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Subject: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: sonic2005 on 07/20/15 at 2:13 am

Most people would agree that the late 90s influence was dying in 2003 and was gone by 04 but I came across an old thread from late 2005

http://www.inthe00s.com/archive/inthe00s/smf/1123281546.shtml

basically saying 2005 still feels like the late 90s I disagree with that but whats your thought on this???


Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 07/20/15 at 3:58 am

I think 2000-2001 was a FLAT OUT continuation of the late 90s imo, but yes 2003 was when the late 90s influence officially died out to me!!

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: #Infinity on 07/20/15 at 5:10 am

Honestly, I think the late 90s died completely in 2001.  Not only did 9/11 occur that year, turning the world upside down geopolitically, a lot of other major changes were occurring during the lead-up that destroyed the vast majority of things that were huge in 1997 to 2000.  Some of the notable things that ended late 90s culture and ushered in early 2000s culture:

+ The true mainstream breakthrough of the Neptunes, beginning with Mystikal's Shake Ya Ass.
+ Survivor brings reality television to a whole new level of popularity.
+ Malcolm in the Middle premieres on television.
+ Spongebob Squarepants becomes much more popular.
+ George W. Bush becomes President of the United States.
+ 9/11, obviously.
+ The Dot Com Bubble crashes, destroying late 90s prosperity and causing a mild recession.
+ The release of Sum 41's All Killer, No Filler and Blink-182's Take Off Your Pants and Jacket, turning second wave pop punk from a one-time phenomenon with Enema of the State into a significant cultural movement that would flourish through the end of the decade.
+ The first Shrek movie comes out, completely redefining the standards of family animated features to cater to the coming generation.
+ Britney and Christina abandon their girl-next-door images for a raunchier style.
+ Teen pop suddenly garners a ton of backlash, leading to the disappearance of boybands from the mainstream.
+ Lauryn Hill, DMX, and Fred Durst fall from grace.
+ Disney releases their biggest flop in years, Atlantis:  The Lost Empire, making it obvious that the company's Renaissance era was over.  Technically, Fantasia 2000 and The Emperor's New Groove are not considered Disney Renaissance films either, but they at least still garnered positive reviews, whereas Atlantis was a regression to the 80s, when the studio was going through an identity crisis and released mostly forgettable films.
+ The sixth generation of video gaming truly takes off, with the releases of Halo: Combat Evolved for the XBOX, Super Smash Bros. Melee for the GameCube, and Grand Theft Auto III, SSX Tricky, and Gran Turismo 3 for the PS2.  The Game Boy Advance was also released shortly beforehand.
+ Sega bows out of the console wars, while Microsoft immediately takes its place.
+ Yu-Gi-Oh! is introduced to the United States, giving Pokémon a true rival for the first and only time (Digimon never caught on to the same degree).
+ Hilary Duff overtakes Britney Spears as the teenybopper princess.
+ The first Harry Potter movie comes out.
+ The First Lord of the Rings movie comes out.
+ Napster is shut down and iTunes is first released.
+ Jay-Z releases The Blueprint, marking a creative shift in hip hop.
+ System of a Down releases Toxicity, paving the way for the more political, less hedonistic hard rock acts of the 2000s (as opposed to Kid Rock, Limp Bizkit and the like).

Even though 2002 and 2003 still have a lot of culture that was also present back in 1997, i.e., the Internet's entrance into the mainstream, South Park, post-grunge, glam rap from New York and the South, the vast bulk of it continued through the rest of the 2000s as well, thus making 2002-2003 feel much more like 2004-2006 than 1997-2001, even if 2000s culture had not yet finished developing its own identity.  There's no way I could classify 2002 with 1999 when, on top of everything introduced in 2001 and late 2000, the former already had things like Avril Lavigne, the second LOTR movie, Jimmy Eat World's The Middle, and Sam Raimi's Spider-Man, even if Buffy, The X-Files, Friends, and Frasier were still on TV.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: mqg96 on 07/20/15 at 7:05 am

late 90's culture died when 9/11 happened around September 2001, but after 2003 it was totally dead like a rock in its grave.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/20/15 at 9:36 am

The did not die away, we said goodbye to them when celebrating on New Year's Eve 1999!

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: snozberries on 07/20/15 at 10:30 am


The did not die away, we said goodbye to them when celebrating on New Year's Eve 1999!
  Exactly Philip!

More importantly...when will these lame discussions about which specific had what certain pop culture significance die.....  Why can't the 90s kids just embrace mostalgia the way the 80s and  70s and 60s kids have? Why do you feel the need to analyze everything you experienced to death?


Never mind. I'll just ignore this topic too since really the discussion is subjective....and therefore completely irrelevant.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 07/20/15 at 12:05 pm


Honestly, I think the late 90s died completely in 2001.  Not only did 9/11 occur that year, turning the world upside down geopolitically, a lot of other major changes were occurring during the lead-up that destroyed the vast majority of things that were huge in 1997 to 2000.  Some of the notable things that ended late 90s culture and ushered in early 2000s culture:

+ The true mainstream breakthrough of the Neptunes, beginning with Mystikal's Shake Ya Ass.
+ Survivor brings reality television to a whole new level of popularity.
+ Malcolm in the Middle premieres on television.
+ Spongebob Squarepants becomes much more popular.
+ George W. Bush becomes President of the United States.
+ 9/11, obviously.
+ The Dot Com Bubble crashes, destroying late 90s prosperity and causing a mild recession.
+ The release of Sum 41's All Killer, No Filler and Blink-182's Take Off Your Pants and Jacket, turning second wave pop punk from a one-time phenomenon with Enema of the State into a significant cultural movement that would flourish through the end of the decade.
+ The first Shrek movie comes out, completely redefining the standards of family animated features to cater to the coming generation.
+ Britney and Christina abandon their girl-next-door images for a raunchier style.
+ Teen pop suddenly garners a ton of backlash, leading to the disappearance of boybands from the mainstream.
+ Lauryn Hill, DMX, and Fred Durst fall from grace.
+ Disney releases their biggest flop in years, Atlantis:  The Lost Empire, making it obvious that the company's Renaissance era was over.  Technically, Fantasia 2000 and The Emperor's New Groove are not considered Disney Renaissance films either, but they at least still garnered positive reviews, whereas Atlantis was a regression to the 80s, when the studio was going through an identity crisis and released mostly forgettable films.
+ The sixth generation of video gaming truly takes off, with the releases of Halo: Combat Evolved for the XBOX, Super Smash Bros. Melee for the GameCube, and Grand Theft Auto III, SSX Tricky, and Gran Turismo 3 for the PS2.  The Game Boy Advance was also released shortly beforehand.
+ Sega bows out of the console wars, while Microsoft immediately takes its place.
+ Yu-Gi-Oh! is introduced to the United States, giving Pokémon a true rival for the first and only time (Digimon never caught on to the same degree).
+ Hilary Duff overtakes Britney Spears as the teenybopper princess.
+ The first Harry Potter movie comes out.
+ The First Lord of the Rings movie comes out.
+ Napster is shut down and iTunes is first released.
+ Jay-Z releases The Blueprint, marking a creative shift in hip hop.
+ System of a Down releases Toxicity, paving the way for the more political, less hedonistic hard rock acts of the 2000s (as opposed to Kid Rock, Limp Bizkit and the like).

Even though 2002 and 2003 still have a lot of culture that was also present back in 1997, i.e., the Internet's entrance into the mainstream, South Park, post-grunge, glam rap from New York and the South, the vast bulk of it continued through the rest of the 2000s as well, thus making 2002-2003 feel much more like 2004-2006 than 1997-2001, even if 2000s culture had not yet finished developing its own identity.  There's no way I could classify 2002 with 1999 when, on top of everything introduced in 2001 and late 2000, the former already had things like Avril Lavigne, the second LOTR movie, Jimmy Eat World's The Middle, and Sam Raimi's Spider-Man, even if Buffy, The X-Files, Friends, and Frasier were still on TV.

Actually 2001 was the last stand for 5th gen gaming being the standard! 2002 was when 6th gen had truly became the standard, HOWEVER, N64 was still very popular in the early 00s!! PS1 on the other hand.... , but anyways 5th gen gaming was offically passe by the summer of 2003!!

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: Howard on 07/20/15 at 1:30 pm


late 90's culture died when 9/11 happened around September 2001, but after 2003 it was totally dead like a rock in its grave.


You think 9/11 had something to do with 90's culture?

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: bchris02 on 07/20/15 at 1:32 pm

The late '90s zeitgeist pretty much died out in late 2001.  There were a few holdovers though that lasted as late as 2006. 

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: #Infinity on 07/20/15 at 2:14 pm


Actually 2001 was the last stand for 5th gen gaming being the standard! 2002 was when 6th gen had truly became the standard, HOWEVER, N64 was still very popular in the early 00s!! PS1 on the other hand.... , but anyways 5th gen gaming was offically passe by the summer of 2003!!


Nah, 2001 was ALL about the sixth generation games. C'mon, the year had the first Halo, the first Pikmin, and the major breakthrough titles for the GTA and SSB franchises! By the Holiday season, there were more than enough landmark titles of the sixth generation for gamers to completely focus on the new consoles. About the only truly significant fifth generation game to come out of 2001 that comes to my mind is Conker's Bad Fur Day, which was a commercial flop, anyway. 2000 may have had a lot of notable fifth-gen titles, like Majora's Mask and Perfect Dark, for example, but by 2001 everybody was eager for something new and groundbreaking, which the latter half of the year would produce in quite the spurt.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 07/20/15 at 3:45 pm


Nah, 2001 was ALL about the sixth generation games. C'mon, the year had the first Halo, the first Pikmin, and the major breakthrough titles for the GTA and SSB franchises! By the Holiday season, there were more than enough landmark titles of the sixth generation for gamers to completely focus on the new consoles. About the only truly significant fifth generation game to come out of 2001 that comes to my mind is Conker's Bad Fur Day, which was a commercial flop, anyway. 2000 may have had a lot of notable fifth-gen titles, like Majora's Mask and Perfect Dark, for example, but by 2001 everybody was eager for something new and groundbreaking, which the latter half of the year would produce in quite the spurt.

Okay, LATE 2001 it was!!! I got the gameboy advanced for my 6th birthday that year! I didn't even get the PS2 until 2003 my 8th birthday!! Hell, I was still playing my N64 in 01 and 02 until I got my PS2 in 03! I got XBOX in 06!! I got the dreamcast years later! lol 2001 was when the gen began but I felt 2002 was when it really took off! Maybe i'm a little bit biased!! ;D

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 07/20/15 at 3:54 pm


Nah, 2001 was ALL about the sixth generation games. C'mon, the year had the first Halo, the first Pikmin, and the major breakthrough titles for the GTA and SSB franchises! By the Holiday season, there were more than enough landmark titles of the sixth generation for gamers to completely focus on the new consoles. About the only truly significant fifth generation game to come out of 2001 that comes to my mind is Conker's Bad Fur Day, which was a commercial flop, anyway. 2000 may have had a lot of notable fifth-gen titles, like Majora's Mask and Perfect Dark, for example, but by 2001 everybody was eager for something new and groundbreaking, which the latter half of the year would produce in quite the spurt.

Also if you're talking about the 01-02 school year then I would agree with you! that was the transition from 5th to 6th! But the 00-01 school year it was still pretty much 5th gen!!

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: TheMusicdewd on 07/20/15 at 4:15 pm

Definitely 2003.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: #Infinity on 07/20/15 at 4:33 pm


Also if you're talking about the 01-02 school year then I would agree with you! that was the transition from 5th to 6th! But the 00-01 school year it was still pretty much 5th gen!!


