inthe00s
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Subject: 2007-08 school year

Written By: bchris02 on 12/22/15 at 5:19 pm

I was in my early twenties by this point, but I want to know if everyone here thinks 2010s culture had already begun during the 2007-08 school year.

I think the case can be made for 2008-09, though in my personal opinion that year was still late '00s, but if your definition of 2010s is Obama's election and Lady Gaga on the radio, I can see how the 2008-09 year qualifies.  However, 2007-08 was devoid of these things.  Scene was big and hipster wasn't in everybody's daily vocabulary.  Songs on the radio was mostly hip-hop, r&b, and pop by artists like Beyonce, Rihanna, and Gwen Stefani.  Virtually no electropop was on the radio at the time and people still called EDM "techno."  The economy was showing signs of recession but had not yet fallen off a cliff.  MySpace was still more popular than Facebook during the first half of 2008.  Tablets and smartphones were not yet commonplace.

So anyways, what are your thoughts on the 2007-08 school year?  Do you think it belongs in the 2000s or 2010s?

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: mqg96 on 12/22/15 at 5:42 pm

Definitely late 2000's culture. The 2007-2008 school year was like the quintessential late 2000's without a question! The peak of the Wii with titles like Super Mario Galaxy, Super Smash Bros Brawl & Mario Kart Wii, the Yes We Can Campaign with Obama's election, Crank That Soulja Boy Tell 'Em, the early Youtube days, MySpace was still the top social media site, etc. Shows like Ugly Betty, Hannah Montana, and Everybody Hates Chris peaked. BTW, I always say that the 2008-2009 school year was the transition between late 2000's and early 2010's culture, just like how the 2000-2001 school year was the transition between late 90's and early 2000's culture.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: Baltimoreian on 12/22/15 at 6:58 pm

It obviously belonged to the 2000s. That's like saying the Y2K scare wasn't related to the 90s.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: #Infinity on 12/22/15 at 6:59 pm


Definitely late 2000's culture. The 2007-2008 school year was like the quintessential late 2000's without a question! The peak of the Wii with titles like Super Mario Galaxy, Super Smash Bros Brawl & Mario Kart Wii, the Yes We Can Campaign with Obama's election, Crank That Soulja Boy Tell 'Em, the early Youtube days, MySpace was still the top social media site, etc. Shows like Ugly Betty, Hannah Montana, and Everybody Hates Chris peaked. BTW, I always say that the 2008-2009 school year was the transition between late 2000's and early 2010's culture, just like how the 2000-2001 school year was the transition between late 90's and early 2000's culture.


Yep, 2007-2008 was the quintessential late 2000s school year.  It was not a huge transition from the previous school year, but most culture for the late 2000s peaked during this period, including the Wii, urban-dance pop, early YouTube, etc.  Scene culture was pretty popular, though emo remained relevant.  The year was one of the 2000s' strongest for movies, featuring two iconic teen comedies in Superbad and Juno, as well as modern classics like American Gangster, There Will Be Blood, and No Country for Old Men.  The PS3 and XBOX 360 finally had a ton of killer apps released during this time, though their sales had still not yet peaked.  The 2007-2008 school year really marked the end of the classic 2000s, though the true transition into 2010s culture did not begin until the second half of 2008, with 2010s culture becoming dominant deeper into that following school year.

2007-2008 was a pretty significant time in my personal life, as it was when I began high school at my private institution that I still hold dear to my heart (more so than college, even).  I started running cross country, developed a whole new appreciation for La Jolla, got my first cell phone, and eventually discovered the Angry Video Game Nerd.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: 80sfan on 12/22/15 at 8:48 pm

Mostly 00s, but there were pieces of 10s coming in, as if crumbs and stuff.  ;)

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: JordanK1982 on 12/23/15 at 12:20 am

I hate describing culture in terms of school years (thinking back to school makes me cringe). Anyways, I looked back to my previous statements and what others have said and I thought about 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2010 quite a bit and I think they're actually still pretty 2000's. Yes, 2008-2010 are still transitional years into the 2010's but, for the most part, they're still really 2000's.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: mqg96 on 12/23/15 at 4:17 am


I hate describing culture in terms of school years (thinking back to school makes me cringe).


You know, 2006-2007, 2001-2002, 1994-1995, 2015-2016 (current), etc. isn't just only called "school years" right? It can also be referred to as "seasons" as well. Like the current 2015-2016 football season or basketball season. Or when it comes to seasons for TV shows on ABC, NBC, CW, FOX, MTV, ESPN, HBO, etc. you'll here them say "for the 2012-2013 season, here's your new set of shows brand new or returning coming up this fall." A lot of the seasons or school years usually start with August or September and end with May or June. The numerical years last from January to December, but sometimes in some cases it feels like the year can last from September to August as well. Believe it or not, it's a HUGE way of defining cultural periods.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: bchris02 on 12/23/15 at 12:37 pm


I hate describing culture in terms of school years (thinking back to school makes me cringe). Anyways, I looked back to my previous statements and what others have said and I thought about 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2010 quite a bit and I think they're actually still pretty 2000's. Yes, 2008-2010 are still transitional years into the 2010's but, for the most part, they're still really 2000's.


