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Subject: 1958: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 02/24/15 at 11:58 pm

"The End" is a song (music by Jimmy Krondes and lyrics by Sid Jacobson) which was released (in the United States) as a 1958 single by Earl Grant. Grant's single on the Decca label, featured Charles "Bud" Dant on orchestra; some pressings of the single were shown with the title "(At) The End (Of A Rainbow)". The single was Grant's only entry into the U.S. Top 40 reaching number seven on the Billboard Hot 100 and number sixteen on the R&B chart.

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Subject: Re: 1958: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 02/25/15 at 11:43 pm

"True Love Ways" is a song co-written by Buddy Holly and Norman Petty and recorded with the Dick Jacobs Orchestra in October 1958, four months before the singer's death. Some argue that this song is the most played "first song" at weddings. It was first released on the posthumous "The Buddy Holly Story, Vol. 2" (Coral 57326/757326, March 1960). The song became a 1960 hit in Britain, reaching #25 on the pop singles chart.

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Subject: Re: 1958: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 03/04/15 at 2:02 am

"A Certain Smile" is a popular song. It was written for the 1958 film of the same name based on the novel A Certain Smile by Françoise Sagan. The song was nominated for the 1958 Academy Award for Best Original Song. The music was written by Sammy Fain with the lyrics by Paul Francis Webster. The song has been covered by artists such as Johnny Mathis, who appeared in the 1958 film as a bar singer who sang the title song, reaching #4 on the UK Singles Chart and #14 on The Billboard Hot 100.

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Subject: Re: 1958: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 03/04/15 at 2:43 am

"Secretly" is a popular song. It was written by Al Hoffman, Dick Manning, and Hugo Peretti and Luigi Creatore and published in 1958.

The best-known recording of the song was done by Jimmie Rodgers, charting in 1958, reaching number three on the U.S. pop chart and number five on the country chart.

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Subject: Re: 1958: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 04/20/15 at 12:14 pm

"I Can't Stop Loving You" is a popular song written and composed by country singer, songwriter and musician Don Gibson, who first recorded it on December 30, 1957, for RCA Victor Records. It was released in 1958 as the B-side of "Oh, Lonesome Me", becoming a double-sided country hit single.

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Subject: Re: 1958: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 06/08/15 at 9:09 am

"Tequila" is a 1958 Latin-flavored rock and roll instrumental recorded by The Champs. It is based on a Cuban mambo beat. The word "Tequila" is spoken three times throughout the tune. "Tequila" became a #1 hit on both the pop and R&B charts at the time of its release and continues to be strongly referenced in pop culture to this day.

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Subject: Re: 1958: The Year in Music

Written By: Howard on 06/08/15 at 2:15 pm


"Tequila" is a 1958 Latin-flavored rock and roll instrumental recorded by The Champs. It is based on a Cuban mambo beat. The word "Tequila" is spoken three times throughout the tune. "Tequila" became a #1 hit on both the pop and R&B charts at the time of its release and continues to be strongly referenced in pop culture to this day.

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This is Pee Wee Herman's favorite song.

Subject: Re: 1958: The Year in Music

Written By: AmericanGirl on 06/11/15 at 10:21 pm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HWbXCz9UZYo

Classic!  8)

Subject: Re: 1958: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 09/13/15 at 9:51 am

Possibly the most well-known version of "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" written by American composer Jerome Kern and lyricist Otto Harbach for their 1933 musical Roberta, was recorded in 1958 by The Platters, for their album Remember When?. The group's cover became a number one hit in the US, on the Billboard Hot 100 music chart.

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Subject: Re: 1958: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 01/16/16 at 10:11 am

"Hoots Mon" is a song written by Harry Robinson, and performed by Lord Rockingham's XI. It was a number-one hit single for three weeks in 1958 on the UK Singles Chart. It is based on the old Scottish folk song "A Hundred Pipers". It was also one of the first rock and roll songs to feature the Hammond organ, which would become popular in rock and roll music the following year with Dave Cortez's "The Happy Organ".

