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Subject: Will iPods and other tech still be big in the '10s?

Written By: guest on 03/10/08 at 2:32 pm

Will iPods, cellphones and the obsessive tech of the present still be big in the '10s? Especially now with iPhones and other smartphones increasing their gigabytes, threatening the iPod's staying power. Will Generation Z rebel against tech obsession and go back analogue?

I think technology these days is so good that it will never get a backlash, such as the forthcoming 2000s backlash. Maybe it will get more scaled down though, in that people will care less about new mp3 players and phones as the price continues to drop.

Subject: Re: Will iPods and other tech still be big in the '10s?

Written By: whistledog on 03/10/08 at 10:55 pm

No.  8 Track players, Betamax machines, wind-up phonograph record players and cellphones the size of military walkie-talkies will make a comeback :D

Subject: Re: Will iPods and other tech still be big in the '10s?

Written By: Jim on 03/10/08 at 11:07 pm


Will iPods, cellphones and the obsessive tech of the present still be big in the '10s? Especially now with iPhones and other smartphones increasing their gigabytes, threatening the iPod's staying power. Will Generation Z rebel against tech obsession and go back analogue?

I think technology these days is so good that it will never get a backlash, such as the forthcoming 2000s backlash. Maybe it will get more scaled down though, in that people will care less about new mp3 players and phones as the price continues to drop.

I would have to agree that technology will stay powerful and get smaller. There is a process of human hybrids that involve the implatation of technology in our systems. It starts with organs, hearts, and other items to keep us alive then followed up with convience items like phones, music, and visual aid implants on the surface of our eyes. Ever thought what it would be like to put on contacts instead of glasses?  How about putting on a TV screen instead on contacts. The transmitter would be implanted and the eyes would be the recepticle. What about implanted hearing aids instead of plug in head set from and old Ipod, ya the ones from way back in 2007.

You need to think about what we can do to be more of a hybrid human and less dependant on plug-ins.

Jimmy from the future- - - - '2134

Subject: Re: Will iPods and other tech still be big in the '10s?

Written By: whistledog on 03/10/08 at 11:16 pm


You got trapped in a quote box


You got trapped in a quote box


Technology moves too fast.  By the time people are able to afford the current technologies, new ones will already be out

Subject: Re: Will iPods and other tech still be big in the '10s?

Written By: sugar168 on 03/10/08 at 11:48 pm

i have read that the IPHONE might not make it past 2009, since it not selling as many as it should be.

Subject: Re: Will iPods and other tech still be big in the '10s?

Written By: sonikuu on 03/11/08 at 1:58 am

I can't really say anything about the state of technology in the 2010s.  I don't think things will change as much as we think they will, at least physically.  An everday street or house won't look too drastically different in the year 2018 than it does in the year 2008 (except for interior design trends, of course).  

The big changes will be, I think, the spread of downloadable content to a greater degree than it is now.  There is already talk of downloadable content one day being the medium of choice for movies, rather than a physical medium.  While I don't think physical mediums will disappear in the 2010s, a greater emphasis on downloading movies and video games online will be present.  Throughout the 2010s, I think downloads and physical mediums (such as Blu-Ray) will exist side by side before downloadable content fully replaces physical mediums in the 2020s.  Except for, of course, music.  I think music may be the one area where we see physical mediums completely die off in the 2010s and be completely replaced by the internet.  I also think that we'll see more and more emphasis on the singles in music due to the fact that many people today download the singles off of music albums and nothing else.  As a result, we could see more emphasis on singles until, eventually, we return to a 1950s situation, where only singles are released and not full albums.

Other than that, I don't think things will change too  much between now and 2018.  HDTV will be the standard of course and CDs will be pretty much dead, but those trends are already occurring (especially the dying of CDs) so its not a huge change.  Mostly everything lately has been upgrades of existing technology rather than something completely innovative (despite the hype, almost everything in the iphone has been done before, just not on the same scale).  I think that trend will continue.  We'll still be using oil (I hope alternative fuels will be on their way to replacing oil in the 2010s, yet I doubt it) and we'll still be paying the consequences that we are now, only worse.  The 2010s economy will not be a healthy one if economic indicators as of 2008 have anything to say.