I agree 100%

In hindsight, people look back at 2008 as being a lot more '10s than it actually was and forget that a lot of '00s culture continued into 2009 or even 2010.  I do think the fall of 2009 would be an accurate date to place the true start of early '10s culture.  Fall 2009 was very different from early 2009.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: JordanK1982 on 12/23/15 at 10:16 pm


You know, 2006-2007, 2001-2002, 1994-1995, 2015-2016 (current), etc. isn't just only called "school years" right? It can also be referred to as "seasons" as well. Like the current 2015-2016 football season or basketball season. Or when it comes to seasons for TV shows on ABC, NBC, CW, FOX, MTV, ESPN, HBO, etc. you'll here them say "for the 2012-2013 season, here's your new set of shows brand new or returning coming up this fall." A lot of the seasons or school years usually start with August or September and end with May or June. The numerical years last from January to December, but sometimes in some cases it feels like the year can last from September to August as well. Believe it or not, it's a HUGE way of defining cultural periods.


Seasons, school years, etc. A change can happen during the beginning of one year that didn't take place during the end of the previous one or vice versa. It makes more sense to me to look at the year itself and divide it up to see what era it fits in with.


I agree 100%

In hindsight, people look back at 2008 as being a lot more '10s than it actually was and forget that a lot of '00s culture continued into 2009 or even 2010.  I do think the fall of 2009 would be an accurate date to place the true start of early '10s culture.  Fall 2009 was very different from early 2009.


What really defined that time for me would be songs like Paparazzi and Tik Tok. Late 2009 throughout 2010 had this distinct vibe but it was much, much closer to the 2000's than the 2010's. Thing thing that separates the 2000's and the 2010's for me would be the huge spike in PC Culture. 2009 and 2010 were still pretty lax compared to 2011 when the tumblr hipster super-hero stuff really started taking off.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: mqg96 on 12/24/15 at 10:18 am


Seasons, school years, etc. A change can happen during the beginning of one year that didn't take place during the end of the previous one or vice versa. It makes more sense to me to look at the year itself and divide it up to see what era it fits in with.


If that works for you then that's find with me. All I'm saying is that a lot of people (not just me) define cultural periods by not just the whole year, but sometimes school years or seasons as well.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: #Infinity on 12/24/15 at 2:29 pm


Seasons, school years, etc. A change can happen during the beginning of one year that didn't take place during the end of the previous one or vice versa. It makes more sense to me to look at the year itself and divide it up to see what era it fits in with.


School years are significant shifts not just for television shows and other key media, but also most people's personal lives.  More so than calendar year, at least if you're still in school, which you are not, but since popular culture usually targets people who are still in grade school or college, I think it's significant.  I think most people can agree that their second semester of, say, 9th grade, was far closer to their first semester of 9th grade than their first semester of 10th grade, even though only the latter would have happened during the same calendar year.  Having completely different courses and having your class moving up the ranks is naturally a pretty big shift, especially if you're moving from one school to the next, or even if your class becomes the eldest in the school.

I know school years themselves aren't the same as what popular culture is being churned out for consumption, but the point is people who haven't completely finished school usually enter the new school year with a fresher state of mind than they do coming into part 2 of essentially the same school year.  Simultaneously, too, people from a newer generation replace older as a new school year begins, so that naturally has an important effect on the social atmosphere of the forum that is school.  Even if you personally don't want to think about school, it's still a very significant measurement of cultural evolution, regardless.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: JordanK1982 on 12/24/15 at 6:30 pm


School years are significant shifts not just for television shows and other key media, but also most people's personal lives.  More so than calendar year, at least if you're still in school, which you are not, but since popular culture usually targets people who are still in grade school or college, I think it's significant.  I think most people can agree that their second semester of, say, 9th grade, was far closer to their first semester of 9th grade than their first semester of 10th grade, even though only the latter would have happened during the same calendar year. Having completely different courses and having your class moving up the ranks is naturally a pretty big shift, especially if you're moving from one school to the next, or even if your class becomes the eldest in the school.

I know school years themselves aren't the same as what popular culture is being churned out for consumption, but the point is people who haven't completely finished school usually enter the new school year with a fresher state of mind than they do coming into part 2 of essentially the same school year.  Simultaneously, too, people from a newer generation replace older as a new school year begins, so that naturally has an important effect on the social atmosphere of the forum that is school.  Even if you personally don't want to think about school, it's still a very significant measurement of cultural evolution, regardless.


It's still purely subjective like 99% of things. These are changes that have much more to do with people's personal lives than with pop culture in general. School, especially high school, is a very isolated environment. The school cultural evolution may change but their social dynamics won't have any big effect on pop culture itself. Lemme tell you, when I was in school, all semesters felt different to me. My 2nd semesters were always much better than the 1st and they were to the point where I couldn't connect with the, for example, "1996-1997 school year" because both semesters of that school year felt completely different much like all the rest of my school years. I'd go into the new year with a fresh state of mind, not new school years. So as you see, my experiences have shaped my viewpoint to look at the year as a whole and to split it up and find out where to place it in what era instead of using school years. You, on the other hand, see school a lot differently than I do. I don't know your personal experiences but I'll guess that maybe though your eyes whole school years felt the same or cohesive enough to you and your pals just based on what you've said to me.

Back on topic: I remembered this time when I was a bit younger and I was staying with my uncle in Toronto. I took my cousins out to this new skate park that just opened up and for the longest time I thought this happened in 2005 or 2006. The way the skateboarders dressed and the vibe of the time felt very 2005/2006 to me. I did some research on the park and it turns out it actually opened up in 2007. This kind of changed my view on 2007 a bit. It still feels slightly more modern but I think it fits in more with 2004-2006 than 2008-2010 just based off my new, uh... "epiphany". 

