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Subject: 1959: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 01/31/15 at 3:12 am

"Does Your Chewing Gum Lose Its Flavour (On the Bedpost Overnight?)" is a novelty song by Lonnie Donegan. Released as a single in 1959, it peaked at number 3 in the UK Singles Chart. It was also Donegan's greatest chart success in the United States, reaching number five on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1961.

The song is a cover version of "Does The Spearmint Lose Its Flavor on the Bedpost Overnight?" written by Billy Rose, Ernest Breuer, and Marty Bloom and first released in 1924 by The Happiness Boys (Ernie Hare and Billy Jones), and later a hit for Lulu Belle and Scotty and The Two Gilberts. The song is humorous in content, the verses each describing a dramatic or urgent scenario leading up to the asking of the titular question.

The title and lyrics of the Donegan version were changed in the UK because "Spearmint" is a registered trademark there, and the BBC would not play songs that mentioned trademarks. Donegan's version of the song was recorded live at the New Theatre Oxford in December 1958 and was released both as a single as a track on the album King of Skiffle. An extended version with more banter was released on the live album The Last Tour.


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Subject: Re: 1959: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 02/25/15 at 11:34 pm

"Among My Souvenirs" is a 1927 song with words by Edgar Leslie and music by Lawrence Wright. In 1959, Connie Francis recorded the song peaking at number seven on the Hot 100. The Connie Francis version also peaked at number ten on the R&B charts. In the United Kingdom, the song reached #11. Her version was arranged by Ray Ellis.

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Subject: Re: 1959: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 03/13/15 at 8:38 am

"Sing, Little Birdie" is the title of the 1959 UK Eurovision entrant which took second place at Eurovision 1959. Performed by husband-and-wife duo Pearl Carr & Teddy Johnson, "Sing, Little Birdie" was the first UK Eurovision entrant to be recorded reaching #12 UK. At the finals for Eurovision 1959, held at Cannes on March 11, 1959, "Sing, Little Birdie" finished in second place, bettered only by the Netherlands Eurovision entrant "Een beetje" by Teddy Scholten.

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Subject: Re: 1959: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 03/14/15 at 4:12 am

"The Deck of Cards" is a recitation that was popularized in both the country and popular music fields, first during the late 1940s. This religious tale of a young American soldier arrested and charged with playing cards during a church service first became a hit in the U.S. in 1948 by country musician T. Texas Tyler.

Though Tyler wrote the spoken-word piece, the earliest known reference is to be found in an account/common-place book belonging to Mary Bacon, a British farmer's wife, dated 20 April 1762. The story of the soldier can be found in full in Mary Bacon's World. A farmer's wife in eighteenth-century Hampshire, published by Threshold Press (2010). The folk story was later recorded in a piece of 19th century British literature called "The Soldier's Almanack, Bible And Prayer Book"

The highest-charting version was recorded in 1959 by future game show host Wink Martindale, and was performed on The Ed Sullivan Show. Martindale's rendition (titled "Deck of Cards") went to No. 7 on the Billboard charts and number 11 on the country charts in 1959, attained multi-platinum recognition, and reached No. 1 on many worldwide music charts. A later cover by Bill Anderson made number 60 on the country charts in 1991. The song was also a UK No. 13 hit in October 1973 for the entertainer Max Bygraves.


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Subject: Re: 1959: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 09/18/15 at 7:54 am

"Venus" is a song written by Ed Marshall and Peter DeAngelis. The most successful and best-known recording of the track was done by Frankie Avalon and released in 1959.

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Subject: Re: 1959: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 09/28/15 at 11:28 am

"El Paso" is a country and western ballad written and originally recorded by Marty Robbins, and first released on Gunfighter Ballads and Trail Songs in September 1959. It was released as a single the following month, and became a major hit on both the country and pop music charts, reaching number one in both at the start of 1960. It won the Grammy Award for Best Country & Western Recording in 1961, and remains Robbins' best-known song.

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Subject: Re: 1959: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 01/15/16 at 11:06 am

Alone At Last by Jackie Wilson, released 1959, reach #8 in the US Charts and #50 in the UK Charts. The melody is based on the theme from Tchaikovsky's First Piano Concerto.

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Subject: Re: 1959: The Year in Music

Written By: AmericanGirl on 01/16/16 at 8:59 am

1959 - great year for music!  :D

Connie Francis was a big hitmaker by 1959 - here she is on American Bandstand:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8x5cUFoDnU

Subject: Re: 1959: The Year in Music

Written By: AmericanGirl on 01/16/16 at 9:09 am

Stay away from that Poison Ivy!  The Coasters in 1959:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ioQOokv7YxA

Subject: Re: 1959: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 02/22/16 at 7:51 am

"Theme from A Summer Place" is a song with lyrics by Mack Discant and music by Max Steiner. Percy Faith recorded the most popular version of the theme, an instrumental orchestral arrangement, at the Columbia 30th Street Studio in New York City, It was released in September 1959 as a single on Columbia Records, credited to "Percy Faith and his Orchestra", prior to the November 1959 release of the film A Summer Place.

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Subject: Re: 1959: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 03/14/16 at 1:14 pm

"High Hopes" is a popular song first popularized by Frank Sinatra, with music written by Jimmy Van Heusen and lyrics by Sammy Cahn.It was introduced by Sinatra and child actor Eddie Hodges in the 1959 film A Hole in the Head, nominated for a Grammy and won an Oscar for Best Original Song at the 32nd Academy Awards.


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Subject: Re: 1959: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 03/20/16 at 2:54 pm

"Non, Je Ne Regrette Rien" (French meaning "No, I regret nothing") is a French song composed by Charles Dumont, with lyrics by Michel Vaucaire. It was written in 1956, and is best known through Édith Piaf's 1959 recording, which spent seven weeks atop the French Singles & Airplay Reviews chart.

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Subject: Re: 1959: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 04/24/16 at 4:54 pm

"It Doesn't Matter Anymore" is a pop ballad written by Paul Anka and recorded by Buddy Holly in 1958. The song reached No. 13 as a posthumous hit on the Billboard Hot 100 charts in early 1959 shortly after Holly was killed in a plane crash on February 3, 1959. The single was a two-sided hit, backed with "Raining in My Heart". "It Doesn't Matter Anymore" was Holly's last US Top 20 hit and featured the orchestral backing of Dick Jacobs. It was also successful in the United Kingdom.

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