inthe00s
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Subject: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: muppethammer26 on 03/29/16 at 8:52 pm

Do you know that the cycle of nostalgia is 20 years after the original decade? For example, people were nostalgic for the 80's in the 00's and the 90's in the 10's, so this means that a 00's nostalgia will happen in the 20's. How will people look back at 00's trends in the 20's? Will people have 00's themed parties with 00's music in the 20's too? I hope this happens.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 03/29/16 at 9:54 pm

Possibly. They would try to be nostalgic towards the 2000s in the near future.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Toon on 03/29/16 at 11:13 pm

Who knows. Maybe people will try to bring back old fashion or be nostalgic for old 00's movies like Harry Potter or Spiderman 2002. By the time we'd hit 2020 I'd assume Virtual Reality would be more popular. People would soon become nostalgic for the pre-Virtual Reality days and talk about Playstation 2, Dreamcast, Xbox, Gamecube, and Gameboy Advance. People would want to things like Youtube to go back to how it was in the late '00s. On music stations you'd probably be hearing 00's music as the "classic throwbacks". In terms of internet would be probably be nostalgic for the Web 1.0 and early 2.0 days. Again who knows. What I find funny is that all the things I mentioned already happens on the internet. Give it time and it would be mainstream with the general public.

As for the "2 Decades Behind" nostalgia I assumed most people on here already knew of that. Nostalgia will always happen. No matter the time period. Someone can like that time period or not, but it won't change the fact that people will be nostalgic for it. An age where nostalgia stops happening sounds too insane to be true.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: #Infinity on 03/29/16 at 11:48 pm

There may be revivals of pseudo-emo and pseudo-urban fashions in some pseudo-2000s form.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: yelimsexa on 03/30/16 at 6:15 am

IMO a lot more subdued compared to the nostalgia of the previous decades. The "zeroes" or "two thousands" or "aughts" or "noughties" just doesn't have the same ring to it like the "nineties", "eighties", "seventies", etc. had, plus especially in places like America where they view that decade as a lost decade in terms of optimism, progress, and hopefulness even though a lot of important developments occurred in that decade worldwide. Of course, this will target the Millenials the most (teen/young adult stuff for the earlier part of the generation and childhood stuff for the later part) along with parts of Generation Z who were little kids or just remember the last part similar to the peripheral '80s nostalgia you see among the oldest Millenials. That said, the '00s seem considerably more modern than the '90s do to me because of the tech boom that happened around the Millenial transition which is another reason why it will seem more subdued much like the first couple decades of the 20th century provided (weaker but having longer legs compared to decades like the '50s-'80s which had distinct "peaks" in nostalgic interest before fading to a peripheral state).

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: SpyroKev on 03/30/16 at 1:01 pm

Whatever happen, I just hope its focused on the Early and Mid 2000s as it should be.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: bchris02 on 03/30/16 at 10:13 pm

The '00s was a horrible decade, with the exception of the very late part (2008-2009).  I hope that there isn't an '00s nostalgia wave that's anything like the '90s nostalgia of the '10s.

The nostalgia wave doesn't always go in 20 year cycles anyways.  Nostalgia in the 1990s was more focused on the '60s than the '70s.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Zelek2 on 03/30/16 at 10:18 pm

I'll agree with Jordan that I hope it's mostly focused on 2000-2003....and I know he hates those years, but possibly the good aspects of 2004-early 2006 thrown in there. 8)

Maybe it'll just be focused on the "Bieber iPhone" part of the decade, but you never know - a lot of 90s nostalgia tends to give equal treatment to the early part (Game Boy, Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, neon clothing, Ren & Stimpy, Sega Genesis and SNES, etc.) in addition to the mid and late parts.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 03/30/16 at 11:36 pm


I'll agree with Jordan that I hope it's mostly focused on 2000-2003....and I know he hates those years, but possibly the good aspects of 2004-early 2006 thrown in there. 8)

Maybe it'll just be focused on the "Bieber iPhone" part of the decade, but you never know - a lot of 90s nostalgia tends to give equal treatment to the early part (Game Boy, Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, neon clothing, Ren & Stimpy, Sega Genesis and SNES, etc.) in addition to the mid and late parts.


I see this thread and was preparing to type up a rant about how glorious the first few years of the 00's were but how the rest of the decade is complete dogsh!t but it seems you've already said all I needed to say. 8) I literally just mentioned on another site about how I don't know if I really want early 00's nostalgia, though. Why? Because the "90's kid" dumbasses might try to ruin that era too. But real 00's nostalgia? Last thing I want to see is faux-Emo make a comeback... 8-P


The nostalgia wave doesn't always go in 20 year cycles anyways.  Nostalgia in the 1990s was more focused on the '60s than the '70s.


This is 100% true.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: #Infinity on 03/30/16 at 11:59 pm

The nostalgia wave doesn't always go in 20 year cycles anyways.  Nostalgia in the 1990s was more focused on the '60s than the '70s.


Well, I think by the Y2K era, the nostalgia cycle was pretty comfortably centered around 70s nostalgia. There were a lot of disco-inspired pop songs around that time, not to mention several other tracks that sample 70s hits. Even earlier in the decade, you already had movies like Dazed and Confused, John Travolta making a huge cinematic comeback, and the return of acoustic guitar rock, reminiscent of 70s pop rock, that had been hard to find throughout the 80s.

The 60s nostalgia in the 90s was mostly centered around the britpop movement, which produced Beatles-influenced bands like Oasis, revivals of some 60s fashions, 60s-flavored songs like Edwyn Collins' "A Girl Like You," and even newly released singles by the Beatles themselves (well, sort of).

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Zelek2 on 03/31/16 at 12:05 am


I literally just mentioned on another site about how I don't know if I really want early 00's nostalgia, though.

What site is it?

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 03/31/16 at 12:08 am


What site is it?


The AV Club.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Zelek2 on 03/31/16 at 12:10 am


The AV Club.

Which article

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 03/31/16 at 12:10 am


Which article


http://www.avclub.com/article/jonah-hill-make-directorial-debut-salute-90s-kids-234588

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Zelek2 on 03/31/16 at 12:21 am

Reading that article made me think that, while a lot of Facebook idiots think otherwise, 90s kids were born in the early-mid 80s too, even though "those damn '87-'89 millennials" (as you say ;D) seem to think it's them and them only.

The 90s weren't just about the mid-late 90s, the early-mid 90s were important parts of the culture too.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 03/31/16 at 12:28 am


Reading that article made me think that, while a lot of Facebook idiots think otherwise, 90s kids were born in the early-mid 80s too, even though "those damn '87-'89 millennials" (as you say ;D) seem to think it's them and them only.

The 90s weren't just about the mid-late 90s, the early-mid 90s were important parts of the culture too.


There is actually another article where they discuss the "I Love the 90's" festival coming up and it's mostly early 90s acts. http://www.avclub.com/article/salt-n-pepa-coolio-and-uh-vanilla-ice-headline-i-l-234501 (the comments are worth viewing to see my excellent festival idea for 1998-2002. Side note: never get disqus 'cause it's auto-deleted/locked out my account 5 times since I've signed up in 2011). I don't even consider myself a "90s kid" since I was pretty much an adolescent throughout most of the decade.

People seem to think that we listened to Vanilla Ice while playing pogs in 1999. ::)

Oh! By the way, did you see the video I sent you, yet? Pretty accurate of life in the the early 00's.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Zelek2 on 03/31/16 at 12:29 am

For some, a teen of a decade is also a "kid" of that decade.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 03/31/16 at 12:31 am


For some, a teen of a decade is also a "kid" of that decade.


You could say so but I think today's nostalgia focuses mostly on childhood or whatever.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: mqg96 on 03/31/16 at 12:35 am


I see this thread and was preparing to type up a rant about how glorious the first few years of the 00's were but how the rest of the decade is complete dogsh!t but it seems you've already said all I needed to say. 8) I literally just mentioned on another site about how I don't know if I really want early 00's nostalgia, though. Why? Because the "90's kid" dumbasses might try to ruin that era too. But real 00's nostalgia? Last thing I want to see is faux-Emo make a comeback... 8-P


What I've noticed is that when most people focus on decades, is that when it's politics or major events that impacted our whole country or world, they focus on every year of the decade. However, when most people talk about the mainstream pop culture or kid culture, they tend to only focus on the core years and late years of the decade, while ignoring the early years. For example, for the 2000's in politics or worldly events, people will focus on 2000-2009, but when it comes to the mainstream pop culture people will only focus on 2003-2009 while ignoring 2000-2002, heck some people would even lump 2010 and 2011 included in as the tail end of 2000's mainstream pop culture.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Zelek2 on 03/31/16 at 12:41 am

When people focus on 2000s culture, I see them discussing 2000-2003 at times, but they always shy away from calling it just "2000s" - they always have to clarify it as being "early 2000s". Contrast that to things like SNES or Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, which not that many people call "early 90s" - they just call them "90s".

