inthe00s
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Subject: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: Donnie Darko on 03/03/06 at 2:28 pm

I'd have to say the '60s.  The '90s is close, but a lot of older people don't like them, but EVERYBODY likes the '60s.

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: Marian on 03/03/06 at 2:29 pm

I think the 50s.that's when we got rock and roll!

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: mach!ne_he@d on 03/03/06 at 2:37 pm

I say the 50's mostly because the decade itself isn't well remembered by anyone born after about 1945. The 60's dont get rediculed that much and the 90's is still a little too recent and too much like the 00's.

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: Donnie Darko on 03/03/06 at 2:39 pm

^Yeah, you'd have to be OLD to remember the '50s now.  Even to be born in them, you wouldn't exactly be a spring chicken.

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: mach!ne_he@d on 03/03/06 at 2:47 pm


^Yeah, you'd have to be OLD to remember the '50s now.  Even to be born in them, you wouldn't exactly be a spring chicken.



Defidently. Likewise you have to be over 30 to fully remember the 80's :o

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: danootaandme on 03/03/06 at 2:50 pm



^Yeah, you'd have to be OLD to remember the '50s now.  Even to be born in them, you wouldn't exactly be a spring chicken.



I was born in the 50's and you are absolutely right.  My springs have definitely sprung.  I gotta tell you from what I remember the
nostalgia has to be alot more fun than the reality. 

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: Donnie Darko on 03/03/06 at 2:51 pm

^Well, at the very youngest 29.

And no minors remember the '80s anymore, unless they have amazing memory.  Even 3 years ago there were 17-year old '86ers who could remember 1989 and 1990.

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: Donnie Darko on 03/03/06 at 2:52 pm


I was born in the 50's and you are absolutely right.  My springs have definitely sprung.  I gotta tell you from what I remember the
nostalgia has to be alot more fun than the reality. 


You forget the crap that happened then, of course.

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: mach!ne_he@d on 03/03/06 at 3:02 pm


^Well, at the very youngest 29.

And no minors remember the '80s anymore, unless they have amazing memory.  Even 3 years ago there were 17-year old '86ers who could remember 1989 and 1990.



Yeah a 77er might remember a tiny bit from 1980. And yeah it's odd that nobody under 18 really remembers the 80's. I'm 18 and I think I might have a very vaugue memory from '89 but probably not. The weird thing is pretty soon no minors will be able to remember the 90's either :o

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: bbigd04 on 03/03/06 at 3:05 pm



Yeah a 77er might remember a tiny bit from 1980. And yeah it's odd that nobody under 18 really remembers the 80's. I'm 18 and I think I might have a very vaugue memory from '89 but probably not. The weird thing is pretty soon no minors will be able to remember the 90's either :o


Yeah I have a little memory from 1989, very little, but I do have a couple memories that occurred in 1989.

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: Donnie Darko on 03/03/06 at 3:06 pm



Yeah a 77er might remember a tiny bit from 1980. And yeah it's odd that nobody under 18 really remembers the 80's. I'm 18 and I think I might have a very vaugue memory from '89 but probably not. The weird thing is pretty soon no minors will be able to remember the 90's either :o


Yup.  I remember even in 1999 beginning to lament the oldness of the '80s, it's funny to think in three years the '90s will be in that same shape.  

And we know how quickly 1999 became 2006, but like I've said since the '00s has so much '90s in it they will "age" less fast than the '80s did, hell 1982 was old in 1985, whereas 1995 isn't especially old even in 2006!

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: Marian on 03/03/06 at 3:08 pm


You forget the crap that happened then, of course.
thast's especially true of the 60s and 70s!

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: mach!ne_he@d on 03/03/06 at 3:18 pm


Yup.  I remember even in 1999 beginning to lament the oldness of the '80s, it's funny to think in three years the '90s will be in that same shape.  



