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Subject: 1951: The Year In Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 05/13/14 at 7:03 am

"Ramblin' Man" is a song written in 1951 by Hank Williams, Sr. It was released as the B-side to the 1953 #1 hit "Take These Chains from My Heart", as well as to the 1976 re-release of "Why Don't You Love Me". It is also included on the 40 Greatest Hits, a staple of his CD re-released material.

The song is notable for the simplicity of its structure, relying upon a 2-chord, minor-key, rhythm guitar figure and alternating minimal accompaniment from fiddle and steel guitar. It also features Williams' trademark "yodel". The song's three verses, all ending in the title line, are sung straight through with no pause for instrumental solos. The song tells the story of a man trapped in his drifting ways, doomed to break his lover's heart. Tales of wanderers were a common theme for Williams, and consequently, Country music as a whole.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V41gDDWEPso

Subject: Re: 1951: The Year In Music

Written By: Paul on 05/13/14 at 7:38 am

One of the most amazing hits from that year, or any other...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g2wb31uFmiM

It started off innocently enough - a ballad which quite a few singers had a go at, in a fairly straight-laced style (including our own Vera Lynn) but nothing really happened until Ray got hold of it...and promptly ripped it to shreds!

The guy was so 'unknown', that the original record was released on a predominantly RnB-based label! And certainly, there was no-one else around at the time who could ever manage a delivery as intense as this - it set the ball rolling for a highly-succesful career, as well as rabid teen-worship. Here in Britain, the youngsters had never seen or heard anything like him and this would almost certainly been a #1 hit (as it was in the US) had we had a record chart at the time...

Sadly, he seems to have become a small footnote in the history of things now... :-\\

Subject: Re: 1951: The Year In Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 05/13/14 at 7:40 am


One of the most amazing hits from that year, or any other...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g2wb31uFmiM

Subject: Re: 1951: The Year In Music

Written By: Paul on 05/13/14 at 7:42 am

Yeah, sorry...YouTube wouldn't play ball with me!

Another huge thing from that year, by the legend that was...a jazz standard, but anticipating rock 'n' roll, perhaps?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UOzB7I2y7Ic

Subject: Re: 1951: The Year In Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 05/13/14 at 7:44 am


Yeah, sorry...YouTube wouldn't play ball with me!

Another huge thing from that year, by the legend that was...a jazz standard, but anticipating rock 'n' roll, perhaps?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UOzB7I2y7Ic
You have to removed the 's' in the https address.

Subject: Re: 1951: The Year In Music

Written By: warped on 05/13/14 at 7:45 am

Patti Page ~ Mockin' Bird Hill

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C28_G5PKo48

All the songs posted so far are just wonderful.

Subject: Re: 1951: The Year In Music

Written By: Paul on 05/13/14 at 10:44 am


You have to removed the 's' in the https address.


This modern teknology will kill me!

I need to calm down and this is the perfect thing to do it with...stunning arrangement!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7y-c000vDMA

(Despite what the person who posted it says, this WAS from 1951!)

Subject: Re: 1951: The Year In Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 05/13/14 at 10:47 am


This modern teknology will kill me!

I need to calm down and this is the perfect thing to do it with...stunning arrangement!



(Despite what the person who posted it says, this WAS from 1951!)
The vocal version by The Bachelors was much later in the 1960s.

Subject: Re: 1951: The Year In Music

Written By: Paul on 05/13/14 at 3:38 pm


The vocal version by The Bachelors was much later in the 1960s.


Yup! Dates back even further than Mantovani, to 1926/7, when Guy Lombardo (another forgotten name) had a big hit with it...

The ever-smiling Bachelors' version was produced by Shel Talmy. A US producer who moved to Britain primarily to expand his horizons - this was his first major hit production...the next one? The very gentle 'You Really Got Me' by The Kinks!

A bigger contrast you couldn't honestly imagine!

Subject: Re: 1951: The Year In Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 02/24/15 at 11:31 pm

"Too Young" is a popular song. The music was written by Sidney Lippman, the lyrics by Sylvia Dee. The song was published in 1951. In the United States, the best-known version of the song was recorded by Nat King Cole on February 6, 1951 and released by Capitol Records. It was a million-selling record and reached the #1 position on the Billboard magazine chart, staying at #1 for 5 weeks and altogether on the Best Seller chart for 29 weeks. Billboard ranked this version as the No. 1 song of 1951. Cole described this song as one of his three favorites among his own songs.

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Subject: Re: 1951: The Year In Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 02/25/15 at 11:22 pm

"Cold, Cold Heart" is a country music and popular music song, written by Hank Williams. This blues ballad is both a classic of honky tonk and an entry in the Great American Songbook. Williams first recorded and released the song in 1951, originally as the B-side (MGM-10904B) to "Dear John". That same year, it was recorded in a pop version by Tony Bennett with a light orchestral arrangement from Percy Faith. This recording was released by Columbia Records as catalog number 39449. It first reached the Billboard magazine charts on July 20, 1951 and lasted 27 weeks on the chart, peaking at #1.

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Subject: Re: 1951: The Year In Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 09/14/15 at 11:44 am

"I Tawt I Taw A Puddy Tat" is a novelty song composed and written by Alan Livingston, Billy May and Warren Foster. It was sung by Mel Blanc, who provided the voice of the bird, Tweety and of his nemesis Sylvester. The song reached No. 9 on the Billboard pop chart during a seven-week chart run in February and March 1951, and sold more than 2 million records.

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