I'm guessing they agree with Jordan that the "real 2000s" sucked and tainted the decade's reputation. ;D

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 03/31/16 at 12:45 am


What I've noticed is that when most people focus on decades, is that when it's politics or major events that impacted our whole country or world, they focus on every year of the decade. However, when most people talk about the mainstream pop culture or kid culture, they tend to only focus on the core years and late years of the decade, while ignoring the early years. For example, for the 2000's in politics or worldly events, people will focus on 2000-2009, but when it comes to the mainstream pop culture people will only focus on 2003-2009 while ignoring 2000-2002, heck some people would even lump 2010 and 2011 included in as the tail end of 2000's mainstream pop culture.


Yeah, this is true. When it comes to the pop culture and everything you'll see the early 2000's are pretty much forgotten in favor of the real 00's of 2003-2009 (unless they're around my age; born sometime in the 80's) but politics are just straight beginning to end of the decade.


When people focus on 2000s culture, I see them discussing 2000-2003 at times, but they always shy away from calling it just "2000s" - they always have to clarify it as being "early 2000s". Contrast that to things like SNES or Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, which not that many people call "early 90s" - they just call them "90s".

I'm guessing they agree with Jordan that the "real 2000s" sucked and tainted the decade's reputation. ;D


I've noticed this, too. It's like Pepsi Blue, it's either "early 00's" and they go out of their way to distinct it from the rest of the decade (yes, guilty as charged) or it's a 90's thing. I think it was sometime last year and I was talking to someone about music and Sum 41 was brought up (around the time Dave rejoined the band) and right away they said "I'd welcome a Sum 41 comeback over anything of today. When was the last time an actual good band has formed in over the last 10/11 years?"

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: yelimsexa on 03/31/16 at 7:56 am


What I've noticed is that when most people focus on decades, is that when it's politics or major events that impacted our whole country or world, they focus on every year of the decade. However, when most people talk about the mainstream pop culture or kid culture, they tend to only focus on the core years and late years of the decade, while ignoring the early years. For example, for the 2000's in politics or worldly events, people will focus on 2000-2009, but when it comes to the mainstream pop culture people will only focus on 2003-2009 while ignoring 2000-2002, heck some people would even lump 2010 and 2011 included in as the tail end of 2000's mainstream pop culture.


That may be true for the '50s and to a lesser degree the '60s/'70s (with the early parts of those decades often overlapping with the mid/late portions of the previous one), but the early '80s receives plenty of love (the peak of classic horror films, new wave, early MTV, second generation of video games, ET, Fast Times at Ridgemenont High, Tootsie, the Facts of Life, etc.) as do the '90s (IMO the early '90s seems to get more love than the mid-late part of the decade). Its too early to tell about the 2000s at this point. Like said, 00's will be slow and subtle compared to being fast and flashy of the '90s and back. Still, I equally except the SNES and N64 as being part of the "90s overall" (even though they represent distinct parts of the decade) just like how I except Gamecube and Wii as both being part of the '00s. You can say the same with music genres, grunge and teen pop will both be seen as "90s music" albeit in different phases. Same with Wild & Crazy Kids and Figure It Out as both being classic '90s Nickelodeon game shows. I actually find the '90s to be quite progressive but still distinctive, just with different flavors as the decade progressed, similar to the '60s/'70s and even to a degree the '80s/'00s for that matter.

But you will have the numerous TV channels playing back movies from the '00s, TV shows from the '00s on the channels that show older programming, a music radio station that plays songs from that era (Music Choice already has a "Pop 2K" channel for this and will assuredly still be there), and there will be some books about cultural and political events being released along with some new movies/song lyrics based upon life in that time. It just won't be as distinctively noticeable, but you won't miss it if you know where to look, just like the nostalgia of previous decades, which likely will also give a focus to some unknown and forgotten stuff that should have been promoted more in the first place.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 03/31/16 at 3:41 pm


When people focus on 2000s culture, I see them discussing 2000-2003 at times, but they always shy away from calling it just "2000s" - they always have to clarify it as being "early 2000s". Contrast that to things like SNES or Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, which not that many people call "early 90s" - they just call them "90s".

I'm guessing they agree with Jordan that the "real 2000s" sucked and tainted the decade's reputation. ;D


I guess it's because 1990 and 1991 can be related to the core 90s. I mean, both the SNES and Fresh Prince lived all the way to 1996-1998. So, it could make sense why people put them up as 90s.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 03/31/16 at 3:51 pm


What I've noticed is that when most people focus on decades, is that when it's politics or major events that impacted our whole country or world, they focus on every year of the decade. However, when most people talk about the mainstream pop culture or kid culture, they tend to only focus on the core years and late years of the decade, while ignoring the early years. For example, for the 2000's in politics or worldly events, people will focus on 2000-2009, but when it comes to the mainstream pop culture people will only focus on 2003-2009 while ignoring 2000-2002, heck some people would even lump 2010 and 2011 included in as the tail end of 2000's mainstream pop culture.


We'll might have people saying that the early 2010s were related to the 2000s.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 03/31/16 at 4:00 pm


Yeah, this is true. When it comes to the pop culture and everything you'll see the early 2000's are pretty much forgotten in favor of the real 00's of 2003-2009 (unless they're around my age; born sometime in the 80's) but politics are just straight beginning to end of the decade.


I think people born during the early-mid 80s would only care about the early 2000s, pop culturally.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: bchris02 on 03/31/16 at 4:49 pm


I see this thread and was preparing to type up a rant about how glorious the first few years of the 00's were but how the rest of the decade is complete dogsh!t but it seems you've already said all I needed to say. 8) I literally just mentioned on another site about how I don't know if I really want early 00's nostalgia, though. Why? Because the "90's kid" dumbasses might try to ruin that era too. But real 00's nostalgia? Last thing I want to see is faux-Emo make a comeback... 8-P

This is 100% true.


2000-03 is already getting lumped into '90s nostalgia, which is a pet peeve of mine.  Usually the people doing that were born in 1995 or 1996 and still claim to be "90s kids".

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: bchris02 on 03/31/16 at 4:53 pm


I think people born during the early-mid 80s would only care about the early 2000s, pop culturally.


I was born in the mid 80s and I prefer the late 2000s.

Scientifically, your pop-culture awareness and appreciation peaks around age 24.  I can attest to this in my own life being that 2007 through 2012 were probably my favorite years pop culturally.  I know its cool to be nostalgic for the early 2000s but I personally don't care for those years that much.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 03/31/16 at 4:59 pm


I was born in the mid 80s and I prefer the late 2000s.

Scientifically, your pop-culture awareness and appreciation peaks around age 24.  I can attest to this in my own life being that 2007 through 2012 were probably my favorite years pop culturally.  I know its cool to be nostalgic for the early 2000s but I personally don't care for those years that much.


Well, I was a kid during the mid-late 2000s, and I prefer them better than the early-mid 2010s. And I'm not 24 yet.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: bchris02 on 03/31/16 at 5:09 pm


Well, I was a kid during the mid-late 2000s, and I prefer them better than the early-mid 2010s. And I'm not 24 yet.


There are exceptions.

Personally, I think 2015 and 2016 (so far) are much, much better than 2013 and 2014, yet I am well past 24 and should be losing interest in pop culture entirely.

I think 2013 and 2014 were just bad years for pop culture.  I know ArcticFox liked them, but in my opinion, there just wasn't much to like those years unless you were 13 and female.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 03/31/16 at 5:38 pm


There are exceptions.

Personally, I think 2015 and 2016 (so far) are much, much better than 2013 and 2014, yet I am well past 24 and should be losing interest in pop culture entirely.

I think 2013 and 2014 were just bad years for pop culture.  I know ArcticFox liked them, but in my opinion, there just wasn't much to like those years unless you were 13 and female.


Yeah... they were boring as hell.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: muppethammer26 on 03/31/16 at 6:47 pm

I hope people don't milk the 00's nostalgia just like they've done to the 90's. I would rather have true 00's kids (anyone born between 1989 and 1997) doing the 00's revival correctly in the 20's. The 90's could be considered a ruined decade for nostalgia today due to these crazy 90's kids.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 03/31/16 at 6:52 pm


2000-03 is already getting lumped into '90s nostalgia, which is a pet peeve of mine.  Usually the people doing that were born in 1995 or 1996 and still claim to be "90s kids".


Yeah.. they also take the 2000s as the 90s for some reason.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: muppethammer26 on 03/31/16 at 6:57 pm


Yeah.. they also take the 2000s as the 90s for some reason.


The early 2000's are not the 90's. The 2000's is from 01/01/2000 to 12/31/2009. What's next? The 90's becoming the 80's, the 80's becoming the 70's, and so on according to them? They are basically stuck in the past.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: 80sfan on 03/31/16 at 6:59 pm

I can just see some guys dressing as Eminem. And some girls dressing as Britney Spears or Beyoncé.  ;)

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: bchris02 on 03/31/16 at 7:02 pm


I hope people don't milk the 00's nostalgia just like they've done to the 90's. I would rather have true 00's kids (anyone born between 1989 and 1997) doing the 00's revival correctly in the 20's. The 90's could be considered a ruined decade for nostalgia today due to these crazy 90's kids.


