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Subject: The Y2K Generation

Written By: velvetoneo on 05/18/06 at 11:02 pm

Does anyone else agree this is sort of a mini-generation of people who were born about late 1981-mid 1985 (the early Y group) and came of age from about 1998-2001, the "Y2K era"? They're like Y in most ways I think, albeit without some of the "get rich or die tryin'" attitudes, and are older than your average Yers, though they are pretty focused on late '90s trends like nu metal, etc. This is also the core of young adult "hipsters" you now find in trendy urban neighborhoods as older Gen X hipsters move onto the 'burbs.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: Donnie Darko on 05/18/06 at 11:04 pm

Yeah I'd say so. Of course the Gen Yers of the late '80s and early '90s can also recall/grew up during the era, but us born c. 1990 are really more the mid-'00s generation.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: velvetoneo on 05/18/06 at 11:06 pm


Yeah I'd say so. Of course the Gen Yers of the late '80s and early '90s can also recall/grew up during the era, but us born c. 1990 are really more the mid-'00s generation.


Yeah, I think the real mid-'00s generation is like people graduating high school 2006-2008, though it also includes people born in the few years surrounding us.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: Donnie Darko on 05/18/06 at 11:07 pm


Yeah, I think the real mid-'00s generation is like people graduating high school 2006-2008, though it also includes people born in the few years surrounding us.


I'd say the Class of 2006 is THE Gen Y class.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: bbigd04 on 05/18/06 at 11:08 pm

Yeah though I would say people around my age were very much into and were a big part of the 1999-2001 era specifically.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: velvetoneo on 05/18/06 at 11:10 pm

When do you think somebody stops really getting 99-00, pop culturally? Like somebody born around 92-93 who was in 1st grade? Somebody born about 92-93 could get the feel of the late '90s and maybe the feel of some of the music (the way I am about the mid-'90s), but they're the first group of people who are too young for Y2K.

I think of the late 1985-mid 1987, classes of '04 and '05, types as being pretty similar. Like they're both the early '00s generation, who came of age in the few years after 9/11 before people started forgetting, though overall they're peak Y with us mid-'00sy types. And yeah, I think 2006 is THE Gen Y class to graduate in. What do you think that was for Gen X and the boomers, and for '90s-style Gen Xers? For the boomers I'd say it was '73, the year my mom graduated.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: bbigd04 on 05/18/06 at 11:12 pm


When do you think somebody stops really getting 99-00, pop culturally? Like somebody born around 92-93 who was in 1st grade? Somebody born about 92-93 could get the feel of the late '90s and maybe the feel of some of the music (the way I am about the mid-'90s), but they're the first group of people who are too young for Y2K.

I think of the late 1985-mid 1987, classes of '04 and '05, types as being pretty similar. Like they're both the early '00s generation, who came of age in the few years after 9/11 before people started forgetting, though overall they're peak Y with us mid-'00sy types. And yeah, I think 2006 is THE Gen Y class to graduate in. What do you think that was for Gen X and the boomers, and for '90s-style Gen Xers? For the boomers I'd say it was '73, the year my mom graduated.


1992 is probably the last year that gets 1999-2000. As I've said my nephew was born in 1992 and he remembers quite a bit from that 1999-2000 time.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: Donnie Darko on 05/18/06 at 11:13 pm

I'd say 1994 is the last year that could really appreciate the Y2K era at all.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: deadrockstar on 05/18/06 at 11:13 pm


I'd say the Class of 2006 is THE Gen Y class.


That technically includes me.  I was  supposed to be clas of '06 but I graduated a year early.  So you think basically those born in 87/88 are the most pure Y?

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: Donnie Darko on 05/18/06 at 11:14 pm

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Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: velvetoneo on 05/18/06 at 11:15 pm

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Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: Donnie Darko on 05/18/06 at 11:18 pm


Yeah, I think so. My grade is very pure Y, and technically we're the peak of the echo boom (89/90), but I think we're a bit more beyond stuff from the '00s, or fancy ourselves to be, or are cynical about things an '88er would take seriously.


Not that we're the '10s generation in any way ... we're just young enough to not be caught up in the current culture. However kids born around 1992 seem to be more into '00s culture than us, ironically.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: deadrockstar on 05/18/06 at 11:19 pm


Yeah, I think so. My grade is very pure Y, and technically we're the peak of the echo boom (89/90), but I think we're a bit more beyond stuff from the '00s, or fancy ourselves to be, or are cynical about things an '88er would take seriously.


Hmm, I have noticed a bit of a difference in those born in the early 90s(you, Marsh, DominEl, Donnie etc.) as opposed to those of us born in the late 80s(me, Beth/MidKnightDarkness, Brian06, Davey Thrashmister etc.). I can't quite put my finger on what the difference is.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: Marty McFly on 05/18/06 at 11:20 pm

I think there definitely is a "feel" among them (as a Late '81er, I'd be at the tail end of it myself), like the stuff they initially liked as kids and probably still do, is more Gen X, but with strong Y traits (online/chatroom fandom, etc) in attitude.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: Donnie Darko on 05/18/06 at 11:20 pm

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Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: bbigd04 on 05/18/06 at 11:22 pm

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Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: deadrockstar on 05/18/06 at 11:23 pm

Well... for the first time in my life I feel slightly dated. :D


Where exactly is the line? I consider people born in the second half of 1989 to be more like early '90s kids.