I agree the 2000-2001 school year was really still the 5th generation, even though the PS2 was already out, but I personally remember as a kid in 2001 getting a Game Boy Advance for my birthday that summer, as wlell as being absolutely STOKED to play Super Smah Bros. Melee, and I'm sure a lot of others felt the same way about Halo. The jump from lifeless polygons that you had to accept with your imagination to actual smooth, rounded, expressionsal, breathing models was such a huge deal at the time. It was like the artwork from the user manuals was finally truly being brought to the big screen, as opposed to just vague representations. It's unbelievable to me that Super Smah Bros. Melee and Halo first came out farther from today than 1988, when the NES was still rising in popularity in America.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: mxcrashxm on 07/20/15 at 5:44 pm

I would have to say sometime around 2003/04. The 6th gaming generation was already in full force despite 10% of the 5th generation still being there (PS1 still made games). Most 90s slang had disappeared from conversations. Broadband rose even though dial-up was still king. Ipods existed, but a majority of folks still MP3s and Discmans; cell phones rose as well although it took a few years for to them to be common. Many of the 90s fashion staples were no longer worn. Music definitely changed with rap becoming more popular than the other genres. A few of the children channels/blocks even rebranded or declined during this time such as D1SM, Fox Kids and Nickelodeon.


Honestly, I think the late 90s died completely in 2001.  Not only did 9/11 occur that year, turning the world upside down geopolitically, a lot of other major changes were occurring during the lead-up that destroyed the vast majority of things that were huge in 1997 to 2000.  Some of the notable things that ended late 90s culture and ushered in early 2000s culture:

+ The true mainstream breakthrough of the Neptunes, beginning with Mystikal's Shake Ya Ass.
+ Survivor brings reality television to a whole new level of popularity.
+ Malcolm in the Middle premieres on television.
+ Spongebob Squarepants becomes much more popular.
+ George W. Bush becomes President of the United States.
+ 9/11, obviously.
+ The Dot Com Bubble crashes, destroying late 90s prosperity and causing a mild recession.
+ The release of Sum 41's All Killer, No Filler and Blink-182's Take Off Your Pants and Jacket, turning second wave pop punk from a one-time phenomenon with Enema of the State into a significant cultural movement that would flourish through the end of the decade.
+ The first Shrek movie comes out, completely redefining the standards of family animated features to cater to the coming generation.
+ Britney and Christina abandon their girl-next-door images for a raunchier style.
+ Teen pop suddenly garners a ton of backlash, leading to the disappearance of boybands from the mainstream.
+ Lauryn Hill, DMX, and Fred Durst fall from grace.
+ Disney releases their biggest flop in years, Atlantis:  The Lost Empire, making it obvious that the company's Renaissance era was over.  Technically, Fantasia 2000 and The Emperor's New Groove are not considered Disney Renaissance films either, but they at least still garnered positive reviews, whereas Atlantis was a regression to the 80s, when the studio was going through an identity crisis and released mostly forgettable films.
+ The sixth generation of video gaming truly takes off, with the releases of Halo: Combat Evolved for the XBOX, Super Smash Bros. Melee for the GameCube, and Grand Theft Auto III, SSX Tricky, and Gran Turismo 3 for the PS2.  The Game Boy Advance was also released shortly beforehand.
+ Sega bows out of the console wars, while Microsoft immediately takes its place.
+ Yu-Gi-Oh! is introduced to the United States, giving Pokémon a true rival for the first and only time (Digimon never caught on to the same degree).
+ Hilary Duff overtakes Britney Spears as the teenybopper princess.
+ The first Harry Potter movie comes out.
+ The First Lord of the Rings movie comes out.
+ Napster is shut down and iTunes is first released.
+ Jay-Z releases The Blueprint, marking a creative shift in hip hop.
+ System of a Down releases Toxicity, paving the way for the more political, less hedonistic hard rock acts of the 2000s (as opposed to Kid Rock, Limp Bizkit and the like).

Even though 2002 and 2003 still have a lot of culture that was also present back in 1997, i.e., the Internet's entrance into the mainstream, South Park, post-grunge, glam rap from New York and the South, the vast bulk of it continued through the rest of the 2000s as well, thus making 2002-2003 feel much more like 2004-2006 than 1997-2001, even if 2000s culture had not yet finished developing its own identity.  There's no way I could classify 2002 with 1999 when, on top of everything introduced in 2001 and late 2000, the former already had things like Avril Lavigne, the second LOTR movie, Jimmy Eat World's The Middle, and Sam Raimi's Spider-Man, even if Buffy, The X-Files, Friends, and Frasier were still on TV.
Great job with your detailed list. It gives people a good perspective on the pop culture as it transitioned from the late 90s to the early 00s.

Furthermore, I agree with you and Eazy-Eman on the span years on the console generations. I also see the 2000-01 school year as the last one where the 5th game consoles were popular although it was transitioning to the 6th with Dreamcast and PS2.

I have a list for you guys on what years each game console generation spans its era.

4th generation: 1991 to 1996

5th generation: 1996 to 2001

6th generation: 2001 to 2006

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: mqg96 on 07/20/15 at 6:33 pm


I would have to say sometime around 2003/04. The 6th gaming generation was already in full force despite 10% of the 5th generation still being there (PS1 still made games). Most 90s slang had disappeared from conversations. Broadband rose even though dial-up was still king. Ipods existed, but a majority of folks still MP3s and Discmans; cell phones rose as well although it took a few years for to them to be common. Many of the 90s fashion staples were no longer worn. Music definitely changed with rap becoming more popular than the other genres. A few of the children channels/blocks even rebranded or declined during this time such as D1SM, Fox Kids and Nickelodeon.
Great job with your detailed list. It gives people a good perspective on the pop culture as it transitioned from the late 90s to the early 00s.

Furthermore, I agree with you and Eazy-Eman on the span years on the console generations. I also see the 2000-01 school year as the last one where the 5th game consoles were popular although it was transitioning to the 6th with Dreamcast and PS2.

I have a list for you guys on what years each game console generation spans its era.

4th generation: 1991 to 1996

5th generation: 1996 to 2001

6th generation: 2001 to 2006


I guess if we had to do it by school years or seasons then it would go kinda like this but I'm not sure if this is accurate.

Late 90's feel:
1997-1998
1998-1999
1999-2000
2000-2001

Early 00's feel:
2001-2002
2002-2003
2003-2004

Classic Mid 00's feel:
2004-2005
2005-2006

Modern Mid 00's feel:
2006-2007
2007-2008

Late 00's feel
2008-2009
2009-2010
2010-2011?

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: mxcrashxm on 07/20/15 at 7:07 pm


I guess if we had to do it by school years or seasons then it would go kinda like this but I'm not sure if this is accurate.

Late 90's feel:
1997-1998
1998-1999
1999-2000
2000-2001

Early 00's feel:
2001-2002
2002-2003
2003-2004

Classic Mid 00's feel:
2004-2005
2005-2006

Modern Mid 00's feel:
2006-2007
2007-2008

Late 00's feel
2008-2009
2009-2010
2010-2011?
I say it is because the vibe of each era was the same and then it transitioned to the next one.  As for the 2010-11 school year, it would be considered late 00s as electropop was still popular; most people had the simple cellphones; fashion was colorful and tight; all 3 7th home game consoles were highly popular; last, the emo/scene trend was relevant before diminishing from mainstream.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: 80sfan on 07/20/15 at 8:04 pm

2003/2004.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 07/20/15 at 8:28 pm


I guess if we had to do it by school years or seasons then it would go kinda like this but I'm not sure if this is accurate.

Late 90's feel:
1997-1998
1998-1999
1999-2000
2000-2001

Early 00's feel:
2001-2002
2002-2003
2003-2004

Classic Mid 00's feel:
2004-2005
2005-2006

Modern Mid 00's feel:
2006-2007
2007-2008

Late 00's feel
2008-2009
2009-2010
2010-2011?



3rd gen's main run(NES, SEGA Master System, Atari 7800)
1985-86
1986-87
1987-88
1988-89
1989-90
1990-91: transition from 3rd to 4th

4th gen's main run(SNES, SEGA Genesis Neo Geo AES)
1991-92
1992-93
1993-94
1994-95
1995-96
1996-97: transition from 4th to 5th
5th gen's main run(PS1, N64, SEGA Saturn, GB Color)
1997-98
1998-99
1999-00
2000-01
2001-02: transition from 5th to 6th
6th gen's main run(PS2, GC, XBOX, SEGA Dreamcast)
2002-03
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07: transition from 6th to 7th
7th gen's main run(PS3, XBOX 360, Wii)
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14: transition from 7th to 8th
8th gen's main run(PS4, XBOX One, Wii U)
2014-15
onging!!

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 07/20/15 at 8:43 pm


You think 9/11 had something to do with 90's culture?

It wasn't just 9/11 Howard, but a combination of other things that infity had mentioned!!

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 07/20/15 at 8:52 pm


Furthermore, I agree with you and Eazy-Eman on the span years on the console generations. I also see the 2000-01 school year as the last one where the 5th game consoles were popular although it was transitioning to the 6th with Dreamcast and PS2.

The Dreamcast was released way too early!!! When I was a little kid back then, I actually thought the dreamcast was a 5th gen console!! ;D ;D  I remember it came out in 1999 when PS1/N64 was still the rage!! When PS2, then XBOX and GC were released it pretty much killed the system!! :o :D

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: mxcrashxm on 07/20/15 at 10:42 pm


The Dreamcast was released way too early!!! When I was a little kid back then, I actually thought the dreamcast was a 5th gen console!! ;D ;D  I remember it came out in 1999 when PS1/N64 was still the rage!! When PS2, then XBOX and GC were released it pretty much killed the system!! :o :D
The reasons why were that the Saturn was a huge failure for the company, hence it died in 1998 during the 5th generation's run. The Dreamcast is what began the 6th generation along with GBC. In addition, the aforementioned console was rushed that many of the games just like the Saturn were not ready to be released on the console as they were not finished.  Most importantly, Sega made too many mistakes which caused their awful strategies to take place killing them in the end as a console maker and as a 1st party developer.

Had the Saturn been a success (it would have been if it wasn't for the bad marketing strategies), the Dreamcast maybe would have been released in 2000 with probably more features and would have had a better outcome with Sega becoming a stronger competitor to Nintendo and Sony.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: mxcrashxm on 07/20/15 at 10:45 pm


3rd gen's main run(NES, SEGA Master System, Atari 7800)
1985-86
1986-87
1987-88
1988-89
1989-90
1990-91: transition from 3rd to 4th

4th gen's main run(SNES, SEGA Genesis Neo Geo AES)
1991-92
1992-93
1993-94
1994-95
1995-96
1996-97: transition from 4th to 5th
5th gen's main run(PS1, N64, SEGA Saturn, GB Color)
1997-98
1998-99
1999-00
2000-01
2001-02: transition from 5th to 6th
6th gen's main run(PS2, GC, XBOX, SEGA Dreamcast)
2002-03
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07: transition from 6th to 7th
7th gen's main run(PS3, XBOX 360, Wii)
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14: transition from 7th to 8th
8th gen's main run(PS4, XBOX One, Wii U)
2014-15
onging!!
This is so accurate. Great job  :)

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 07/20/15 at 11:12 pm


The reasons why were that the Saturn was a huge failure for the company, hence it died in 1998 during the 5th generation's run. The Dreamcast is what began the 6th generation along with GBC. In addition, the aforementioned console was rushed that many of the games just like the Saturn were not ready to be released on the console as they were not finished.  Most importantly, Sega made too many mistakes which caused their awful strategies to take place killing them in the end as a console maker and as a 1st party developer.

