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Subject: 1956: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 02/27/15 at 1:20 am

"Innamorata" is a song written by Harry Warren and the lyrics by Jack Brooks. It was written for the 1955 Martin and Lewis film, Artists and Models. In Italian, the word innamorata means "in love". The biggest selling recording of the song was sung by Dean Martin (issued as Capitol Records catalog number 3352), reaching #27 on the Billboard magazine chart in 1956. Jerry Vale also had a major recording (Columbia Records catalog number 40634) of the song in the same year.

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Subject: Re: 1956: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 03/10/15 at 3:59 pm

"Que Sera, Sera (Whatever Will Be, Will Be)", first published in 1956, is a popular song written by the Jay Livingston and Ray Evans songwriting team. The song was introduced in the Alfred Hitchcock film The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956), starring Doris Day and James Stewart in the lead roles. Day's recording of the song for Columbia Records (catalog number 40704) made it to number two on the Billboard Hot 100 and number one in the UK Singles Chart. The song received the 1956 Academy Award for Best Original Song with the alternative title "Whatever Will Be, Will Be (Que Sera, Sera)". It was the third Oscar in this category for Livingston and Evans, who previously won in 1948 and 1950. In 2004 it finished at #48 in AFI's 100 Years...100 Songs survey of top tunes in American cinema.

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Subject: Re: 1956: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 06/10/15 at 8:33 am

"(The) Green Door" is a 1956 popular song with music composed by Bob Davie and lyrics written by Marvin Moore.  In the United Kingdom, Lowe's version reached #8 on the charts, but a version by Frankie Vaughan was even more popular, reaching #2. Another UK recording, by Glen Mason, reached #24 on the UK chart. The lyrics describe the allure of a mysterious private club with a green door, behind which "a happy crowd" play piano, smoke and "laugh a lot", and inside which the singer is not allowed. At the time of the song's initial popularity in the 1950s, many believed it was inspired by a green-doored restaurant and bar called "The Shack" in Columbia, Missouri, where singer Jim Lowe had attended the University of Missouri. However long-time Shack owner Joe Franke doubts this theory. An oft-repeated urban legend has developed saying the song refers to London's first lesbian club, Gateways (1930–1985), which was in Bramerton Street in Chelsea. It had a green door and was featured in the film The Killing of Sister George. But aside from that there is no substantive connection between the 1950s American song and the British club.

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Subject: Re: 1956: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 01/18/16 at 4:56 am

"St. Therese Of The Roses" is a 1956 popular song written by Remus Harris and Arthur Strauss. The song takes the form of a prayer to St. Therese of the rose (Saint Thérèse of Lisieux) by a man who is about to marry asking the saint for her to send her blessings to himself and his sweetheart so they will have a happy and loving marriage. A version performed by Billy Ward and His Dominoes was recorded on 18 April 1956 and issued in June of that year on the Decca label (Catalogue No. 29933). In the United States the song reached #27 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the summer of 1956.

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Subject: Re: 1956: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 01/23/16 at 6:34 am

Slim Whitman had a top twenty hit with "Tumbling Tumbleweeds" in 1956. "Tumbling Tumbleweeds" is a song composed by Bob Nolan. Although one of the most famous songs associated with the Sons of the Pioneers, the song was composed by Nolan in the 1930s, while working as a caddy and living in Los Angeles. Originally titled "Tumbling Tumble Leaves", the song was reworked into the title "Tumbling Tumbleweeds" and into fame with the 1935 Gene Autry film of the same name. Members of the Western Writers of America chose it as one of the Top 100 Western songs of all time.

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Subject: Re: 1956: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 01/23/16 at 8:12 am


"Innamorata" is a song written by Harry Warren and the lyrics by Jack Brooks. It was written for the 1955 Martin and Lewis film, Artists and Models. In Italian, the word innamorata means "in love". The biggest selling recording of the song was sung by Dean Martin (issued as Capitol Records catalog number 3352), reaching #27 on the Billboard magazine chart in 1956. Jerry Vale also had a major recording (Columbia Records catalog number 40634) of the song in the same year.

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Rats!!!! This video is no longer available!


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Subject: Re: 1956: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 09/22/16 at 8:19 am

"Silver Threads and Golden Needles", a song written by Jack Rhodes and Dick Reynolds, was first recorded by Wanda Jackson in 1956. The original lyrics, as performed by Jackson, contain a verse not usually included in later versions, which also often differed in other minor details.