Many of them not really '90s kids.  I think 1992 is probably the cutoff birth year for actually being a '90s kid.  I cringe when I see people born later jumping on the '90s nostalgia bandwagon, butchering it and throwing in early 2000s fads, not knowing the difference.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 03/31/16 at 7:08 pm


I hope people don't milk the 00's nostalgia just like they've done to the 90's. I would rather have true 00's kids (anyone born between 1989 and 1997) doing the 00's revival correctly in the 20's. The 90's could be considered a ruined decade for nostalgia today due to these crazy 90's kids.


But wouldn't 1989-1994 babies remember the 90s as kids? Unlike 1995-1997 babies, who barely had any memories of the 90s, they also went to elementary school during at least one semester in the decade. I think true '00s kids would be born in 1995-1998, since they started elementary school during the early 2000s.

1995 = (2000-01) kindergarten year to (2005-06) elementary graduation
1996 = (2001-02) kindergarten year to (2006-07) elementary graduation
1997 = (2002-03) kindergarten year to (2007-08) elementary graduation
1998 = (2003-04) kindergarten year to (2008-09) elementary graduation

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 03/31/16 at 7:09 pm


The early 2000's are not the 90's. The 2000's is from 01/01/2000 to 12/31/2009. What's next? The 90's becoming the 80's, the 80's becoming the 70's, and so on according to them? They are basically stuck in the past.


Yeah, but I'm saying that most late 90s babies take their 2000s childhoods as false childhoods, if they were brainwashed by actual 90s kids.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: muppethammer26 on 03/31/16 at 7:53 pm


But wouldn't 1989-1994 babies remember the 90s as kids? Unlike 1995-1997 babies, who barely had any memories of the 90s, they also went to elementary school during at least one semester in the decade. I think true '00s kids would be born in 1995-1998, since they started elementary school during the early 2000s.

1995 = (2000-01) kindergarten year to (2005-06) elementary graduation
1996 = (2001-02) kindergarten year to (2006-07) elementary graduation
1997 = (2002-03) kindergarten year to (2007-08) elementary graduation
1998 = (2003-04) kindergarten year to (2008-09) elementary graduation


Also, add in 1999 as well. Plus, some elementary schools end at different grades, so for example, a 1996 person could graduate from elementary school at only 4th grade and go right to middle school as early as 2006 at 5th grader, while a 1998 person could stay in elementary as late as 2010 as a 6th grader, so take that into consideration.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 03/31/16 at 8:06 pm


Also, add in 1999 as well. Plus, some elementary schools end at different grades, so for example, a 1996 person could graduate from elementary school at only 4th grade and go right to middle school as early as 2006 at 5th grader, while a 1998 person could stay in elementary as late as 2010 as a 6th grader, so take that into consideration.


But 1999 babies attended kindergarten in the 2004-05 school year, which was when mid 2000s culture was at its peak. Also, I could get that you stay in elementary school as a 6th grader, but I'm talking about school years. Not alternate solutions to graduate elementary school.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: muppethammer26 on 03/31/16 at 8:10 pm


But 1999 babies attended kindergarten in the 2004-05 school year, which was when mid 2000s culture was at its peak. Also, I could get that you stay in elementary school as a 6th grader, but I'm talking about school years. Not alternate solutions to graduate elementary school.


I wasn't talking about alternative solutions to graduate. I was talking about how some school systems do differently with the grades for elementary and how people would graduate elementary at different grades depending on location. Some do K-4, some do K-5, some do K-6.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 03/31/16 at 8:28 pm


I wasn't talking about alternative solutions to graduate. I was talking about how some school systems do differently with the grades for elementary and how people would graduate elementary at different grades depending on location. Some do K-4, some do K-5, some do K-6.


Oh. Well then, I guess if that happens. Especially for the school districts that have the 6th grade year as elementary, then I guess 1994-1997 babies would be like true '00s kids there.

1994 = (2005-06)
1995 = (2006-07)
1996 = (2007-08)
1997 = (2008-09)

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 03/31/16 at 11:01 pm


I think people born during the early-mid 80s would only care about the early 2000s, pop culturally.


I agree. That's pretty much the main demographic for early 00's culture and the only people I see who have any nostalgia for the era.


2000-03 is already getting lumped into '90s nostalgia, which is a pet peeve of mine.  Usually the people doing that were born in 1995 or 1996 and still claim to be "90s kids".


What also bothers me is when kids think we listened to Vanilla Ice and played with Pogs in 1999. The whole "90s kid" obsession is dumb; most of these kids are too young to have been there to actually understand the 90's.


I was born in the mid 80s and I prefer the late 2000s.

Scientifically, your pop-culture awareness and appreciation peaks around age 24.  I can attest to this in my own life being that 2007 through 2012 were probably my favorite years pop culturally.  I know its cool to be nostalgic for the early 2000s but I personally don't care for those years that much.


I disagree with you on this one, though. I was 24 in 2006/2007 and I was way past caring about pop culture by then. The only 00's (or 20XX years in general) I like are 2000, 2001 and 2002 (and maybe 2003). 8)


There are exceptions.

Personally, I think 2015 and 2016 (so far) are much, much better than 2013 and 2014, yet I am well past 24 and should be losing interest in pop culture entirely.

I think 2013 and 2014 were just bad years for pop culture.  I know ArcticFox liked them, but in my opinion, there just wasn't much to like those years unless you were 13 and female.


Yeah, I'm probably a big exception here. I lost interest slowly between 2003 and 2004 before finally dropping off in 2005.

I think the 2010's in general are great if you're 13, female, have a billion piercings on your face, wear skinny jeans and have a tumblr addiction.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: musicguy93 on 04/01/16 at 1:40 am


Many of them not really '90s kids.  I think 1992 is probably the cutoff birth year for actually being a '90s kid.  I cringe when I see people born later jumping on the '90s nostalgia bandwagon, butchering it and throwing in early 2000s fads, not knowing the difference.


I'd say 1990 is probably the cutoff for being a "true" 90s kid. 1991ers may be called 90s kids, but I guess that's up for debate. But 1992 is a bit too late, in my opinion. There is no huge difference between those born in 1992 and those born in 1993. Having them in separate categories seems odd to me.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: musicguy93 on 04/01/16 at 1:44 am


2000-03 is already getting lumped into '90s nostalgia, which is a pet peeve of mine.  Usually the people doing that were born in 1995 or 1996 and still claim to be "90s kids".


What's wrong with people lumping 2000-2002 (2003 to a certain extent) with the late 90s? I can understand if they were lumping it with the core 90s, but honestly, 1999 had more in common with 2003 than it did with 1993. Heck it had more in common with 2003 than it did with 1995!

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: musicguy93 on 04/01/16 at 1:47 am


I was born in the mid 80s and I prefer the late 2000s.

Scientifically, your pop-culture awareness and appreciation peaks around age 24.  I can attest to this in my own life being that 2007 through 2012 were probably my favorite years pop culturally.  I know its cool to be nostalgic for the early 2000s but I personally don't care for those years that much.


Man, if that's true, I hope things start to improve in 2017. If it does, the 2020s could turn out to be an awesome decade. The core 2010s culture is pissing me off  >:(

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/01/16 at 2:10 am

What also bothers me is when kids think we listened to Vanilla Ice and played with Pogs in 1999. The whole "90s kid" obsession is dumb; most of these kids are too young to have been there to actually understand the 90's.

You sound just like The Early '90s Guy! :o

Yeah, I'm probably a big exception here. I lost interest slowly between 2003 and 2004 before finally dropping off in 2005.

My interest in pop culture pretty much died after I graduated high school and early 2010s influences started to fade. They were still dominant for most of my first two years of college, but even as early as the last third of 2011, the quality was starting to slip, though still better than the side-buzz/piercing/Instagram/rape culture/selfie/empty-promised social protest/creatively stagnant era of spring 2013 to present.

I think the 2010's in general are great if you're 13, female, have a billion piercings on your face, wear skinny jeans and have a tumblr addiction.

Yep, diversity at its finest!

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/01/16 at 6:24 am


You sound just like The Early '90s Guy! :o


Oh man, he's rubbing off on me... :-\\ Problem with these kids is that it's not a simple appreciation for 90's, is that they think they're the definitive authorities over the decade 'cause they played with Pogs and watched Rugrats in 1997 or whatever and will use this to say they're better than other people. Like, what!? To me, this makes no sense.


My interest in pop culture pretty much died after I graduated high school and early 2010s influences started to fade. They were still dominant for most of my first two years of college, but even as early as the last third of 2011, the quality was starting to slip, though still better than the side-buzz/piercing/Instagram/rape culture/selfie/empty-promised social protest/creatively stagnant era of spring 2013 to present.