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: #Infinity on 12/24/15 at 9:13 pm


It's still purely subjective like 99% of things. These are changes that have much more to do with people's personal lives than with pop culture in general. School, especially high school, is a very isolated environment. The school cultural evolution may change but their social dynamics won't have any big effect on pop culture itself. Lemme tell you, when I was in school, all semesters felt different to me. My 2nd semesters were always much better than the 1st and they were to the point where I couldn't connect with the, for example, "1996-1997 school year" because both semesters of that school year felt completely different much like all the rest of my school years. I'd go into the new year with a fresh state of mind, not new school years. So as you see, my experiences have shaped my viewpoint to look at the year as a whole and to split it but and find out where to place it in what era instead of using school years. You, on the other hand, see school a lot differently than I do. I don't know your personal experiences but I'll guess that maybe though your eyes whole school years felt the same or cohesive enough to you and your pals just based on what you've said to me.


There are certain certain differences between autumn and spring semesters, particularly mild shifts in elective courses, different songs to play in bad, different plays to rehearse, but most importantly different sports seasons.  The change is more apparent in college, where your classes change completely with every semester and some people even graduate at the end of autumn instead of the end of spring.  Regardless, I have still always felt more of a shift in my personal life with the coming of a new school year entirely than just the next chronological year during the same school year.  It's a pretty big deal to go from a 7th grader to an 8th grader, or a 10th grader to an 11th grader.

Also, school is a "very isolated environment?"  When you're growing up, school is generally where you meet the majority of your friends and a forum where you are exposed to people of your generation, the ones who introduce you to popular culture in the first place.  Why else would kid and teen media be so school-centric in its general setup, even if the characters or subjects do a lot of things beyond the campus?  Friend circles usually evolve in-between school years because every grade somebody lives is a different, distinct experience for them.  For me personally, 3rd grade was the Dragon Ball Z school year (when everybody in my class was obsessed with the show), 4th grade was the Yu-Gi-Oh! school year, 9th grade was defined by my introduction to my new high school,  and 10th grade was all about becoming more intimate with my school than previously (as well as being the first full school year I was an AVGN fan, plus when I got my Facebook account).  11th grade was possibly the biggest shift of all, as it was when my school entered a brand new era, as well as when I took both my academics, as well as my extracurriculars more seriously than ever before, as I was now an upperclassman with a leadership resonsibility that I lacked in 10th grade.  Even though certainly not every single change in my personal life or trends I noticed occurred at the very beginning of the new school year, the fresh landscape of a new school year caused me to categorize things from the school year in general as part of the same period that begins in August/September and ends in May/June.  Sure, plenty of cultural change may occur during the course of a full school year, but the change itself is easiest to gauge through your everyday schedule, which is naturally very contingent with school.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: JordanK1982 on 12/24/15 at 9:59 pm


There are certain certain differences between autumn and spring semesters, particularly mild shifts in elective courses, different songs to play in bad, different plays to rehearse, but most importantly different sports seasons.  The change is more apparent in college, where your classes change completely with every semester and some people even graduate at the end of autumn instead of the end of spring.  Regardless, I have still always felt more of a shift in my personal life with the coming of a new school year entirely than just the next chronological year during the same school year.  It's a pretty big deal to go from a 7th grader to an 8th grader, or a 10th grader to an 11th grader.

Also, school is a "very isolated environment?"  When you're growing up, school is generally where you meet the majority of your friends and a forum where you are exposed to people of your generation, the ones who introduce you to popular culture in the first place.  Why else would kid and teen media be so school-centric in its general setup, even if the characters or subjects do a lot of things beyond the campus?  Friend circles usually evolve in-between school years because every grade somebody lives is a different, distinct experience for them.  For me personally, 3rd grade was the Dragon Ball Z school year (when everybody in my class was obsessed with the show), 4th grade was the Yu-Gi-Oh! school year, 9th grade was defined by my introduction to my new high school,  and 10th grade was all about becoming more intimate with my school than previously (as well as being the first full school year I was an AVGN fan, plus when I got my Facebook account).  11th grade was possibly the biggest shift of all, as it was when my school entered a brand new era, as well as when I took both my academics, as well as my extracurriculars more seriously than ever before, as I was now an upperclassman with a leadership resonsibility that I lacked in 10th grade.  Even though certainly not every single change in my personal life or trends I noticed occurred at the very beginning of the new school year, the fresh landscape of a new school year caused me to categorize things from the school year in general as part of the same period that begins in August/September and ends in May/June.  Sure, plenty of cultural change may occur during the course of a full school year, but the change itself is easiest to gauge through your everyday schedule, which is naturally very contingent with school.


Your experience is clearly much different than mine and your post shows that. You weigh more importance on schooling on your personal life than I do. High School, and not to mention Grade and Middle School, is a totally isolated environment. College/Uni is where you branch out a bit and what you do starts to make am impact on other outside sources but in High School, aside from whatever studies and maybe some extra-curricular activities that you do to get into college, what happens inside those walls doesn't matter in the long run. Our lives are already pretty isolated and insignificant enough as it is but when you're in High School, you're life, interests and your circle of friends are very minuscule things that you grow out of as you get older (or, in my case, grow out of you because I still have the tastes of an angsty 14 year old boy). Those social interactions? The drama? That's not isolated to whatever little clique you have in your school? I don't see how that makes a big impact anywhere else. Maybe in the age of the internet it's different with the rise of social media but back in the late 90's when we still used AOL and had Dial-Up, it didn't. In school, we are kind of forced to make friends with the people around us because they're all we've got. Friends of convenience, I like to call it. In the outside world, we have more choices and a lot more variety. Some of it might stick with you but a good amount of it is stuff you either try to forget about or bury away in a box in your closet until you want to reminisce again. I did not meet the majority of my friends through school. I met friends through going out to Punk Rock shows, going to skate parks, record shops, etc. I had maybe 4 good friends and a couple of acquaintances in High School. For the most part, I didn't meet people like me with the same common interests through school. I met some of my best friends and my wife outside of school. A good amount of people who describe periods of their lives as "in 9th grade" etc., etc., etc. but I prefer to not be so boxed in by the school system and would rather use my age and the year to describe and define moments of my life because most of my defining coming-of-age events happened while outside of school. Hell, I think I skipped classes more than I went to school to be perfectly honest with you. You, on the other hand, seem to have had many of your defining life events happen in school which is why you see this differently. Different experiences make the world go 'round.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: 80sfan on 12/24/15 at 10:14 pm