Had the Saturn been a success (it would have been if it wasn't for the bad marketing strategies), the Dreamcast maybe would have been released in 2000 with probably more features and would have had a better outcome with Sega becoming a stronger competitor to Nintendo and Sony.

Sega Saturn was also a failure because SEGA got cocky!! The Dreamcast was poorly marketed, and the president of SEGA also died in 2001! I wondered if the saturn had been a success and if the president hadn't died so early; maybe the outcome might have been different!! Could you have imagined the rivalry between the Gamecube and the Dreamcast? :D :D :D  That would have been wayyyyy cooler and better for the industry then playstation vs xbox! The business changed IMMENSELY when 7th gen began! If SEGA had survived maybe things would have been different!

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: mxcrashxm on 07/21/15 at 12:51 am


Sega Saturn was also a failure because SEGA got cocky!! The Dreamcast was poorly marketed, and the president of SEGA also died in 2001! I wondered if the saturn had been a success and if the president hadn't died so early; maybe the outcome might have been different!! Could you have imagined the rivalry between the Gamecube and the Dreamcast? :D :D :D  That would have been wayyyyy cooler and better for the industry then playstation vs xbox! The business changed IMMENSELY when 7th gen began! If SEGA had survived maybe things would have been different!
Very true. Had none of those things happened either, Sega would definitely still be here today and yeah I think the industry would be vastly different. Microsoft wouldn't have enter the console market; the competition would have been incredible between the 3 companies. The exclusive characters of the respective console brands would have had more games. Gaming would be more important than graphics or even the entertainment. There might not have been online multiplayer. The 7th generation would have been much better. I'm not sure about this, but some people feel that Microsoft slowly killed gaming. Their strategies are way different compared to Sony and even Nintendo. They don't even have many exclusives to their brand and they may be the reason why gaming has changed significantly over the years.

Here's something I read on Gamefaqs a few days ago. It was a discussion on what the 7th generation gaming is like for those born before 1990. After a few pages, some of the users begin to talk about the gaming industry in general.

http://www.gamefaqs.com/boards/927750-playstation-3/69838307

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 07/21/15 at 2:15 am


Very true. Had none of those things happened either, Sega would definitely still be here today and yeah I think the industry would be vastly different. Microsoft wouldn't have enter the console market; the competition would have been incredible between the 3 companies. The exclusive characters of the respective console brands would have had more games. Gaming would be more important than graphics or even the entertainment. There might not have been online multiplayer. The 7th generation would have been much better. I'm not sure about this, but some people feel that Microsoft slowly killed gaming. Their strategies are way different compared to Sony and even Nintendo. They don't even have many exclusives to their brand and they may be the reason why gaming has changed significantly over the years.

Here's something I read on Gamefaqs a few days ago. It was a discussion on what the 7th generation gaming is like for those born before 1990. After a few pages, some of the users begin to talk about the gaming industry in general.

http://www.gamefaqs.com/boards/927750-playstation-3/69838307

I'm starting to consider the 6th generation to be a MAJOR transitional era, from the old school type gaming to the modern gaming we have today!!

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: #Infinity on 07/21/15 at 4:15 am


The reasons why were that the Saturn was a huge failure for the company, hence it died in 1998 during the 5th generation's run. The Dreamcast is what began the 6th generation along with GBC. In addition, the aforementioned console was rushed that many of the games just like the Saturn were not ready to be released on the console as they were not finished.  Most importantly, Sega made too many mistakes which caused their awful strategies to take place killing them in the end as a console maker and as a 1st party developer.

Had the Saturn been a success (it would have been if it wasn't for the bad marketing strategies), the Dreamcast maybe would have been released in 2000 with probably more features and would have had a better outcome with Sega becoming a stronger competitor to Nintendo and Sony.


Let's not forget, either, the multiple add-ons Sega released for the Genesis.  The Sega CD was ambitious for attempting to define CD's as the standard format for video games, but just like the Saturn, it came out too early, making it look like a completely unnecessary attempt to improve sales for the Genesis when it should have just been its own system.  Only two years later, and on the same day the Saturn came out in Japan, there was the 32X, which took the company's hardware add-on frenzy to a whole new level of absurdity.  The Sega CD at least had Sonic CD, but the 32X was more like a key used to unlock otherwise restricted Genesis games, rather than a technological step up.  All the effort that should have been concentrated on producing a good Sonic game for the Saturn by the 1995 holiday season was instead wasted on this piece of egotistical marketing.

Even taking Sega's marketing failures out of the picture, Nintendo was already taking its own, separate direction into the next generation of gaming that would end up succeeding more in the end.  The original Star Fox came out in early 1993 and already contained 3D graphics, yet all you needed to play it was an extra chip for your Super Nintendo, not a new system altogether.  The game may not hold up now, but it was a definite success at the time.  Even more notable, however, was the release of Donkey Kong Country, which came out the same day as the 32X and did pretty much exactly what the add-on was trying to achieve - prolong its system's lifespan with notably better graphics and more sophisticated gameplay, and as was the case with Star Fox, you didn't need to dish out $100 for a new piece of hardware just to play it on your SNES.  The three games in the DKC trilogy (especially the second) helped Nintendo truly dominate Sega by the mid-90s when it otherwise would have become just as irrelevant as its competitor.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: mqg96 on 07/21/15 at 7:58 am


I'm starting to consider the 6th generation to be a MAJOR transitional era, from the old school type gaming to the modern gaming we have today!!


I wouldn't say 6th generation was transitional, maybe the tail end of it, I would say that 7th generation was transitional, because up to date that seems like the longest generation we've had so far, it lasted from late 2005/2006 up until 2013/2014. Look at how it was when the Wii, XBOX 360, and PS3 started out but later during its run the Kinect came out and all these other stuff.

I honestly feel like 3rd generation & 4th generation gaming were similar to each other in a sense. The 2-D gaming with the very 1st Nintendo home console. The NES which got big, and then you still have the Atari 7800 at the time. 4th generation it continues but upgrades to 16 bit. SNES and Sega Genesis were real popular at the time as well.

5th generation and 6th generation gaming were similar to each other. It was the 1st time we started playing 3-D graphics type gaming on our consoles, and at the time online gaming wasn't as big yet and it was the last major time local multiplayer with your friends at the house was still big. This was the time the Playstation 1st debuted. Sega had kinda died out around this time. We have the Nintendo 64 which was real popular. In my opinion this was the true golden age of gaming. My favorite era right here. Then later on we have the Playstation 2, Gamecube, and the original XBOX. It couldn't have gotten any better once those came on the scene. It seemed like around this time when online gaming hadn't taken over yet, there was still a much more wide variety, selection, and diversity of games to choose from.

Now we are currently in 8th generation gaming, however, it still feels like a continuation of 7th generation gaming. Because this has been the generation where online gaming has gotten big. We've had all these new ways of gaming. Remember the craze of the Wii remote control and the Kinect later on. It was like a roller coaster ride. Also around this generation it seems like certain genres of gaming have declined in popularity, like racing games for example or linear platformer. It seems like online gaming has taken over which has definitely had an effect over the last few years, and now you have all these consoles trying to connect to internet and makes you play movies on Netflix now at the same time. You see what I mean?

So really the gap between 3rd generation and 4th generation wasn't that big, just 8 bit to 16 bit but still 2-D gaming.

The gap between 5th generation and 6th generation wasn't that big, it was just the 3-D graphics upgraded and more crystallized.

The gap between 7th generation and this current 8th generation hasn't been seen that big either so far.

However, the gap between 2nd generation and 3rd generation was HUGE, because the first Nintendo Entertainment System came out which changed the whole gaming world forever.

The gap between 4th generation and 5th generation was HUGE, because we transitioned over from the 2-D era of gaming to the 3-D era and the Playstation had came on the scene as well.

The gap between 6th generation and 7th generation I can't even explain how transitional that was, the Wii craze and the Kinect craze later on, the excitement of playing ONLINE more, the addition of being able to play movies and have internet browsers on your consoles at the same time, etc. It just feels different.

This is just my opinion BTW so feel free to share.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: mxcrashxm on 07/21/15 at 11:10 am


I'm starting to consider the 6th generation to be a MAJOR transitional era, from the old school type gaming to the modern gaming we have today!!
Me too. As soon as the 6th generation began, the game industry was tremendously much better. Then all of a sudden, the 7th generation comes in and takes a nose dive adding unnecessary things.


Let's not forget, either, the multiple add-ons Sega released for the Genesis.  The Sega CD was ambitious for attempting to define CD's as the standard format for video games, but just like the Saturn, it came out too early, making it look like a completely unnecessary attempt to improve sales for the Genesis when it should have just been its own system.  Only two years later, and on the same day the Saturn came out in Japan, there was the 32X, which took the company's hardware add-on frenzy to a whole new level of absurdity.  The Sega CD at least had Sonic CD, but the 32X was more like a key used to unlock otherwise restricted Genesis games, rather than a technological step up.  All the effort that should have been concentrated on producing a good Sonic game for the Saturn by the 1995 holiday season was instead wasted on this piece of egotistical marketing.

Even taking Sega's marketing failures out of the picture, Nintendo was already taking its own, separate direction into the next generation of gaming that would end up succeeding more in the end.  The original Star Fox came out in early 1993 and already contained 3D graphics, yet all you needed to play it was an extra chip for your Super Nintendo, not a new system altogether.  The game may not hold up now, but it was a definite success at the time.  Even more notable, however, was the release of Donkey Kong Country, which came out the same day as the 32X and did pretty much exactly what the add-on was trying to achieve - prolong its system's lifespan with notably better graphics and more sophisticated gameplay, and as was the case with Star Fox, you didn't need to dish out $100 for a new piece of hardware just to play it on your SNES.  The three games in the DKC trilogy (especially the second) helped Nintendo truly dominate Sega by the mid-90s when it otherwise would have become just as irrelevant as its competitor.
That too. It goes all the way back to bad marketing strategies. Releasing game consoles too early and adding unnecessary things putted a dent into the company. Had Sega waited for the right time to release those consoles, it would have gave them a better reputation. Moreover, the Saturn wouldn't have been a failure considering that the games produced for the console would have been ready for launch. If the Genesis was selling very well, then there shouldn't have been a point to add another console to the mix. Because of that, Sega began declining harshly.

Another thing I observed about the Saturn is that during its entire run, there were no major Sonic games to save the console. That was originally supposed to be Sonic's transition into the 3D world like the N64 did for Mario. Had that happened, the Saturn would have been a better success. I know there were great games on that console, but it wasn't enough for the Saturn to surpass the PS1 and the N64, thus making a early demise for the system in 1998 and to move on to the next project which was the Dreamcast.

And yes, those games being released at the time definitely brought Nintendo more success especially DKC. To this day, those are now classics and although they aged poorly, they are still replayable. Furthermore like you said, the SNES did have add-ons; however, unlike Sega, it wasn't another system. It was basically small chips and expansion packs. That's what truly put Nintendo ahead of the competition and ultimately won in the end during the 4th generation.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: mxcrashxm on 07/21/15 at 11:15 am


I wouldn't say 6th generation was transitional, maybe the tail end of it, I would say that 7th generation was transitional, because up to date that seems like the longest generation we've had so far, it lasted from late 2005/2006 up until 2013/2014. Look at how it was when the Wii, XBOX 360, and PS3 started out but later during its run the Kinect came out and all these other stuff.