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Subject: Re: 1956: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 05/04/17 at 8:17 pm

"Be-Bop-A-Lula" is a rockabilly song first recorded in 1956 by Gene Vincent and His Blue Caps. The writing of the song is credited to Gene Vincent and his manager, Bill "Sheriff Tex" Davis. The song was released in June 1956 on Capitol Records' single F3450, and immediately sold well. The song was successful on three American singles charts: it peaked at #7 on the US Billboard pop music chart, #8 on the R&B chart, and also made the top ten on the C&W Best Seller chart peaking at #5. In the UK, it peaked at #16 in August 1956.

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Subject: Re: 1956: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 10/11/17 at 11:15 am

"Come Go with Me" is a song written by C. E. Quick (a.k.a. Clarence Quick), an original member (bass vocalist) of the American doo-wop vocal group The Del-Vikings (also spelled Dell Vikings on Dot records releases, with no dash). The song was originally recorded by The Del-Vikings in 1956 and was released on Fee Bee Records. Norman Wright was the lead vocalist on this song. When the group signed with Dot Records in 1957, the song became a hit, peaking at #4 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and becoming the group's highest-charting song. The song was later featured in the films American Graffiti (1973), Diner (1982), Stand by Me (1986) and Joe Versus the Volcano (1990).

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Subject: Re: 1956: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 11/12/17 at 9:58 am

"Just Walkin' in the Rain" is a popular song. It was written in 1952 by Johnny Bragg and Robert Riley, two prisoners at Tennessee State Prison in Nashville, after a comment made by Bragg as the pair crossed the courtyard while it was raining. Bragg allegedly said, "Here we are just walking in the rain, and wondering what the girls are doing." Riley suggested that this would make a good basis for a song, and within a few minutes, Bragg had composed two verses. However, because Bragg was unable to read and write, he asked Riley to write the lyrics down in exchange for being credited as one of the song's writers. Bragg and his band, the Prisonaires, later recorded the song for Sun Records and it became a hit on the US Billboard R&B chart in 1953. However, the best-known version of the song was recorded by Johnnie Ray in 1956 on the label Columbia Records; it reached No. 2 on the US Billboard Hot 100, and No. 1 on the UK Singles Chart for seven weeks. It became a gold record. Ray initially disliked the song, but sang it based on the recommendation of Mitch Miller. Ray's version featured the backup male vocals of the Ray Conniff Singers as well as a whistler.

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Subject: Re: 1956: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 02/19/18 at 12:21 pm

"Walk Hand in Hand" is a popular song by Johnny Cowell, published in 1956. The biggest-selling version recorded of the song was sung by Tony Martin, reaching #2 in the UK and #10 on the United States Billboard chart in 1956. The same year, it was recorded by Andy Williams, whose version hit #54 on the chart, and by Ronnie Carroll, whose version reached No. 13 on the UK singles chart. A later recording by Gerry & The Pacemakers reached No.29 on the UK chart, No. 10 in Canada, and "bubbled under" at No.103 on the Billboard chart at the end of 1965.

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Subject: Re: 1956: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 06/10/18 at 7:33 am

"Love Me Tender" is a 1956 song recorded by Elvis Presley and published by Elvis Presley Music from the 20th Century Fox film of the same name. The words and music are credited to Ken Darby under the pseudonym "Vera Matson", the name of his wife, and Elvis Presley. The RCA Victor recording by Elvis Presley was no. 1 on both the Billboard and Cashbox charts in 1956. The song was adapted from the tune of "Aura Lee", a sentimental Civil War ballad. The single debuted at #2 on the "Best Sellers in Stores" pop singles chart, the first time a single made its first appearance at the #2 position. The song hit #1 on the Billboard charts the week ending November 3, 1956, remaining in the position for 5 weeks and reached no. 11 on the charts in the UK. "Love Me Tender" also reached number three for three weeks on the R&B chart. It was also an achievement as "Love Me Tender" succeeded another Presley single, "Hound Dog/Don't Be Cruel" at #1.

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Subject: Re: 1956: The Year in Music

Written By: AL-B Mk. III on 06/19/18 at 12:40 am

Bill Doggett - Honky Tonk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5vqFrt3ZuwY

Subject: Re: 1956: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/18/18 at 10:58 am

Webb Peirce's iconic hit 1956 "Teenage Boogie" was covered by British singer Marc Bolan as "I Love to Boogie" in 1974, but strangely credited to Bolan and not Pierce.

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