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Subject: 2006 vs. 2008 which year felt like a bigger transition??

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 11/30/15 at 11:56 am

Based off of sonicfan's topic, I want your guy's thoughts on which year felt more changeful. We have all discussed the major cultural shift that happened in 2006, and the impactful shift that occurred in 2008; but which was ultimately bigger.In 2006,Many things from early 00s came to an end such as the 6th gen of video gaming, shows like The West Wing, Malcolm in the Middle, the Bernie Mac Show, That's 70 Show, Will&Grace. MNF premiered on ESPN. Hannah Montana and HSM became the faces of Disney Channel. The backlash against the Bush administration started as well. 2008 saw the financial crisis that lasted a long time,Obama getting elected, HD tv becoming THE standard, facebook overtaking myspace, PS3 started to get some recognition,Lady Gaga and Katy Perry hit it big at the end of the year, electropop was coming in, ringtone rap overtook snap rap,7th generation of video gaming was entering it's all time peak etc. I'll go with 2008 overall, but I wonder what you all think about that!


https://wondersinthedark.files.wordpress.com/2013/09/2006.jpg

http://www.nielsen.com/content/dam/corporate/us/en/newswire/uploads/2008/10/election2008_button2.jpg

Subject: Re: 2006 vs 2008 which year felt like a bigger transition??

Written By: #Infinity on 11/30/15 at 12:32 pm

2008.  Having the economy suddenly plummet, a new President elected to the Oval Office, new technology emerge, and completely different styles of music on the near-horizon are all pretty huge deals.  2006 may have had the mainstream breakthrough of YouTube, Wikipedia, Facebook, PS3, and Wii, but most of them became further established as 2008 progressed and led into 2009.  The autumn of 2006 was the beginning of the cultural late 2000s, but the second half of 2008 was dawning new decade altogether.

Subject: Re: 2006 vs 2008 which year felt like a bigger transition??

Written By: mqg96 on 11/30/15 at 12:38 pm

Nothing tops the changes that happened culturally in all aspects throughout 2008. Politically, worldly, pop culturally in terms of music and shows. Anything from mid 2008 and earlier could debatably be considered as dated now. That's how much of a changing year 2008 was looking back. 2006 was more of a changing year in the pop culture of TV, movies, logos, etc. but there wasn't anything that big politically or music wise that shifted throughout the year. However, 2006 was the transition year out from 6th generation gaming into 7th generation gaming, but that was more late 2006/early 2007.

Subject: Re: 2006 vs 2008 which year felt like a bigger transition??

Written By: mqg96 on 11/30/15 at 12:40 pm


2006 may have had the mainstream breakthrough of YouTube, Wikipedia, Facebook, PS3, and Wii, but most of them became further established as 2008 progressed and led into 2009.  The autumn of 2006 was the beginning of the cultural late 2000s, but the second half of 2008 was dawning new decade altogether.


Yeah, it seemed like the changes that occurred throughout 2006 was the final nail in the coffin for any early 2000's influences leftover, however, most of the stuff that debuted throughout 2006 or got popular in 2007, didn't fully establish itself until 2008, with some exceptions.

Subject: Re: 2006 vs 2008 which year felt like a bigger transition??

Written By: bchris02 on 11/30/15 at 12:47 pm

I am in the minority but I believe 2009 was the big transition year and not 2008.  Culturally 2008 was far more '00s than '10s.  However, the groundwork for the transition began in 2008.  2008 itself though was still an '00s year.

Subject: Re: 2006 vs 2008 which year felt like a bigger transition??

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 11/30/15 at 12:53 pm


I am in the minority but I believe 2009 was the big transition year and not 2008.  Culturally 2008 was far more '00s than '10s.  However, the groundwork for the transition began in 2008.  2008 itself though was still an '00s year.

I'd say 2009 was the first year after the shift happened. But 2008 was DEFINITELY a transitional time! It was still FOR THE MOST PART late 2000s, but the later half of the year things felt different.

Subject: Re: 2006 vs 2008 which year felt like a bigger transition??

Written By: #Infinity on 11/30/15 at 12:57 pm


I am in the minority but I believe 2009 was the big transition year and not 2008.  Culturally 2008 was far more '00s than '10s.  However, the groundwork for the transition began in 2008.  2008 itself though was still an '00s year.


I think 2009 was a more transformative year culturally, but you can't deny that the global mindset was extremely different at the end of 2008 from the beginning, due to things like the economy tanking, Obama getting elected, and music starting to head in a different direction.  2009 was the year that all of late 2008's seeds of change began to really blossom, and so yes, it was a more transitional year culturally, but the transition from the 2000s to the 2010s wasn't just confined to a single year (it began during the latter half of 2008, slowed down around the spring of 2010, and ended conclusively in 2011 with the death of Bin Laden, end of the Iraq War, and sharp decline of non-touchscreen phones).