I honestly feel like 3rd generation & 4th generation gaming were similar to each other in a sense. The 2-D gaming with the very 1st Nintendo home console. The NES which got big, and then you still have the Atari 7800 at the time. 4th generation it continues but upgrades to 16 bit. SNES and Sega Genesis were real popular at the time as well.

5th generation and 6th generation gaming were similar to each other. It was the 1st time we started playing 3-D graphics type gaming on our consoles, and at the time online gaming wasn't as big yet and it was the last major time local multiplayer with your friends at the house was still big. This was the time the Playstation 1st debuted. Sega had kinda died out around this time. We have the Nintendo 64 which was real popular. In my opinion this was the true golden age of gaming. My favorite era right here. Then later on we have the Playstation 2, Gamecube, and the original XBOX. It couldn't have gotten any better once those came on the scene. It seemed like around this time when online gaming hadn't taken over yet, there was still a much more wide variety, selection, and diversity of games to choose from.

Now we are currently in 8th generation gaming, however, it still feels like a continuation of 7th generation gaming. Because this has been the generation where online gaming has gotten big. We've had all these new ways of gaming. Remember the craze of the Wii remote control and the Kinect later on. It was like a roller coaster ride. Also around this generation it seems like certain genres of gaming have declined in popularity, like racing games for example or linear platformer. It seems like online gaming has taken over which has definitely had an effect over the last few years, and now you have all these consoles trying to connect to internet and makes you play movies on Netflix now at the same time. You see what I mean?

So really the gap between 3rd generation and 4th generation wasn't that big, just 8 bit to 16 bit but still 2-D gaming.

The gap between 5th generation and 6th generation wasn't that big, it was just the 3-D graphics upgraded and more crystallized.

The gap between 7th generation and this current 8th generation hasn't been seen that big either so far.

However, the gap between 2nd generation and 3rd generation was HUGE, because the first Nintendo Entertainment System came out which changed the whole gaming world forever.

The gap between 4th generation and 5th generation was HUGE, because we transitioned over from the 2-D era of gaming to the 3-D era and the Playstation had came on the scene as well.

The gap between 6th generation and 7th generation I can't even explain how transitional that was, the Wii craze and the Kinect craze later on, the excitement of playing ONLINE more, the addition of being able to play movies and have internet browsers on your consoles at the same time, etc. It just feels different.

This is just my opinion BTW so feel free to share.
Honestly to me, I feel that the 7th generation is split into 2 eras which are the pre Kinect/PSM days and the current one. The former spanned from 2005 to 2010 while the latter spanned from 2010/11 to right now.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: Baltimoreian on 07/21/15 at 11:33 am

I never have any memories from the late 90s, but early 2000s culture ended around late 2004 to me.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 07/21/15 at 12:16 pm


I wouldn't say 6th generation was transitional, maybe the tail end of it, I would say that 7th generation was transitional, because up to date that seems like the longest generation we've had so far, it lasted from late 2005/2006 up until 2013/2014. Look at how it was when the Wii, XBOX 360, and PS3 started out but later during its run the Kinect came out and all these other stuff.

I honestly feel like 3rd generation & 4th generation gaming were similar to each other in a sense. The 2-D gaming with the very 1st Nintendo home console. The NES which got big, and then you still have the Atari 7800 at the time. 4th generation it continues but upgrades to 16 bit. SNES and Sega Genesis were real popular at the time as well.

5th generation and 6th generation gaming were similar to each other. It was the 1st time we started playing 3-D graphics type gaming on our consoles, and at the time online gaming wasn't as big yet and it was the last major time local multiplayer with your friends at the house was still big. This was the time the Playstation 1st debuted. Sega had kinda died out around this time. We have the Nintendo 64 which was real popular. In my opinion this was the true golden age of gaming. My favorite era right here. Then later on we have the Playstation 2, Gamecube, and the original XBOX. It couldn't have gotten any better once those came on the scene. It seemed like around this time when online gaming hadn't taken over yet, there was still a much more wide variety, selection, and diversity of games to choose from.

Now we are currently in 8th generation gaming, however, it still feels like a continuation of 7th generation gaming. Because this has been the generation where online gaming has gotten big. We've had all these new ways of gaming. Remember the craze of the Wii remote control and the Kinect later on. It was like a roller coaster ride. Also around this generation it seems like certain genres of gaming have declined in popularity, like racing games for example or linear platformer. It seems like online gaming has taken over which has definitely had an effect over the last few years, and now you have all these consoles trying to connect to internet and makes you play movies on Netflix now at the same time. You see what I mean?

So really the gap between 3rd generation and 4th generation wasn't that big, just 8 bit to 16 bit but still 2-D gaming.

The gap between 5th generation and 6th generation wasn't that big, it was just the 3-D graphics upgraded and more crystallized.

The gap between 7th generation and this current 8th generation hasn't been seen that big either so far.

However, the gap between 2nd generation and 3rd generation was HUGE, because the first Nintendo Entertainment System came out which changed the whole gaming world forever.

The gap between 4th generation and 5th generation was HUGE, because we transitioned over from the 2-D era of gaming to the 3-D era and the Playstation had came on the scene as well.

The gap between 6th generation and 7th generation I can't even explain how transitional that was, the Wii craze and the Kinect craze later on, the excitement of playing ONLINE more, the addition of being able to play movies and have internet browsers on your consoles at the same time, etc. It just feels different.

This is just my opinion BTW so feel free to share.

The reason I wrote what I wrote earlier is because prior to the 6th gen and hell even the 5th gen to a degree the gaming business was still seen in that old school way! You could even say both 5th and 6th gen was a transitional period!! SEGA's LAST console was during that era, XBOX came and their strategies changed the way we see gaming to this very day! This was also the last gen Nintendo took competition seriously because this was technically SEGA's last generation. The 7th generation was not a transitional era time AT ALL, there is no difference in the gaming industry then and now! You're correct 8th gen feels like an extension of the 7th gen era! therefore that AUTOMATICALLY does not make 7th gen a transition! SEGA not surviving had a MASSIVE impact on the gaming world!! If SEGA had made it to 7th and 8th gen I guarantee you Nintendo would not have released those bullcrap consoles!! ;D ;D


During the 6th gen the industry was slowly beginning to change, then 7th gen came and WOW!!! SEGA's downfall had a MAJOR impact!! The business has gotten too corporate in my opinion, the fun in gaming is gone for me!! All Sony and Microsoft care about are making entertainment consoles rather than true gaming consoles! SEGA actually cared about gaming first! Nintendo does too, but their competition (SEGA) is gone! SEGA and Nintendo competing would have been better than the XBOX/Playstation rivalry! Which seemed like more a fan thing, Nintendo and SEGA would actually go at each other!

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: Howard on 07/21/15 at 1:41 pm

I have a list for you guys on what years each game console generation spans its era.

4th generation: 1991 to 1996

5th generation: 1996 to 2001

6th generation: 2001 to 2006


The 4th is The PS1
5th has to be The PS2 ?
6th has to be The PS3?

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: mxcrashxm on 07/21/15 at 2:09 pm


The 4th is The PS1
5th has to be The PS2 ?
6th has to be The PS3?
Close. PS1 is 5th. PS2 is 6th and PS3 is 7th. 4th is SNES/Genesis.


The reason I wrote what I wrote earlier is because prior to the 6th gen and hell even the 5th gen to a degree the gaming business was still seen in that old school way! You could even say both 5th and 6th gen was a transitional period!! SEGA's LAST console was during that era, XBOX came and their strategies changed the way we see gaming to this very day! This was also the last gen Nintendo took competition seriously because this was technically SEGA's last generation. The 7th generation was not a transitional era time AT ALL, there is no difference in the gaming industry then and now! You're correct 8th gen feels like an extension of the 7th gen era! therefore that AUTOMATICALLY does not make 7th gen a transition! SEGA not surviving had a MASSIVE impact on the gaming world!! If SEGA had made it to 7th and 8th gen I guarantee you Nintendo would not have released those bullcrap consoles!! ;D ;D


During the 6th gen the industry was slowly beginning to change, then 7th gen came and WOW!!! SEGA's downfall had a MAJOR impact!! The business has gotten too corporate in my opinion, the fun in gaming is gone for me!! All Sony and Microsoft care about are making entertainment consoles rather than true gaming consoles! SEGA actually cared about gaming first! Nintendo does too, but their competition (SEGA) is gone! SEGA and Nintendo competing would have been better than the XBOX/Playstation rivalry! Which seemed like more a fan thing, Nintendo and SEGA would actually go at each other!
Oh yeah. Your post is accurate. I feel the same way too. If you really think about it, the consoles do seem to be entertainment much more than before. It's really sad because as a gamer, I looked forward to playing more new games everyday. Now, not so much.  While the 6th generation was a huge influence on the game industry, it still had the vibe where it was more about the games than the entertainment. For example, there are numerous classics on all consoles such as Halo, SMS, Mario Party, Mario Kart, Jak & Daxter, Sly Cooper, Fusion Frenzy, GTA3, San Andreas, and the Sonic Adventure games. Additionally, it was the last generation with local mutiplayer with friends and family. I don't even see that at all anymore. 

I feel that Microsoft had something to do with the significant change. Although the PS2 came with a DVD player, Xbox had that as well along with its online membership program Xbox Live. Yes Sega had online first with its Sega Channel, but the Xbox is what truly ushered in the early online gaming.

That said, it really hasn't been the same since the second half of the 7th generation. I feel that since 2010, the consoles are more about entertainment than actual games. In fact, the graphics seem to be more important than the games themselves. Nintendo is the only one who still have hopes in the industry. Sony did as well, but they decided to compete with Microsoft with entertainment instead of games beginning with the Kinect era. That's really a bad sign of the game industry being in decline. I really hope it gets better soon. Otherwise, there might be a serious game crash which may cause the industry to disappear altogether.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: mqg96 on 07/21/15 at 3:48 pm


Close. PS1 is 5th. PS2 is 6th and PS3 is 7th. 4th is SNES/Genesis.
Oh yeah. Your post is accurate. I feel the same way too. If you really think about it, the consoles do seem to be entertainment much more than before. It's really sad because as a gamer, I looked forward to playing more new games everyday. Now, not so much.  While the 6th generation was a huge influence on the game industry, it still had the vibe where it was more about the games than the entertainment. For example, there are numerous classics on all consoles such as Halo, SMS, Mario Party, Mario Kart, Jak & Daxter, Sly Cooper, Fusion Frenzy, GTA3, San Andreas, and the Sonic Adventure games. Additionally, it was the last generation with local mutiplayer with friends and family. I don't even see that at all anymore. 

I feel that Microsoft had something to do with the significant change. Although the PS2 came with a DVD player, Xbox had that as well along with its online membership program Xbox Live. Yes Sega had online first with its Sega Channel, but the Xbox is what truly ushered in the early online gaming.

That said, it really hasn't been the same since the second half of the 7th generation. I feel that since 2010, the consoles are more about entertainment than actual games. In fact, the graphics seem to be more important than the games themselves. Nintendo is the only one who still have hopes in the industry. Sony did as well, but they decided to compete with Microsoft with entertainment instead of games beginning with the Kinect era. That's really a bad sign of the game industry being in decline. I really hope it gets better soon. Otherwise, there might be a serious game crash which may cause the industry to disappear altogether.


