inthe00s
The Pop Culture Information Society...

These are the messages that have been posted on inthe00s over the past few years.

Check out the messageboard archive index for a complete list of topic areas.

This archive is periodically refreshed with the latest messages from the current messageboard.




Check for new replies or respond here...

Subject: 1940s Songs

Written By: 1999 Baby, 2000s Kid on 08/14/16 at 3:19 am

I'll start off with a song from the most popular singer of the decade.

Don't Fence Me In - Bing Crosby & The Andrews Sisters
vMnLoOnrwbg

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: Baltimoreian on 08/14/16 at 8:47 am

There Are Such Things - Frank Sinatra

fIjJnpUvyts

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: 1999 Baby, 2000s Kid on 08/14/16 at 7:21 pm

Sentimental Journey - Les Brown & Doris Day
O7umIJj8UBo

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: 1999 Baby, 2000s Kid on 08/15/16 at 3:39 am

Nature Boy - Nat King Cole
Iq0XJCJ1Srw

Straighten Up and Fly Right - Nat King Cole
6fVaP6dM1fs

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: 1999 Baby, 2000s Kid on 08/16/16 at 1:25 am

Paper Doll - The Mills Brothers
n2m8VZBfRYo

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: 1999 Baby, 2000s Kid on 08/17/16 at 12:53 am

(There'll Be Bluebirds Over) The White Cliffs of Dover - Vera Lynn
_FawMg0NXpg

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: 1999 Baby, 2000s Kid on 08/17/16 at 2:27 pm

The Gypsy - The Ink Spots
yovIyTnUr5I

We Three - The Ink Spots
TOhtZdINkY0

Whispering Grass - The Ink Spots
zBrwaCjJIFU

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: 1999 Baby, 2000s Kid on 08/17/16 at 7:11 pm

Charles Trenet was one of the few singers of his era who wrote all his songs, and didn't sing standards.

This is the original "Beyond the Sea".  La Mer - Charles Trenet
IIiYUvmung8

Boum - Charles Trenet
p0KWyWwVp0E

Douce France - Charles Trenet
ij1vtzIFlMg

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: 1999 Baby, 2000s Kid on 08/18/16 at 4:39 pm

Here are some of Glenn Miller's songs, he was one of the biggest big band leaders of his time.

Pennsylvania 6-5000 - Glenn Miller
m_muFwwTSMs

In the Mood - Glenn Miller
omjZ73GFPaQ

Chattanooga Choo Choo - Glenn Miller
AJUKOdehuiI

A String of Pearls - Glenn Miller
8Qq2AV7Wx5w

American Patrol - Glenn Miller
EAVejLjXVdw

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: 1999 Baby, 2000s Kid on 08/19/16 at 12:11 pm

This song was a number 1 hit in 1946, and was the 22nd most popular recording of the pre-rock era. Frankie Carle and Marjorie Hughes were actually father and daughter, but Frankie Carle didn't want people to know she was his daughter, because of fear of nepotism that would hurt her career. They revealed it soon after this song became a major success.

Oh! What it Seemed to Be - Frankie Carle and Marjorie Hughes
0G4kT6HK6oI

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: 1999 Baby, 2000s Kid on 09/02/16 at 2:19 am

Another song that hit number one in 1946 that was written for the movie, Road to Utopia.

Personality - Johnny Mercer and the Pied Pipers

2aEa4aVe3Rs

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: Philip Eno on 09/11/16 at 6:58 pm

"Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy" was a major hit in 1941 for The Andrews Sisters and an iconic World War II tune. It can be considered an early jump blues recording. The song is ranked No. 6 on Songs of the Century.

Mm1wuKvrxAw

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: 1999 Baby, 2000s Kid on 09/12/16 at 2:02 am


"Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy" was a major hit in 1941 for The Andrews Sisters and an iconic World War II tune. It can be considered an early jump blues recording. The song is ranked No. 6 on Songs of the Century.

Mm1wuKvrxAw


Oh, I heard that song today on Pandora (I already knew it, but it's been a while since I last heard it), I didn't expect it to be no. 6 of the century though. What was the list you used?

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: Philip Eno on 09/12/16 at 2:34 am


Oh, I heard that song today on Pandora (I already knew it, but it's been a while since I last heard it), I didn't expect it to be no. 6 of the century though. What was the list you used?
Source: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Songs_of_the_Century

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: 1999 Baby, 2000s Kid on 09/12/16 at 4:28 am


Source: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Songs_of_the_Century


Thanks for the link, I actually own a lot of those songs on my iPod, ;D I'm shocked to see so much pre 1960s music.
It's not a bad thing, just didn't expect it.

