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Subject: 1940s

Written By: 80sfan on 12/20/13 at 5:53 pm

Let's talk about the 1940s. Anyone, anyone??

To me, 1940 is really old! Here's a picture from December 16, 1940.

http://latimesphoto.files.wordpress.com/2012/12/fa_796_gorman1940_970.jpg


Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: Katluver on 12/20/13 at 9:24 pm


Let's talk about the 1940s. Anyone, anyone??

To me, 1940 is really old! Here's a picture from December 16, 1940.

http://latimesphoto.files.wordpress.com/2012/12/fa_796_gorman1940_970.jpg


I've always been attracted to that decade.

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: 80sfan on 12/20/13 at 9:35 pm


I've always been attracted to that decade.


I'm curious. Why?  :) :)

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: Katluver on 12/20/13 at 9:41 pm


I'm curious. Why?  :) :)


That's a good question because I'm not sure why...just something about that decade. Could be the mannerisms, the fashion, the homes...

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: 80sfan on 12/20/13 at 9:55 pm


That's a good question because I'm not sure why...just something about that decade. Could be the mannerisms, the fashion, the homes...


I got sick of thinking about the 1980s, so I decided to talk about another decade.

If there was one word to describe the 1940s was.... 'classy'. You could maybe say the same thing about the 1950s, but the 50s had a suburban feel to it.

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: Mat1991 on 12/20/13 at 10:17 pm

I've always wondered if the way men talked in movies from the 1940s mirrored the way ordinary men in that period talked, e.g. talking super fast and with a pompous tone, and saying "see" at the end of each sentence.  ::)

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: 80sfan on 12/20/13 at 10:43 pm

https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRcwWQPvnPBlctoTdJ91PG4ryB9xKtfNwfnvXMAyXSoeFHj4Yms

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: 80sfan on 12/20/13 at 10:44 pm


I've always wondered if the way men talked in movies from the 1940s mirrored the way ordinary men in that period talked, e.g. talking super fast and with a pompous tone, and saying "see" at the end of each sentence.  ::)


Probably not. But since I'm too young  ;D, I could still be way off!

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: Mat1991 on 12/20/13 at 11:40 pm


Probably not. But since I'm too young  ;D, I could still be way off!


Is there anybody here who might know? This question keeps me awake in bed at night.  :D

Actually, my grandmother might be able to answer. She was a teenager and young adult in the '40s.

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: yearofthemonkey on 12/21/13 at 2:31 pm


I've always wondered if the way men talked in movies from the 1940s mirrored the way ordinary men in that period talked, e.g. talking super fast and with a pompous tone, and saying "see" at the end of each sentence.  ::)


Its actually  a type of posh accent used by actors and New England aristocrats. Very few people actually spoke like that.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mid-Atlantic_accent

If you watch movies from the 50's and 60's, alot of the veteran actors still use that accent while younger actors speak in a more vernacular tone (for example, the speech of the older Reverend Mosby in "The Parent Trap" compared to the speech of the family)

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: Howard on 12/21/13 at 3:18 pm


That's a good question because I'm not sure why...just something about that decade. Could be the mannerisms, the fashion, the homes...


I liked the way people dressed back in the 1940's.

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: Howard on 12/21/13 at 3:20 pm

http://www.kenyonreview.org/wp-content/uploads/blog/uploads/2011/07/family1940s1.jpg

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: CatwomanofV on 12/21/13 at 6:10 pm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zGxL2uNr7bk


Cat

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: 80sfan on 12/21/13 at 8:53 pm


I liked the way people dressed back in the 1940's.


I prefer the way they dressed in the 1950s. It may be very similar though.

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: yearofthemonkey on 12/22/13 at 5:32 am

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ijnfdLFhn2o

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: Howard on 12/22/13 at 6:32 am


I prefer the way they dressed in the 1950s. It may be very similar though.


and the hairstyles were cooler back then. Some guys wore slicked back hair with gel and hairspray and cowlick.

