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Subject: 19th Century Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/19/15 at 3:20 pm

The Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op. 125 (also known as "the Choral"), is Ludwig van Beethoven's final complete symphony. Completed in 1824, the symphony is one of the best-known works in classical music. Among critics, it is almost universally considered Beethoven's greatest work, and many consider it one of the greatest compositions in the western musical canon.

The symphony was the first example of a major composer using voices in a symphony (thus making it a choral symphony). The words are sung during the final movement by four vocal soloists and a chorus. They were taken from the "Ode to Joy", a poem written by Friedrich Schiller in 1785 and revised in 1803, with additions made by the composer. Today, it stands as one of the most played symphonies in the world.

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Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: 80sfan on 07/19/15 at 3:23 pm

I wonder if you know more about 1700s and 1800s music, Philip. Was there ever a 'bad' or stagnant era for music during those days? 

I don't know anything about music before 1910.

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/19/15 at 3:29 pm


I wonder if you know more about 1700s and 1800s music, Philip. Was there ever a 'bad' or stagnant era for music during those days? 

I don't know anything about music before 1910.
Back then, the classical music was for the upper circles of society, and not reaching the lower classes.

One quote,  and I do not know who originally said it sums it up for me.

"Mozart wrote his music to pay the rent, Beethoven wrote his music to be remembered."

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: 80sfan on 07/19/15 at 3:31 pm


Back then, the classical music was for the upper circles of society, and not reaching the lower classes.

One quote,  and I do not know who originally said it sums it up for me.

"Mozart wrote his music to pay the rent, Beethoven wrote his music to be remembered."


So there was no 'popular' music for the masses? Only for upper classes?

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/19/15 at 3:32 pm


So there was no 'popular' music for the masses? Only for upper classes?
Music had it variety, the poor had country jigs to dance to.

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: 80sfan on 07/19/15 at 3:35 pm

Good enough explanations for me. Thank you.

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/19/15 at 4:18 pm

Also, it has to be understood the Beethoven at the time if composing his 9th Symphony was completely deaf.

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: 80sfan on 07/19/15 at 4:22 pm


Also, it has to be understood the Beethoven at the time if composing his 9th Symphony was completely deaf.


He must have been instilled with talent from the Gods.  :o

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/19/15 at 4:25 pm


He must have been instilled with talent from the Gods.  :o
He was a complete genius.

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/20/15 at 9:02 am


So there was no 'popular' music for the masses? Only for upper classes?
I forgot to mention there was music in churches for religious purposes.

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: 80sfan on 07/20/15 at 9:48 am


I forgot to mention there was music in churches for religious purposes.


Hallelujah!

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/20/15 at 10:13 am


Hallelujah!
...the Hallelujah Chorus from Handel's Messiah was much earlier.

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/20/15 at 10:21 am


Hallelujah!

...the Hallelujah Chorus from Handel's Messiah was much earlier.
Which has been around mentioned in 1741: The Year In Music.

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Howard on 07/20/15 at 1:24 pm


Also, it has to be understood the Beethoven at the time if composing his 9th Symphony was completely deaf.


Did he compose his 5th Symphony? ???

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/20/15 at 1:27 pm


Did he compose his 5th Symphony? ???
Yes, he completed in 1808.

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: 80sfan on 07/20/15 at 6:07 pm

I heard that Beethoven could be kind of cranky sometimes. I think that he was mad he was going deaf. I'd be a bit cranky too.  ::)  ::)

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/21/15 at 6:20 am


I heard that Beethoven could be kind of cranky sometimes. I think that he was mad he was going deaf. I'd be a bit cranky too.  ::)  ::)
Beethoven never married, reasons why are not known, and liked his walks in the countryside, but was inspired by them walks. He was obsessed with the number of beans to make his cup of coffee, the number had to be right, no more, no less.

BTW, I must look up more on his personal life.

