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Subject: 1956: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 02/27/15 at 1:20 am

"Innamorata" is a song written by Harry Warren and the lyrics by Jack Brooks. It was written for the 1955 Martin and Lewis film, Artists and Models. In Italian, the word innamorata means "in love". The biggest selling recording of the song was sung by Dean Martin (issued as Capitol Records catalog number 3352), reaching #27 on the Billboard magazine chart in 1956. Jerry Vale also had a major recording (Columbia Records catalog number 40634) of the song in the same year.

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Subject: Re: 1956: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 03/10/15 at 3:59 pm

"Que Sera, Sera (Whatever Will Be, Will Be)", first published in 1956, is a popular song written by the Jay Livingston and Ray Evans songwriting team. The song was introduced in the Alfred Hitchcock film The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956), starring Doris Day and James Stewart in the lead roles. Day's recording of the song for Columbia Records (catalog number 40704) made it to number two on the Billboard Hot 100 and number one in the UK Singles Chart. The song received the 1956 Academy Award for Best Original Song with the alternative title "Whatever Will Be, Will Be (Que Sera, Sera)". It was the third Oscar in this category for Livingston and Evans, who previously won in 1948 and 1950. In 2004 it finished at #48 in AFI's 100 Years...100 Songs survey of top tunes in American cinema.

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Subject: Re: 1956: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 06/10/15 at 8:33 am

"(The) Green Door" is a 1956 popular song with music composed by Bob Davie and lyrics written by Marvin Moore.  In the United Kingdom, Lowe's version reached #8 on the charts, but a version by Frankie Vaughan was even more popular, reaching #2. Another UK recording, by Glen Mason, reached #24 on the UK chart. The lyrics describe the allure of a mysterious private club with a green door, behind which "a happy crowd" play piano, smoke and "laugh a lot", and inside which the singer is not allowed. At the time of the song's initial popularity in the 1950s, many believed it was inspired by a green-doored restaurant and bar called "The Shack" in Columbia, Missouri, where singer Jim Lowe had attended the University of Missouri. However long-time Shack owner Joe Franke doubts this theory. An oft-repeated urban legend has developed saying the song refers to London's first lesbian club, Gateways (1930–1985), which was in Bramerton Street in Chelsea. It had a green door and was featured in the film The Killing of Sister George. But aside from that there is no substantive connection between the 1950s American song and the British club.

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Subject: Re: 1956: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 01/18/16 at 4:56 am

"St. Therese Of The Roses" is a 1956 popular song written by Remus Harris and Arthur Strauss. The song takes the form of a prayer to St. Therese of the rose (Saint Thérèse of Lisieux) by a man who is about to marry asking the saint for her to send her blessings to himself and his sweetheart so they will have a happy and loving marriage. A version performed by Billy Ward and His Dominoes was recorded on 18 April 1956 and issued in June of that year on the Decca label (Catalogue No. 29933). In the United States the song reached #27 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the summer of 1956.

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Subject: Re: 1956: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 01/23/16 at 6:34 am

Slim Whitman had a top twenty hit with "Tumbling Tumbleweeds" in 1956. "Tumbling Tumbleweeds" is a song composed by Bob Nolan. Although one of the most famous songs associated with the Sons of the Pioneers, the song was composed by Nolan in the 1930s, while working as a caddy and living in Los Angeles. Originally titled "Tumbling Tumble Leaves", the song was reworked into the title "Tumbling Tumbleweeds" and into fame with the 1935 Gene Autry film of the same name. Members of the Western Writers of America chose it as one of the Top 100 Western songs of all time.

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Subject: Re: 1956: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 01/23/16 at 8:12 am


"Innamorata" is a song written by Harry Warren and the lyrics by Jack Brooks. It was written for the 1955 Martin and Lewis film, Artists and Models. In Italian, the word innamorata means "in love". The biggest selling recording of the song was sung by Dean Martin (issued as Capitol Records catalog number 3352), reaching #27 on the Billboard magazine chart in 1956. Jerry Vale also had a major recording (Columbia Records catalog number 40634) of the song in the same year.

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Rats!!!! This video is no longer available!


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