Yeah its odd for me to think that a 2007er will view the 2000's the same way I view the 80's let alone actually be nostalgic for them like I am the 80s's :D

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: Donnie Darko on 03/03/06 at 3:19 pm



Yeah its odd for me to think that a 2007er will view the 2000's the same way I view the 80's let alone actually be nostalgic for them like I am the 80s's :D




The '00s will probably seem magical to people who weren't there for them.  The '90s were very down-to-earth, so they're not as "glorifiable".

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: mach!ne_he@d on 03/03/06 at 3:23 pm


The '00s will probably seem magical to people who weren't there for them.  The '90s were very down-to-earth, so they're not as "glorifiable".



Yeah I can see it now. A 2005er getting all warm and fuzzy inside whenever he hears "Laffy Taffy" ;D

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: Roadgeek on 03/03/06 at 4:54 pm

The 90's. Some of the best years of my life.

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: sonikuu on 03/03/06 at 5:38 pm

The least ridiculed is the 90's, but the most loved is definitely the 60's and 80's.  So many things happened in the 60's, it just makes your  head spin.  Civil Rights Movement, Vietnam War, John F. Kennedy, British Invasion changing music forever, etc.  It's pretty clear that, 100 years from  now, the 60's will probably be the  most notable decade in the second half of the 20th century.  As for the 80's, its the most loved right now due to the 80's nostagia picking up steam.  This is only temporary though and the most loved decade will change with every new decade due to nostalgia.

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: velvetoneo on 03/03/06 at 5:57 pm

I think the people who'll really love the '00s will be teens in the later 2020s and early 2030s, like the children of the current Gen Y people who love the '00s. But by far, the '60s is the most loved decade...nobody hates the '60s. The '50s was ridiculed as being repressive and conservative and whitebread, but all the change of the '60s was really simmering under them.

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: Matt the Rat76 on 03/03/06 at 9:31 pm

the 90's is the most loved decade of the latter 20th Century and it was cool and just to think i am born in 1976 (30 in april) 80's and 90's is cool

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: Trimac20 on 03/04/06 at 10:39 am

Here again, answering another of Donnie Darko's threads.lol.

Yeah, it's true the 80s are almost the 'olden days' now, and despite being ridiculed, at least as many (Secretly or otherwise) absolutely adore the decade. Don't know if any survey has been done of this, but I think it depends on who you ask. Older people, of course, felt more nostalgic about the 60s, 70s.etc.

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: Tanya1976 on 03/04/06 at 9:33 pm


Here again, answering another of Donnie Darko's threads.lol.

Yeah, it's true the 80s are almost the 'olden days' now, and despite being ridiculed, at least as many (Secretly or otherwise) absolutely adore the decade. Don't know if any survey has been done of this, but I think it depends on who you ask. Older people, of course, felt more nostalgic about the 60s, 70s.etc.


Damn it, the 80s are not olden days!!!

I voted for the 60s though and the 90s after.

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: Donnie Darko on 03/04/06 at 10:28 pm


Damn it, the 80s are not olden days!!!

I voted for the 60s though and the 90s after.


As sad as it is, considering your average '80s lover is age 33-42 I have to say they are the "olden days". :(

Well, maybe not the late '80s.  Young people in their 20s can still remember the late '80s.

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: velvetoneo on 03/04/06 at 10:52 pm


As sad as it is, considering your average '80s lover is age 33-42 I have to say they are the "olden days". :(

Well, maybe not the late '80s.  Young people in their 20s can still remember the late '80s.


We've basically been living in a more high-tech version of the '80s for awhile now. I think the olden days ended in the late '70s or early '80s...and the olden days before that ended in what, 1915?

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: Donnie Darko on 03/04/06 at 11:07 pm


We've basically been living in a more high-tech version of the '80s for awhile now. I think the olden days ended in the late '70s or early '80s...and the olden days before that ended in what, 1915?


I'd say so.  1982+ is the current age.

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: Marty McFly on 03/05/06 at 1:47 am


We've basically been living in a more high-tech version of the '80s for awhile now. I think the olden days ended in the late '70s or early '80s...and the olden days before that ended in what, 1915?