Is going to school that cool?  ???

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: JordanK1982 on 12/24/15 at 10:17 pm


Is going to school that cool?  ???


I always found school pretty boring.  :-\\

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: 80sfan on 12/24/15 at 10:24 pm


I always found school pretty boring.  :-\\


It's supposed to be boring. :.ducks:.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: JordanK1982 on 12/24/15 at 10:42 pm


It's supposed to be boring. :.ducks:.


Glad I was doing school the right way then. ;D

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: #Infinity on 12/25/15 at 12:48 am


Your experience is clearly much different than mine and your post shows that. You weigh more importance on schooling on your personal life than I do. High School, and not to mention Grade and Middle School, is a totally isolated environment. College/Uni is where you branch out a bit and what you do starts to make am impact on other outside sources but in High School, aside from whatever studies and maybe some extra-curricular activities that you do to get into college, what happens inside those walls doesn't matter in the long run. Our lives are already pretty isolated and insignificant enough as it is but when you're in High School, you're life, interests and your circle of friends are very minuscule things that you grow out of as you get older (or, in my case, grow out of you because I still have the tastes of an angsty 14 year old boy). Those social interactions? The drama? That's not isolated to whatever little clique you have in your school? I don't see how that makes a big impact anywhere else. Maybe in the age of the internet it's different with the rise of social media but back in the late 90's when we still used AOL and had Dial-Up, it didn't. In school, we are kind of forced to make friends with the people around us because they're all we've got. Friends of convenience, I like to call it. In the outside world, we have more choices and a lot more variety. Some of it might stick with you but a good amount of it is stuff you either try to forget about or bury away in a box in your closet until you want to reminisce again. I did not meet the majority of my friends through school. I met friends through going out to Punk Rock shows, going to skate parks, record shops, etc. I had maybe 4 good friends and a couple of acquaintances in High School. For the most part, I didn't meet people like me with the same common interests through school. I met some of my best friends and my wife outside of school. A good amount of people who describe periods of their lives as "in 9th grade" etc., etc., etc. but I prefer to not be so boxed in by the school system and would rather use my age and the year to describe and define moments of my life because most of my defining coming-of-age events happened while outside of school. Hell, I think I skipped classes more than I went to school to be perfectly honest with you. You, on the other hand, seem to have had many of your defining life events happen in school which is why you see this differently. Different experiences make the world go 'round.


I think I may not have clarified the main point I was trying to get across.  I'm not referring to how grade school students impact society at-large, but rather vice versa.  School years are just the easiest framing devices because they're shaped around something almost universally concrete, as opposed to just digits on a calendar and new-years resolutions.  Obviously, the impact of school varies by person, and you and I contrast each other pretty heavily on that matter, since whereas you were extremely disinterested in school and experienced primary growth through a variety of other social avenues, school was pretty much the centre of my life growing up, especially high school in particular.  Actually, I myself did not really have friends who shared my distinct interests at the time (eurobeat music, Dance Dance Revolution simulation, and AVGN), and thus bonded mostly with online forum communities, but school was still an extremely relevant place to me regardless because it exposed me to the real world as my generation was experiencing at the time and ultimately shaped my understanding of society and cultural trends in general.  School matters to the vast majority of people at least in some form, even if it's not the primary institution that shapes their lives.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: 2001 on 12/25/15 at 2:08 am

2007-2008 school year (or Fall 2007 to Summer 2008) was still very much core 2000s. Not much 2010s culture had settled in at that point. 2008-2009 was the big shift in my opinion. Late 2008/early 2009 was the transition period. That was when Facebook and Twitter took off and life changed forever for most people after that. Well, not because of those things, but the other events that took place around that time as well.

I don't think the first iPhone is a fair start to the 2010s. First of all, the first iPhone wasn't all that relevant, it was only popular because of brand name. The iPhone 3GS, the first 3G enabled smartphone and the first iPhone that could take video,  is the first relevant smartphone in my opinion, and that came out Fall 2009. 2010s culture was now in full swing.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: MarkMc1990 on 12/25/15 at 10:58 am

I too have always thought it somewhat more practical to discuss nostalgia in terms of school years/"seasons" rather than calendar years, but that may change the further removed I become from having been a part of the school system. Also, changes in fashion for example seemed to correspond more with the beginning of a new school year because people would buy a bunch of new clothes for it.

2007-08, I was a junior in high school. Definitely didn't feel '10s yet from what I remember. Emo kids still prominent. Soulja Boy, Hey There Delilah, Bleeding Love, No One, and Mariah Carey's final #1 hit to date.