I know back in 6th generation PS2 and XBOX did have online with the XBOX live thing, but even then I really didn't notice that many people use it that much. Anyways you pretty much hit the buzzer with EVERYTHING I have in bold. I always say that anything around 5th generation, 6th generation, and the 1st half of 7th generation was really exciting for me. IMO the decline began as soon as 7th generation began and online gaming got big. I'm not an expert on Sega's history since I was never into it including its Sonic games, however, those are some interesting facts right there. As for 2010, you're absolutely right, with the release of Black Op's, that's when the true (old) spirit of playing video games died out for me. Since then it's been about trying to have the best online capacity, having the best graphics, best type shooting games, etc. I really miss it back in 5th & 6th generation when playing games with your friends was still a thing and more variety of genres were still popular.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: bchris02 on 07/21/15 at 3:56 pm

6th Gen is when I lost interest in console gaming.  There was a huge difference between the quality and style of the games that were coming out for N64 and Sega Dreamcast and what later came out for PS2 and Xbox.  Prior to 6th Gen, it was for the most part Sega vs Nintendo.  I really liked that in those days, consoles and the PC were completely different platforms with different kinds of games.  During the 6th Gen, console gaming became more similar to the PC than it had been in the past and many big titles came out for all three platforms whereas before most consoles had exclusive titles as did the PC.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 07/21/15 at 4:17 pm


I know back in 6th generation PS2 and XBOX did have online with the XBOX live thing, but even then I really didn't notice that many people use it that much. Anyways you pretty much hit the buzzer with EVERYTHING I have in bold. I always say that anything around 5th generation, 6th generation, and the 1st half of 7th generation was really exciting for me. IMO the decline began as soon as 7th generation began and online gaming got big. I'm not an expert on Sega's history since I was never into it including its Sonic games, however, those are some interesting facts right there. As for 2010, you're absolutely right, with the release of Black Op's, that's when the true (old) spirit of playing video games died out for me. Since then it's been about trying to have the best online capacity, having the best graphics, best type shooting games, etc. I really miss it back in 5th & 6th generation when playing games with your friends was still a thing and more variety of genres were still popular.


Yeah, 2010 was the turning point of the gaming business! Things haven't been the same for me since the second half of the 7th gen!! I actually liked 2011 and 2013, but 2014 and 2015 have been TERRIBLE years for the industry!!!

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: mxcrashxm on 07/21/15 at 10:15 pm


I know back in 6th generation PS2 and XBOX did have online with the XBOX live thing, but even then I really didn't notice that many people use it that much. Anyways you pretty much hit the buzzer with EVERYTHING I have in bold. I always say that anything around 5th generation, 6th generation, and the 1st half of 7th generation was really exciting for me. IMO the decline began as soon as 7th generation began and online gaming got big. I'm not an expert on Sega's history since I was never into it including its Sonic games, however, those are some interesting facts right there. As for 2010, you're absolutely right, with the release of Black Op's, that's when the true (old) spirit of playing video games died out for me. Since then it's been about trying to have the best online capacity, having the best graphics, best type shooting games, etc. I really miss it back in 5th & 6th generation when playing games with your friends was still a thing and more variety of genres were still popular.
Yeah me too. I definitely don't see that in many of today's games. Local mutiplayer was more fun than online. It made the experiences much better. Also, while there are some good ones for these current generations, the second half of the 7th generation and the 8th are missing some elements. If the companies can regain those qualities again, the game industry will be able to be much better.

And yep, the 6th and first half of the 7th were the last to have that gaming vibe. Since then, it hasn't been the same. It's why I don't games as much as I used to. I now take breaks time in between.


Yeah, 2010 was the turning point of the gaming business! Things haven't been the same for me since the second half of the 7th gen!! I actually liked 2011 and 2013, but 2014 and 2015 have been TERRIBLE years for the industry!!!
This. Although I don't have many games released in those years, the industry vastly has been declining very much since the beginning of last year. Moreover, I saw a few threads and articles stating that PS4 is the only one that's doing well in this console generation. 

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: mxcrashxm on 07/21/15 at 10:23 pm


6th Gen is when I lost interest in console gaming.  There was a huge difference between the quality and style of the games that were coming out for N64 and Sega Dreamcast and what later came out for PS2 and Xbox.  Prior to 6th Gen, it was for the most part Sega vs Nintendo.  I really liked that in those days, consoles and the PC were completely different platforms with different kinds of games.  During the 6th Gen, console gaming became more similar to the PC than it had been in the past and many big titles came out for all three platforms whereas before most consoles had exclusive titles as did the PC.
You hit it perfectly. That's another thing I observed throughout the game industry. Since then, there hasn't been many exclusives for all of the consoles except Nintendo. Sony actually had exclusives and then as soon as the PS3 hits, they were gone. Other than Sly Cooper, the other exclusive Sony games never made it to the PS3. However, there was one introduced into the system and that was LBP. Microsoft I noticed never really had exclusives except quite a few. If there was more exclusives for each console, it would make the game industry alot better which means more competition.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 07/21/15 at 10:45 pm


Yeah me too. I definitely don't see that in many of today's games. Local mutiplayer was more fun than online. It made the experiences much better. Also, while there are some good ones for these current generations, the second half of the 7th generation and the 8th are missing some elements. If the companies can regain those qualities again, the game industry will be able to be much better.

And yep, the 6th and first half of the 7th were the last to have that gaming vibe. Since then, it hasn't been the same. It's why I don't games as much as I used to. I now take breaks time in between.
This. Although I don't have many games released in those years, the industry vastly has been declining very much since the beginning of last year. Moreover, I saw a few threads and articles stating that PS4 is the only one that's doing well in this console generation. 

It has gotten sooo bad, that I've become like AVGN; recollecting old games for my PS1, PS2, N64, and Dreamcast!! The industry has declined for me so much, that I've started to become quite the retro gamer! ;D

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: ocarinafan96 on 07/21/15 at 10:59 pm

I would say the late 90's died in a political sense on 9/11

However pop culture wise I believe the late 90's died around late 2003 or early 2004

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: bchris02 on 07/22/15 at 5:32 pm


However pop culture wise I believe the late 90's died around late 2003 or early 2004


It was kind of a slow transition.  One of the big turning points in my opinion was when the boy bands started to become more urban influenced, even featuring rappers in some of their songs.  This happened in the summer of 2001 when *NSync released their third album.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: XYkid on 07/22/15 at 7:27 pm

Somewhere between 2001 and 2004/5, so I'd say 2002/3.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: #Infinity on 07/22/15 at 8:35 pm


It was kind of a slow transition.  One of the big turning points in my opinion was when the boy bands started to become more urban influenced, even featuring rappers in some of their songs.  This happened in the summer of 2001 when *NSync released their third album.


Don't forget, though, *NSYNC's guest appearance on Blaque's Bring it All to Me, on which they talk about "thug appeal," or just the laughably bad urban accent on LFO's Summer Girls.  Both of these were from 1999.  Even Wannabe, the song that truly popularized teen pop, relies largely on its rap.  I agree that NSYNC's Celebrity feels notably more 2000s than No Strings Attached, especially the remix of Girlfriend featuring Nelly, but I'm not sure if it was a true turning point for a genre that was about to die, anyway.  Girlfriend was actually sort of a stepping stone for Justin Timberlake's solo career, versus Pop and Gone, which were released as singles sooner.  Besides, mid-late 2001 still had a lot of teen pop that sounded very late 90s, like Jessica Simpson's Irresistible, Willa Ford's I Wanna Be Bad, and O-Town's All or Nothing.  The true turning point was when Britney Spears released I'm a Slave 4 U, since it signaled a complete refutal of the bubbly, melodic nature of late 90s pop in favor of the harder, raunchier style of the 2000s.  A lot like the world itself following 9/11, the relative innocence of popular music died after the biggest star in the world grew up.  Imo, the last true teen pop song to garner mainstream success was LeAnn Rimes' Can't Fight the Moonlight, although that song was originally made two years before its chart breakthrough in 2002.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: Catherine91UK on 07/23/15 at 1:26 pm

If I had to give a quick answer without thinking too much, I'd say around mid 2003.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: ArcticFox on 08/16/15 at 1:18 am

It seems to me that the aughts started looking like the aughts around 2002 or 2003. Look at this album cover from June 2002. See the hairstyles, the glasses, and the leather jackets?:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/99/Our_Lady_Peace_-_Gravity.jpg

This is what men were wearing in 1998:
http://www.leatherup.com/images/product/large/1720-Black.jpg

People tend to act like 1998 and 2002 are the same, when really they look nothing alike. The 2002 picture looks like it could have easily been taken in 2005, but the 1998 picture looks like something from 1994 (I actually copy that look when I go out on winter nights!). The music also changed dramatically ("If I Could Go" by Angie Martinez doesn't sound '90s at all!), and the television landscape was shifting into new directions as American Idol broke out that year. 1998 was pretty much exclusively scripted TV. 1998 has much more in common with 1994 than with 2002. 2002, on the other hand, is pretty much the same as 2005. Even 2000 is different from 2002!

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: #Infinity on 08/16/15 at 2:08 am

People tend to act like 1998 and 2002 are the same, when really they look nothing alike. The 2002 picture looks like it could have easily been taken in 2005, but the 1998 picture looks like something from 1994 (I actually copy that look when I go out on winter nights!). The music also changed dramatically ("If I Could Go" by Angie Martinez doesn't sound '90s at all!), and the television landscape was shifting into new directions as American Idol broke out that year. 1998 was pretty much exclusively scripted TV. 1998 has much more in common with 1994 than with 2002. 2002, on the other hand, is pretty much the same as 2005. Even 2000 is different from 2002!


I agree there was a lot of change between 1998 and 2002, particularly around 2001 and late 2000, but I wouldn't go as far as to say 1998 was closer to 1994.  Geopolitically, it definitely was, but otherwise there were enough changes that 1998 felt more connected to the early 2000s.  In music, both grunge and gangsta rap were long gone in 1998, whereas both genres peaked around '94, hip hop had become much more commercial and materialistic (hardly different from 2002), urban music was still in the midst of its millennial, syncopated percussion-driven sound, and even post-grunge had become more watered down compared to its Sixteen Stone and Selling the Drama days.  The Internet hardly even existed in 1994, whereas by 1998 it was a massive, booming industry that would continue its growth into the early 2000s.  Video games had already made the leap into the third dimension, and Sony had overtaken Sega as Nintendo's rival.  I also think fashion in the millennial era is much more connected to what still existed in 2002 than what was in during 1994.  Clothing was already much brighter and more colorful, frosted tips were a popular fad with guys (which they'd remain through 2004), and the dark, grungy look of 1994 was starting to fade out.  Women were also more likely to have straightened hair or pigtails, as opposed to curled hair as was still common in '94.  I do not think the photo you posted from 1998 looks connected to 1994 at all.