As for when the Old West/pre-electricity/cars era ended, I'd say that's about right. 1913-15 or so. That era as a whole (20th century living and technology, but some 19th century mindset), probably ended around 1963 or early '64 - the start of the "60s" 60s.

Like I've mentioned before, an average street more or less looks the same now as the '80s, sans the updated logos, more rounded cars, and "frizzy/big" hairstyles. ;) Truthfully, I'd agree with you and say 1982. Possibly even the late '70s could squeeze in too, as very "beginner modern".

P.S. The '80s are only (slightly) "old" in date, not the time themselves, so much. It's alot harder for us to take in the fact that it is the age it currently is, just because in the grand scheme of things, it's still relatively similar now. We're not on our toes by stuff changing rapidly in two years anymore.

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: Trimac20 on 03/05/06 at 5:53 am


As for when the Old West/pre-electricity/cars era ended, I'd say that's about right. 1913-15 or so. That era as a whole (20th century living and technology, but some 19th century mindset), probably ended around 1963 or early '64 - the start of the "60s" 60s.

Like I've mentioned before, an average street more or less looks the same now as the '80s, sans the updated logos, more rounded cars, and "frizzy/big" hairstyles. ;) Truthfully, I'd agree with you and say 1982. Possibly even the late '70s could squeeze in too, as very "beginner modern".

P.S. The '80s are only (slightly) "old" in date, not the time themselves, so much. It's alot harder for us to take in the fact that it is the age it currently is, just because in the grand scheme of things, it's still relatively similar now. We're not on our toes by stuff changing rapidly in two years anymore.


Of course i use the term 'olden days' liberally, since no one can agree what the 'old days' are. I think the 'modern era' is post Industrial Revolution (about 1860s), and the Digital or Information Age began in the 80s. It is an age where digital technology plays an essential role in daily life. As for the appearance of the urban landscape, I think one can easily tell the 80s from now (apart from cars, shops, street-signs). I think the measure of how 'current' an era is, is if a normal school-aged child can immediately identify it as being 'different.' The cut-off for me would be sometime in the 80s.

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: velvetoneo on 03/05/06 at 7:15 am


As for when the Old West/pre-electricity/cars era ended, I'd say that's about right. 1913-15 or so. That era as a whole (20th century living and technology, but some 19th century mindset), probably ended around 1963 or early '64 - the start of the "60s" 60s.

Like I've mentioned before, an average street more or less looks the same now as the '80s, sans the updated logos, more rounded cars, and "frizzy/big" hairstyles. ;) Truthfully, I'd agree with you and say 1982. Possibly even the late '70s could squeeze in too, as very "beginner modern".

P.S. The '80s are only (slightly) "old" in date, not the time themselves, so much. It's alot harder for us to take in the fact that it is the age it currently is, just because in the grand scheme of things, it's still relatively similar now. We're not on our toes by stuff changing rapidly in two years anymore.


The difference between the 1890s and the 1910s is shocking, way bigger than the 1980s-2000s difference, as I've said before. I mean, people went from using horses to cars and candles and gas lamps to electric light.

I think the beginning of the end of the 19th century mindset was the "Lost Generation" who were young adults during the '20s, and as a group were utterly disdainful of Victorian morals. They had the "flappers", women who had premarital sex and wore lots of makeup and danced to black music and with black men in public, oftentimes transgressed racial boundaries, and could not relate to Victorian mores in general, preferring to party. If there had been no World War II and Great Depression, I think we would be at the '60s alot sooner. There was alot of teen rebellion (see Rebel Without a Cause) in the '50s and bohemianism, but it didn't explode until the '60s because the '50s were such a repressive decade. The '20s were the beginning of what became a total reality by the '70s.

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: Marty McFly on 03/05/06 at 7:22 am


The difference between the 1890s and the 1910s is shocking, way bigger than the 1980s-2000s difference, as I've said before. I mean, people went from using horses to cars and candles and gas lamps to electric light.