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: Howard on 12/22/13 at 6:33 am

http://cdn.stylisheve.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/1940s-Hairstyles-for-men-_03.jpg

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: 80sfan on 12/22/13 at 11:33 am


http://cdn.stylisheve.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/1940s-Hairstyles-for-men-_03.jpg


Is that Marlon Brando?  ???

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: Howard on 12/22/13 at 7:07 pm


Is that Marlon Brando?  ???


Yes It Is.

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: warped on 12/28/13 at 2:16 pm

I would have liked to have lived or be born in the 1940s, just after WW2.
I'd prefer to live in the 1940s than today.

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: Howard on 12/28/13 at 3:06 pm

What were they drinking as far as the hot beverages were concerned in the 1940's? ???

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: CatwomanofV on 12/29/13 at 6:04 pm


What were they drinking as far as the hot beverages were concerned in the 1940's? ???



Hmmm, my guess would be coffee, tea, & hot chocolate for the most part.



Cat

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: amjikloviet on 12/29/13 at 6:14 pm



Hmmm, my guess would be coffee, tea, & hot chocolate for the most part.



Cat



I'm guessing lots of sodas/soda floats too.

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: Paul on 12/30/13 at 3:37 am

If you were in Britain...beer! Yes - it was warm enough to be classed as a hot beverage!

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: Philip Eno on 12/30/13 at 4:02 am



Hmmm, my guess would be coffee, tea, & hot chocolate for the most part.



Cat
Tea is definitely a hot beverage of that time.

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: Howard on 12/30/13 at 6:33 am



I'm guessing lots of sodas/soda floats too.



and that was also in the early 1950's too.

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: CatwomanofV on 12/30/13 at 5:20 pm



I'm guessing lots of sodas/soda floats too.



Those are cold drinks. Howard was asking about hot drinks.



Cat

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: Howard on 12/30/13 at 7:26 pm

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2645/4497214122_1de9f34257.jpg

and they were still smoking cigarettes too.

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: warped on 12/30/13 at 7:35 pm


http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2645/4497214122_1de9f34257.jpg

and they were still smoking cigarettes too.


Umm, lots of people still smoke today, Howard.

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: Howard on 12/31/13 at 6:53 am


Umm, lots of people still smoke today, Howard.


I know they did but not Lucky Strikes.

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: zcrito on 03/09/14 at 6:17 pm

I don't know why or how I came across this one this past week, but it's a good one from 1944,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hmx1L8G25q4
The Trolley Song (Meet Me In St. Louis movie) -- Judy Garland


And from 1945,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7c85NXfwJqA
I Fall In Love Too Easily (Anchors Aweigh movie) -- Frank Sinatra



Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: 80sfan on 03/09/14 at 6:42 pm


I don't know why or how I came across this one this past week, but it's a good one from 1944,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hmx1L8G25q4
The Trolley Song (Meet Me In St. Louis movie) -- Judy Garland


And from 1945,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7c85NXfwJqA
I Fall In Love Too Easily (Anchors Aweigh movie) -- Frank Sinatra


Cool videos!

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: warped on 03/12/14 at 4:32 pm


I don't know why or how I came across this one this past week, but it's a good one from 1944,

The Trolley Song (Meet Me In St. Louis movie) -- Judy Garland


And from 1945,

I Fall In Love Too Easily (Anchors Aweigh movie) -- Frank Sinatra


Nice songs. I like listening to 1940s music.

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: Philip Eno on 06/30/15 at 12:05 pm

"Whispering Grass (Don't Tell The Trees)" is a popular song written by Fred Fisher and his daughter Doris Fisher. The song was first recorded by Erskine Hawkins & His Orchestra in 1940. The Ink Spots featuring Bill Kenny also recorded it the same year. A live instrumental version was played and recorded by Johnny Hodges with Duke Ellington and his orchestra in the Cristal Ballroom, Fargo, North Dakota, also in 1940.