I also disagree about 2002 being pretty much the same as 2005.  A lot of trends from 2002 carried into that year, for sure, but there was still a definite shift in feel and overall style by 2005.  Firstly, crunk/snap music, a hallmark of mid-2000s music, was not a mainstream trend whatsoever in 2002 (Lil Jon & the Eastside Boyz' Kings of Crunk came out late that year, but it wouldn't become popular until a whole year later).  Pop punk was also becoming more emo, less poppy, with the key band blink-182 breaking up that year, while Fall Out Boy and All-American Rejects took their place.  Online gaming was much more widespread by 2005, especially with the release of the XBOX 360 near the end of the year.  Geopolitically, the post-9/11 patriotism that dominated 2002 had faded away, with people instead complaining about George Bush's incompetence in handling the Iraq War and Hurricane Katrina.  Wikipedia also first became popular around 2005, revolutionizing online access to important information for the coming years.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: ocarinafan96 on 08/16/15 at 8:28 am

Here's my opinion of the cultural eras using school years:

Neon/NES Era aka late 80's/early 90's:

1987-1988
1988-1989
1989-1990 (Ultimate Neon School Year)
1990-1991
1991-1992
1992-1993 (Transition from Neon to Grunge)

Grunge/SNES Era aka core 90's:
1993-1994
1994-1995
1995-1996 (Ultimate 90's School Year)
1996-1997
1997-1998 (Transition from Grunge to Millennial)

Millennial/Playstation Era aka Late 90's/Early 00's:
1998-1999
1999-2000
2000-2001 (Ultimate Millennial School Year)
2001-2002
2002-2003
2003-2004 (Transition from Millennial to Emo)

Emo/iPOD Era aka Core 00's:
2004-2005
2005-2006
2006-2007 (Ultimate 00's School Year)
2007-2008
2008-2009 (Transition from Emo to Electropop)

Electropop/Blackberry Era aka Late 00's/Early 10's:
2009-2010
2010-2011 (Ultimate Electropop School Year)
2011-2012
2012-2013
2013-2014 (Transition from Electropop to Hipster)

Hipster/iPhone Era aka Core 10's
2014-2015

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: #Infinity on 08/16/15 at 4:59 pm

My perspective with school years, beginning with the early 80s:

Atari/Arena Rock/Post-Disco Age (early 80s):
1980-1981 (transition from late 70s to early 80s)
1981-1982 (definitive school year)
1982-1983

Brat Pack/Hi-NRG/Horror Comedy Age (the mid-80s):
1983-1984 (transition from early 80s to mid-80s)
1984-1985
1985-1986 (definitive school year)
1986-1987
1987-1988 (transition from mid-80s to neighties)

Bush '41/TMNT/NES Age (the "neighties"):
1988-1989
1989-1990 (definitive school year)
1990-1991

Sega Genesis/Ren & Stimpy/Nirvana Age (early 90s):
1991-1992 (transition from neighties to early 90s)
1992-1993 (definitive school year)
1993-1994 (transition from early 90s to mid-90s)

Britpop/Jim Carrey/Biggie/Donkey Kong Country Age (mid-90s):
1994-1995
1995-1996 (definitive school year)
1996-1997 (transition from mid-90s to late 90s):

Teen Pop/PS1/N64/AOL Age (millennial period):
1997-1998
1998-1999
1999-2000 (definitive school year)
2000-2001 (transition from millennial period to early 2000s)

Post-9/11/Yu-Gi-Oh!/Neptunes Age (early 2000s):
2001-2002 (definitive school year)
2002-2003

MySpace/Crunk Age (mid-2000s):
2003-2004 (transition from early 2000s to mid-2000s)
2004-2005 (definitive school year)
2005-2006 (transition from mid-2000s to late 2000s)

Wii/Ringtone Age (late 2000s):
2006-2007
2007-2008 (definitive school year)
2008-2009 (transition from late 2000s to early 2010s)

Lady Gaga/Great Recession/Tea Party Age (early 2010s):
2009-2010
2010-2011 (definitive school year)
2011-2012
2012-2013 (transition from early 2010s to mid-2010s)

Netflix/Frozen/Disco Revival Age (mid-2010s):
2013-2014 (definitive school year so far)
2014-2015

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: ocarinafan96 on 08/16/15 at 9:57 pm


My perspective with school years, beginning with the early 80s:

Atari/Arena Rock/Post-Disco Age (early 80s):
1980-1981 (transition from late 70s to early 80s)
1981-1982 (definitive school year)
1982-1983

Brat Pack/Hi-NRG/Horror Comedy Age (the mid-80s):
1983-1984 (transition from early 80s to mid-80s)
1984-1985
1985-1986 (definitive school year)
1986-1987
1987-1988 (transition from mid-80s to neighties)

Bush '41/TMNT/NES Age (the "neighties"):
1988-1989
1989-1990 (definitive school year)
1990-1991

Sega Genesis/Ren & Stimpy/Nirvana Age (early 90s):
1991-1992 (transition from neighties to early 90s)
1992-1993 (definitive school year)
1993-1994 (transition from early 90s to mid-90s)

Britpop/Jim Carrey/Biggie/Donkey Kong Country Age (mid-90s):
1994-1995
1995-1996 (definitive school year)
1996-1997 (transition from mid-90s to late 90s):

Teen Pop/PS1/N64/AOL Age (millennial period):
1997-1998
1998-1999
1999-2000 (definitive school year)
2000-2001 (transition from millennial period to early 2000s)

Post-9/11/Yu-Gi-Oh!/Neptunes Age (early 2000s):
2001-2002 (definitive school year)
2002-2003

MySpace/Crunk Age (mid-2000s):
2003-2004 (transition from early 2000s to mid-2000s)
2004-2005 (definitive school year)
2005-2006 (transition from mid-2000s to late 2000s)

Wii/Ringtone Age (late 2000s):
2006-2007
2007-2008 (definitive school year)
2008-2009 (transition from late 2000s to early 2010s)

Lady Gaga/Great Recession/Tea Party Age (early 2010s):
2009-2010
2010-2011 (definitive school year)
2011-2012
2012-2013 (transition from early 2010s to mid-2010s)

Netflix/Frozen/Disco Revival Age (mid-2010s):
2013-2014 (definitive school year so far)
2014-2015


I think this was pretty accurate the only few issues with it is that I think the millennial period should extend to the 2002-2003 school year and 2003-2004 should be the actual Millennial to Core 00's transition.

From what I remembered throughout the 2001-2002 school year you still had that 'millennial' sound in many music acts at the time. Plus you had carry overs from previous years such as Girlfriend by NSYNC & Rock the Boat by the late Aaliyah. Plus the late 90's sounding dance tracks were still very much in the mainstream in 2002 plus you still had a lot of Pop rock hits in 2002 and 2003.

Ill give you a few examples based off what was popular throughout 2001-2003:

1jVMY0cXskY

vQpdLm5NdxY

re9j2wOPzAY

Now you would notice that around 2003 was when the TRUE transition. Notice how you still had some of those late 90's/early 00's style dance tracks in the video, notice that Pop Punk & Nu Metal like tracks were still played. This was to show that there was still a Millennial influence in the music. Now notice that there was a lot of Crunk in the video, thats to show that 00's influences were now starting to become very obvious. So 2003 was when things really started to change though some would argue that the 2002-2003 school year would still be leaning more towards the millennial era and 2003-2004 would be the actual transition to the REAL 2000's.

Music isn't the only factor, but tv as well. Popular Millennial Tween/Teen shows like Dawson's Creek, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Sabrina the Teenaged Witch, & Even Stevens to name a few all ended in 2003. Plus other 90's tv shows like Friends & Frasier ended in 2004! Also Powerhouse Era Cartoon Network, Klasky Csupo Nickelodeon, & Classic Toon Disney all had their eras end in 2004 with some of their hit shows like Rugrats, The Wild Thonrberry's and Johnny Bravo to name a few, end that same year as well.

I'll show you some commercials ranging from the years 2001-2003 so you could see for yourself:

H8yy9rMJUmY
qBoiW0n3y4o
nAqhvTnqvSQ

And individual commercials:
po915tRgLOY
8bSsKcgkrvE
HKlXtysD0d0

2004 is also considered the last Web 1.0 year, as half of Americans still had Dial Up at that point. 2002 was the last year that VHS was more popular than DVD, starting in mid 2003 DVDs were more popular. Plus the first mainstream social media site, Myspace didn't even debut until late 2003, and become a juggernaut until 2004.

Plus popular movie franchises that debuted in the very late 90's continued to be popular throughout the early 00's such as; Men In Black saga, Star Wars Prequels, Matrix saga, & the Austin Powers Saga to name a few.

So IMO this I how I would break up the Millennial period


Early Millennial (Still had some core 90's elements but mostly Millennial)
1997-1998
1998-1999

Peak Millennial (The Peak of the period)
1999-2000
2000-2001

Late Millennial (The end of the period, started to show some 00's elements, plus 9/11 occurred)
2001-2002
2002-2003

2003-2004 (The transition from Millennial to Core 00's)

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: tv on 08/16/15 at 10:39 pm

Probably 2003 because of 50 Cent's debut or Spring 2004 because of "Crunk" getting popular with "Lil Jon". Still though 2003 didn't sound all that un-late 90's. Songs like "No Letting Go" by Wayne Wonder and "Turn Me On" by Kevin Lytle didn't sound all that un late 90's from 2003. Lil Jon hardly sounded like anything that would have came from the late 90's though. I remember complaining how BET used to play risqué  rap videos around 2003 or 2004 and it didn't seem like they showed those video's as much in 2002. I remember there was R&B that sounded like late 90's like Ginuwine, Faith Evans, IMX(formally" Immature"), Joe, and Donnell Jones. 2003 that kind of R&B went away despite R. Kelly being popular that year with his album "The Chocolate Factory". There was still some R&B like John Legend, Usher, and Alicia Keys in the mid 2000's though.

I would have to note in terms of rock music "Evanesence" was popular in 2003 but they didn't seem that detached from the late 90's music.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: ocarinafan96 on 08/16/15 at 10:48 pm


Probably 2003 because of 50 Cent's debut or Spring 2004 because of "Crunk" getting popular with "Lil Jon". Still though 2003 didn't sound all that un-late 90's. Songs like "No Letting Go" by Wayne Wonder and "Turn Me On" by Kevin Lytle didn't sound all that un late 90's from 2003. Lil Jon hardly sounded like anything that would have came from the late 90's though. I remember complaining how BET used to play risqué  rap videos around 2003 or 2004 and it didn't seem like they showed those video's as much in 2002. I remember there was R&B that sounded like late 90's like Ginuwine, Faith Evans, IMX(formally" Immature"), Joe, and Donnell Jones. 2003 that kind of R&B went away despite R. Kelly being popular that year with his album "The Chocolate Factory" There was still some R&B like John Legend, Usher, and Alicia Keys in the mid 2000's though.

I would have to note in terms of rock music "Evanesence" was popular in 2003 but they didn't seem that detached from the late 90's music.


Yeah I agree with all of this, Hence why 2003 was such a transitional year for music. The 2002-2003 school year was leaning towards the millennia side while 2003-2004 was leaning towards the core 00's side. 2004-2005 was the first true 00's school year without question!

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 08/16/15 at 11:08 pm


Probably 2003 because of 50 Cent's debut or Spring 2004 because of "Crunk" getting popular with "Lil Jon". Still though 2003 didn't sound all that un-late 90's. Songs like "No Letting Go" by Wayne Wonder and "Turn Me On" by Kevin Lytle didn't sound all that un late 90's from 2003. Lil Jon hardly sounded like anything that would have came from the late 90's though. I remember complaining how BET used to play risqué  rap videos around 2003 or 2004 and it didn't seem like they showed those video's as much in 2002. I remember there was R&B that sounded like late 90's like Ginuwine, Faith Evans, IMX(formally" Immature"), Joe, and Donnell Jones. 2003 that kind of R&B went away despite R. Kelly being popular that year with his album "The Chocolate Factory". There was still some R&B like John Legend, Usher, and Alicia Keys in the mid 2000's though.

I would have to note in terms of rock music "Evanesence" was popular in 2003 but they didn't seem that detached from the late 90's music.



Agreed, for me it begun in the fall of 2001! Then COMPLETELY in summer of 2003!