As for a rebellion against technology, there is no chance of that happening.  There has never been a large scale rebellion against technology in modern times.  Small scale, yes, but no large scale one.  While I think there will be a rebellion against the materialism of the 2000s, the materialism will still exist, just more subtle and not taking center stage.  People will still extremely materialistic in the 90s, it was just much more subtle and laid back in comparision to the "Greed is good" era of the 80s.

Subject: Re: Will iPods and other tech still be big in the '10s?

Written By: mach!ne_he@d on 03/11/08 at 3:37 am

^Yeah, I don't think technology will ever truly be "rebelled" against. The technology of the '00s may be cutting edge right now, but so were the big cell phones, personal computers, CD's, and VHS players of the '80s, and they were all embraced in the less materialistic '90s.

Subject: Re: Will iPods and other tech still be big in the '10s?

Written By: Midas on 03/11/08 at 10:22 am


No.  8 Track players, Betamax machines, wind-up phonograph record players and cellphones the size of military walkie-talkies will make a comeback :D


Don't forget the abacus and rotary phones! :D

Subject: Re: Will iPods and other tech still be big in the '10s?

Written By: Tia on 03/11/08 at 10:31 am


Don't forget the abacus and rotary phones! :D
pong! teletype!

http://www.columbia.edu/acis/history/teletype.jpg

old-school suckage!

i actually think in the 2010s hoarding canned goods and chasing people with a baseball bat to try and get a tiny piece of fish to eat will be big. but maybe i'm a pessimist.

Subject: Re: Will iPods and other tech still be big in the '10s?

Written By: Jessica on 03/11/08 at 10:47 am


i actually think in the 2010s hoarding canned goods and chasing people with a baseball bat to try and get a tiny piece of fish to eat will be big. but maybe i'm a pessimist.


Costco sells food survival kits. I ran across them yesterday while trying to look something up. Check it out:

FOOD!

Subject: Re: Will iPods and other tech still be big in the '10s?

Written By: Tia on 03/11/08 at 10:51 am


Costco sells food survival kits. I ran across them yesterday while trying to look something up. Check it out:

FOOD!
shoo, that bucket o' chow could come in handy in the coming apocalypse, fer shurr.

Subject: Re: Will iPods and other tech still be big in the '10s?

Written By: Jessica on 03/11/08 at 11:11 am


shoo, that bucket o' chow could come in handy in the coming apocalypse, fer shurr.


Or when those stars 8,000 light years from us essplode and the gamma rays attack.

Subject: Re: Will iPods and other tech still be big in the '10s?

Written By: Tia on 03/11/08 at 11:17 am


Or when those stars 8,000 light years from us essplode and the gamma rays attack.
when marmosets suddenly develop superhuman intelligence and strive to enslave humanity in their gambit for galactic domination and we're forced to hide in the woods, you mean.

Subject: Re: Will iPods and other tech still be big in the '10s?

Written By: guest on 03/11/08 at 2:20 pm


I can't really say anything about the state of technology in the 2010s.  I don't think things will change as much as we think they will, at least physically.  An everday street or house won't look too drastically different in the year 2018 than it does in the year 2008 (except for interior design trends, of course). 

The big changes will be, I think, the spread of downloadable content to a greater degree than it is now.  There is already talk of downloadable content one day being the medium of choice for movies, rather than a physical medium.  While I don't think physical mediums will disappear in the 2010s, a greater emphasis on downloading movies and video games online will be present.  Throughout the 2010s, I think downloads and physical mediums (such as Blu-Ray) will exist side by side before downloadable content fully replaces physical mediums in the 2020s.  Except for, of course, music.  I think music may be the one area where we see physical mediums completely die off in the 2010s and be completely replaced by the internet.  I also think that we'll see more and more emphasis on the singles in music due to the fact that many people today download the singles off of music albums and nothing else.  As a result, we could see more emphasis on singles until, eventually, we return to a 1950s situation, where only singles are released and not full albums.