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: Philip Eno on 09/12/16 at 4:33 am


Thanks for the link, I actually own a lot of those songs on my iPod, ;D I'm shocked to see so much pre 1960s music.
It's not a bad thing, just didn't expect it.
Thanks.

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: Howard on 09/12/16 at 3:58 pm


"Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy" was a major hit in 1941 for The Andrews Sisters and an iconic World War II tune. It can be considered an early jump blues recording. The song is ranked No. 6 on Songs of the Century.

Mm1wuKvrxAw


There's also a Bette Midler version.

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: Philip Eno on 09/14/16 at 8:42 pm

Rum and Coca-Cola” is the title of a popular calypso. Originally composed by Lord Invader and Lionel Belasco, it was copyrighted in the United States by entertainer Morey Amsterdam and became a huge hit in 1945 for the Andrews Sisters, spending ten weeks at the top of Billboard's U.S. Pop Singles chart.

zGxL2uNr7bk

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: Philip Eno on 12/02/16 at 8:04 am

"Mambo No. 5" is a mambo and jive dance song originally recorded and composed by Cuban Dámaso Pérez Prado in 1949. The song's popularity was renewed by German artist Lou Bega's sampling and vocal version of the original, released under the same name on Bega's 1999 debut album A Little Bit of Mambo.

dKuvJ7zG9LI

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: Howard on 12/02/16 at 2:35 pm


"Mambo No. 5" is a mambo and jive dance song originally recorded and composed by Cuban Dámaso Pérez Prado in 1949. The song's popularity was renewed by German artist Lou Bega's sampling and vocal version of the original, released under the same name on Bega's 1999 debut album A Little Bit of Mambo.

dKuvJ7zG9LI


good song.  :)

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: 1999 Baby, 2000s Kid on 12/03/16 at 2:38 am


"Mambo No. 5" is a mambo and jive dance song originally recorded and composed by Cuban Dámaso Pérez Prado in 1949. The song's popularity was renewed by German artist Lou Bega's sampling and vocal version of the original, released under the same name on Bega's 1999 debut album A Little Bit of Mambo.

dKuvJ7zG9LI


Wow, I never knew he got it from a different song, also Perez Prado is great.

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: Philip Eno on 03/19/17 at 3:50 am

"We'll Gather Lilacs", also called We'll Gather Lilacs In The Spring, is a song by Welsh composer Ivor Novello that he wrote for the hit musical romance Perchance to Dream. The stage musical opened at the Hippodrome Theatre in London's West End in 1945 and ran until 1948. The song, sung in the show by Olive Gilbert, was the most popular and enduring to emerge from the production. It was originally recorded by Geraldo and his Orchestra, who reached the UK charts with it in 1946. It has since been performed by many artists, including notably Anne Ziegler and Webster Booth, Richard Tauber, Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, Marion Grimaldi and Julie Andrews. Written as World War Two drew to its close, the song describes the yearning of parted couples to be reunited. It evokes the joy they would feel when together once again, and the pleasures of the English countryside in spring with its lilac blossom.

OvC8gz-cq88

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: Philip Eno on 05/03/17 at 5:07 am

"Till the End of Time" is a popular song written by lyricist Buddy Kaye and composer Ted Mossman and published in 1945. The melody is based on Frédéric Chopin's Polonaise in A flat major, Op. 53, the "Polonaise héroique". The biggest hit was by Perry Como; another version by Dick Haymes also charted; the Les Brown orchestra, with vocalist Doris Day, and Ginny Simms also made a recording of the song. It featured prominently in the 1946 film of the same name.

KFXA_-2cIYU

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: Philip Eno on 05/04/17 at 8:45 pm

"Pistol Packin' Mama" is a 1943 song with the words written by Al Dexter, who adapted the melody from "Boil Them Cabbage Down." The song is notable in that it was the first number one on the Juke Box Folk Records chart, which was later known as the Hot Country Songs chart. The version performed by Bing Crosby and the Andrews Sisters was the first number on the Juke Box Folk records charts followed by the original version (recorded March 18, 1942) performed by Al Dexter released on Okeh 6708.

b39ALX4neIk

Technically, the video is unavailable in the country I am in, but I can still with the link as usual. Hoping it still works for you?