I was really big into reality TV that year
ANTM Cycles 9 & 10
Survivor: China & Survivor: Micronesia
American Idol 7

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: the2001 on 12/25/15 at 11:35 am


2007-2008 school year (or Fall 2007 to Summer 2008) was still very much core 2000s. Not much 2010s culture had settled in at that point. 2008-2009 was the big shift in my opinion. Late 2008/early 2009 was the transition period. That was when Facebook and Twitter took off and life changed forever for most people after that. Well, not because of those things, but the other events that took place around that time as well.

I don't think the first iPhone is a fair start to the 2010s. First of all, the first iPhone wasn't all that relevant, it was only popular because of brand name. The iPhone 3GS, the first 3G enabled smartphone and the first iPhone that could take video,  is the first relevant smartphone in my opinion, and that came out Fall 2009. 2010s culture was now in full swing.


The 2000s feel was there in the summer of 2008  around 70% 65% something like that

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: JordanK1982 on 12/25/15 at 1:46 pm


I think I may not have clarified the main point I was trying to get across.  I'm not referring to how grade school students impact society at-large, but rather vice versa.  School years are just the easiest framing devices because they're shaped around something almost universally concrete, as opposed to just digits on a calendar and new-years resolutions.  Obviously, the impact of school varies by person, and you and I contrast each other pretty heavily on that matter, since whereas you were extremely disinterested in school and experienced primary growth through a variety of other social avenues, school was pretty much the centre of my life growing up, especially high school in particular.  Actually, I myself did not really have friends who shared my distinct interests at the time (eurobeat music, Dance Dance Revolution simulation, and AVGN), and thus bonded mostly with online forum communities, but school was still an extremely relevant place to me regardless because it exposed me to the real world as my generation was experiencing at the time and ultimately shaped my understanding of society and cultural trends in general.  School matters to the vast majority of people at least in some form, even if it's not the primary institution that shapes their lives.


Exactly. I didn't get that kind of experience out of school. A good number of people at that age (13/14-17/18) only have School in their lives and, of course, it becomes the center of their universe but not me. I learned about my generation and experienced it the same way most people do. I watched the music videos, I bought the albums, I went to the movies and all that fun stuff but I was far more immersed in the culture (specifically, the music culture). I went out of my way to see bands whenever I could and totally get as involved as possible. Much more dedication than the average music listener. I learned about society, trends and culture through going out of my way and just getting out there. Not even relating to music, I'd just travel with my friends all over the god damn state and it also helped to have an uncle who lives in Canada which helped me branch out even more. I'd go into different places and check out skate spots and record stores to get the feel and culture of each location I was at and talk to whoever I could find with a NoFX or Lagwagon T-Shirt. My mindset about school was completely different than yours but we do have something in common where we looked elsewhere to find people to connect with and share interests.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: Slim95 on 12/25/15 at 4:46 pm

It was not part of late 2000s culturally. Only numerically. The culture of the late 00's started Fall of 2008. That period was still classic 00's and fit with the mid 2000s although of course you stared seeing hints of what the late 00's/early 10's were gonna bring.

That school year was amazing by the way. I was in grade 7 and started a new junior high school and it was the best school year of my life. I have major nostalgia for that time.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: #Infinity on 12/25/15 at 5:11 pm


It was not part of late 2000s culturally. Only numerically. The culture of the late 00's started Fall of 2008. That period was still classic 00's and fit with the mid 2000s although of course you stared seeing hints of what the late 00's/early 10's were gonna bring.


Are the late 2000s/early 2010s basically the same period to you?

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: mqg96 on 12/25/15 at 5:50 pm


It was not part of late 2000s culturally. Only numerically. The culture of the late 00's started Fall of 2008.


Are you kidding me? What's your definition of late 2000's culture? First you're saying mid 2000's culture started in 2003, and now you're spreading that out through summer 2008 saying the late 2000's culture started in Fall 2008? I always thought the 2008-2009 school year the transitional period out of late 2000's culture.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: #Infinity on 12/26/15 at 12:17 am


Are you kidding me? What's your definition of late 2000's culture? First you're saying mid 2000's culture started in 2003, and now you're spreading that out through summer 2008 saying the late 2000's culture started in Fall 2008? I always thought the 2008-2009 school year the transitional period out of late 2000's culture.


Apparently, he thinks the early 2010s completely overlap with the late 2000s, based on the way he phrases the sentence you didn't quote.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: Slim95 on 12/26/15 at 12:27 am


Are the late 2000s/early 2010s basically the same period to you?

Yes, the late 00's and early 2010's are pretty much the same.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: Slim95 on 12/26/15 at 12:30 am


Are you kidding me? What's your definition of late 2000's culture? First you're saying mid 2000's culture started in 2003, and now you're spreading that out through summer 2008 saying the late 2000's culture started in Fall 2008? I always thought the 2008-2009 school year the transitional period out of late 2000's culture.

Late 2000s culture is 2008 and 2009. 2007 is late 00's numerically as I said. But 2007 fits more with the mid 00's than the late 00's. 2007 is a classic 2000s year, the last year that felt truly old. We all have different opinions on this, I respect yours.  :)

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: #Infinity on 12/26/15 at 2:36 am


Yes, the late 00's and early 2010's are pretty much the same.