I think the beginning of the end of the 19th century mindset was the "Lost Generation" who were young adults during the '20s, and as a group were utterly disdainful of Victorian morals. They had the "flappers", women who had premarital sex and wore lots of makeup and danced to black music and with black men in public, oftentimes transgressed racial boundaries, and could not relate to Victorian mores in general, preferring to party. If there had been no World War II and Great Depression, I think we would be at the '60s alot sooner. There was alot of teen rebellion (see Rebel Without a Cause) in the '50s and bohemianism, but it didn't explode until the '60s because the '50s were such a repressive decade. The '20s were the beginning of what became a total reality by the '70s.


Very interesting, I think I see what you're saying. The '30s and '40s had jazz, big band and such, but the "pop culture" of that time (say 1929 to 1945 -- or the Depression to the end of WW II) almost feels like a single time and watered down/updated '20s. Several years ago, I read the book The Great Gatspy which was set in the '20s, and from what I remember, the feel of the time is alot like you described. Very "swinging" and wild in its own way.

It would almost make more sense if the '50s followed the '20s. I never quite thought of it that way, but the Victorian era almost does seem like a precursor to the greaser/malt shop/early rock era. Well, maybe not right away, but it seems like 10 years removed more than 30.

That means the "60s" would be in the 1940s, and "2006" would be in the '80s. :)

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: velvetoneo on 03/05/06 at 7:38 am


Very interesting, I think I see what you're saying. The '30s and '40s had jazz, big band and such, but the "pop culture" of that time (say 1929 to 1945 -- or the Depression to the end of WW II) almost feels like a single time and watered down/updated '20s. Several years ago, I read the book The Great Gatsby which was set in the '20s, and from what I remember, the feel of the time is alot like you described. Very "swinging" and wild in its own way.

It would almost make more sense if the '50s followed the '20s. I never quite thought of it that way, but the Victorian era almost does seem like a precursor to the greaser/malt shop/early rock era. Well, maybe not right away, but it seems like 10 years removed more than 30.

That means the "60s" would be in the 1940s, and "2006" would be in the '80s. :)


Yes, culturally they would... :).  I think the '50s was when "teen rebellion" became popular for the first time since the '20s and on a larger scale. The '50s were like a version of the '20s with excessive social repression, but the '20s had their own hang-ups too, i.e. the KKK and classist Republican politics.

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: Marty McFly on 03/05/06 at 7:45 am


Yes, culturally they would... :).  I think the '50s was when "teen rebellion" became popular for the first time since the '20s and on a larger scale. The '50s were like a version of the '20s with excessive social repression, but the '20s had their own hang-ups too, i.e. the KKK and classist Republican politics.


Yeah, the '50s were more teen rebellion, while the '20s were cultural/widespread rebellion on a different scale.

BTW, the '20s did seem very "modern" for its time. I bet 1905 seemed like a world away by 1925! I wonder if teens of the time thought it was ancient, LOL (I was going to say it would be interesting to ask them, but it occured to me there aren't that many 1900's or even 1910s babies still alive now).  :\'(

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: velvetoneo on 03/05/06 at 7:50 am


Yeah, the '50s were more teen rebellion, while the '20s were cultural/widespread rebellion on a different scale.

BTW, the '20s did seem very "modern" for its time. I bet 1905 seemed like a world away by 1925! I wonder if teens of the time thought it was ancient, LOL (I was going to say it would be interesting to ask them, but it occured to me there aren't that many 1900's or even 1910s babies still alive now).  :\'(


I think they did, teens in the '20s did things like cramming themselves in telephone booths and driving around in Model T Fords with slogans painted on them. Of course mild by today's standards, but for then amazingly rebellious.

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: JamieMcBain on 03/05/06 at 1:30 pm

The 50's

Subject: Re: Most Loved Decade of the Latter 20th Century

Written By: GoodRedShirt on 03/05/06 at 4:38 pm

The 50s probably. I've never heard anyone ridicule the 50s...

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