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Subject: 1952: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 02/26/15 at 12:20 am

"I Went To Your Wedding" is a popular song written and composed by Jessie Mae Robinson and published in 1952. The biggest hit version was recorded by Patti Page. It was recorded on August 6, 1952, and issued by Mercury Records as catalog number 5899, with the flip side "You Belong to Me." It first entered the Billboard chart on August 22nd, 1952, lasting 21 weeks and reaching #1 on the chart.  "I Went to Your Wedding" also afforded Page a #1 hit in Australia.

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Subject: Re: 1952: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 02/27/15 at 12:59 am

"Heart and Soul" is a popular song, with music by Hoagy Carmichael and lyrics by Frank Loesser, published in 1938. In 1952, The Four Aces had a #11 hit in the US Charts. The song's A-section is often simplified as a repeating I-vi-IV-V progression and taught to beginning piano students as an easy two-hand duet. Much like the piece "Chopsticks", this (somewhat inaccurate) version became widely known, even to those who never studied piano. The chord progression, often referred to as the "'50s progression", was later employed in the doo-wop hits of the 1950s.

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Subject: Re: 1952: The Year in Music

Written By: Paul on 02/27/15 at 10:43 am

1952 was the year that we in Britain finally got a record sales chart - a mere dozen or so years behind America! Atop that first chart, making a nice, quiet entrance, was this...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5LB4e9tkR98

...and even though it had been around since the summer of that year, it was still popular enough to be on the top into 1953!

Yet for all of that, Al's best remembered in Britain for 'Spanish Eyes'!

Subject: Re: 1952: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 09/14/15 at 12:40 pm

"You Belong to Me" is a romantic pop music ballad from 1952. A version by Jo Stafford became the most popular version, topping the charts in both the United States and the United Kingdom (the first song by a female singer to top the UK Singles Chart)

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Subject: Re: 1952: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 02/18/16 at 3:52 am

"Singin' In the Rain" is a song with lyrics by Arthur Freed and music by Nacio Herb Brown, published in 1929. The song "Singin' In the Rain" sung by Gene Kelly is a centerpiece of the musical film of the same name, Singin' in the Rain (1952). It is unclear exactly when the song was written; it has been claimed that the song was performed as early as 1927. The song was listed as No. 3 on AFI's 100 Years...100 Songs.

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Subject: Re: 1952: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 02/18/16 at 4:55 am


"Singin' In the Rain" is a song with lyrics by Arthur Freed and music by Nacio Herb Brown, published in 1929. The song "Singin' In the Rain" sung by Gene Kelly is a centerpiece of the musical film of the same name, Singin' in the Rain (1952). It is unclear exactly when the song was written; it has been claimed that the song was performed as early as 1927. The song was listed as No. 3 on AFI's 100 Years...100 Songs.

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"Good Morning" is a song by Nacio Herb Brown (music) and Arthur Freed (lyrics) written for the 1939 film Babes in Arms and performed by Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney. Its best known performance was in the 1952 hit musical film Singin' in the Rain, where it was sung by Betty Noyes (who dubbed the singing voice of Debbie Reynolds), Gene Kelly and Donald O'Connor. In 2004 the version in Singin' in the Rain finished at #72 on AFI's 100 Years...100 Songs survey of the top tunes in American cinema.

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Subject: Re: 1952: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 06/11/16 at 3:27 pm

“The Ballad of High Noon” (or “Do Not Forsake Me, O My Darlin’”) is a popular song published in 1952, with music by Dimitri Tiomkin and lyrics by Ned Washington. It was introduced in the movie High Noon, sung over the opening credits by Tex Ritter. It was awarded the 1952 Academy Award for Best Original Song, and was performed that night for the Academy by Ritter.

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Subject: Re: 1952: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 09/17/16 at 7:30 am

"Jambalaya (On the Bayou)" is a song written and recorded by American country music singer Hank Williams that was first released in July 1952. Named for a Creole and Cajun dish, jambalaya, it spawned numerous cover versions and has since achieved popularity in several different music genres.

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Subject: Re: 1952: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 03/08/17 at 3:29 am

"Eternally" is a song with music by Charles Chaplin, and words by the English lyricists Geoff Parsons and John Turner. The music was initially composed for Charles Chaplin's film Limelight (1952) titled "Terry's Theme"; the film won an Oscar for "Best Original Dramatic Score" at the 45th Academy Awards in 1973. The song was covered by many artists at that time.

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Subject: Re: 1952: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 05/03/17 at 6:24 am

"The Wild Side of Life" is a song made famous by country music singer Hank Thompson. Originally released in 1952, the song became one of the most popular recordings in the genre's history, spending 15 weeks at No. 1 on the Billboard country charts, solidified Thompson's status as a country music superstar and inspired the answer song, "It Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels" by Kitty Wells. A version by the British rock band Status Quo reached the UK top 10 in 1976.

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Subject: Re: 1952: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 05/03/17 at 8:51 am

"It Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels" is a 1952 country song written by J. D. "Jay" Miller, and originally recorded by Kitty Wells. It was an answer song to the Hank Thompson hit "The Wild Side of Life." The song — which blamed unfaithful men for creating unfaithful women — became the first No. 1 Billboard country hit for a solo female artist. In addition to helping establish Wells as country music's first major female star, "It Wasn't God..." paved the way for other female artists, particularly Dolly Parton, Patsy Cline, Loretta Lynn, and Tammy Wynette, and songs where women defied the typical stereotype of being submissive to men and putting up with their often unfaithful ways.

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Subject: Re: 1952: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 01/06/18 at 8:33 am

"When I Fall in Love" is a popular song, written by Victor Young (music) and Edward Heyman (lyrics). It was introduced in the film One Minute to Zero. Jeri Southern sang on the first recording released in April 1952 with the song's composer, Victor Young, handling the arranging and conducting duties. The song has become a standard, with many artists recording it, though the first hit version was sung by Doris Day released in July 1952. Probably, the most famous version of this song was recorded by Nat King Cole on December 28, 1956, and released in 1957.

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Subject: Re: 1952: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 06/11/18 at 11:01 am

"Inchworm", also known as "The Inch Worm", is a song originally performed by Danny Kaye in the 1952 film Hans Christian Andersen. It was written by Frank Loesser.

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