I think you are right.  Because my best friend was born in November of '88(as opposed to me in January), and he is still just like me culturally, but I had another friend who is a year younger than him(november of 89) and I noticed a difference between him and the kids he went to school with(some of whom I met) and my best friend and his other friends from his school(some of whom I've met).

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: Donnie Darko on 05/18/06 at 11:24 pm

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Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: velvetoneo on 05/18/06 at 11:24 pm

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Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: deadrockstar on 05/18/06 at 11:25 pm


There is a little difference, though I think the '90ers are fairly close to us late '80ers, but the '91ers is where they start getting a lot more different I think.


Yeah.. my step sister is a 90er, and shes different from me, but just a little.  However my best friend's little brother is a 92er, and hes further removed.  I'd say hes still Gen Y, but perhaps 91 or 92 to around 95 or 96 are like a cusp between Gen Y and Gen Z.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: Donnie Darko on 05/18/06 at 11:26 pm

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Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: bbigd04 on 05/18/06 at 11:26 pm


Yeah, there's a slight, almost imperceptible difference between somebody born around 1990, even if it's just after the late '80s, like myself, and somebody born in 1988. We're less '00sy and have a slightly more detached view of it, I think...but then why is a '92er more into the '00s than we are? Maybe it comes from entering puberty around 9/11, so it's really stuck with us.

I think the line is late '90, leaving peak Y for late Y.  The '91ers is where they get different. What would you pinpoint the difference between a class of '06 type and a class of '08 type is? The two grades get along very well in my school, more than any other two have.


I agree the '91ers is where it gets really different. I'm pretty into the '00s, but I appreciate older stuff as well a lot, something a '92er most likely does not.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: Donnie Darko on 05/18/06 at 11:28 pm


I agree the '91ers is where it gets really different. I'm pretty into the '00s, but I appreciate older stuff as well a lot, something a '92er most likely does not.


I think this is because a 1991er would be 7 in 1998, and 1997 was a huge change year. Someone born in 1991 might not appreciate pre-digital times as well as a 1990er would.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: velvetoneo on 05/18/06 at 11:30 pm


I think this is because a 1991er would be 7 in 1998, and 1997 was a huge change year. Someone born in 1991 might not appreciate pre-digital times as well as a 1990er would.


I always see the summer of '98 as being that final change, with Windows '98 and computers becoming essential.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: velvetoneo on 05/18/06 at 11:32 pm

I think overall the late 1985-mid 1990 peak Yers are unified as the 9/11 generation, the people who were like in 6th to 10th grade and having their viewpoints and opinions formed very rapidly at the time.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: deadrockstar on 05/19/06 at 12:17 am


I think overall the late 1985-mid 1990 peak Yers are unified as the 9/11 generation, the people who were like in 6th to 10th grade and having their viewpoints and opinions formed very rapidly at the time.


Agreed. 9/11 and the immediate events surrounding it have had a tremendous influence in shaping my world view.  I was 13 at the time, and its what spurred me into following politics and current events(which I have almost religiously since then).  Anyone more than a couple of years younger then(under 11- what I'd say is about the average age when puberty starts now) was not quite old enough to get into the current events and have their viewpoint influenced by it, and those more than 3 years or so older(17 and up) already had the foundation of their worldview laid.  For me, 13 was definitely the age at which I became truely aware of the world beyond my own experiences of existence(for more reasons than 9/11).

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: velvetoneo on 05/19/06 at 12:32 pm

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Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: Trimac20 on 05/19/06 at 7:04 pm

I don't really feel 9/11 had a significant impact on my end of Generation Y, as we were already 15 - well into our teenage years - when 9/11 struck. But I guess it is the big event of the early 21st century.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: velvetoneo on 05/19/06 at 7:21 pm


I don't really feel 9/11 had a significant impact on my end of Generation Y, as we were already 15 - well into our teenage years - when 9/11 struck. But I guess it is the big event of the early 21st century.


I think that people come of age around 16, so then theoretically the 1986 group would be MOST impacted by it (this is true from my experience with '86ers.) It had a huge effect if you're from the NYC area, specifically, and the Northeastern US in general.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: Donnie Darko on 05/19/06 at 7:22 pm


I don't really feel 9/11 had a significant impact on my end of Generation Y, as we were already 15 - well into our teenage years - when 9/11 struck. But I guess it is the big event of the early 21st century.


To be honest it didn't personally affect me that much either, because I didn't know anyone who was in the attacks.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: velvetoneo on 05/19/06 at 7:24 pm


To be honest it didn't personally affect me that much either, because I didn't know anyone who was in the attacks.