The question then, I suppose, is why was there no shift around 2006 or at least early 2007?  2007 is pretty much a classic 2000s year, but only a peripheral one at most, as it's far too modern to be directly compared to the mid-2000s, especially if the mid-2000s stretches back to include all of 2003.  2003 and even early 2004 did not have MySpace, iPods, Wikipedia, YouTube, or Blackberry phones on a mainstream level.  The mid-2000s were strongly associated with sixth generation video games, shows like That's So Raven and Teen Titans, movies starring Lindsay Lohan, and Paris Hilton still in the peak of her popularity.  None of these still had a strong footing by the 2007-2008 school year.  2007 was unambiguously Web 2.0, whereas the mid-2000s in general represented the transition between the old and the new.  Scene kids were a big thing around 2006/2007 but not before that.  People had more than enough reason to buy seventh generation gaming consoles by the 2007-2008 school year, which was arguably the peak of the generation's software.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: Slim95 on 12/26/15 at 2:58 am


The question then, I suppose, is why was there no shift around 2006 or at least early 2007?  2007 is pretty much a classic 2000s year, but only a peripheral one at most, as it's far too modern to be directly compared to the mid-2000s, especially if the mid-2000s stretches back to include all of 2003.  2003 and even early 2004 did not have MySpace, iPods, Wikipedia, YouTube, or Blackberry phones on a mainstream level.  The mid-2000s were strongly associated with sixth generation video games, shows like That's So Raven and Teen Titans, movies starring Lindsay Lohan, and Paris Hilton still in the peak of her popularity.  None of these still had a strong footing by the 2007-2008 school year.  2007 was unambiguously Web 2.0, whereas the mid-2000s in general represented the transition between the old and the new.  Scene kids were a big thing around 2006/2007 but not before that.  People had more than enough reason to buy seventh generation gaming consoles by the 2007-2008 school year, which was arguably the peak of the generation's software.

Some people are more detail oriented and notice more changes throughout years. I am not one who divides a lot of eras into small different pieces like three year groupings which is why I group 03-07 as one era, there is a difference between 03' and 07', but the general feel is similar especially compared to things after 2008. Also if you split the decades into thirds, numerically the mid 2000s are 2013-2007, so I don't know why people on here are confused as to why I put 2003 with the mid 00's but whatever. Everything changes gradually as years go by and nothing happens overnight. The only huge change I noticed though was in 2008, way bigger and more abrupt than shifts and changes from many years before including the early and mid 2000s as changes happened more gradually then.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: #Infinity on 12/26/15 at 5:20 am


Some people are more detail oriented and notice more changes throughout years. I am not one who divides a lot of eras into small different pieces like three year groupings which is why I group 03-07 as one era, there is a difference between 03' and 07', but the general feel is similar especially compared to things after 2008. Also if you split the decades into thirds, numerically the mid 2000s are 2013-2007, so I don't know why people on here are confused as to why I put 2003 with the mid 00's but whatever. Everything changes gradually as years go by and nothing happens overnight. The only huge change I noticed though was in 2008, way bigger and more abrupt than shifts and changes from many years before including the early and mid 2000s as changes happened more gradually then.


2003 to 2007 isn't three years at all, assuming your boundaries are inclusive, it's five years, in which case even by your gradual change logic, 2003 and 2007 can't be part of the same sub-period at all.  The closest you could get would be if you were personally from the high school class of 2007, in which case you began school coming into autumn 2003 and finished it at the end of spring 2007.

Also, the numerical mid-2000s actually span from autumn 2003 through summer 2006.  2006 is really the seventh year of the 2000s decade because 2000 was the first.  In that case, late 2000s culture (or at least whatever period's culture directly preceded the early 2010s) began pretty much perfectly on schedule, at least by this board's consensus of there being a significant shift in 2006.  Even if you count the year ending in 0 as the final year of a decade, that would make autumn 2004 the beginning of the numerical 2000s instead of 2003.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: Slim95 on 12/26/15 at 11:57 am


2003 to 2007 isn't three years at all, assuming your boundaries are inclusive, it's five years, in which case even by your gradual change logic, 2003 and 2007 can't be part of the same sub-period at all.  The closest you could get would be if you were personally from the high school class of 2007, in which case you began school coming into autumn 2003 and finished it at the end of spring 2007.

Also, the numerical mid-2000s actually span from autumn 2003 through summer 2006.  2006 is really the seventh year of the 2000s decade because 2000 was the first.  In that case, late 2000s culture (or at least whatever period's culture directly preceded the early 2010s) began pretty much perfectly on schedule, at least by this board's consensus of there being a significant shift in 2006.  Even if you count the year ending in 0 as the final year of a decade, that would make autumn 2004 the beginning of the numerical 2000s instead of 2003.

Well I don't group things in 3 years, I would rather group them in 5 years and sometimes 8-10 years. I don't see a lot of cultural changes the same way.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: #Infinity on 12/26/15 at 4:42 pm


Well I don't group things in 3 years, I would rather group them in 5 years and sometimes 8-10 years. I don't see a lot of cultural changes the same way.


Why are the late 2000s/early 2010s so short, then, especially considering you're lumping two periods into one?

Do you at least consider the breakthrough of Wikipedia, YouTube, Facebook, and seventh generation video games around 2006 and 2007 a fairly notable shift?  That's a lot of far-reaching change to come out of such a short interval of time, and I think it pretty clearly separates the 2007-2008 school year from late 2003-2005.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: Slim95 on 12/26/15 at 6:23 pm


Why are the late 2000s/early 2010s so short, then, especially considering you're lumping two periods into one?

Do you at least consider the breakthrough of Wikipedia, YouTube, Facebook, and seventh generation video games around 2006 and 2007 a fairly notable shift?  That's a lot of far-reaching change to come out of such a short interval of time, and I think it pretty clearly separates the 2007-2008 school year from late 2003-2005.

They aren't short. 2008-2013 can be seen as one period to me. Not a lot of changes occurred around that time. Even today we have a lot of things that were popular from 2008.