That's when you noticed it too, eh? I felt like in 2010-2012 that basic PC paranoia template was there but around Spring 2013 is when I saw all these colored haired, pierced face uhh... tumblrite jokes on the internet. Later that year I heard about the "social justice warrior" and next thing I know it's a bigger sub-culture than Nu Metal! But yeah, you're time span is pretty close to mine when our interest in pop culture died. I was only a few years out of high school when I decided "Yeaaahhh... This stuff isn't my thing..."


Yep, diversity at its finest!


I know right? All people in the 2010's are acknowledged and celebrated but you have to look the part and fit the stereotypes or your peers won't accept you. This is fine because people in the 2010's are unique, creative people. It's like yesterday, I heard some song on the radio and these hipsters go "Na, na, na, na" in a crowd chant in the background and I couldn't help but think "Geezz... These sound like the most apathetic crowd of hipsters I've ever heard." We are hitting a new age of "not giving a sh!t" that not even Generation X could understand. The 2010's are a fantastic decade!


Man, if that's true, I hope things start to improve in 2017. If it does, the 2020s could turn out to be an awesome decade. The core 2010s culture is pissing me off  >:(


That would be cool but we'll have to ship the tumblr teenz™ to Mars first.


What's wrong with people lumping 2000-2002 (2003 to a certain extent) with the late 90s? I can understand if they were lumping it with the core 90s, but honestly, 1999 had more in common with 2003 than it did with 1993. Heck it had more in common with 2003 than it did with 1995!


I agree with this statement but I also agree that if "90s kids" are just going to lump 2000-2002 (or 2003... or 2007...) just to be "90s kids" they shouldn't even bother. My year and a half of high school (late 1996, all of 1997) felt really different than the other two and a half (1998-2000) but those years felt like the early 00's (1998/1999. 2000 should be a big duh, though 'cause it's literally early 00's ;D) which felt like the "faux-90s" or "what-if 00's" to me.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: SpyroKev on 04/01/16 at 10:46 am

I'm going to continually agree that 2003 is identical to the Late 90s. 2000-2002 is a no brainer.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: mqg96 on 04/01/16 at 11:17 am


I'm going to continually agree that 2003 is identical to the Late 90s. 2000-2002 is a no brainer.


I wouldn't say 2003 was completely identical as 2000-2002 were to the late 90's, but I agree that 2003 was still the final year any late 90's influences were relevant though, but at the same time the first year core 2000's influences and culture started coming in.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Shemp97 on 04/01/16 at 11:53 am


IMO a lot more subdued compared to the nostalgia of the previous decades. The "zeroes" or "two thousands" or "aughts" or "noughties" just doesn't have the same ring to it like the "nineties", "eighties", "seventies", etc. had, plus especially in places like America where they view that decade as a lost decade in terms of optimism, progress, and hopefulness even though a lot of important developments occurred in that decade worldwide. Of course, this will target the Millenials the most (teen/young adult stuff for the earlier part of the generation and childhood stuff for the later part) along with parts of Generation Z who were little kids or just remember the last part similar to the peripheral '80s nostalgia you see among the oldest Millenials. That said, the '00s seem considerably more modern than the '90s do to me because of the tech boom that happened around the Millenial transition which is another reason why it will seem more subdued much like the first couple decades of the 20th century provided (weaker but having longer legs compared to decades like the '50s-'80s which had distinct "peaks" in nostalgic interest before fading to a peripheral state).

I coined the term "hundreds" ('00s).

Also, a lot of 00s tech originated in the 90s. The 90s seems to group with the 00s tech-wise, while the 10s will probably be more like the 20s.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: mqg96 on 04/01/16 at 11:55 am


I coined the term "hundreds" ('00s).

Also, a lot of 00s tech originated in the 90s. The 90s seems to group with the 00s tech-wise, while the 10s will probably be more like the 20s.


Nice to see you back on this site again! 8)

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Shemp97 on 04/01/16 at 12:36 pm



8) ¡uᴉɐƃɐ ǝʇᴉs sᴉɥʇ uo ʞɔɐq noʎ ǝǝs oʇ ǝɔᴉN

And what a day to decide to return on ;D

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: mach!ne_he@d on 04/01/16 at 12:36 pm


My interest in pop culture pretty much died after I graduated high school and early 2010s influences started to fade. They were still dominant for most of my first two years of college, but even as early as the last third of 2011, the quality was starting to slip, though still better than the side-buzz/piercing/Instagram/rape culture/selfie/empty-promised social protest/creatively stagnant era of spring 2013 to present.


It was around that same age for me, too. I was heavily into pop culture up to 2005, following all the hot music groups, buying trendy band-tees, getting Post-Grunge ringtones for my old flip-phone, watching the latest music videos on Fuse, etc., but I started to gradually lose interest after that. 2006 was the last year that I really followed the Billboard Hot 100 closely, and by 2008 I probably couldn't tell you 2/3rds of the songs on there.

I'm not sure what happened in the late '00s. I don't know if was my own personal tastes maturing or what, but I just started feeling really "out of step" with popular music around 2006-07, and my interest level hasn't even come close to going back to what it was during my high school years.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/01/16 at 3:36 pm


It was around that same age for me, too. I was heavily into pop culture up to 2005, following all the hot music groups, buying trendy band-tees, getting Post-Grunge ringtones for my old flip-phone, watching the latest music videos on Fuse, etc., but I started to gradually lose interest after that. 2006 was the last year that I really followed the Billboard Hot 100 closely, and by 2008 I probably couldn't tell you 2/3rds of the songs on there.

I'm not sure what happened in the late '00s. I don't know if was my own personal tastes maturing or what, but I just started feeling really "out of step" with popular music around 2006-07, and my interest level hasn't even come close to going back to what it was during my high school years.


I feel the same way, even though I was a kid in the 2000s. All this decade brought us was generic electronic crap that's always #1 on the charts.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: SpyroKev on 04/01/16 at 4:32 pm


˙uı ƃuıɯoɔ pǝʇɹɐʇs ǝɹnʇןnɔ puɐ sǝɔuǝnןɟuı s,0002 ǝɹoɔ ɹɐǝʎ ʇsɹıɟ ǝɥʇ ǝɯıʇ ǝɯɐs ǝɥʇ ʇɐ ʇnq 'ɥƃnoɥʇ ʇuɐʌǝןǝɹ ǝɹǝʍ sǝɔuǝnןɟuı s,06 ǝʇɐן ʎuɐ ɹɐǝʎ ןɐuıɟ ǝɥʇ ןןıʇs sɐʍ 3002 ʇɐɥʇ ǝǝɹƃɐ I ʇnq 's,06 ǝʇɐן ǝɥʇ oʇ ǝɹǝʍ 2002-0002 sɐ ןɐɔıʇuǝpı ʎןǝʇǝןdɯoɔ sɐʍ 3002 ʎɐs ʇ,upןnoʍ I


Uhhhhhhh. Either my computer is glitched or you typed that in a different language.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Toon on 04/01/16 at 4:42 pm


I coined the term "hundreds" ('00s).

Also, a lot of 00s tech originated in the 90s. The 90s seems to group with the 00s tech-wise, while the 10s will probably be more like the 20s.


Yeah, a lot of the tech from the 00s has actually been around since the 90s.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: mqg96 on 04/01/16 at 5:05 pm


Uhhhhhhh. Either my computer is glitched or you typed that in a different language.


Nope, your computer is glitched....

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/01/16 at 6:19 pm


Oh man, he's rubbing off on me... :-\\ Problem with these kids is that it's not a simple appreciation for 90's, is that they think they're the definitive authorities over the decade 'cause they played with Pogs and watched Rugrats in 1997 or whatever and will use this to say they're better than other people. Like, what!? To me, this makes no sense.


I don't even really consider myself a real 90s kid despite being born in 1992, I just see myself purely as a Y2K era kid, since the culture of my period of interest spanned mostly from late 1996 through early 2003, beginning with the release of the Nintendo 64 and several cartoons and educational tools I grew up with, and ending with Yu-Gi-Oh!, Codename: Kids Next Door, and Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire. I played a lot of computer games from the mid-90s and was highly familiar with the Super Nintendo, not to mention I still had a casual interest in some fads through mid-2004 – I remember watching Miguzi a lot, as well as still being highly interested in Codename: Kids Next Door at the time – but it's still primarily the Y2K era, especially 1999-2001-ish in particular that comes to my mind when I think of what made the greatest impact on me at a young age. I know I can't call myself a true 90s kid because I never even knew anything about the Sega Genesis until I watched AVGN, I was familiar with very few kid shows from the mid-90s and earlier, The Hunchback of Notre Dame was the first Disney Renaissance movie I vividly remember being brand new, and I never even got into things like Power Rangers or Full House (though my sister eventually became a fan of the latter). I consider 1994 and 1995 to be tied for quintessential 90s year because late 90s was either very similar to what was still popular during the early 2000s and even mid-2000s, or already had its roots earlier in the 90s; boybands and girl groups were technically already really popular in 1994, during which Color Me Badd, Boyz II Men, All-4-One, and Eternal scored some of the year's biggest hits; none of them, however, were still popular in 2000 or 2001, as *NSYNC and the Backstreet Boys were. So basically, I see the early-mid 90s as the peak of what defined the "nineties," and I can safely say I missed out on the vast bulk of it during my childhood because at that time, I was still into strictly kiddie things like Barney and Sesame Street.

