisting of an aria and a set of 30 variations. First published in 1741, the work is considered to be one of the most important examples of variation form. The Variations are named after Johann Gottlieb Goldberg, who may have been the first performer.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N2YMSt3yfko

Subject: Re: 1741: The Year In Music

Written By: gibbo on 12/14/13 at 8:59 pm

I might be Baching up the wrong tree with this selection... ;)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6JQm5aSjX6g

Subject: Re: 1741: The Year In Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 12/15/13 at 6:26 am


I was looking it up and to my surprise there was no songs in 1741.
It is not songs to be looked for in these topics, it is the music of the year.

Subject: Re: 1741: The Year In Music

Written By: whistledog on 12/15/13 at 9:39 pm


I was looking it up and to my surprise there was no songs in 1741.


Not even any funk songs? :(

Subject: Re: 1741: The Year In Music

Written By: Howard on 12/16/13 at 6:19 am


Not even any funk songs? :(


nope, not even funk songs, unless you call Walter Murphy "A Fifth Of Beethoven" from 1979 funk but that's more disco than funk.

Subject: Re: 1741: The Year In Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 12/16/13 at 6:24 am


nope, not even funk songs, unless you call Walter Murphy "A Fifth Of Beethoven" from 1979 funk but that's more disco than funk.
The Symphony No. 5 in C minor of Ludwig van Beethoven, Op. 67, was written in 1804–1808, and was premiered on 22 December 1808.

Subject: Re: 1741: The Year In Music

Written By: Paul on 12/16/13 at 9:42 am

Vivaldi died in this year - he was best known for the Four Seasons, but then Frankie Valli kicked him out of the group and became lead singer... :P

Subject: Re: 1741: The Year In Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 12/16/13 at 9:59 am


Vivaldi died in this year - he was best known for the Four Seasons... :P
I noticed that in my research, but could locate any composition for him for that year.

Subject: Re: 1741: The Year In Music

Written By: Paul on 12/16/13 at 4:32 pm


I noticed that in my research, but could locate any composition for him for that year.


Possibly the reason he died...bad career move, dying!

Subject: Re: 1741: The Year In Music

Written By: CatwomanofV on 12/16/13 at 4:49 pm


"Messiah" is an English-language oratorio composed in 1741 by George Frideric Handel, with a scriptural text compiled by Charles Jennens from the King James Bible, and from the Psalms included with the Book of Common Prayer. It was first performed in Dublin on 13 April 1742 and received its London premiere nearly a year later. After an initially modest public reception, the oratorio gained in popularity, eventually becoming one of the best-known and most frequently performed choral works in Western music.

Part 2 of the "Messiah" closes with the chorus "Hallelujah", in the key of D major with trumpets and timpani. This chorus is often performed out of context, especially around Christmas and Easter. The choir introduces in homophony a characteristic simple motif on the word, playing with the interval of a second, which re-appears throughout the piece. Several lines from the Book of Revelation (Revelation 19:6,16, Revelation 11:15) are treated differently, as in a motet, but unified by "Hallelujah" as a conclusion or as a countersubject in a fugal section. The line "for the Lord God omnipotent reigneth" is sung by all voices, first in unison, then in imitation with Hallelujah-exclamations interspersed. The second line "The kingdom of this world" is sung in a four part setting like a chorale. The third idea "and he shall reign for ever and ever" starts as a fugue on a theme with bold leaps, reminiscent in sequence of Philipp Nicolai's Lutheran chorale Wachet auf. As a countersubject, the words "for ever – and ever" assume the rhythm of the Hallelujah-motif. The final acclamation "King of Kings ..." is sung on one note, energized by repeated calls "Hallelujah" and "for ever – and ever", raised higher and higher, up to a rest full of tension and a final solemn "Hallelujah".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C3TUWU_yg4s



Oh man, I can remember MOST of the second alto part but not all.  :-[  It has been a LONG, LONG time since I was part of a choir where we preformed this.



Cat

Subject: Re: 1741: The Year In Music

Written By: Howard on 12/17/13 at 4:08 pm


Vivaldi died in this year - he was best known for the Four Seasons, but then Frankie Valli kicked him out of the group and became lead singer... :P



;D

Subject: Re: 1741: The Year In Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 12/18/13 at 2:19 am


Possibly the reason he died...bad career move, dying!
Vivaldi spent 25 years of his life composing and has been decomposing since his his death.

Subject: Re: 1741: The Year In Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 12/18/13 at 2:20 am

The "Pièces de clavecin en concerts", published in 1741, constitute the only chamber music by Jean-Philippe Rameau and were composed in full maturity; they came after his music for solo harpsichord, and just before Les Indes galantes.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OSMmQSy03D0

Subject: Re: 1741: The Year In Music

Written By: apollonia1986 on 12/18/13 at 2:06 pm

When I saw the title for this, I had to come peek in. Interesting.  ;D

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