It wasn't a very noticeable shift to me. Facebook and YouTube became big but they are still social media sites. Social media has been popular since 2004 with MySpace. They were just replacing MySpace and older social networking sites. Besides, Facebook really became popular in 2008.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: mqg96 on 12/26/15 at 6:47 pm


They aren't short. 2008-2013 can be seen as one period to me. Not a lot of changes occurred around that time. Even today we have a lot of things that were popular from 2008.

It wasn't a very noticeable shift to me. Facebook and YouTube became big but they are still social media sites. Social media has been popular since 2004 with MySpace. They were just replacing MySpace and older social networking sites. Besides, Facebook really became popular in 2008.


If that's the case then everything since 2008 would be early 2010's culture and definitely not late 2000's, since you view 2008-2013 as one full era. 2008 is definitely not 2013, it's not far enough to be considered as dated or old but it's a different world at this point now, even George Bush was still the president for all of 2008 despite Obama being elected that year. Also, 2003-2007 is 5 different years, again, 2003 was a completely different pop cultural world than 2007, not far enough to be considered as dated when comparing the years but it's still not the same. I heard that you're from Canada right? This might be why your viewpoint of cultures are much different than ours.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: Slim95 on 12/26/15 at 6:52 pm


If that's the case then everything since 2008 would be early 2010's culture and definitely not late 2000's, since you view 2008-2013 as one full era. 2008 is definitely not 2013, it's not far enough to be considered as dated or old but it's a different world at this point now, even George Bush was still the president for all of 2008 despite Obama being elected that year. Also, 2003-2007 is 5 different years, again, 2003 was a completely different pop cultural world than 2007, not far enough to be considered as dated when comparing the years but it's still not the same. I heard that you're from Canada right? This might be why your viewpoint of cultures are much different than ours.

Well I think it's a different world from the first half of 2008, but it's not a different world today compared to the second half of 2008. (though it is for my personal life) Yes, I'm in Canada. Things are admittedly slower paced here. But we still get American music, media and all that stuff.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: #Infinity on 12/27/15 at 5:06 am


Well I think it's a different world from the first half of 2008, but it's not a different world today compared to the second half of 2008. (though it is for my personal life) Yes, I'm in Canada. Things are admittedly slower paced here. But we still get American music, media and all that stuff.


I'm not sure if being from Canada is that much of an excuse.  New technology, and frankly most cultural trends, are pretty universal.  Heck, Canadian pop/urban artists have completely dominated the charts globally this decade, like Justin Bieber, The Weeknd, and Drake.  This a big shift from the previous decade, when pop rock acts like Avril Lavigne, Sum 41, and Nickelback were Canada's most prominent musical export.  Even Shemp97 believed popular culture underwent a big shift around 2009.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: Slim95 on 12/27/15 at 1:13 pm


I'm not sure if being from Canada is that much of an excuse.  New technology, and frankly most cultural trends, are pretty universal.  Heck, Canadian pop/urban artists have completely dominated the charts globally this decade, like Justin Bieber, The Weeknd, and Drake.  This a big shift from the previous decade, when pop rock acts like Avril Lavigne, Sum 41, and Nickelback were Canada's most prominent musical export.  Even Shemp97 believed popular culture underwent a big shift around 2009.

An excuse for what? We all have different opinions and life experiences and we live on different parts of the world. Nobody is wrong and nobody is right, it depends on their experiences. This apparent "Decadology" stuff isn't considered science, so you can't tell someone they are wrong based on what you perceive, what others say or where you live. Like I said, everyone has different experiences so it's pointless arguing about it. I'm pretty sure arguing about this is considered Decadology, which is against the rules, which is why I will no longer be replying to this thread.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: #Infinity on 12/27/15 at 2:38 pm


An excuse for what? We all have different opinions and life experiences and we live on different parts of the world. Nobody is wrong and nobody is right, it depends on their experiences. This apparent "Decadology" stuff isn't considered science, so you can't tell someone they are wrong based on what you perceive, what others say or where you live. Like I said, everyone has different experiences so it's pointless arguing about it. I'm pretty sure arguing about this is considered Decadology, which is against the rules, which is why I will no longer be replying to this thread.


It sounds like the current moderators just want these threads to be for the sake of discussion and not just intentionally annoying people.  I realize just as much as anyone that this whole matter is subjective.  I only continue the topic going because I'm curious and want to hear the details of your perspective, not because I believe my way is absolute science.  If you're sick of this thread, then I'l reply here no more.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: bchris02 on 12/27/15 at 6:35 pm

One thing I am curious is why people mark the shift to Web 2.0 in the late '00s as the beginning of the '10s when in my opinion, very impactful technological changes occurred during the early '10s which in my opinion brought in true '10s culture.  Were the mid-00s changes such as the rise of YouTube and Facebook and the debut of 7th gen consoles really more impactful than these?