That's when you noticed it too, eh? I felt like in 2010-2012 that basic PC paranoia template was there but around Spring 2013 is when I saw all these colored haired, pierced face uhh... tumblrite jokes on the internet. Later that year I heard about the "social justice warrior" and next thing I know it's a bigger sub-culture than Nu Metal! But yeah, you're time span is pretty close to mine when our interest in pop culture died. I was only a few years out of high school when I decided "Yeaaahhh... This stuff isn't my thing..."

If only there was some positive end in sight. Alas...

I know right? All people in the 2010's are acknowledged and celebrated but you have to look the part and fit the stereotypes or your peers won't accept you. This is fine because people in the 2010's are unique, creative people. It's like yesterday, I heard some song on the radio and these hipsters go "Na, na, na, na" in a crowd chant in the background and I couldn't help but think "Geezz... These sound like the most apathetic crowd of hipsters I've ever heard." We are hitting a new age of "not giving a sh!t" that not even Generation X could understand. The 2010's are a fantastic decade!

I should seriously just start wearing sweat pants, a straightened bob or Rachel with bleached tips, and solid-colored crop-tops on a regular basis and just snicker sardonically every time somebody criticizes me for looking out of step.

I agree with this statement but I also agree that if "90s kids" are just going to lump 2000-2002 (or 2003... or 2007...) just to be "90s kids" they shouldn't even bother. My year and a half of high school (late 1996, all of 1997) felt really different than the other two and a half (1998-2000) but those years felt like the early 00's (1998/1999. 2000 should be a big duh, though 'cause it's literally early 00's ;D) which felt like the "faux-90s" or "what-if 00's" to me.


Even 1997 feels closer to 2002 than it does to 1993, especially the second half in particular. 1997 had the web 2.0 Internet being popular, early millennial/shuffle-beat pop, adult contemporary artists/groups like matchbox twenty, Third Eye Blind, Sarah McLachlan, shows like South Park, King of the Hill, 7th Heaven, and the Klasky Csupo/Cartoon Cartoon era in their peaks; 3D gaming being standard before online gaming was commonplace, Y2K-style pop punk being really popular, Generation Y being an important focus of adolescent culture, baggy non-grunge clothing, and pretty much the same materialistic-yet-vibrant overall style of popular culture. I know you're going to strongly disagree with this, based on Beavis & Butthead alone, but pretty much everything else about 1997 was like the first full year of precursors to the 2000s, or at least what was popular during a good chunk of that decade.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: bchris02 on 04/01/16 at 6:53 pm


What's wrong with people lumping 2000-2002 (2003 to a certain extent) with the late 90s? I can understand if they were lumping it with the core 90s, but honestly, 1999 had more in common with 2003 than it did with 1993. Heck it had more in common with 2003 than it did with 1995!


Because they are very different compared to the '90s.  While some things that were popular in the '90s overstayed their welcome well into the '00s (Exhibit 1: Friends), the overall '90s feel and zeitgeist was gone around the time Bush was inaugurated in 2001.  2000 is the only '00s year that I would lump in with the '90s. 

Kids born in 1995 or 1996 who try to say they are '90s kids because they were into things like Lizzie McGuire and Spongebob Squarepants are what I am talking about.

The last hurrah for '90s kid culture was early Pokemon at its peak, prior to Pokemon The Movie 2000.  Nothing after that can be considered '90s kid culture.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/01/16 at 7:16 pm


Because they are very different compared to the '90s.  While some things that were popular in the '90s overstayed their welcome well into the '00s (Exhibit 1: Friends), the overall '90s feel and zeitgeist was gone around the time Bush was inaugurated in 2001.  2000 is the only '00s year that I would lump in with the '90s. 

Kids born in 1995 or 1996 who try to say they are '90s kids because they were into things like Lizzie McGuire and Spongebob Squarepants are what I am talking about.

The last hurrah for '90s kid culture was early Pokemon at its peak, prior to Pokemon The Movie 2000.  Nothing after that can be considered '90s kid culture.


I wish this was acceptable towards most early 2000s kids, who think they're an extension towards the late 90s.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: musicguy93 on 04/01/16 at 8:01 pm


Because they are very different compared to the '90s.  While some things that were popular in the '90s overstayed their welcome well into the '00s (Exhibit 1: Friends), the overall '90s feel and zeitgeist was gone around the time Bush was inaugurated in 2001.  2000 is the only '00s year that I would lump in with the '90s. 

Kids born in 1995 or 1996 who try to say they are '90s kids because they were into things like Lizzie McGuire and Spongebob Squarepants are what I am talking about.

The last hurrah for '90s kid culture was early Pokemon at its peak, prior to Pokemon The Movie 2000.  Nothing after that can be considered '90s kid culture.


Actually the zeitgeist of the 90s ended during the late part of the decade, around 1998ish. In general people group the late 90s with the early 00s, in an era known as the Y2K era (which most people consider to be roughly 1998-early 2003, but it's all up for debate). Therefore Pokemon is a Y2K era trend, not a 90s trend. People don't generally consider 1998-1999 to be apart of the 90s zeitgeist. Same way people don't consider 2000-2002 to be apart of the core 2000s.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Slim95 on 04/01/16 at 10:22 pm

I can't wait for 2000s nostalgia. I already miss that decade a lot. 90s nostalgia sucks, it's very superficial and internet based. So many dumb videos of stuff people think is the 90s but really is only late 90s or 2000s. I hope the 00's get the revival it deserves.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Toon on 04/01/16 at 10:25 pm


Actually the zeitgeist of the 90s ended during the late part of the decade, around 1998ish. In general people group the late 90s with the early 00s, in an era known as the Y2K era (which most people consider to be roughly 1998-early 2003, but it's all up for debate). Therefore Pokemon is a Y2K era trend, not a 90s trend. People don't generally consider 1998-1999 to be apart of the 90s zeitgeist. Same way people don't consider 2000-2002 to be apart of the core 2000s.


I've always noticed this around the internet and in real life discussions. People always say "Late '90s and Early '00s" when referring to things like music, fashion, movies and other trends. They'd always group the late '90s and early '00s as 1 whole era. Just going on Google or Youtube I always see things like "Late 90s and early '00s Music" or Late '90s/Early '00s Fashion" etc.


I can't wait for 2000s nostalgia. I already miss that decade a lot. 90s nostalgia sucks, it's very superficial and internet based. So many dumb videos stuff people think is the 90s but really is only late 90s or 2000s. I hope the 00's get the revival it deserves.


As mentioned before I found this whole 90's nostalgia and 90's kid thing is very annoying to the point where it ruined the 1990s decade for me. I feared the same would happen to the '00s (and any other decade) as well once the nostalgia wave for the decade hits people in the future.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: aja675 on 04/01/16 at 10:37 pm


Yeah, but I'm saying that most late 90s babies take their 2000s childhoods as false childhoods, if they were brainwashed by actual 90s kids.
The people who are making them feel this way are just insecure.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/01/16 at 11:24 pm


I don't even really consider myself a real 90s kid despite being born in 1992, I just see myself purely as a Y2K era kid, since the culture of my period of interest spanned mostly from late 1996 through early 2003, beginning with the release of the Nintendo 64 and several cartoons and educational tools I grew up with, and ending with Yu-Gi-Oh!, Codename: Kids Next Door, and Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire. I played a lot of computer games from the mid-90s and was highly familiar with the Super Nintendo, not to mention I still had a casual interest in some fads through mid-2004 – I remember watching Miguzi a lot, as well as still being highly interested in Codename: Kids Next Door at the time – but it's still primarily the Y2K era, especially 1999-2001-ish in particular that comes to my mind when I think of what made the greatest impact on me at a young age. I know I can't call myself a true 90s kid because I never even knew anything about the Sega Genesis until I watched AVGN, I was familiar with very few kid shows from the mid-90s and earlier, The Hunchback of Notre Dame was the first Disney Renaissance movie I vividly remember being brand new, and I never even got into things like Power Rangers or Full House (though my sister eventually became a fan of the latter). I consider 1994 and 1995 to be tied for quintessential 90s year because late 90s was either very similar to what was still popular during the early 2000s and even mid-2000s, or already had its roots earlier in the 90s; boybands and girl groups were technically already really popular in 1994, during which Color Me Badd, Boyz II Men, All-4-One, and Eternal scored some of the year's biggest hits; none of them, however, were still popular in 2000 or 2001, as *NSYNC and the Backstreet Boys were. So basically, I see the early-mid 90s as the peak of what defined the "nineties," and I can safely say I missed out on the vast bulk of it during my childhood because at that time, I was still into strictly kiddie things like Barney and Sesame Street.