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Howard on 07/21/15 at 1:23 pm


I heard that Beethoven could be kind of cranky sometimes. I think that he was mad he was going deaf. I'd be a bit cranky too.  ::)  ::)


Wasn't he wearing his hearing aid?

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Howard on 07/21/15 at 1:24 pm


Beethoven never married, reasons why are not known, and liked his walks in the countryside, but was inspired by them walks. He was obsessed with the number of beans to make his cup of coffee, the number had to be right, no more, no less.

BTW, I must look up more on his personal life.


So he was a bit OCD?

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/21/15 at 1:26 pm


Wasn't he wearing his hearing aid?
It was ear trumpets in those days, I have to find out if he had one.

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/21/15 at 1:37 pm


Wasn't he wearing his hearing aid?


http://www.beethoven-haus-bonn.de/sixcms/media.php/74/hoerrohre.jpg

Beethoven had been increasingly battling hearing difficulties since he was thirty. In 1813 he had Johann Nepomuk Mälzel, an inventor of mechanical devices, produce several ear trumpets. They did not, however, prove very useful. Yet for a long time he placed his hopes on "hearing machines".

The Beethoven Haas Museum is in Bonn, Germany.

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: 80sfan on 07/21/15 at 7:54 pm


Wasn't he wearing his hearing aid?


What Philip said, I don't know anything about Beethoven.

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: 80sfan on 07/21/15 at 7:55 pm


http://www.beethoven-haus-bonn.de/sixcms/media.php/74/hoerrohre.jpg

Beethoven had been increasingly battling hearing difficulties since he was thirty. In 1813 he had Johann Nepomuk Mälzel, an inventor of mechanical devices, produce several ear trumpets. They did not, however, prove very useful. Yet for a long time he placed his hopes on "hearing machines".

The Beethoven Haas Museum is in Bonn, Germany.


Why did he steadily become deaf?  ???

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/22/15 at 10:41 am


Why did he steadily become deaf?  ???
From:

"Around 1796, by the age of 26, Beethoven began to lose his hearing. He suffered from a severe form of tinnitus, a "ringing" in his ears that made it hard for him to hear music; he also tried to avoid conversations. The cause of Beethoven's deafness is unknown, but it has variously been attributed to typhus, auto-immune disorders (such as systemic lupus erythematosus), and even his habit of immersing his head in cold water to stay awake. The explanation from Beethoven's autopsy was that he had a "distended inner ear," which developed lesions over time."

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Howard on 07/22/15 at 1:26 pm


It was ear trumpets in those days, I have to find out if he had one.


Do they still sell ear trumpets?

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Baltimoreian on 07/22/15 at 6:01 pm

Basically, the 1700s and 1800s are just the best times for classical music. Even though nobody ever complain on how bad it is, since nobody really founded any of Beethoven's fan letters. Or, maybe nobody really knows where he lived (even though he mostly lived in Germany and Austria, that's what I know).

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/23/15 at 7:05 am


Basically, the 1700s and 1800s are just the best times for classical music.
For me it is, The crossover from the Classical Era to the Romantic Era.

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/23/15 at 8:53 am


Even though nobody ever complain on how bad it is, since nobody really founded any of Beethoven's fan letters.


Beethoven lived at the time of no fan base societies.

Out of interest the first 'star performer' of the Romantic Era was composer, virtuoso pianist, conductor Franz Liszt, when he performed it was sold concerts and he was mobbed like rock stars today.

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: 80sfan on 07/23/15 at 9:27 am


From:

"Around 1796, by the age of 26, Beethoven began to lose his hearing. He suffered from a severe form of tinnitus, a "ringing" in his ears that made it hard for him to hear music; he also tried to avoid conversations. The cause of Beethoven's deafness is unknown, but it has variously been attributed to typhus, auto-immune disorders (such as systemic lupus erythematosus), and even his habit of immersing his head in cold water to stay awake. The explanation from Beethoven's autopsy was that he had a "distended inner ear," which developed lesions over time."