I'm probably somewhat regionally biased, since I had two classmates with parents who only by chance escaped the WTC attacks and six citizens of town died in the attacks.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: Donnie Darko on 05/19/06 at 7:25 pm


I'm probably somewhat regionally biased, since I had two classmates with parents who only by chance escaped the WTC attacks and six citizens of town died in the attacks.


Well New Jersey is right next to NYC, so that makes sense. I live on the West Coast, which is almost as close to Hawaii as New York.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: Trimac20 on 05/19/06 at 7:27 pm


To be honest it didn't personally affect me that much either, because I didn't know anyone who was in the attacks.


I didn't know anyone in the attacks either (at least I don't think I do) - but apart from being a massive world event, I don't know it would affect my culturally, especially as I lived halfway round the world. But I guess terrorism impacts us all in some way.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: Donnie Darko on 05/19/06 at 7:28 pm


I didn't know anyone in the attacks either (at least I don't think I do) - but apart from being a massive world event, I don't know it would affect my culturally, especially as I lived halfway round the world. But I guess terrorism impacts us all in some way.


We're all terrorists, really. To live in a modern society, you will support terrorism in some way or another by your consumption.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: Trimac20 on 05/19/06 at 7:31 pm


We're all terrorists, really. To live in a modern society, you will support terrorism in some way or another by your consumption.


Has terrorism really increased that much? Methinks it's sort of hype. I mean the 90s had plenty of terrorism like the first WTC Attacks, Oklahoma, various hotels; yet terrorism was not associated with - to cite a derogatory term - the 'towelheads' until after 9/11. Suddenly all Arabs are supposed to be terrorists. Makes ALOT of sense (I'm being sarcastic, btw lol).

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: Donnie Darko on 05/19/06 at 7:34 pm


Has terrorism really increased that much? Methinks it's sort of hype. I mean the 90s had plenty of terrorism like the first WTC Attacks, Oklahoma, various hotels; yet terrorism was not associated with - to cite a derogatory term - the 'towelheads' until after 9/11. Suddenly all Arabs are supposed to be terrorists. Makes ALOT of sense (I'm being sarcastic, btw lol).


;D

Yes I agree. Even as far back as the '70s and '80s terrorism was very prevalent.

I think it as a problem, controversially enough is overrated. Of course terrorism is terrible, as is anything involving death, but there are much bigger problems in the world, like pollution, nuclear tension, domestic violence, and the US Government!  :D

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: Trimac20 on 05/19/06 at 7:36 pm


;D

Yes I agree. Even as far back as the '70s and '80s terrorism was very prevalent.

I think it as a problem, controversially enough is overrated. Of course terrorism is terrible, as is anything involving death, but there are much bigger problems in the world, like pollution, nuclear tension, domestic violence, and the US Government!  :D


Hmm, Terrorism is still very important, but dedicating all your funds to war.etc at the expense of everything else is just deplorable. Thousands die each year of diseases, yet G.W.B hasn't declared a 'War on Medical inadequacy'.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: Donnie Darko on 05/19/06 at 7:38 pm


Hmm, Terrorism is still very important, but dedicating all your funds to war.etc at the expense of everything else is just deplorable. Thousands die each year of diseases, yet G.W.B hasn't declared a 'War on Medical inadequacy'.


Well anything involving life is important, but why hasn't George Bush focused on other things? Besides he doesn't care about Osama anyway.

Just to play devil's advocate here, is it really desirable to fight off all diseases? After all the world already has so many people; it's better to die of natural causes than to die by blowing each other up.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: Trimac20 on 05/19/06 at 7:43 pm


Well anything involving life is important, but why hasn't George Bush focused on other things? Besides he doesn't care about Osama anyway.

Just to play devil's advocate here, is it really desirable to fight off all diseases? After all the world already has so many people; it's better to die of natural causes than to die by blowing each other up.


I agree part of the problem is over-population, but as it stands, with much better health care, basics like drinkable water that's not all muddy, proper food.etc we can improve the life of ppl in all countries. We sort of have a duty to improve life which is already existing. Certainly, places like American, while densely populated, are not beyond being adequately cared for.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: lizjagger on 05/19/06 at 11:15 pm

the y2k generation starts with anyone born after 85

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: Echo Nomad on 05/20/06 at 1:39 am


the y2k generation starts with anyone born after 85


I applauded you simply because I believe my actual generation goes from about 65-85.

To address the original topic:
But really though when we talking about 5 or 6 year spans the G word shouldn't be used. I think that's why there's a lot of confusion about what years belong to what Generation. Instead we should be using some other terms like waves, eras, ect. For instance the Boom Generation is generally thought to span between 1946 and 1964- a 18 year period. Yet what does a 20 year old in 1966 have with a 20 year old in 1984?

Subject: Re: The Y2K Generation

Written By: mach!ne_he@d on 05/20/06 at 11:46 am

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