I've always considered myself a teen/adolescent of both the real 90's and the faux-90's. I mean, I don't really consider these classifications too important but it's only since all this "90's kid" talk that I've actually given it thought. My defining 90's moment were all 1993 and beyond, when I was over 10 (pretty much an adolescent at that point) and getting into stuff like Beavis and Butthead, Dookie and Smash. Side note: I've noticed you talk about the AVGN a lot and recently I've come across his videos so, I've decided to check them out based on a recommendation. He's pretty funny! Some of my favorites is probably the one where he does Super-Man, Action 52 and the Bible Games. I can relate to a lot of his experiences growing up with the older consoles. My first renaissance movie was Little Mermaid but the first one I was super into was probably the Lion King; as a kid I thought it was a super cool movie (still like it a lot). Growing up I was super into Full House which I watched beginning to end but I was too old for the Power Rangers by time it aired. I agree with that, 1994 or 95 to me is what defines the 90's the most.


If only there was some positive end in sight. Alas...


Yeepppp... I can only deal with hipster pop rap for so long.


I should seriously just start wearing sweat pants, a straightened bob or Rachel with bleached tips, and solid-colored crop-tops on a regular basis and just snicker sardonically every time somebody criticizes me for looking out of step.


You should! ;D I still wear dickies, Hurley, chain wallets (not as often as I used to but I still do it) and spiky my hair like I've been doing since 1995. I think I look more stylish than any skinny jeans dweeb!


Even 1997 feels closer to 2002 than it does to 1993, especially the second half in particular. 1997 had the web 2.0 Internet being popular, early millennial/shuffle-beat pop, adult contemporary artists/groups like matchbox twenty, Third Eye Blind, Sarah McLachlan, shows like South Park, King of the Hill, 7th Heaven, and the Klasky Csupo/Cartoon Cartoon era in their peaks; 3D gaming being standard before online gaming was commonplace, Y2K-style pop punk being really popular, Generation Y being an important focus of adolescent culture, baggy non-grunge clothing, and pretty much the same materialistic-yet-vibrant overall style of popular culture. I know you're going to strongly disagree with this, based on Beavis & Butthead alone, but pretty much everything else about 1997 was like the first full year of precursors to the 2000s, or at least what was popular during a good chunk of that decade.


You do have very good points. I wouldn't say it's necessarily closer but it's pretty much in the middle between the real and faux 90's; like a transition that leans slightly more towards the real 90's. There's Beavis and Butthead and because of my high school experience where the seniors still listened to grunge and had the fashion until late, late in 1997 before adapting to the whole frosted tips, baggy chain wallet styles of the late 90's/early 00's. I remember how by then, the aesthetics changed and felt less 90's. I agree about the artists and TV shows you bring up as well. Thing about Pop Punk is very true, too. I remember when Green Day came out with nimrod, Lagwagon with Double Pladinum and smaller bands like Limp and Riverfenix came out with their debuts (all which sound pretty early 00s but have hints of 90's) and after that more and more bands, big or small, started updating their styles (or semi-updating since it was still a continuation of the 90's sound just a bit more polished). You could say 1997 began the what-if 00's and I could see your point.


Actually the zeitgeist of the 90s ended during the late part of the decade, around 1998ish. In general people group the late 90s with the early 00s, in an era known as the Y2K era (which most people consider to be roughly 1998-early 2003, but it's all up for debate). Therefore Pokemon is a Y2K era trend, not a 90s trend. People don't generally consider 1998-1999 to be apart of the 90s zeitgeist. Same way people don't consider 2000-2002 to be apart of the core 2000s.


I agree, the last two 90's years are not very 90's-like but they're 90's enough to be faux-90's and what-if 00's.


I've always noticed this around the internet and in real life discussions. People always say "Late '90s and Early '00s" when referring to things like music, fashion, movies and other trends. They'd always group the late '90s and early '00s as 1 whole era. Just going on Google or Youtube I always see things like "Late 90s and early '00s Music" or Late '90s/Early '00s Fashion" etc.


I've seen this too. Majority people I've asked or talked to group the late 90's and early 00's together.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 04/01/16 at 11:25 pm


Because they are very different compared to the '90s.  While some things that were popular in the '90s overstayed their welcome well into the '00s (Exhibit 1: Friends), the overall '90s feel and zeitgeist was gone around the time Bush was inaugurated in 2001.  2000 is the only '00s year that I would lump in with the '90s. 

Kids born in 1995 or 1996 who try to say they are '90s kids because they were into things like Lizzie McGuire and Spongebob Squarepants are what I am talking about.

The last hurrah for '90s kid culture was early Pokemon at its peak, prior to Pokemon The Movie 2000.  Nothing after that can be considered '90s kid culture.
This in bold. This is why I can see 2001 being the start of the core 00s along with other factors. Honestly, I watched some old commercials from the late 90s and early 00s sometime ago and there were actually many differences between them. One thing that comes to mind is the game consoles. In the late 90s, it was all about 5th generation; the early 00s were all about 6th consoles. Many fads of the late 90's such as Tamagotchis, Furbys, and Poke-Mania had faded by 2001.Certain fashion trends had disappeared by that time such as overalls, fubu, and tucked clothes.

I understand that there are some similarities between both eras, but some people might not know that there was not many of them.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/02/16 at 12:24 am


This in bold. This is why I can see 2001 being the start of the core 00s along with other factors. Honestly, I watched some old commercials from the late 90s and early 00s sometime ago and there were actually many differences between them. One thing that comes to mind is the game consoles. In the late 90s, it was all about 5th generation; the early 00s were all about 6th consoles. Many fads of the late 90's such as Tamagotchis, Furbys, and Poke-Mania had faded by 2001.Certain fashion trends had disappeared by that time such as overalls, fubu, and tucked clothes.

I understand that there are some similarities between both eras, but some people might not know that there was not many of them.


Overalls, tucked clothing (this wasn't really that popular in the 90's in the first place, really, but you could still see some people doing it), Furbys and Fubu (still worn by many Nu Metallers and Hip Hoppers until it left the US market in '03) were still around until 2003/2004. Tamagotchis were gone by 1999 (before it's 2004 comeback).

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/02/16 at 12:58 am


I've always considered myself a teen/adolescent of both the real 90's and the faux-90's. I mean, I don't really consider these classifications too important but it's only since all this "90's kid" talk that I've actually given it thought. My defining 90's moment were all 1993 and beyond, when I was over 10 (pretty much an adolescent at that point) and getting into stuff like Beavis and Butthead, Dookie and Smash.


I personally have difficulty defining my adolescence because I was so driven away from popular culture after just turning 13, during which horrible Dirty South rap like Pretty Ricky and Dem Franchize Boyz were becoming popular. My adolescence was basically defined by Dance Dance Revolution (primarily a 1999-2006 fad), eurobeat (which nobody else aside from certain Japanophiles listens to), academics, cross country, and AVGN, the only thing whose peak (about 2006 to 2011) lines up with my adolescent years. I did pay a bit of attention to the radio again during 11th and 12th grade, but I still listened to eurobeat far more.

Side note: I've noticed you talk about the AVGN a lot and recently I've come across his videos so, I've decided to check them out based on a recommendation. He's pretty funny! Some of my favorites is probably the one where he does Super-Man, Action 52 and the Bible Games. I can relate to a lot of his experiences growing up with the older consoles.

He really brought a lot of comfort to me during the hardest times during high school. There's just such a charm in the way he liberally invents obscene phrases to describe the horrible games he's reviewing, while still having a cerebral intuitiveness to his commentary. The Super-Man, Action 52, and Bible Games episodes are all among my favorites, you have great taste!

My first renaissance movie was Little Mermaid but the first one I was super into was probably the Lion King; as a kid I thought it was a super cool movie (still like it a lot).

Interesting how the first Disney Renaissance film that truly stood out to you was released when you were 11 or 12, a year after Beavis & Butthead premiered on television. Back when I was your age at the time of The Lion King's Release (2003-2004), the two Disney films that came out were Brother Bear and Home on the Range, neither of which I had any interest in seeing, especially the latter. It really goes to show how much better Disney was in the 90s than the 2000s!

Yeepppp... I can only deal with hipster pop rap for so long.

Not to mention it only gets more repetitive and nonmusical with each new release...sigh.

You should! ;D I still wear dickies, Hurley, chain wallets (not as often as I used to but I still do it) and spiky my hair like I've been doing since 1995. I think I look more stylish than any skinny jeans dweeb!

Y2K-era fashion just feels so me! It perfectly balances bright, fluffy casualness with that slight touch of spunk that gives it substance! The human mind isn't naturally inclined to plaster tattoos and piercings across the flesh or to shave the side of your head while cutting the rest of your hair to two inches in length!

You do have very good points. I wouldn't say it's necessarily closer but it's pretty much in the middle between the real and faux 90's; like a transition that leans slightly more towards the real 90's.