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Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/15/15 at 11:02 am

Rum and Coca-Cola” is the title of a popular calypso. Originally composed by Lord Invader and Lionel Belasco, it was copyrighted in the United States by entertainer Morey Amsterdam and became a huge hit in 1945 for the Andrews Sisters, spending ten weeks at the top of Billboard's U.S. Pop Singles chart.

zGxL2uNr7bk

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/15/15 at 11:44 am

"We'll Gather Lilacs", also called We'll Gather Lilacs In The Spring, is a song by Welsh composer Ivor Novello, which he wrote for the hit musical romance "Perchance to Dream". The stage musical opened at the Hippodrome Theatre in London's West End in 1945 and ran until 1948. The song, sung in the show by Olive Gilbert, was the most popular and enduring to emerge from the production. It was recorded originally by Geraldo and his Orchestra who made the UK charts with it in 1946. It has since been performed by many artists including notably Anne Ziegler and Webster Booth, Richard Tauber, Frank Sinatra and Julie Andrews.

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Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: Philip Eno on 09/14/15 at 8:52 am

"The Third Man Theme" (also known as "The Harry Lime Theme") is an instrumental written and performed by Anton Karas for the soundtrack to the film The Third Man (1949).

r8jN1treRKQ

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: Philip Eno on 09/16/15 at 9:54 am

"Dear Hearts and Gentle People" is a popular song published in 1949 with music by Sammy Fain and lyrics by Bob Hilliard. They were inspired to write the song based on a scrap of paper with the words "Dear friends and gentle hearts" written on it that was found on the body of Stephen Foster when he was discovered in a New York hotel room in January 1864. Popular versions were recorded in 1949 by Dinah Shore, Gordon MacRae, Bing Crosby and Dennis Day.

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Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: Philip Eno on 01/23/16 at 7:21 am

"Baby, It's Cold Outside" is a song written by Frank Loesser in 1944. It is a call and response duet in which one of the singers (usually performed by a male voice) attempts to convince a guest (usually performed by a female voice) that they should stay together for a romantic evening because the weather is cold and the trip home would be difficult. Originally recorded for the film Neptune's Daughter, it has been recorded by many artists since its original release. The song in its original form was released on the soundtrack for Neptune's Daughter sung by Ricardo Montalban and Esther Williams.

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Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: Howard on 01/23/16 at 7:46 am

http://ww2.hdnux.com/photos/16/05/56/3693477/3/1024x1024.jpg
heavy snowstorm in 1948

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: Philip Eno on 04/15/16 at 2:10 pm

"Autumn Leaves" is a much-recorded popular song. Originally it was a 1945 French song, "Les feuilles mortes" (literally "The Dead Leaves"), with music by Hungarian-French composer Joseph Kosma and lyrics by poet Jacques Prévert. The Hungarian title is "Hulló levelek" (Falling Leaves). Yves Montand (with Irène Joachim) introduced "Les feuilles mortes" in the film Les Portes de la nuit (1946).


Here sung by Nat "King" Cole in 1956.
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Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: Howard on 04/15/16 at 2:24 pm

http://i.imgur.com/jg5Yyi8.png
Dessau, 1945

Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: Philip Eno on 04/25/16 at 7:52 am

"(I've Got a Gal in) Kalamazoo" is a #1 popular song recorded by Glenn Miller and His Orchestra in 1942. It was written by Mack Gordon and Harry Warren and published in 1942. It was featured in the musical film Orchestra Wives and was recorded by Glenn Miller and His Orchestra, featuring Tex Beneke, Marion Hutton and The Modernaires, who released in 1942.

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Subject: Re: 1940s

Written By: Howard on 04/25/16 at 2:22 pm

http://mrjohnsonssclasses.wikispaces.com/file/view/Monroe.jpg/324095758/479x285/Monroe.jpg
Marilyn Monroe

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