I'd say 2009 was the first year after the shift happened. But 2008 was DEFINITELY a transitional time! It was still FOR THE MOST PART late 2000s, but the later half of the year things felt different.


bchris definitely has a point, though.  At the beginning of 2009, songs like Single Ladies, Heartless, I Hate This Part, and Keeps Gettin' Better were still dominating the charts alongside Beautiful and Just Dance, not to mention The Office was still in its prime.  By the end of 2009, music was all about Tik Tok, Bad Romance, What'cha Say, Meet Me Halfway, and the like; MySpace was pretty much dead, more and more people were getting iPhones, Glee and Modern Family were the big tv shows of the day, and music videos of all kinds were being uploaded to YouTube via Vevo.

Subject: Re: 2006 vs 2008 which year felt like a bigger transition??

Written By: bchris02 on 11/30/15 at 1:25 pm


bchris definitely has a point, though.  At the beginning of 2009, songs like Single Ladies, Heartless, I Hate This Part, and Keeps Gettin' Better were still dominating the charts alongside Beautiful and Just Dance, not to mention The Office was still in its prime.  By the end of 2009, music was all about Tik Tok, Bad Romance, What'cha Say, Meet Me Halfway, and the like; MySpace was pretty much dead, more and more people were getting iPhones, Glee and Modern Family were the big tv shows of the day, and music videos of all kinds were being uploaded to YouTube via Vevo.


This.

There was a huge difference between early 2009 and late 2009 culturally, much bigger than the difference between early 2008 and late 2008.  While I definitely agree that the seeds of change were planted in 2008 and the broader worldview began to shift, we really didn't see the fruits of those changes culturally until 2009.  I think the 2008-09 TV season was probably the peak season for The Office.

I consider the Obama Presidency to be a '10s thing but the 2008 election to be very '00s, because the entire election and conversation centered around the country's dissatisfaction with then-President Bush, on both foreign policy and economic matters.

Subject: Re: 2006 vs 2008 which year felt like a bigger transition??

Written By: mqg96 on 11/30/15 at 1:44 pm


This.

There was a huge difference between early 2009 and late 2009 culturally, much bigger than the difference between early 2008 and late 2008.  While I definitely agree that the seeds of change were planted in 2008 and the broader worldview began to shift, we really didn't see the fruits of those changes culturally until 2009.  I think the 2008-09 TV season was probably the peak season for The Office.

I consider the Obama Presidency to be a '10s thing but the 2008 election to be very '00s, because the entire election and conversation centered around the country's dissatisfaction with then-President Bush, on both foreign policy and economic matters.


Let's be more specific, a late 00's phenomenon. That's better. A very 00's thing would mean core/mid 00's, or the heart of 2000's culture around 2004-2007. Heck I'd take 2003 as a core 00's year any day over 2008. Early 00's culture and late 00's culture are part of 00's culture, but it isn't extreme 00's though.

Subject: Re: 2006 vs. 2008 which year felt like a bigger transition??

Written By: batfan2005 on 12/05/15 at 10:25 am

I always thought 2005-2008 as one big transional period, which finalized in 2009. In 2005 most of the late 90's influences have faded away, like glam rap and post grunge. In the fall of '05, there started to be less rap and more dance pop, and that trend continued in the years to follow. There were also less reality TV shows than in the early 2000's, and it was the rise of social media with MySpace. It was also the transition from the post-9/11 patriotic and conservative culture to the more liberal culture which got Obama elected, and Bush Jr's approval rating plummeted during this period.

That period reminded me of the 1989-1992 period, both culturally and politically. The difference was that that period was Bush Sr's single term, and it bridged the Reagan era with the Clinton era.

Subject: Re: 2006 vs. 2008 which year felt like a bigger transition??

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 12/05/15 at 11:53 am


I always thought 2005-2008 as one big transional period, which finalized in 2009. In 2005 most of the late 90's influences have faded away, like glam rap and post grunge. In the fall of '05, there started to be less rap and more dance pop, and that trend continued in the years to follow. There were also less reality TV shows than in the early 2000's, and it was the rise of social media with MySpace. It was also the transition from the post-9/11 patriotic and conservative culture to the more liberal culture which got Obama elected, and Bush Jr's approval rating plummeted during this period.