1997 is sort of paradoxical in that it was technically defined by trends that fully blossomed by the beginning of the 2000s or even beyond, yet it still felt unquestionably 90s and didn't quite have the same sleekness as 1999-2003. It's probably one of my favorite years to discuss because of its intricacies.

There's Beavis and Butthead and because of my high school experience where the seniors still listened to grunge and had the fashion until late, late in 1997 before adapting to the whole frosted tips, baggy chain wallet styles of the late 90's/early 00's. I remember how by then, the aesthetics changed and felt less 90's.

It makes sense that the senior classes at your high school still listened to grunge in 1997, since they would have basically been the last year to have leaned more towards Generation X than Generation Y, which first started to really get a voice in 1997 and 1998 but wasn't completely dominant until roughly mid-1999, by which point nu-metal and edgy urban pop had completely swallowed up the alternative rock and adult ballads that still dominated 1997 and 1998, not to mention The Simpsons' golden age, Seinfeld, and Beavis & Butthead were all definitely over by then.

I agree about the artists and TV shows you bring up as well. Thing about Pop Punk is very true, too. I remember when Green Day came out with nimrod, Lagwagon with Double Pladinum and smaller bands like Limp and Riverfenix came out with their debuts (all which sound pretty early 00s but have hints of 90's) and after that more and more bands, big or small, started updating their styles (or semi-updating since it was still a continuation of the 90's sound just a bit more polished). You could say 1997 began the what-if 00's and I could see your point.

There were a lot of new beginnings in 1997, plus the last third of 1996. You had the Generation Y wave of teen pop break out in mid-1996 in Europe before reaching America at the turn of the following spring, the release of Radiohead's OK Computer, the golden standard for alternative music that replaced britpop and grunge and paved the way for 2000s/2010s indie; the Nintendo 64 and PlayStation fully surpass the Super NES for the first time, the Internet slowly becoming standard and not just a passing fad, and finally a whole bunch of significant television premieres, including Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Sunset Beach, Sabrina the Teenage Witch, 7th Heaven, King of the Hill, South Park, Daria, Stargate SG-1, Hey Arnold!, Recess, Judge Judy, Cartoon Cartoons, Ally McBeal, and Oz, among several others. I've also compared yearbook photos from the 90s, and it feels like the portraits from 1997 are a lot different from the 1995 ones, as a large amount of teens already had short spiked hair, frosted tips, and moderately more casual clothes instead of the Cobain, wavy-haired, patchy look of the early and mid-90s. Even 1996 seems pretty different

My guess is that a fair number of middle schoolers and high school underclassmen at the time would have been picking up on most of these new things (excluding the kid cartoons, which were more significant to core/late millennials) in 1997, while the upperclassmen would have still watched Season 7 of Beavis & Butthead and Seasons 8 and 9 of The Simpsons, listened to Pearl Jam and Stone Temple Pilots, and worn somewhat grungy styles during that time.

I've seen this too. Majority people I've asked or talked to group the late 90's and early 00's together.

Sadly, though, they don't always get specific things right. I've seen so many things from 1999 described as early 2000s, while other trends from 2000 and 2001 get categorized with the late 90s. This is why Y2K/millennial era is so much more convenient!

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 04/02/16 at 1:19 am


Overalls, tucked clothing (this wasn't really that popular in the 90's in the first place, really, but you could still see some people doing it), Furbys and Fubu (still worn by many Nu Metallers and Hip Hoppers until it left the US market in '03) were still around until 2003/2004. Tamagotchis were gone by 1999 (before it's 2004 comeback).
The words in bold is what I don't remember seeing after 2000. They were replaced with tracksuits, baggy jeans and robot dogs.

Other features that were different between the late 90's and the early 00's were music (each genre had changed over time including Pop-Punk) and movies. Teen pop was basically gone by 2001 and even the Disney Renaissance was already over by then.


I don't even really consider myself a real 90s kid despite being born in 1992, I just see myself purely as a Y2K era kid, since the culture of my period of interest spanned mostly from late 1996 through early 2003, beginning with the release of the Nintendo 64 and several cartoons and educational tools I grew up with, and ending with Yu-Gi-Oh!, Codename: Kids Next Door, and Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire. I played a lot of computer games from the mid-90s and was highly familiar with the Super Nintendo, not to mention I still had a casual interest in some fads through mid-2004 – I remember watching Miguzi a lot, as well as still being highly interested in Codename: Kids Next Door at the time – but it's still primarily the Y2K era, especially 1999-2001-ish in particular that comes to my mind when I think of what made the greatest impact on me at a young age. I know I can't call myself a true 90s kid because I never even knew anything about the Sega Genesis until I watched AVGN, I was familiar with very few kid shows from the mid-90s and earlier, The Hunchback of Notre Dame was the first Disney Renaissance movie I vividly remember being brand new, and I never even got into things like Power Rangers or Full House (though my sister eventually became a fan of the latter). I consider 1994 and 1995 to be tied for quintessential 90s year because late 90s was either very similar to what was still popular during the early 2000s and even mid-2000s, or already had its roots earlier in the 90s; boybands and girl groups were technically already really popular in 1994, during which Color Me Badd, Boyz II Men, All-4-One, and Eternal scored some of the year's biggest hits; none of them, however, were still popular in 2000 or 2001, as *NSYNC and the Backstreet Boys were. So basically, I see the early-mid 90s as the peak of what defined the "nineties," and I can safely say I missed out on the vast bulk of it during my childhood because at that time, I was still into strictly kiddie things like Barney and Sesame Street.
What I bolded is how I feel as well. I might not be a pure 90s kid, but I was never a full 00s kid either. My childhood was in the time frame as yours since it took place during the Y2K era.


I personally have difficulty defining my adolescence because I was so driven away from popular culture after just turning 13, during which horrible Dirty South rap like Pretty Ricky and Dem Franchize Boyz were becoming popular. My adolescence was basically defined by Dance Dance Revolution (primarily a 1999-2006 fad), eurobeat (which nobody else aside from certain Japanophiles listens to), academics, cross country, and AVGN, the only thing whose peak (about 2006 to 2011) lines up with my adolescent years. I did pay a bit of attention to the radio again during 11th and 12th grade, but I still listened to eurobeat far more.
Wait, I thought they were an R&B group.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/02/16 at 2:17 am


I personally have difficulty defining my adolescence because I was so driven away from popular culture after just turning 13, during which horrible Dirty South rap like Pretty Ricky and Dem Franchize Boyz were becoming popular. My adolescence was basically defined by Dance Dance Revolution (primarily a 1999-2006 fad), eurobeat (which nobody else aside from certain Japanophiles listens to), academics, cross country, and AVGN, the only thing whose peak (about 2006 to 2011) lines up with my adolescent years. I did pay a bit of attention to the radio again during 11th and 12th grade, but I still listened to eurobeat far more.


I definitely see what you mean and I'd probably not like starting High School in 2006 rather than 1996. Man, all that Crunk and faux-Emo would be unbearable. The stuff that was popular during my teen-young adult years suited my tastes pretty well.


He really brought a lot of comfort to me during the hardest times during high school. There's just such a charm in the way he liberally invents obscene phrases to describe the horrible games he's reviewing, while still having a cerebral intuitiveness to his commentary. The Super-Man, Action 52, and Bible Games episodes are all among my favorites, you have great taste!


I definitely see why. He sure brings on a good laugh! Thanks! You do too! ;) I just checked out the Spider-Man games he reviewed; I'm pretty happy he enjoyed Maximum Carnage because that's still one of my favorite SNES games to this day. Hong Kong 97 is also pretty hilarious. What are some of his best videos? I love to check out more!


Interesting how the first Disney Renaissance film that truly stood out to you was released when you were 11 or 12, a year after Beavis & Butthead premiered on television. Back when I was your age at the time of The Lion King's Release (2003-2004), the two Disney films that came out were Brother Bear and Home on the Range, neither of which I had any interest in seeing, especially the latter. It really goes to show how much better Disney was in the 90s than the 2000s!


Yeah, it's kinda funny. I dunno what it is about it but I really liked it. My other favorite is probably Hercules, that one is filled with good jokes! Oh man... I think I saw Home on the Range once on TV? I think it was right smack in the middle and it made absolutely no sense. What a horrible turd of a film. Brother Bear was melodramatic like MySpace and geez, it's way too depressing than it ever needed to be!


Not to mention it only gets more repetitive and nonmusical with each new release...sigh.


It's like they're competing with Crunk! I don't get this new trend of apathetic hipsters with ukuleles or this Drake-style Autotune rap. What's the appeal? The music is garbage, too! These are the worst beats I've heard in years and they're not even fun. These are party songs!?


Y2K-era fashion just feels so me! It perfectly balances bright, fluffy casualness with that slight touch of spunk that gives it substance! The human mind isn't naturally inclined to plaster tattoos and piercings across the flesh or to shave the side of your head while cutting the rest of your hair to two inches in length!