I really like music history. This was interesante.

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/23/15 at 9:30 am


I really like music history. This was interesante.
I wish I studied music when I was younger, but back then I would never know the knowledge I would learn as now.

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Howard on 07/23/15 at 3:25 pm


Beethoven lived at the time of no fan base societies.

Out of interest the first 'star performer' of the Romantic Era was composer, virtuoso pianist, conductor Franz Liszt, when he performed it was sold concerts and he was mobbed like rock stars today.


How would he feel if he had a Facebook or Twitter account today?

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/23/15 at 3:42 pm


How would he feel if he had a Facebook or Twitter account today?
Knowing his traits, he would probably shun them.

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Howard on 07/23/15 at 4:41 pm


Knowing his traits, he would probably shun them.


He wouldn't like being tweeted?

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/23/15 at 4:44 pm


He wouldn't like being tweeted?
No, he seemed to be a loner, I believe he hated other people.

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Baltimoreian on 07/23/15 at 4:49 pm


Beethoven lived at the time of no fan base societies.

Out of interest the first 'star performer' of the Romantic Era was composer, virtuoso pianist, conductor Franz Liszt, when he performed it was sold concerts and he was mobbed like rock stars today.


Well, they had mail back then. So, some people who were big fans of him possibly tried to send him fan letters (not saying that they did, since there's no evidence proving that he had fan letters).

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: 80sfan on 07/23/15 at 6:33 pm


No, he seemed to be a loner, I believe he hated other people.


I know that it's the truth, but the truth is sometimes funny.  ;D

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: 80sfan on 07/23/15 at 6:34 pm


How would he feel if he had a Facebook or Twitter account today?



:.Beethoven has accepted your friend request:.

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Baltimoreian on 07/23/15 at 7:14 pm


How would he feel if he had a Facebook or Twitter account today?


For Facebook, I think he would only have a few friends, like Mozart or someone else. For Twitter, I think he'll be tweeting on what's he doing in life and his updates on upcoming symphonies.

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/24/15 at 6:42 am


For Facebook, I think he would only have a few friends, like Mozart or someone else. For Twitter, I think he'll be tweeting on what's he doing in life and his updates on upcoming symphonies.
Beethoven did meet Mozart at the age of 16.

http://www.classicfm.com/composers/beethoven/guides/beethoven-and-mozart/

Beethoven was to busy composing to be tweeting.

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Howard on 07/24/15 at 6:58 am


No, he seemed to be a loner, I believe he hated other people.


So he never had friends?

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Howard on 07/24/15 at 7:00 am


For Facebook, I think he would only have a few friends, like Mozart or someone else. For Twitter, I think he'll be tweeting on what's he doing in life and his updates on upcoming symphonies.


It would be funny seeing Beethoven doing Twitter. ;D

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/24/15 at 7:10 am


So he never had friends?
He detested the fact when he became guardian to his nephew.

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Howard on 07/24/15 at 2:44 pm


He detested the fact when he became guardian to his nephew.


Did he have a family?

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/24/15 at 2:47 pm


Did he have a family?
He did not marry, I do not how many siblings.

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Howard on 07/25/15 at 6:42 am


He did not marry, I do not how many siblings.


So he just lived alone? ???

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Baltimoreian on 07/25/15 at 9:00 am


Beethoven did meet Mozart at the age of 16.

http://www.classicfm.com/composers/beethoven/guides/beethoven-and-mozart/

Beethoven was to busy composing to be tweeting.


So, I guess Mozart would be one of his friends if they had Facebook.

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/25/15 at 9:04 am


So, I guess Mozart would be one of his friends if they had Facebook.
Up to a certain point, Mozart died when Beethoven was 21 in 1791. Beethoven started composing at the age of 12, his major works of symphonies and concertos were composed long after 1791.