Other than that, I don't think things will change too  much between now and 2018.  HDTV will be the standard of course and CDs will be pretty much dead, but those trends are already occurring (especially the dying of CDs) so its not a huge change.  Mostly everything lately has been upgrades of existing technology rather than something completely innovative (despite the hype, almost everything in the iphone has been done before, just not on the same scale).  I think that trend will continue.  We'll still be using oil (I hope alternative fuels will be on their way to replacing oil in the 2010s, yet I doubt it) and we'll still be paying the consequences that we are now, only worse.  The 2010s economy will not be a healthy one if economic indicators as of 2008 have anything to say.

As for a rebellion against technology, there is no chance of that happening.  There has never been a large scale rebellion against technology in modern times.  Small scale, yes, but no large scale one.  While I think there will be a rebellion against the materialism of the 2000s, the materialism will still exist, just more subtle and not taking center stage.  People will still extremely materialistic in the 90s, it was just much more subtle and laid back in comparision to the "Greed is good" era of the 80s.


^That was really well summarized. I agree, that technology has never really been rebelled against in modern times because it makes people's lives more convenient. In the 2010s things probably won't be too much different than now in tech. I definitely agree that physical media for music is soon to be obsolete as people are already no longer buying albums and instead getting just their favorite tracks off iTunes and the like.  I can still see Blu-Ray being around in 2018, but it'll be at the point where regular DVD's are at now, in that they will be about to be replaced by something else (now their being replaced by Blu-Ray, which will probably be on the cusp of being replaced by downloads by 2018).

There will probably be less obsession with "who has the latest what." I'd say it won't be so much technology that gets a backlash in the 2010s, as it will be the materialistic excess created by the spread of new technology.  This of course is apart of a much larger backlash against the 2000s (i.e. darker fashion and music, more 90s genres and sounds make a revival or get picked up on where they left off) A good point you made that was really accurate was how even the 90s were materialistic, but it was more subtle compared to the 80s, and probably because of the anti-80s sentiment.

Subject: Re: Will iPods and other tech still be big in the '10s?

Written By: mach!ne_he@d on 03/11/08 at 8:40 pm


^That was really well summarized. I agree, that technology has never really been rebelled against in modern times because it makes people's lives more convenient. In the 2010s things probably won't be too much different than now in tech. I definitely agree that physical media for music is soon to be obsolete as people are already no longer buying albums and instead getting just their favorite tracks off iTunes and the like.  I can still see Blu-Ray being around in 2018, but it'll be at the point where regular DVD's are at now, in that they will be about to be replaced by something else (now their being replaced by Blu-Ray, which will probably be on the cusp of being replaced by downloads by 2018).

There will probably be less obsession with "who has the latest what." I'd say it won't be so much technology that gets a backlash in the 2010s, as it will be the materialistic excess created by the spread of new technology.  This of course is apart of a much larger backlash against the 2000s (i.e. darker fashion and music, more 90s genres and sounds make a revival or get picked up on where they left off) A good point you made that was really accurate was how even the 90s were materialistic, but it was more subtle compared to the 80s, and probably because of the anti-80s sentiment.



Yeah, I think by the start of the 2020's most physical media will probably be going out in favor of digital media. CD sales are already down so far from where they were 10 years ago due to the rise of MP3's , I can't imagine where they'll be at by 2018.

Subject: Re: Will iPods and other tech still be big in the '10s?

Written By: Brian06 on 03/11/08 at 9:06 pm

Technology has always been progressing, I have no idea where the OP is getting his idea that tech began in the '00s but well that's obviously false. Technology is a continuous cycle (like pretty much everything) that keeps progressing over time and has always existed. You'll see more mobile internet devices like the iPhone/iPod touch in the '10s, traditional iPods are already old technology, people will regularly surf the internet on these devices as they improve.

Subject: Re: Will iPods and other tech still be big in the '10s?