That period reminded me of the 1989-1992 period, both culturally and politically. The difference was that that period was Bush Sr's single term, and it bridged the Reagan era with the Clinton era.

I'd say 2006-2008 were THE transitional years, but that's just me! You could honestly say it was the new early 90s period(1990-1992).

Subject: Re: 2006 vs. 2008 which year felt like a bigger transition??

Written By: ocarinafan96 on 12/05/15 at 12:57 pm


I always thought 2005-2008 as one big transional period, which finalized in 2009. In 2005 most of the late 90's influences have faded away, like glam rap and post grunge. In the fall of '05, there started to be less rap and more dance pop, and that trend continued in the years to follow. There were also less reality TV shows than in the early 2000's, and it was the rise of social media with MySpace. It was also the transition from the post-9/11 patriotic and conservative culture to the more liberal culture which got Obama elected, and Bush Jr's approval rating plummeted during this period.

That period reminded me of the 1989-1992 period, both culturally and politically. The difference was that that period was Bush Sr's single term, and it bridged the Reagan era with the Clinton era.


Yeah I agree. Also 89-92 was the Bush 41 era while 05-08 was the second term of Bush 43. Plus 89-92 was the peak of Gen X youth culture while 05-08 was the peak of Gen Y youth culture

Subject: Re: 2006 vs. 2008 which year felt like a bigger transition??

Written By: ArcticFox on 12/05/15 at 3:02 pm


Yeah I agree. Also 89-92 was the Bush 41 era while 05-08 was the second term of Bush 43. Plus 89-92 was the peak of Gen X youth culture while 05-08 was the peak of Gen Y youth culture


I strongly disagree with this. Bill Clinton's first term, as well as his election year was the peak of Generation X pop culture. Michael Azerrad's 1993 novel Come as You Are: The Story of Nirvana talks about how Nirvana's Nevermind album caused a revolutionary shift in the generational zeitgeist and ended the Baby Boomer's dominance in the musical landscape. Going by your definition, Nevermind's release would have either done nothing or resulted in the end of Gen X. They really were on a roll in Bill Clinton's first term (the flagship President of Generation X) before their empire started to slowly crumble throughout the late '90s when the Spice Girls became popular in January 1997 and continued until the 2000-2001 school year when pop culture was purely millennial. Regardless, Nevermind still had an influence on popular culture even in the late '90s. That's also when more a optimistic mindset became apparent which clashed with the cynicism of the mid '90s. 1988-1991 had plenty of definitive X-culture of it's own because alternative rock and hip-hop were then mainstream trends, but the biggest were still awful hair metal and bland Paula Abdul-style dance pop. 1992-1996 was the pinnacle of Generation X's cultural reign.

Millennials are harder to define because it's a much longer generation than X and the multiple cohorts came of age in such different times. I'll say the pinnacle of Millennial culture starts at either 2006 or 2007 and ends at 2012, so probably 2007-2011. I could include even the present as part of pinnacle Millennial, but 2012-present culture has been more fragmented and balkanized and as a result harder to pinpoint, label, and define.

Subject: Re: 2006 vs. 2008 which year felt like a bigger transition??

Written By: #Infinity on 12/05/15 at 3:20 pm


I strongly disagree with this. Bill Clinton's first term, as well as his election year was the peak of Generation X pop culture. Michael Azerrad's 1993 novel Come as You Are: The Story of Nirvana talks about how Nirvana's Nevermind album caused a revolutionary shift in the generational zeitgeist and ended the Baby Boomer's dominance in the musical landscape. Going by your definition, Nevermind's release would have either done nothing or resulted in the end of Gen X. They really were on a roll in Bill Clinton's first term (the flagship President of Generation X) before their empire started to slowly crumble throughout the late '90s when the Spice Girls became popular in January 1997 and continued until the 2000-2001 school year when pop culture was purely millennial. Regardless, Nevermind still had an influence on popular culture even in the late '90s. That's also when more a optimistic mindset became apparent which clashed with the cynicism of the mid '90s. 1988-1991 had plenty of definitive X-culture of it's own because alternative rock and hip-hop were then mainstream trends, but the biggest were still awful hair metal and bland Paula Abdul-style dance pop. 1992-1996 was the pinnacle of Generation X's cultural reign.


80s pop is Boomer music?  I thought the Boomers grew up with the Beatles, Motown, and psychedelic bands in the 60s, and later disco, singer-songwriters, glam rock, and prog rock in the 70s.  The arrival of Duran Duran, Madonna, Pat Benatar, and the like was a pretty disruptive shift in the early 80s that killed off whatever remaining stock the Baby Boomers had on the top 40.  The spirit of Baby Boomer music began to truly die off in 1980 with the murder of John Lennon, while the MTV generation came into full gear soon after.