Second half of 2009
----------------------
-Electropop explodes in Top 40
-Windows 7 is released
-Glee becomes all the rage
-iPhone 3GS is released, which is much more popular than the original iPhone
-Facebook is now more relevant than MySpace
-Scene culture begins to fade; Hipster culture is in its budding stages
-Justin Bieber debuts

2010
-----
-iPad is released, beginning the tablet era
-Android phones are released, bringing more affordable smartphones to the masses
-Twitter becomes more popular, Instagram is launched
-Obamacare
-The rise of the Tea Party

2011
-----
-Adele debuts
-Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2 ends the longrunning movie franchise
-Peak of Dubstep, electropop.
-Rihanna releases "We Found Love", which was important in terms of setting up the sound that would dominate the mid-10s
-Lady Gaga at her peak
-Don't Ask, Don't Tell ends

2012
-----
-Carly Rae Jepsen released "Call Me Maybe"
-Hunger Games released
-Obama comes out in favor of same-sex marriage, is re-elected
-Windows 8 is released
-Macklemore debuts

2013
-----
-Ariana Grande debuts, ushering in the age of teen pop that has dominated mid 10s music
-Electropop declines, with Lady Gaga and Ke$ha's new hits being much less well-received than their earlier stuff
-Prop 8, DOMA, Same-sex marriage bans struck down, beginning SJW culture
-"Hipster" now mainstream
-Logos decline in popularity for teen retailers (A&F, American Eagle, etc)

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: 2001 on 12/27/15 at 7:37 pm


I'm not sure if being from Canada is that much of an excuse.  New technology, and frankly most cultural trends, are pretty universal.  Heck, Canadian pop/urban artists have completely dominated the charts globally this decade, like Justin Bieber, The Weeknd, and Drake.  This a big shift from the previous decade, when pop rock acts like Avril Lavigne, Sum 41, and Nickelback were Canada's most prominent musical export.  Even Shemp97 believed popular culture underwent a big shift around 2009.


I think Slim is saying early 2008 was core 2000s, while late 2008 is part of the "2008-2013" era, which isn't all that different from what you guys are saying :P

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: 2001 on 12/27/15 at 7:41 pm


One thing I am curious is why people mark the shift to Web 2.0 in the late '00s as the beginning of the '10s when in my opinion, very impactful technological changes occurred during the early '10s which in my opinion brought in true '10s culture.  Were the mid-00s changes such as the rise of YouTube and Facebook and the debut of 7th gen consoles really more impactful than these?

Second half of 2009
----------------------
-Electropop explodes in Top 40
-Windows 7 is released
-Glee becomes all the rage
-iPhone 3GS is released, which is much more popular than the original iPhone
-Facebook is now more relevant than MySpace
-Scene culture begins to fade; Hipster culture is in its budding stages
-Justin Bieber debuts

2010
-----
-iPad is released, beginning the tablet era
-Android phones are released, bringing more affordable smartphones to the masses
-Twitter becomes more popular, Instagram is launched
-Obamacare
-The rise of the Tea Party

2011
-----
-Adele debuts
-Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2 ends the longrunning movie franchise
-Peak of Dubstep, electropop.
-Rihanna releases "We Found Love", which was important in terms of setting up the sound that would dominate the mid-10s
-Lady Gaga at her peak
-Don't Ask, Don't Tell ends

2012
-----
-Carly Rae Jepsen released "Call Me Maybe"
-Hunger Games released
-Obama comes out in favor of same-sex marriage, is re-elected
-Windows 8 is released
-Macklemore debuts

2013
-----
-Ariana Grande debuts, ushering in the age of teen pop that has dominated mid 10s music
-Electropop declines, with Lady Gaga and Ke$ha's new hits being much less well-received than their earlier stuff
-Prop 8, DOMA, Same-sex marriage bans struck down, beginning SJW culture
-"Hipster" now mainstream
-Logos decline in popularity for teen retailers (A&F, American Eagle, etc)


It's all a buildup of the culture IMO. I mean, take the legalization of gay marriage in 2015. It's a bit foolish to say 2015 and 2016 are completely different years for just that reason, when it was the entire 2010s culture from all the way back in 2008 that got the whole ball rolling.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: #Infinity on 12/27/15 at 7:49 pm


One thing I am curious is why people mark the shift to Web 2.0 in the late '00s as the beginning of the '10s when in my opinion, very impactful technological changes occurred during the early '10s which in my opinion brought in true '10s culture.  Were the mid-00s changes such as the rise of YouTube and Facebook and the debut of 7th gen consoles really more impactful than these?


I think YouTube and Facebook were indeed more significant than the majority of changes you listed, not to mention they weren't the only breakthroughs that occurred around 2006.  YouTube, especially, completely revolutionized the entire way media is consumed and distributed.  I know web videos existed before it, but they were either short, meme-centric, or only in the hands of web design geeks, although even non-YouTube web videos became much improved and better-established during the late 2000s.

2011
-----
-Adele debuts


She was actually already popular in the late 2000s upon releasing 19, which won her several major awards.  It is true that the success of 21 dwarfs that of her debut, however.

Subject: Re: 2007-08 school year

Written By: bchris02 on 12/27/15 at 8:16 pm


I think YouTube and Facebook were indeed more significant than the majority of changes you listed, not to mention they weren't the only breakthroughs that occurred around 2006.  YouTube, especially, completely revolutionized the entire way media is consumed and distributed.  I know web videos existed before it, but they were either short, meme-centric, or only in the hands of web design geeks, although even non-YouTube web videos became much improved and better-established during the late 2000s.


Maybe its because of my own personal experience in which I was already using YouTube and Facebook in 2005.  I had a MySpace but I was never as into it as most people, I was more of a Facebook person from the beginning.  I see the shift to Web 2.0 as defining the mid '00s, not the beginning of '10s culture.  This is especially true for web-based social media as opposed to app-based social media which I associate with the '10s.  I also see 7th gen gaming as being more '00s than '10s, even though it was hugely popular in the early '10s.

I can understand how for others, who may have not jumped on the bandwagon until 2008, those things define the '10s but for me, they define the mid and late '00s.  '10s culture is electropop, teen pop, Obama, SJW culture, and the tablet/smartphone era.

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