The record is mostly instrumental, punctuated by four stereotypical Scottish phrases:

"Och aye", an exclamation meaning "Yes"
"Hoots mon", an interjection usually meaning "Hey man!"
"There's a moose loose aboot this hoose" ("There's a mouse loose about this house"), a standard cliché highlighting Scots language pronunciation.
"It's a braw, bricht, moonlicht nicht." ("It's a fine, bright moonlit night")

The author and journalist Benny Green played the tenor saxophone on the recording.

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Subject: Re: 1958: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 02/01/16 at 3:30 pm

A song written by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans, Sophia Loren made famous "Bing! Bang! Bong!", which she sang in the 1958 film “Houseboat”, co-starring Cary Grant.

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Subject: Re: 1958: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 03/10/16 at 8:51 am

In 1958, Big Records released "Our Song" by a teenage duo from Queens, New York, Tom and Jerry. The duo will become famous in the '60s under their real names, Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel.

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Subject: Re: 1958: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 04/28/16 at 10:24 am

"My Baby Just Cares for Me" is a jazz standard written by Walter Donaldson with lyrics by Gus Kahn. Written for the film version of the musical comedy Whoopee! (1930), the song became a signature tune for Eddie Cantor who sang it in the movie. A stylized version of the song by Nina Simone, recorded in 1958, was a top 10 hit in the United Kingdom after it was used in a 1987 perfume commercial and resulted in a renaissance for Simone.


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Subject: Re: 1958: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 09/28/16 at 6:42 am

"To Know Him Is to Love Him" is a song written by Phil Spector, inspired by words on his father's tombstone, "To Know Him Was To Love Him." It was first recorded by the only vocal group of which he was a member, the Teddy Bears. Their recording spent three weeks at No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart in 1958, while reaching No. 2 on UK's New Musical Express chart. Peter & Gordon and Bobby Vinton later had hits with the song, with its title and lyrics changed to "To Know You Is to Love You". In 1987, the song was resurrected by Dolly Parton, Linda Ronstadt and Emmylou Harris, whose Trio recording topped the U.S. country singles charts. The song is in 12/8 time.

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Subject: Re: 1958: The Year in Music

Written By: AL-B Mk. III on 12/04/16 at 3:36 am

Tommy Edwards - It's All In The Game

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wvCohsoW0B8

Subject: Re: 1958: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 05/14/17 at 10:01 pm

"Witch Doctor" is a song performed by Ross Bagdasarian Sr., and released in 1958 by Liberty Records under the stage name David Seville. The song peaked at number one on the Billboard Hot 100. The single was considered a major surprise hit on the chart, where it stayed at number one for two weeks and became Seville's first number-one single. The single peaked at number one on the Billboard R&B chart and on the Cash Box chart as well. The single sold over one million copies in the United States. Billboard ranked it as the No. 4 song for 1958.

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Subject: Re: 1958: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 08/23/17 at 2:59 pm

"Devoted to You" is a song written by Felice and Boudleaux Bryant. The best-known version was recorded by The Everly Brothers, and released by Cadence Records in 1958. This version was issued as the flip side of "Bird Dog," but reached the charts on its own, at No. 10 on the United States pop charts, No. 25 in Australia, and No. 1 in Canada. In addition, the song reached No. 7 on the United States country music chart and No. 2 on the rhythm and blues chart.

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Subject: Re: 1958: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 05/06/18 at 5:32 am

"Beep Beep", released in 1958, is a novelty song by The Playmates, written by Carl Cicchetti and Donald Claps. Some versions feature an instrumental introduction with the refrain used before the first verse begins. The longer version usually omits this due to the slowness of the first verse which is sung. The song is an example of accelerando, in which the tempo of the song gradually increases commensurate with the increasing speed of the drivers. The song is noted for its unusual instrument that makes the beeping sounds. The song was on the Billboard Top 40 charts for twelve weeks, and peaked at #4. It sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc. The Playmates appeared on the Milton Berle Show televised December 3, 1958, at the height of the song's popularity.

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Subject: Re: 1958: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 06/11/18 at 5:39 am

"I'll Be Seeing You" is a popular song, with music by Sammy Fain and lyrics by Irving Kahal. Published in 1938, it was inserted into the Broadway musical Right This Way, which closed after fifteen performances. Jo Stafford recorded the song on her 1958 album G.I. Jo – Songs of World War II with arrangements by Paul Weston (her husband) as the band leader.

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