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Howard on 07/25/15 at 2:00 pm


So, I guess Mozart would be one of his friends if they had Facebook.


What would've he had tweeted about?

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/25/15 at 2:02 pm


What would've he had tweeted about?
They music?

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Howard on 07/25/15 at 3:14 pm


They music?


He would hashtag alot.

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/25/15 at 3:21 pm


He would hashtag alot.
Was the hashtag invented then?

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Baltimoreian on 07/25/15 at 5:39 pm


He would hashtag alot.


#WriteSymphoniesEveryDay

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/26/15 at 2:09 am


He would hashtag alot.
The earliest reference to hashtsag I can see is 1964.

From Wiki:

"Octothorp, octothorpe, octathorp, octatherp
Used by Bell Labs engineers by 1968. Lauren Asplund says that he and a colleague were the source of octothorp at AT&T engineering in New York in 1964. The Merriam-Webster New Book of Word Histories, 1991, has a long article that is consistent with Doug Kerr's essay, in that it says "octotherp" was the original spelling, and that the word arose in the 1960s among telephone engineers as a joke. The first appearance of "octothorp" in a US patent is in a 1973 filing which also refers to the six-pointed asterisk (✻) used on telephone buttons as a "sextile"."

and
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Lasplund

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Howard on 07/26/15 at 1:26 pm


Was the hashtag invented then?


I don't think so in the 1800's. ???

Subject: Re: 1824: The Year in Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/26/15 at 1:31 pm


I don't think so in the 1800's. ???
Exactly!

Subject: Re: 1820s music and songs

Written By: Philip Eno on 05/12/17 at 9:51 pm

The Duetto buffo di due gatti ("humorous duet for two cats") is a popular performance piece for two sopranos which is often performed as a concert encore. The "lyrics" consist entirely of the repeated word "miau" ("meow"). Sometimes it is also performed by a soprano and a tenor, or a soprano and a bass.While the piece is typically attributed to Gioachino Rossini, it was not actually written by him, but is instead a compilation written in 1825 that draws principally on his 1816 opera, Otello. Hubert Hunt putatively claims that the compiler was Robert Lucas de Pearsall, who for this purpose adopted the pseudonym "G. Berthold".

Here performed by Victoria de los Ángeles (soprano), Elisabeth Schwarzkopf (soprano), Gerald Moore (piano), from 1969.
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Subject: Re: 19th Century Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 03/16/18 at 12:03 pm

"Where Did You Get That Hat?" is a comic song which was composed and first performed by Joseph J. Sullivan at Miner's Eighth Avenue Theatre in 1888. It was a great success and has since been performed by many others including J. C. Heffron, Stanley Holloway and Dave Barnes. The song is now also a very popular piece performed for musical theatre exams (grades 4 to 8) and music hall concerts.

"Any Old Iron" is a British music hall song written by Charles Collins, Fred E. Terry and E.A. Sheppard, with deep Internet searching, I cannot located a publication date for this song.

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Subject: Re: 19th Century Music

Written By: CatwomanofV on 03/16/18 at 4:01 pm

My favs of Beethoven's:

-6th Symphony (Pastoral)
-9th Symphony (Ode to Joy)
-Für Elise

But my all-time favorite is this one. If I were to EVER be able to play a piece on the piano, it would be this:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Tr0otuiQuU 


And when I hear it, I can't help think of THIS:  :D ;D ;D ;D


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=toyLQzd8HrY

FYI, I did have an Aunt Marion but she never said anything about marrying a musician. lol.


Cat 

Subject: Re: 19th Century Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 03/16/18 at 4:05 pm


My favs of Beethoven's:

-6th Symphony (Pastoral)
-9th Symphony (Ode to Joy)
-Für Elise

But my all-time favorite is this one. If I were to EVER be able to play a piece on the piano, it would be this:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Tr0otuiQuU 


And when I hear it, I can't help think of THIS:  :D ;D ;D ;D


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=toyLQzd8HrY

FYI, I did have an Aunt Marion but she never said anything about marrying a musician. lol.