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: ArcticFox on 08/17/15 at 12:47 am


Electropop/Blackberry Era aka Late 00's/Early 10's:
2009-2010
2010-2011 (Ultimate Electropop School Year)
2011-2012
2012-2013
2013-2014 (Transition from Electropop to Hipster)

Hipster/iPhone Era aka Core 10's
2014-2015


There are many things I disagree with about that list, but this is what I disagree with most. First of all, Blackberries weren't cool anymore after 2010. They were basically the technological equivalent of mom jeans. Second, I'd make that era much shorter. I'd say the 2011-2012 was the transitional period, with Rihanna's "We Found Love" being the first hint of the modern period.

Third of all, and most important, the label of the core 2010's is wrong. Hipsters are of the same period as the electropop era that you mention. I remember hearing of hipsters in 2007. The hipster look of the late aughts was this.

http://www.singlegirlsurvival.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/tcfa406_Hipster.jpg
No one wears those anymore. Not even the unfashionable ones.

Honestly, I think every era (or decade) has their culture/counter-culture paradigm. I'd say the electropop era c/cc was Guidos/Hipsters. As a matter of fact, "hipsters" never really go away. The hair metal guys in the '80s and the grungeheads in the '90s were hipsters. They're an "anti-trend" movement that is trendy. Every decade has their hipsters.

Fun fact: Did you know that the name "hippie" actually comes from the name "hipster"? Exactly!

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: #Infinity on 08/17/15 at 2:49 am


I think this was pretty accurate the only few issues with it is that I think the millennial period should extend to the 2002-2003 school year and 2003-2004 should be the actual Millennial to Core 00's transition.

From what I remembered throughout the 2001-2002 school year you still had that 'millennial' sound in many music acts at the time. Plus you had carry overs from previous years such as Girlfriend by NSYNC & Rock the Boat by the late Aaliyah. Plus the late 90's sounding dance tracks were still very much in the mainstream in 2002 plus you still had a lot of Pop rock hits in 2002 and 2003.


I can understand why a lot of people categorize the early 2000s with the late 90s, since a lot of key trends introduced in the latter period survived into the former, but I think the geopolitical impact of 9/11 alone is enough to give the two periods very separate feels, both of which are more connected to their respective decades than each other.  I made a long list of things earlier in this thread of things that I feel officially transitioned the world out of the millennial period, most of which are from 2001 and 2000.  Like I stated then, most of the new trends introduced in the late 90s, like South Park, Eminem, nu-metal, and the Internet as a primary medium of life, remained important during the rest of the 2000s as well, so I wouldn't consider them reasons to bridge the late 90s and early 2000s together.

I also don't think Rock the Boat and Girlfriend are distinctly millennial songs.  Rock the Boat closely resembles Aaliyah's breakthrough 1994 single, Back & Forth, but urban songs of its subdued, rhythmic nature remained relevant in the early 2000s, as well.  Girlfriend may be by *NSYNC, but it's about as early 2000s as any songs of the boyband movement ever got, considering it was produced by the Neptunes and features Nelly.  Early 2002 did have LeAnn Rimes' Can't Fight the Moonlight (the very last song to become popular with a genuinely 90s flavor, imo), but by far and large, teen pop died as a movement in late 2001, which was also when Britney Spears released her first "adult" album.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: ocarinafan96 on 08/17/15 at 9:30 am


I can understand why a lot of people categorize the early 2000s with the late 90s, since a lot of key trends introduced in the latter period survived into the former, but I think the geopolitical impact of 9/11 alone is enough to give the two periods very separate feels, both of which are more connected to their respective decades than each other.  I made a long list of things earlier in this thread of things that I feel officially transitioned the world out of the millennial period, most of which are from 2001 and 2000.  Like I stated then, most of the new trends introduced in the late 90s, like South Park, Eminem, nu-metal, and the Internet as a primary medium of life, remained important during the rest of the 2000s as well, so I wouldn't consider them reasons to bridge the late 90s and early 2000s together.

I also don't think Rock the Boat and Girlfriend are distinctly millennial songs.  Rock the Boat closely resembles Aaliyah's breakthrough 1994 single, Back & Forth, but urban songs of its subdued, rhythmic nature remained relevant in the early 2000s, as well.  Girlfriend may be by *NSYNC, but it's about as early 2000s as any songs of the boyband movement ever got, considering it was produced by the Neptunes and features Nelly.  Early 2002 did have LeAnn Rimes' Can't Fight the Moonlight (the very last song to become popular with a genuinely 90s flavor, imo), but by far and large, teen pop died as a movement in late 2001, which was also when Britney Spears released her first "adult" album.


Yeah music wise things were changing in around 2002. Whats your opinion on other pop cultural things though? For instance millennial tv shows, fashion & music?

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: ocarinafan96 on 08/17/15 at 9:47 am


There are many things I disagree with about that list, but this is what I disagree with most. First of all, Blackberries weren't cool anymore after 2010. They were basically the technological equivalent of mom jeans. Second, I'd make that era much shorter. I'd say the 2011-2012 was the transitional period, with Rihanna's "We Found Love" being the first hint of the modern period.

Third of all, and most important, the label of the core 2010's is wrong. Hipsters are of the same period as the electropop era that you mention. I remember hearing of hipsters in 2007. The hipster look of the late aughts was this.

http://www.singlegirlsurvival.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/tcfa406_Hipster.jpg
No one wears those anymore. Not even the unfashionable ones.

Honestly, I think every era (or decade) has their culture/counter-culture paradigm. I'd say the electropop era c/cc was Guidos/Hipsters. As a matter of fact, "hipsters" never really go away. The hair metal guys in the '80s and the grungeheads in the '90s were hipsters. They're an "anti-trend" movement that is trendy. Every decade has their hipsters.

Fun fact: Did you know that the name "hippie" actually comes from the name "hipster"? Exactly!


Ok for the first one, here are a few reasons why I would include the 2011-2012 school year with the electropop period.

What I mean by electropop is the era when musicians like Rhianna, Lady Gaga, Kesha, & Justin Bieber were relevant and in their prime. This hasn't really been the case past 2012.

TV shows like Breaking Bad for instance continued throughout 2011-2012, & 2012-2013.

Fashion like colorful skinny jeans, brands like Abercrombie & Fitch, or even the whole scene look was still very common in the 11-12 school years as well. It was 12-13 when things started to transition to today. Plus the Guido subculture was at its peak for this period thanks to the popularity of Jersey Shore which aired from 2009-2012.

You also had the massive popularity of 16 & Pregnant & Teen Mom in this period as well. Facebook was still the dominant social media site during this time. It wasn't until 12-13 when things started to go in the direction towards Twitter.

And of course your comment on Blackberry's well your half right. 2010-2011 was most definitely Blackberry territory but 11-12 was still mostly Blackberry era as well its just that this was the first school year that I noticed a lot more kids my age starting to get iphones & Androids as well. However it wouldn't be weird if a kid were to have a Blackberry during this time. 11-12 would be the transition, 12-13 the first iphone or Android year.

On your second comment, while yes the hipster trend has been a thing for a while now, it wasn't really until 2012 when the trend started to hit the mainstream. Back in 2007 for instance it was all about Chavs, Emos, 'Gangstas', & Preps. For a good chunk of my high school years (lets say 2010-early 2013) it was all about Guidos, Scenes, & Preps. The hipster look didn't become common in my high school until 2012-2013 and by the 2013-2014 school year it was unstoppable!

So to update my list this how the whole era went down:

2008-2009 Core 00's to Electropop Transition

2009-2010 - Electropop Era

2010-2011 (Ultimate Electropop School Year)

2011-2012 (Another strong candidate for ultimate Electropop year)

2012-2013 (The transitional era but slightly leaning towards Electropop since shows like Jersey Shore and Breaking Bad were still on the air, the scene trend and guido trend were in their last legs, we were still in the 7th generation of game consoles for the most part and music wise you still had a lot of late 00's sounding pop songs on the radio)

2013-2014 (The transitional era but slightly leaning towards the current era as social media sites like Vine and Instagram blew up this year, the hipster trend was now entering its peak in popularity, we were now transitioning into the 8th generation of video game consoles, & music was now starting to sound like the modern era with less late 00's sounding Electropop and Dubstep and more of an emphasis on EDM, and current sounding Electropop, plus Primetime TV started to make a comeback with shows like Orange is the New Black & House of Cards with Netflix now a juggernaut force showing no signs of slowing down)

2014-2015 (the first 100% 2010's school year)

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: bchris02 on 08/17/15 at 2:01 pm

I think there were lingering '90s influences as late as 2006, but 2001 was the last year they were particularly strong.  By 2002 it definitely felt like a new decade.  Technologically we already had Windows XP and broadband Internet access in the home was finally starting to take off.  Video game graphics were experiencing huge leaps forward around that time and the PC was beginning its golden age as a gaming platform.  In music, post-grunge was the big story that year with Nickelback and Chad Kroger.  Teen pop also went in a more mature, urban influenced direction that year.  Politically it was a conservative year with Bush still having strong support as it was post 9/11 but pre-Iraq.

I would say the most '90s thing about the era was that many popular televisions shows of the era began in the mid or late '90s.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: ArcticFox on 08/17/15 at 3:11 pm


I wouldn't go as far as to say 1998 was closer to 1994. I also think fashion in the millennial era is much more connected to what still existed in 2002 than what was in during 1994. I do not think the photo you posted from 1998 looks connected to 1994 at all.


It is, actually. I don't know how much you know about '90s fashion, but that leather jacket style was definitely cool in 1994. It started with the African-American community, and spread to the white people around 1995/96-ish. Here are some pictures and videos:

Biggie Smalls "Juicy" video, 1994
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_JZom_gVfuw (the thumbnail shows it, also pay attention to 3:04)

The 1996 premiere of "Romeo and Juliet".
http://ak-hdl.buzzfed.com/static/enhanced/webdr05/2013/8/23/18/enhanced-buzz-3333-1377297126-22.jpg
http://ak-hdl.buzzfed.com/static/enhanced/webdr05/2013/8/23/18/enhanced-buzz-3336-1377295278-19.jpg
http://ak-hdl.buzzfed.com/static/enhanced/webdr05/2013/8/23/17/enhanced-buzz-3323-1377294108-13.jpg

Puff Daddy in 1994:
http://escobar300.files.wordpress.com/2010/06/puff-daddy.jpg

Sarah Michelle Gellar, Buffy Season 1, 1996 (filmed)
http://vignette2.wikia.nocookie.net/buffy/images/1/19/S1q1.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20130313153305

And all of this is just the mid '90s! I think 1998 definitely has more in common with the mid '90s than the early aughts (the distance between the two eras in that one year is exactly the same), although 1996 and 2000 are perhaps not that different (I could be wrong though). By 2002, '90s fashion was definitely gone in favor of more plain clothes.

You can actually look at the whole Buzzfeed thing here. Very '90s indeed. This is quintessential '90s fashion IMO:
http://www.buzzfeed.com/briangalindo/highlights-from-the-1996-premiere-of-romeo-juliet#.ujb4gDXk9x

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: ocarinafan96 on 08/17/15 at 3:16 pm


I think there were lingering '90s influences as late as 2006, but 2001 was the last year they were particularly strong.  By 2002 it definitely felt like a new decade.  Technologically we already had Windows XP and broadband Internet access in the home was finally starting to take off.  Video game graphics were experiencing huge leaps forward around that time and the PC was beginning its golden age as a gaming platform.  In music, post-grunge was the big story that year with Nickelback and Chad Kroger.  Teen pop also went in a more mature, urban influenced direction that year.  Politically it was a conservative year with Bush still having strong support as it was post 9/11 but pre-Iraq.