Written By: Rice_Cube on 03/11/08 at 9:28 pm

...soon we will have implantable brain chips that will allow us to fry our enemies with a single thought!

Go technology!

Subject: Re: Will iPods and other tech still be big in the '10s?

Written By: sonikuu on 03/12/08 at 1:52 am


There will probably be less obsession with "who has the latest what." I'd say it won't be so much technology that gets a backlash in the 2010s, as it will be the materialistic excess created by the spread of new technology.  This of course is apart of a much larger backlash against the 2000s (i.e. darker fashion and music, more 90s genres and sounds make a revival or get picked up on where they left off) A good point you made that was really accurate was how even the 90s were materialistic, but it was more subtle compared to the 80s, and probably because of the anti-80s sentiment.


Yeah, there will be less obsession over who has what in the 2010s.  Part of this will be due to the bad economy that will characterize the early 2010s (we're already heading into recession now and that will most likely carry over into the early 2010s).  I think the existence of an economic recession in the early 90s was part of the reason why the excessive materialism of the 80s died out.  

Also, there will be less obsession over who has what because technology will be more widespread in the 2010s.  There won't be much of a big deal being made over HDTVs and mp3 players and stuff like that because they will be so commonplace that they'll lose their position as a status symbol.  Once again, look at the 80s compared to the 90s.  Having a VCR or a CD player was a pretty big deal in the 80s (except VCRs started to become commonplace in the late 80s - my mom and dad got a VCR in the late 80s and they weren't particularly rich or anything), but they were so commonplace in the 90s that it was really no big deal.  Same goes for the internet - it may have been a status symbol in 1995, but it became so commonplace by 2000 that it wasn't that big of a deal anymore.  The same will be true of 00s tech in the 2010s.  Having an mp3 player or an HDTV won't be a big deal because practically everyone will have one.

Subject: Re: Will iPods and other tech still be big in the '10s?

Written By: midnite on 03/12/08 at 11:08 pm

obviously all of this technology (ipod, phone, gps, webcam phone, internet) will be combined into one form - probably a phone at first (like the iphone) then maybe small enough to be a wristwatch. 

They have webcam phones in Japan right?  When will that technology come to North America?

Subject: Re: Will iPods and other tech still be big in the '10s?

Written By: sugar168 on 03/13/08 at 2:10 pm


Costco sells food survival kits. I ran across them yesterday while trying to look something up. Check it out:

FOOD!



food survival kits thats nuts!!!

Subject: Re: Will iPods and other tech still be big in the '10s?

Written By: Marty McFly on 03/15/08 at 12:26 pm


Yeah, there will be less obsession over who has what in the 2010s.  Part of this will be due to the bad economy that will characterize the early 2010s (we're already heading into recession now and that will most likely carry over into the early 2010s).  I think the existence of an economic recession in the early 90s was part of the reason why the excessive materialism of the 80s died out.  

Also, there will be less obsession over who has what because technology will be more widespread in the 2010s.  There won't be much of a big deal being made over HDTVs and mp3 players and stuff like that because they will be so commonplace that they'll lose their position as a status symbol.  Once again, look at the 80s compared to the 90s.  Having a VCR or a CD player was a pretty big deal in the 80s (except VCRs started to become commonplace in the late 80s - my mom and dad got a VCR in the late 80s and they weren't particularly rich or anything), but they were so commonplace in the 90s that it was really no big deal.  Same goes for the internet - it may have been a status symbol in 1995, but it became so commonplace by 2000 that it wasn't that big of a deal anymore.  The same will be true of 00s tech in the 2010s.  Having an mp3 player or an HDTV won't be a big deal because practically everyone will have one.


Yeah, people used lots of '80s tech in the '90s. They probably used it even MORE then, because it just became something that was so mainstream and affordable, that it was no longer a big deal and everyone had it. I agree that the recession made the yuppie materalism die out (well Black Monday '87 probably was the beginning of the decline, but that's another story).

