inthe00s
The Pop Culture Information Society...

These are the messages that have been posted on inthe00s over the past few years.

Check out the messageboard archive index for a complete list of topic areas.

This archive is periodically refreshed with the latest messages from the current messageboard.




Check for new replies or respond here...

Subject: Accent change over time

Written By: Trimac20 on 02/18/06 at 5:55 am

To the few Aussies out there (or others familiar) have you ever noticed how, if you watch old movies.etc (e.g. the F.J. Holden, Barry McKenzie ;)) you notice the Australian accent sounded a lot broader than today? I'm not talking 1920s, but from about the 1960s it got a lot broader. Til about 1960 it sounded more 'British' than today, but then it sounded broader, til about the late 80s, 90s when it became unfashionable (ocker, yobbo connotations) to have a very broad accent.
I'm not talking just Paul Hogan or the 'outback' character, but in General (have u seen the video of Abba's Australian tour?). I was always puzzled by that. My thinking goes, if we are becoming less British, are accent should sound more distinctive...though I spose globalisation plays a part in it. The same doesn't seem to be the case in the US or UK, but the change in Australia seems so noticeable...Just wondering about the socio-cultural factors that affect something like this...

Americans and all who watch the Crocodile Hunter or Kath and Kim think all Aussies speak like that, but in reality it is quite rare among the general population (Kath and Kim's is extreme; few speak with such an accent). But then again, Americans have never been very good at interpreting the Australian accent...

Subject: Re: Accent change over time

Written By: velvetoneo on 02/18/06 at 6:03 am

There was actually a study done in the US that regional accents are getting stronger here. However, with myself I think I've noticed that I've become less Jerseyish from spending time away from my parents, though I still talk very Jersey at home. Like I used to say "awl", "mawl", etc., now I say more "aowl", "maowl"...the "w" sound is more subdued, but I still talk the other way alot, mostly around friends and family.

Subject: Re: Accent change over time

Written By: LyricBoy on 02/18/06 at 6:36 am


There was actually a study done in the US that regional accents are getting stronger here. However, with myself I think I've noticed that I've become less Jerseyish from spending time away from my parents, though I still talk very Jersey at home. Like I used to say "awl", "mawl", etc., now I say more "aowl", "maowl"...the "w" sound is more subdued, but I still talk the other way alot, mostly around friends and family.


Not sure about other regional accesnts, but here in Pittsburgh ("Picksburg") PA, we have a thriving downtown ("dahntahn") and we cheer for the Steelers ("Stillers") and we like our cherry ("churry") pie.  We wrap up loose papers with rubber bands ("Gum bands") and we wash ("warsh" or "wush") our cars proudly ("prahdly").

;D

Subject: Re: Accent change over time

Written By: Donnie Darko on 02/19/06 at 3:52 am

Few would agree, but I think native Pacific Northwesterners talk different relative to Californian transplants.  They don't say "Like" a lot and NEVER say "Hella".  Their accent also is a little slower and kind of Canadian, but without the raising they have for "about", if you know what I mean.

Subject: Re: Accent change over time

Written By: velvetoneo on 02/19/06 at 6:46 am

Every different part of the NYC area has a different accent. North Jersey/Newark area has a diffeent accent as compared to Hudson County closer to Manhattan. Then, people in Manhattan have a different accent, the remaining original Bronxites in the Bronx and people in Westchester and parts of Bergen and Rockland have Bronxy accents, people in Brooklyn and Staten Island have Brooklynese accents, and then there's the Queens/Long Island accent. The African-American NY/NJ accent varies by location and borough, too, and there's a Puerto Rican and Dominican accent particular to NYC, and a Chinese or Korean accent, that differs based on location within the NYC area. And Italians, German-Irish, and Jews talk differently. Then there's the "lockjaw" type WASP voice present in parts of Long Island, the Upper East Side, and Fairfield County.

Subject: Re: Accent change over time

Written By: LyricBoy on 02/19/06 at 7:16 am


Every different part of the NYC area has a different accent. North Jersey/Newark area has a diffeent accent as compared to Hudson County closer to Manhattan. Then, people in Manhattan have a different accent, the remaining original Bronxites in the Bronx and people in Westchester and parts of Bergen and Rockland have Bronxy accents, people in Brooklyn and Staten Island have Brooklynese accents, and then there's the Queens/Long Island accent. The African-American NY/NJ accent varies by location and borough, too, and there's a Puerto Rican and Dominican accent particular to NYC, and a Chinese or Korean accent, that differs based on location within the NYC area. And Italians, German-Irish, and Jews talk differently. Then there's the "lockjaw" type WASP voice present in parts of Long Island, the Upper East Side, and Fairfield County.


Speaking of NYC, I wonder if Howard has a thick NYC accent?  ???

Subject: Re: Accent change over time

Written By: Trimac20 on 02/20/06 at 8:02 am

Do any of you notice the 'Southern accent' and other distinctive accents dying out in the United States, especially among young people? Britney Spears is supposed to be from Louisana and Justin Timberlake (I know bad examples) is from Memphis but both have pretty standard accents. Is it mainly among people in show-biz or among the general population as well?

Subject: Re: Accent change over time

Written By: velvetoneo on 02/20/06 at 1:41 pm

Bubbele, that's just in show business. A survey showed accents are really getting stronger. They have to get rid of Southern accents to succeed, that's always been the standard. Actors are supposed to talk in a General American voice.

Check for new replies or respond here...