I would say the most '90s thing about the era was that many popular televisions shows of the era began in the mid or late '90s.


Well it depends on what you mean by 90's. If you are referring to the late 90's exclusively then I would say it died in 2002 or 2003 but if you are referring to that entire late 90's/early 00's era then that era died around early 04'.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: Baltimoreian on 08/17/15 at 3:20 pm


My perspective with school years, beginning with the early 80s:

Atari/Arena Rock/Post-Disco Age (early 80s):
1980-1981 (transition from late 70s to early 80s)
1981-1982 (definitive school year)
1982-1983

Brat Pack/Hi-NRG/Horror Comedy Age (the mid-80s):
1983-1984 (transition from early 80s to mid-80s)
1984-1985
1985-1986 (definitive school year)
1986-1987
1987-1988 (transition from mid-80s to neighties)

Bush '41/TMNT/NES Age (the "neighties"):
1988-1989
1989-1990 (definitive school year)
1990-1991

Sega Genesis/Ren & Stimpy/Nirvana Age (early 90s):
1991-1992 (transition from neighties to early 90s)
1992-1993 (definitive school year)
1993-1994 (transition from early 90s to mid-90s)

Britpop/Jim Carrey/Biggie/Donkey Kong Country Age (mid-90s):
1994-1995
1995-1996 (definitive school year)
1996-1997 (transition from mid-90s to late 90s):

Teen Pop/PS1/N64/AOL Age (millennial period):
1997-1998
1998-1999
1999-2000 (definitive school year)
2000-2001 (transition from millennial period to early 2000s)

Post-9/11/Yu-Gi-Oh!/Neptunes Age (early 2000s):
2001-2002 (definitive school year)
2002-2003

MySpace/Crunk Age (mid-2000s):
2003-2004 (transition from early 2000s to mid-2000s)
2004-2005 (definitive school year)
2005-2006 (transition from mid-2000s to late 2000s)

Wii/Ringtone Age (late 2000s):
2006-2007
2007-2008 (definitive school year)
2008-2009 (transition from late 2000s to early 2010s)

Lady Gaga/Great Recession/Tea Party Age (early 2010s):
2009-2010
2010-2011 (definitive school year)
2011-2012
2012-2013 (transition from early 2010s to mid-2010s)

Netflix/Frozen/Disco Revival Age (mid-2010s):
2013-2014 (definitive school year so far)
2014-2015


I liked of how you broken down the 80s, 90s and 2000s into eras that I agree with.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: #Infinity on 08/17/15 at 4:19 pm


It is, actually. I don't know how much you know about '90s fashion, but that leather jacket style was definitely cool in 1994. It started with the African-American community, and spread to the white people around 1995/96-ish. Here are some pictures and videos:

Biggie Smalls "Juicy" video, 1994
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_JZom_gVfuw (the thumbnail shows it, also pay attention to 3:04)

The 1996 premiere of "Romeo and Juliet".
http://ak-hdl.buzzfed.com/static/enhanced/webdr05/2013/8/23/18/enhanced-buzz-3333-1377297126-22.jpg
http://ak-hdl.buzzfed.com/static/enhanced/webdr05/2013/8/23/18/enhanced-buzz-3336-1377295278-19.jpg
http://ak-hdl.buzzfed.com/static/enhanced/webdr05/2013/8/23/17/enhanced-buzz-3323-1377294108-13.jpg

Puff Daddy in 1994:
http://escobar300.files.wordpress.com/2010/06/puff-daddy.jpg

Sarah Michelle Gellar, Buffy Season 1, 1996 (filmed)
http://vignette2.wikia.nocookie.net/buffy/images/1/19/S1q1.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20130313153305

And all of this is just the mid '90s! I think 1998 definitely has more in common with the mid '90s than the early aughts (the distance between the two eras in that one year is exactly the same), although 1996 and 2000 are perhaps not that different (I could be wrong though). By 2002, '90s fashion was definitely gone in favor of more plain clothes.

You can actually look at the whole Buzzfeed thing here. Very '90s indeed. This is quintessential '90s fashion IMO:
http://www.buzzfeed.com/briangalindo/highlights-from-the-1996-premiere-of-romeo-juliet#.ujb4gDXk9x


Well, first off, a lot of what you listed isn't even from 1994, but 1996 (whose last third was very transitional).

Second, 1994 didn't have...

Frosted Tips:
http://images3.mtv.com/uri/mgid:file:docroot:mtv.com:/shared/promoimages/buzzworthy_blog/boy-band-hair-2013/bbh-4.jpg?enlarge=false&matte=true&matteColor=black&quality=0.85

Bright clothing with playful ponytails:
http://media4.popsugar-assets.com/files/2012/02/08/1/498/4981322/6359ec817022ba38_51129356.xxxlarge/i/1998-Spice-Girls.jpg

Much flashier and more colorful as a whole than the fashions that dominated the early and mid-90s, a trend that would continue into the 2000s.

Justin Timberlake in 2002, still with frosted hair:
http://ak-hdl.buzzfed.com/static/2015-05/7/5/enhanced/webdr06/enhanced-29126-1430991511-2.jpg

Girls Aloud in 2002:
http://www.look.co.uk/sites/default/files/imagecache/scaled_620px_wide/GirlsAloud20021.jpg

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: mqg96 on 08/17/15 at 5:58 pm


Justin Timberlake in 2002, still with frosted hair:
http://ak-hdl.buzzfed.com/static/2015-05/7/5/enhanced/webdr06/enhanced-29126-1430991511-2.jpg

Girls Aloud in 2002:
http://www.look.co.uk/sites/default/files/imagecache/scaled_620px_wide/GirlsAloud20021.jpg


I've said it before, but there is a HUGE attitude change in terms of fashion clothes and hair styles between 2002 and 2003. I mean HUGE I tell you! It goes from late 90's style to core 2000's. Fashion wise though not pop culturally.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: ArcticFox on 08/17/15 at 6:35 pm


Well, first off, a lot of what you listed isn't even from 1994, but 1996 (whose last third was very transitional).


I agree with you for the most part, but the style was cutting edge in 1994. It became more mainstream as the mid '90s went on.

While it's true that the late '90s were more colorful than the mid '90s, but I think Bufy the Vampire Slayer is a great example of mid-late '90s fashion. SMG had a different look every season, with the changes in clothing reflecting the shifts in fashion trends.

Also, the reason why I pair the mid and late '90s together is because they both have metallic clothing as fashion trends, whereas by 2002 "futuristic" fashion was a thing of the past. I think of the 2002-2005 era as "white trash", with ripped jeans, low-rise pants, graphic tees, and hoodies. The styles of the early-mid aughts just don't look as good as the styles of the mid and late '90s, in my opinion. The '90s had a much cleaner, more minimalistic and streamlined style.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: mqg96 on 08/17/15 at 6:47 pm


Well it depends on what you mean by 90's. If you are referring to the late 90's exclusively then I would say it died in 2002 or 2003 but if you are referring to that entire late 90's/early 00's era then that era died around early 04'.


The late 90's culture full time exclusively died out throughout 2001 with the inauguration of George Bush, 6th generation gaming being in full swing, true early 2000's movies or movies that would define the 2000's coming out like Shrek, Spy Kids, The Fast & the Furious, Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings, etc. and with the tragic event of 9/11. Late 2001, 2002, and 2003 was the true early 2000's with some late 90's influences left, but at the same time those were transitional times until 2004 hit, when there were no late 90's influences left, core 2000's had officially began, and the 2000's decade had fully formed its own identity.

The discontinuation of 5th generation games & consoles. DVD's becoming the dominant form of home distribution in the United States over VHS. The U.S. going into war with Iraq. The release of the Nintendo DS (which marked end of the Gameboy era). The release of social media sites like Myspace (which would be the predecessor of Facebook, Youtube, & Twitter releases the following years). The cancellation/ending of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Dawson's Creek, Even Stevens, Lizzie McGuire, Fraiser, Friends, Cartoon Cartoons, Klaspy Kluspo era Nicktoons, etc. The end of Cartoon Network's golden age. The premieres of That's So Raven and Drake & Josh. Broadbands becoming the majority source of internet in most people's homes and dial-up going on a huge decline. Were all reasons why the core 2000's went full effect by late 2003 through 2004.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: ocarinafan96 on 08/17/15 at 7:04 pm


The late 90's culture full time exclusively died out throughout 2001 with the inauguration of George Bush, 6th generation gaming being in full swing, true early 2000's movies or movies that would define the 2000's coming out like Shrek, Spy Kids, The Fast & the Furious, Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings, etc. and with the tragic event of 9/11. Late 2001, 2002, and 2003 was the true early 2000's with some late 90's influences left, but at the same time those were transitional times until 2004 hit, when there were no late 90's influences left, core 2000's had officially began, and the 2000's decade had fully formed its own identity.

The discontinuation of 5th generation games & consoles. DVD's becoming the dominant form of home distribution in the United States over VHS. The U.S. going into war with Iraq. The release of the Nintendo DS (which marked end of the Gameboy era). The release of social media sites like Myspace (which would be the predecessor of Facebook, Youtube, & Twitter releases the following years). The cancellation/ending of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Dawson's Creek, Even Stevens, Lizzie McGuire, Fraiser, Friends, Cartoon Cartoons, Klaspy Kluspo era Nicktoons, etc. The end of Cartoon Network's golden age. The premieres of That's So Raven and Drake & Josh. Broadbands becoming the majority source of internet in most people's homes and dial-up going on a huge decline. Were all reasons why the core 2000's went full effect by late 2003 through 2004.


Hence why I consider 2002-2003 the last True Early 2000's School Year.

Here's how I see it using school years ranging from the late 90's to today:

1996-1997 Core 90's - Millennial Transition

Early Millennial/True Late 90's Era
1997-1998
1998-1999

Core Millennial Period
1999-2000
2000-2001 (Quintessential Millennial School Year)

Late Millennial/True Early 00's Era
2001-2002
2002-2003

2003-2004 Millennial - Core 00's Transition

First Half of Core 00's
2004-2005
2005-2006

Second Half of Core 00's
2006-2007 (Quintessential 2000's School Year)
2007-2008

2008-2009 Core 00's - Electropop Transition

First Half of Electropop
2009-2010
2010-2011 (Quintessential Electropop School Year)

Second Half Electropop
2011-2012
2012-2013

2013-2014 Electropop - Core 10's Transition

2014-2015 Core 10's

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: ArcticFox on 08/18/15 at 9:37 pm


I've said it before, but there is a HUGE attitude change in terms of fashion clothes and hair styles between 2002 and 2003. I mean HUGE I tell you! It goes from late 90's style to core 2000's. Fashion wise though not pop culturally.


I'd argue against that. I'm watching a 2003 episode of The Bernie Mac show, and it looks pretty early aughts. If you were to say 2004 then I would agree. I'd also argue there is a difference in style between the late '90s and the early '00s IMO.

Subject: Re: When did the late 90s influence die out to you??

Written By: mqg96 on 08/18/15 at 11:07 pm


I'd argue against that. I'm watching a 2003 episode of The Bernie Mac show, and it looks pretty early aughts. If you were to say 2004 then I would agree. I'd also argue there is a difference in style between the late '90s and the early '00s IMO.


We have a WINNER here! Well I guess in this case all late 90's influences died out all at once in 2004 which kicked off the core 2000's. Some earlier though but the majority in 2004 yes.

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