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: Philip Eno on 05/10/17 at 10:04 pm

"Yes, My Darling Daughter" is a 1940 song by Jack Lawrence first introduced by Dinah Shore on Eddie Cantor's NBC RED Network radio program on October 24, 1940. It was Shore's first solo record. Dinah's version, released on the RCA owned Bluebird Records label, peaked at #10 on Billboard Magazine's Best Seller chart. The music used by Lawrence is based on a Ukrainian folk-song "Oi ne khody, Hrytsju", often ascribed to the Ukrainian songstress Marusia Churai. It first appeared in the 1812 vaudeville "The Cossack-Poet" by the Italian composer Catterino Cavos. This melody is unknown before Cavos, and is assumed that it was written by him.

ace9e3y4H_w

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: Philip Eno on 05/13/17 at 2:10 am

"Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!", also known as "Let It Snow", is a song written by lyricist Sammy Cahn and composer Jule Styne in July 1945. It was written in Hollywood, California during a heat wave as Cahn and Styne imagined cooler conditions. Although the song's lyrics make no mention of Christmas, it is played on radio stations during the Christmas season and is often covered by various artists on Christmas-themed albums.

vGRC2LYmHfU

Technically, the video is unavailable in the country I am in, but I can still acquire the link as usual. Hoping it still works for you?

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: Philip Eno on 05/15/17 at 2:36 am

"If I Had a Hammer (The Hammer Song)" is a song written by Pete Seeger and Lee Hays. It was written in 1949 in support of the progressive movement, and was first recorded by The Weavers, a folk music quartet composed of Seeger, Hays, Ronnie Gilbert and Fred Hellerman. It was a number 10 hit for Peter, Paul and Mary in 1962 and then went to number three a year later when recorded by Trini Lopez.

heIyz6_pqac

Technically, the video is unavailable in the country I am in, but I can still acquire the link as usual. Hoping it still works for you?

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: Philip Eno on 08/14/17 at 1:15 pm

"(I Love You) for Sentimental Reasons" is a popular song written in 1945 by Ivory "Deek" Watson & William "Pat" Best, the latter being a founding member of the Four Tunes. The credits and the publishing (Leeds Publishing Co.) list Deek Watson, former founding member of the Ink Spots, as a co-writer. Best later stated that Watson had nothing to do with the creation of the song, but Watson maintained in his late 1960s autobiography that he and Best wrote the song together, lyrics and music respectively. The biggest-selling version by Nat King Cole was released by Capitol Records as catalog number 304. It first reached the Billboard Best Seller chart on November 22, 1946, and lasted 12 weeks on the chart, peaking at number one.

TnEtvtmFcgo

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: Philip Eno on 10/02/17 at 1:24 pm

"Moonlight in Vermont" is a popular song about the U.S. state of Vermont, written by John Blackburn (lyrics) and Karl Suessdorf (music) and published in 1944. The lyrics are unusual in that they do not rhyme. John Blackburn, the lyricist, has been quoted as saying, "After completing the first 12 bars of the lyric, I realized there was no rhyme and then said to Karl, 'Let’s follow the pattern of no rhyme throughout the song. It seemed right.'"The lyrics are also unconventional in that each verse (not counting the bridge) is a haiku. The song is considered an unofficial state song of Vermont and is frequently played as the first dance song at Vermont wedding receptions. It was first introduced by Margaret Whiting in a 1944 recording, and has been covered by numerous other artists over the years.

jdbHf3ml0J0

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: Philip Eno on 02/14/18 at 4:00 am

"Tennessee Waltz" is a popular country music song with lyrics by Redd Stewart and music by Pee Wee King written in 1946 and first released in January 1948. The song became a multimillion seller via a 1950 recording – as "The Tennessee Waltz" – by Patti Page. As of 1974, it was the biggest selling song ever in Japan.

XJoVtzikrAk

Subject: 1940s Songs

Written By: Dude111 on 02/14/18 at 6:21 pm

I love alot of 1940s country music!!

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: Philip Eno on 02/19/18 at 11:20 am


I love alot of 1940s country music!!
Post your favourites ones here.

Subject: 1940s Songs

Written By: Dude111 on 02/19/18 at 8:17 pm

Hmmm my favs Phil??

I guess 1 is SMOKE SMOKE SMOKE THAT CIGERETTE - Tex Williams

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: Philip Eno on 03/14/18 at 9:56 am

"Mamma" is a popular song composed in 1940 by Cesare Andrea Bixio with Italian lyrics by Bixio Cherubini under the title "Mamma son tanto felice" (Mum, I am so happy).