People nowadays stereotype Generation X as the Nirvana generation who rebelled against Boomer/Silent-sponsored corporatism from the 80s, but they forget that Generation X is really also the MTV Generation.  The channel was pivotal in the cultural shift of the early 1980s, and it was significant again in the early 90s once Smells Like Teen Spirit began circulation.  New wave, hair metal, and hi-nrg were undoubtedly geared towards Generation X, they were just more associated with the older births of that cohort, whereas grunge and gangsta rap represented the later birth years.  It's the same as how the Backstreet Boys and Spice Girls are usually considered to be targeted towards Generation Y the same way Lady Gaga and Kesha are, even though they represent opposite sides of the generation.

Subject: Re: 2006 vs. 2008 which year felt like a bigger transition??

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 12/05/15 at 4:49 pm


Yeah I agree. Also 89-92 was the Bush 41 era while 05-08 was the second term of Bush 43. Plus 89-92 was the peak of Gen X youth culture while 05-08 was the peak of Gen Y youth culture

I'd say both Bush Sr.'s term and Clinton's first term were both the peak of Gen X culture, and George W.'s 2nd term and Obama's first term were both the peak of Gen Y culture.

Subject: Re: 2006 vs. 2008 which year felt like a bigger transition??

Written By: ocarinafan96 on 12/05/15 at 7:31 pm


80s pop is Boomer music?  I thought the Boomers grew up with the Beatles, Motown, and psychedelic bands in the 60s, and later disco, singer-songwriters, glam rock, and prog rock in the 70s.  The arrival of Duran Duran, Madonna, Pat Benatar, and the like was a pretty disruptive shift in the early 80s that killed off whatever remaining stock the Baby Boomers had on the top 40.  The spirit of Baby Boomer music began to truly die off in 1980 with the murder of John Lennon, while the MTV generation came into full gear soon after.

People nowadays stereotype Generation X as the Nirvana generation who rebelled against Boomer/Silent-sponsored corporatism from the 80s, but they forget that Generation X is really also the MTV Generation.  The channel was pivotal in the cultural shift of the early 1980s, and it was significant again in the early 90s once Smells Like Teen Spirit began circulation.  New wave, hair metal, and hi-nrg were undoubtedly geared towards Generation X, they were just more associated with the older births of that cohort, whereas grunge and gangsta rap represented the later birth years.  It's the same as how the Backstreet Boys and Spice Girls are usually considered to be targeted towards Generation Y the same way Lady Gaga and Kesha are, even though they represent opposite sides of the generation.

Subject: Re: 2006 vs. 2008 which year felt like a bigger transition??

Written By: ocarinafan96 on 12/05/15 at 7:39 pm


I'd say both Bush Sr.'s term and Clinton's first term were both the peak of Gen X culture, and George W.'s 2nd term and Obama's first term were both the peak of Gen Y culture.


Yeah I agree with your category of Gen X. With Gen Y though, the Obama era seems more like late Gen Y/Early Gen Z, basically us the youth of today. Similar to how Clinton was the president during the late Gen X/Early Gen Y era. If we're going by presidential terms then it should look like this:

Reagan's Firts Term 1981-1985: Early Gen X Era - New Wave, Punk, Metal

Reagan's Second Term/HW First Term 1985-1993: Core Gen X Era - Hair Metal, Gangsta Rap, Grunge

Clinton's First Term 1993-1997: Late Gen X era - Gangsta Rap, Grunge/Post Grunge, Britpop

Clinton's Second Term 1997-2001: Early Gen Y Era - Teen Pop, Nu Metal, Party Rap

Bush's Presidency 2001-2009: Core Gen Y Era - Crunk/Snap Rap, Pop Punk, Emo, R&B

Obama's First Term 2009-2013: Late Gen Y Era - Electropop, Dubstep, Ringtone Rap

Obama's Second Term 2013-Present: Early Gen Z Era - EDM, Modern Electropop, Modern Teen Pop

Subject: Re: 2006 vs. 2008 which year felt like a bigger transition??

Written By: batfan2005 on 12/06/15 at 8:04 am


I'd say 2006-2008 were THE transitional years, but that's just me! You could honestly say it was the new early 90s period(1990-1992).


That would work. As long as it maintains the 16 year parallel so it can maintain order in the universe, lol

Subject: Re: 2006 vs. 2008 which year felt like a bigger transition??