Doesn't it seem like the '90s in general was more laid back and outdoorsy, and people seemed a bit less obsessed about having the newest big thing? Sure, there were a few "new" things like carphones, PCs, videogame systems like the Super NES and Sega which weren't available in the actual '80s, but it didn't play as much of a part in most people's lives. Like, you could have a street or an indoor scene and not even know they existed! Whereas cellphones and ipods are pretty ubiquitous today.

I'd say the Internet was the first piece of technology that was advanced from the Eighties. The lifestyle in the early-mid '90s (maybe even up to 1998ish a little bit) was pretty much like I described above, with people content with older stuff or still doing things like going to the mall.


But as for the main topic - come to think of it, I don't think there's ever been a rebellion against technology over the years. There might be people who choose to live without certain things, and there's more "old school" youth now than in past generations, so I could see teens in the '10s who are interested in cassettes and VCRs in a retro sense. But in terms of it being a widespread thing, the current tech will always be embraced.

Subject: Re: Will iPods and other tech still be big in the '10s?

Written By: mach!ne_he@d on 03/15/08 at 7:47 pm


Yeah, there will be less obsession over who has what in the 2010s.  Part of this will be due to the bad economy that will characterize the early 2010s (we're already heading into recession now and that will most likely carry over into the early 2010s).  I think the existence of an economic recession in the early 90s was part of the reason why the excessive materialism of the 80s died out. 

Also, there will be less obsession over who has what because technology will be more widespread in the 2010s.  There won't be much of a big deal being made over HDTVs and mp3 players and stuff like that because they will be so commonplace that they'll lose their position as a status symbol.  Once again, look at the 80s compared to the 90s.  Having a VCR or a CD player was a pretty big deal in the 80s (except VCRs started to become commonplace in the late 80s - my mom and dad got a VCR in the late 80s and they weren't particularly rich or anything), but they were so commonplace in the 90s that it was really no big deal.  Same goes for the internet - it may have been a status symbol in 1995, but it became so commonplace by 2000 that it wasn't that big of a deal anymore.  The same will be true of 00s tech in the 2010s.  Having an mp3 player or an HDTV won't be a big deal because practically everyone will have one.



Yeah, people used lots of '80s tech in the '90s. They probably used it even MORE then, because it just became something that was so mainstream and affordable, that it was no longer a big deal and everyone had it. I agree that the recession made the yuppie materalism die out (well Black Monday '87 probably was the beginning of the decline, but that's another story).

Doesn't it seem like the '90s in general was more laid back and outdoorsy, and people seemed a bit less obsessed about having the newest big thing? Sure, there were a few "new" things like carphones, PCs, videogame systems like the Super NES and Sega which weren't available in the actual '80s, but it didn't play as much of a part in most people's lives. Like, you could have a street or an indoor scene and not even know they existed! Whereas cellphones and ipods are pretty ubiquitous today.

I'd say the Internet was the first piece of technology that was advanced from the Eighties. The lifestyle in the early-mid '90s (maybe even up to 1998ish a little bit) was pretty much like I described above, with people content with older stuff or still doing things like going to the mall.


But as for the main topic - come to think of it, I don't think there's ever been a rebellion against technology over the years. There might be people who choose to live without certain things, and there's more "old school" youth now than in past generations, so I could see teens in the '10s who are interested in cassettes and VCRs in a retro sense. But in terms of it being a widespread thing, the current tech will always be embraced.



I agree with both you guys here. I had alot of firsthand experience with this since I was in school in both the '90s and '00s, and I remember, back when I graduated high school in the 2004-2005 school year, there a whole bunch of kids in middle school and even younger that had cell phones, Mp3 players, and the like, and at that point I kinda saw how much things had really changed.

When I started middle school in 1998, the most advanced tech I remember seeing anybody bring to school was a Gameboy, but it wasn't like it would be considered 'uncool' not to have one, in fact at that time you were considered lucky to have one. Having the internet also wasn't a given then, I remember alot of people in my class even as late as 2000 that still didn't have it. It seems like that's the main thing that's changed since the '90s and maybe even the early '00s. For example, in 2000 it would've been cool to have a cell phone, but today it's just sort of expected.

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