Here sung by Beniamino Gigli
LJw7CldmvYc

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: CatwomanofV on 03/16/18 at 5:24 pm


"Moonlight in Vermont" is a popular song about the U.S. state of Vermont, written by John Blackburn (lyrics) and Karl Suessdorf (music) and published in 1944. The lyrics are unusual in that they do not rhyme. John Blackburn, the lyricist, has been quoted as saying, "After completing the first 12 bars of the lyric, I realized there was no rhyme and then said to Karl, 'Let’s follow the pattern of no rhyme throughout the song. It seemed right.'"The lyrics are also unconventional in that each verse (not counting the bridge) is a haiku. The song is considered an unofficial state song of Vermont and is frequently played as the first dance song at Vermont wedding receptions. It was first introduced by Margaret Whiting in a 1944 recording, and has been covered by numerous other artists over the years.

jdbHf3ml0J0



We had this played at our reception but it was THIS version:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=esynsha53A8

It wasn't our first dance but our third (we had two "first dance" songs because we couldn't decide which one to go with-so we did both). This was the dance that Carlos danced with my mother & I danced with his father. Then we switched and I danced with my father and he danced with his sister (to fill in for his mother). We then switched once again and he danced with my niece (our maid of honor) & I danced with his son (our best man). We wanted to recognized all of these people but didn't want to have to play 3 different songs-so we just switched off. It worked.



Cat

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs and Music

Written By: Philip Eno on 06/13/18 at 5:38 am

Appalachian Spring is a composition by Aaron Copland that premiered in 1944 and has achieved widespread and enduring popularity as an orchestral suite. The ballet, scored for a thirteen-member chamber orchestra, was created upon commission of choreographer and dancer Martha Graham with funds from the Coolidge Foundation. It premiered on Monday, October 30, 1944 at the Library of Congress in Washington D.C., with Martha Graham dancing the lead role. The set was designed by the American sculptor Isamu Noguchi. Copland was awarded the 1945 Pulitzer Prize for Music for his achievement. The original ballet version is divided into 14 movements. The movements that do not appear in the orchestral suite occur mostly between the 7th and last movement as variations on the Shaker melody Simple Gifts (1848).

WVahuS9hk_s

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/15/18 at 12:30 am

"Nancy (with the Laughing Face)" is a song composed in 1942 by Jimmy Van Heusen, with lyrics by Phil Silvers, called, originally, "Bessie (With The Laughing Face)". Many, perhaps most, people wrongly assume the song was composed specifically for Frank Sinatra's wife or daughter, each named Nancy, not only because the original recording of the song was Sinatra's for Columbia in 1944, but because the song was never published or recorded as anything but "Nancy".

hTdwFYxv_ro

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: meesa on 07/15/18 at 1:42 am

one of my favorites
RhuzhkPpKz0

and, originally recorded in the late 30s, but popular during the early 40s before swing died, and I can't think of 40s music without it.
fhyhP_5VfKM

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/15/18 at 4:46 am

"Cotton Fields" is a song written by American blues musician Huddie Ledbetter, better known as Lead Belly, who made the first recording of the song in 1940. Famously covered by the Beach Boys in 1970.

46h56pidCiE

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: Philip Eno on 08/13/18 at 7:24 am

"Send Me the Pillow You Dream On" is country song written and recorded by Hank Locklin. The song has become a standard for the Nashville sound, and has been covered by pop, country, and bluegrass artists. Locklin first released the song in 78-disc Star 1360 in September 1949, but it didn't hit the charts. Locklin re-released it in December 1957 on RCA Victor 47-7127 single, and it peaked at No. 5 on Billboard's chart of "Most Played C&W by Jockeys" and crossed over to the pop charts. In the 1960s, the song was a hit for The Browns, Johnny Tillotson, and Dean Martin.

PdHl3yVYyUE

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: Philip Eno on 09/15/18 at 4:22 am

"Sixteen Tons" is a song written by Merle Travis about a coal miner, based on life in coal mines in Muhlenberg County, Kentucky. Travis first recorded the song at the Radio Recorders Studio B in Hollywood, California on August 8, 1946. Cliffie Stone played bass on the recording. It was first released in July 1947 by Capitol on Travis' album Folk Songs of the Hills. The song became a gold record.The line "You load sixteen tons and what do you get? Another day older and deeper in debt" came from a letter written by Travis' brother John. Another line came from their father, a coal miner, who would say: "I can't afford to die. I owe my soul to the company store." A 1955 version recorded by Tennessee Ernie Ford reached number one in the Billboard charts, while another version by Frankie Laine was released only in Western Europe, where it gave Ford's version competition.

5pfVvqLM_e4

Subject: Re: 1940s Songs

Written By: Philip Eno on 12/22/18 at 3:32 am

"White Christmas" is a 1942 Irving Berlin song reminiscing about an old-fashioned Christmas setting. The version sung by Bing Crosby is the world's best-selling single with estimated sales in excess of 50 million copies worldwide. Other versions of the song, along with Crosby's, have sold over 50 million copies.

P8Ozdqzjigg

Check for new replies or respond here...