Cat 
I just recently saw "The Peanuts Movie" and I had totally forgotten about Schroeder adoration for Beethoven.

btw, your chosen symphonies are the same favourites for me.

Subject: Re: 19th Century Music

Written By: Dundee on 03/16/18 at 4:37 pm

Let's have a talk about the horrible racism in the so-called "Coon songs" of back then :)?

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Subject: Re: 19th Century Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 05/18/18 at 8:11 am

The Symphony No. 3 in C minor, Op. 78, was completed by Camille Saint-Saëns in 1886 at what was probably the artistic peak of his career. It is also popularly known as the Organ Symphony, even though it is not a true symphony for organ, but simply an orchestral symphony where two sections out of four use the pipe organ. The composer inscribed it as: Symphonie No. 3 "avec orgue" (with organ). The symphony was commissioned by the Royal Philharmonic Society in England, and the first performance was given in London on 19 May 1886, at St James's Hall, conducted by the composer. After the death of his friend Franz Liszt on 31 July 1886, Saint-Saëns dedicated the work to Liszt's memory. The composer also conducted the French premiere in January 1887. The entire main theme of the Maestoso was later adapted and used in the 1977 pop-song "If I Had Words" by Scott Fitzgerald and Yvonne Keeley. The song and the symphony were used as the main theme in the 1995 family film Babe and its 1998 sequel Babe: Pig in the City and can be heard in the 1989 comedy, How to Get Ahead in Advertising.



hopaQjQFUYw

Subject: Re: 19th Century Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 06/10/18 at 7:42 am

"Aura Lea" (sometimes spelled "Aura Lee") is an American Civil War song about a maiden. It was written in 1861 by W. W. Fosdick (lyrics) and George R. Poulton (music). The tune is familiar to modern audiences from the 1956 Elvis Presley #1 hit "Love Me Tender" with new lyrics by Ken Darby, a derivative adaptation of the original. A later Presley recording for the film The Trouble with Girls entitled "Violet (Flower of N.Y.U.)" also used the melody of "Aura Lea".

Here sung by Jim Reeves in the 1950s, and predates Elvis Presley.
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Subject: Re: 19th Century Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 06/13/18 at 5:33 am

"Simple Gifts" is a Shaker song written and composed in 1848 by Elder Joseph Brackett.

CLAnuG1340g

Subject: Re: 19th Century Music

Written By: fusefan on 09/14/18 at 10:01 pm

Dan W. Quinn “The Streets Of Cairo”

http://youtube.com/watch?v=6A5yJ5Z2Ezw


Will F. Denny “How’d You Like To Be The Iceman”

http://youtube.com/watch?v=wv_Zrgza2xM


George J. Gaskin “The Sidewalks Of New York”

http://youtube.com/watch?v=aaea5erirME

Subject: Re: 19th Century Music

Written By: Howard on 09/15/18 at 3:32 pm

Would you put The Victorian Era in this category? ???

Subject: Re: 19th Century Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 09/15/18 at 3:43 pm


Would you put The Victorian Era in this category? ???
Yes, The Victorian Era started in 1837 to 1901, the years of Queen Victoria's reign.

Subject: Re: 19th Century Music

Written By: Dundee on 09/15/18 at 5:02 pm


Dan W. Quinn “The Streets Of Cairo”

http://youtube.com/watch?v=6A5yJ5Z2Ezw

Aka the song Ke$ha "sampled" in one of her songs 117 years later :D
edP0L6LQzZE

A true 19th vs 21st century music battle 8)

Subject: Re: 19th Century Music

Written By: Howard on 09/16/18 at 2:05 pm


Yes, The Victorian Era started in 1837 to 1901, the years of Queen Victoria's reign.


I've never heard of Victorian Era music before.

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