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 12/06/15 at 10:54 am


That would work. As long as it maintains the 16 year parallel so it can maintain order in the universe, lol

Not only do I think decades repeat themselves 16 years after, but 40 years as well! Some people compared the early 2010s with the early 70s. Guys like arctic hacve compared the mid 2010s withthe mid 70s.

Subject: Re: 2006 vs. 2008 which year felt like a bigger transition??

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 12/06/15 at 11:06 am


Yeah I agree with your category of Gen X. With Gen Y though, the Obama era seems more like late Gen Y/Early Gen Z, basically us the youth of today. Similar to how Clinton was the president during the late Gen X/Early Gen Y era. If we're going by presidential terms then it should look like this:

Reagan's Firts Term 1981-1985: Early Gen X Era - New Wave, Punk, Metal

Reagan's Second Term/HW First Term 1985-1993: Core Gen X Era - Hair Metal, Gangsta Rap, Grunge

Clinton's First Term 1993-1997: Late Gen X era - Gangsta Rap, Grunge/Post Grunge, Britpop

Clinton's Second Term 1997-2001: Early Gen Y Era - Teen Pop, Nu Metal, Party Rap

Bush's Presidency 2001-2009: Core Gen Y Era - Crunk/Snap Rap, Pop Punk, Emo, R&B

Obama's First Term 2009-2013: Late Gen Y Era - Electropop, Dubstep, Ringtone Rap

Obama's Second Term 2013-Present: Early Gen Z Era - EDM, Modern Electropop, Modern Teen Pop

IMO
Reagan's First Term 1981-1985: Early Gen X Era - New Wave, Punk, Metal, old school hip hop

Reagan's Second Term 1985-1989: Early/Core Gen X Era - Hair Metal, first wave Golden Age hip hop, tail end of new wave

George HW Bush's Term 1989-1993:Core Gen X- First wave Grunge, Golden Age hip hop,dance and party music

Clinton's First Term 1993-1997: Core/Late Gen X era - West Coast Gangsta Rap, East Coast Hardcore Hip Hop,Grunge/Post Grunge, Britpop

Clinton's Second Term 1997-2001: Tail end of X/Early Gen Y Era - Teen Pop, Nu Metal, Party Rap, Post Grunge

Bush's First Term 2001-2005: Early/Core Gen Y Era - Glam and Bling Bling Rap, Pop Punk, R&B, Post Grunge, some nu metal

Bush's Second Term 2005-2009: Core Gen Y- Emo, Metacore, Crank and Snap Rap

Obama's First Term 2009-2013: Late Gen Y Era - Electropop, Dubstep, Ringtone Rap

Obama's Second Term 2013-Present: Tail end of Y/Early Gen Z Era - EDM, Modern Electropop, Modern Teen Pop

Subject: Re: 2006 vs. 2008 which year felt like a bigger transition??

Written By: ocarinafan96 on 12/06/15 at 11:59 am


IMO
Reagan's First Term 1981-1985: Early Gen X Era - New Wave, Punk, Metal, old school hip hop

Reagan's Second Term 1985-1989: Early/Core Gen X Era - Hair Metal, first wave Golden Age hip hop, tail end of new wave

George HW Bush's Term 1989-1993:Core Gen X- First wave Grunge, Golden Age hip hop,dance and party music

Clinton's First Term 1993-1997: Core/Late Gen X era - West Coast Gangsta Rap, East Coast Hardcore Hip Hop,Grunge/Post Grunge, Britpop

Clinton's Second Term 1997-2001: Tail end of X/Early Gen Y Era - Teen Pop, Nu Metal, Party Rap, Post Grunge

Bush's First Term 2001-2005: Early/Core Gen Y Era - Glam and Bling Bling Rap, Pop Punk, R&B, Post Grunge, some nu metal

Bush's Second Term 2005-2009: Core Gen Y- Emo, Metacore, Crank and Snap Rap

Obama's First Term 2009-2013: Late Gen Y Era - Electropop, Dubstep, Ringtone Rap

Obama's Second Term 2013-Present: Tail end of Y/Early Gen Z Era - EDM, Modern Electropop, Modern Teen Pop


Yeah that works as well! All in all I think we could both agree that the pinnacle of Gen X Culture was between 1990-1991 aka the era of Grunge/Golden Age Hip Hop, Start of Gangsta Rap, Tail end of Hair/Glam Metal, Era of Ballads, etc. give or take.

The pinnacle of Gen Y Culture was 2006-2007 aka the era of Crunk/Snap & Party Rap, R&B, Emo Music, Post Grunge, Tail end of Pop Punk, 'Dirty Pop', start of Electropop, early Dubstep, etc. give or take.

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