You and me both. I love the rad skateboarder fashion of the time (which is why I continue to wear it). I agree. I don't understand what's called attractive today. Women looked much better in the 90's and early 00's. Today? Why is the colored hair, pierced faced mess so popular? And even for men, if I wanted to be stylish I have to look like Mackelmore! He's a dweeb!



1997 is sort of paradoxical in that it was technically defined by trends that fully blossomed by the beginning of the 2000s or even beyond, yet it still felt unquestionably 90s and didn't quite have the same sleekness as 1999-2003. It's probably one of my favorite years to discuss because of its intricacies.


Yeah, it's a really strange year. It's either what-if 00's or real 90's. So many people have different experiences of it, too.


It makes sense that the senior classes at your high school still listened to grunge in 1997, since they would have basically been the last year to have leaned more towards Generation X than Generation Y, which first started to really get a voice in 1997 and 1998 but wasn't completely dominant until roughly mid-1999, by which point nu-metal and edgy urban pop had completely swallowed up the alternative rock and adult ballads that still dominated 1997 and 1998, not to mention The Simpsons' golden age, Seinfeld, and Beavis & Butthead were all definitely over by then.

There were a lot of new beginnings in 1997, plus the last third of 1996. You had the Generation Y wave of teen pop break out in mid-1996 in Europe before reaching America at the turn of the following spring, the release of Radiohead's OK Computer, the golden standard for alternative music that replaced britpop and grunge and paved the way for 2000s/2010s indie; the Nintendo 64 and PlayStation fully surpass the Super NES for the first time, the Internet slowly becoming standard and not just a passing fad, and finally a whole bunch of significant television premieres, including Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Sunset Beach, Sabrina the Teenage Witch, 7th Heaven, King of the Hill, South Park, Daria, Stargate SG-1, Hey Arnold!, Recess, Judge Judy, Cartoon Cartoons, Ally McBeal, and Oz, among several others. I've also compared yearbook photos from the 90s, and it feels like the portraits from 1997 are a lot different from the 1995 ones, as a large amount of teens already had short spiked hair, frosted tips, and moderately more casual clothes instead of the Cobain, wavy-haired, patchy look of the early and mid-90s. Even 1996 seems pretty different

My guess is that a fair number of middle schoolers and high school underclassmen at the time would have been picking up on most of these new things (excluding the kid cartoons, which were more significant to core/late millennials) in 1997, while the upperclassmen would have still watched Season 7 of Beavis & Butthead and Seasons 8 and 9 of The Simpsons, listened to Pearl Jam and Stone Temple Pilots, and worn somewhat grungy styles during that time.


Yeah, my perspective is that a lot of things for the 1998-2002 era began in 1997 especially with what was going on with TV which extends back to 1996. When it comes to the music and fashion of 1997 to 1998 what I remember is in 1998 is the seniors started jocking the music and fashion trends of us below their age and soon enough they too had skateboarder fashion, frosted tips and chain wallets themselves. We already dressed like this starting around 1995 and the number grew in 1996 and 1997 to the point where it swallowed up the older kids, too. 1997 is the last time I remember Grunge kids with longer hair hanging around in their cars or in the stoner corners (not to be confused with the hip hop corners. Those groups would never mix!) listening to their Nirvana tapes. Hell, even Hip Hop got really sh!tty in 1997, if you ask me. First it was all about MC Master P, then all those guys from Cash Money, Juvnile, etc. Aside from a few bright spots from 1997-2004, 1996 is the last year that I think was really good for Hip Hop.


Sadly, though, they don't always get specific things right. I've seen so many things from 1999 described as early 2000s, while other trends from 2000 and 2001 get categorized with the late 90s. This is why Y2K/millennial era is so much more convenient!


This is true but you know I'm just going to perpetuate this madness. ;) ;D On this site, there was this article about 90's drinks and people being hopeful for Josta's comeback and I couldn't help but refer to Pepsi Blue's Rap Metal madness. "If you're gonna bring back 90's drinks, then bring back Pepsi Blue!"


The words in bold is what I don't remember seeing after 2000. They were replaced with tracksuits, baggy jeans and robot dogs.

Other features that were different between the late 90's and the early 00's were music (each genre had changed over time including Pop-Punk) and movies. Teen pop was basically gone by 2001 and even the Disney Renaissance was already over by then.


Baggy jeans (this one's something that both the 90's and early 00's are known for) and tracksuits (rappers started this trend but it also continued on into the 00's, I think. I remember track suits being really popular with some Nu Metal bands like P.O.D. and Hed P.E. too) were definitely popular in the late 90's. By Robot Dogs, you mean the Poo-Chi? That's definitely a 2000-2002 thing. I still saw many teens wearing overalls until 2003 (which I think is the last time anybody ever dared to wear them) and Furbys were still sold until 2002 before coming back in 2005/2012/2013.

Pop Punk definitely did not change until 2003 when Fall Out Boy and blink-182 changed their sounds started the real 00's faux-Emo Pop Punk sound. After those albums, more and more bands imitated this and not shortly after the slaughter of real Emo in June 2004 took place. Before that, the sound was based entirely on Limp's Pop and Disorderly, Home Grown's Act Your Age, blink-182's Enema of the State, Lit's A Place in the Sun and Lagwagon's Let's Talk About Feelings.Other genres like RnB, Hip Hop, Nu Metal, Emo (the pre-historic kind) and Post-Grunge also stayed pretty similar to their late 90's sound. Teen Pop still had remains on the charts and even bands who aren't necessarily Backstreet Boy clones but still had the cheesy boy band stigma (i.e. B2K, who were more RnB based but fit the stereotypes and were seen as a typical boy band) still on charts. Movies were all about teen films like Can't Hardly Wait, American Pie and Something About Mary, a trend which continued on until 2004 (after that, it was all straight-to-DVD films that weren't funny) or superhero films which felt like teen films (i.e. Spider-Man and Daredevil although some like X-Men had more serious tones). Disney Renaissance was done by 1999 so it's not even an early 00's thing, strictly speaking.


Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/02/16 at 6:09 am


I can't wait for 2000s nostalgia. I already miss that decade a lot. 90s nostalgia sucks, it's very superficial and internet based. So many dumb videos of stuff people think is the 90s but really is only late 90s or 2000s. I hope the 00's get the revival it deserves.


I guess it could be revived by people who were kids and young teens during the decade, since I don't think a lot of people like the 2000s. Sure, they can bring in more positive vibes about the decade, but people who hated the decade back then would still attack those who revive it.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/02/16 at 6:18 am


As mentioned before I found this whole 90's nostalgia and 90's kid thing is very annoying to the point where it ruined the 1990s decade for me. I feared the same would happen to the '00s (and any other decade) as well once the nostalgia wave for the decade hits people in the future.


I don't think biased nostalgia would ruin the 2000s for me. Besides, the 2000s are one of the most underrated decades ever, since people mostly focus more on the politics from it. They don't even appreciate the pop culture of the decade.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/02/16 at 8:19 am


I definitely see what you mean and I'd probably not like starting High School in 2006 rather than 1996. Man, all that Crunk and faux-Emo would be unbearable. The stuff that was popular during my teen-young adult years suited my tastes pretty well.


I really wish I had been born around your time, roughly the late 70s or early 80s! I would have been really content to have had my childhood in the 80s, adolescence in the 90s, and adulthood in the 00s. Popular culture would have basically lined up with my interests perfectly!

I definitely see why. He sure brings on a good laugh! Thanks! You do too! ;) I just checked out the Spider-Man games he reviewed; I'm pretty happy he enjoyed Maximum Carnage because that's still one of my favorite SNES games to this day. Hong Kong 97 is also pretty hilarious. What are some of his best videos? I love to check out more!

Haha, Hong Kong 97 is a riot! Some of my other recommendations of his include Plumbers Don't Wear Ties (an obscure 3DO game that has to be seen to be believed), Ghostbusters, Silver Surfer, The Simpsons, Nintendo Power, Dragon's Lair NES, The Wizard/Super Mario Bros. 3, Superman 64, the CD-i reviews, Transformers, Cheetahmen, Back to the Future Re-Revisited, Steven Spielberg Games, Dark Castle, Schwarzenegger Games, Ghosts n' Goblins, Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure, Tiger Electronics Games, AVGN Games!, Big Rigs: Over the Road Racing, and Universal Studios Theme Park Adventure. Frankly, I recommend just marathoning through all episodes of the series, but those are the must-see's if time is short!

Yeah, it's kinda funny. I dunno what it is about it but I really liked it. My other favorite is probably Hercules, that one is filled with good jokes! Oh man... I think I saw Home on the Range once on TV? I think it was right smack in the middle and it made absolutely no sense. What a horrible turd of a film. Brother Bear was melodramatic like MySpace and geez, it's way too depressing than it ever needed to be!

Hercules, much like its character Philoctetes, was the G.O.A.T. to me back when I saw it as a kid. Though I vividly remember owning Hunchback of Notre Dame gargoyle and Frollo toys from Burger King in 1996, Hercules was the first Disney Renaissance film that just swallowed up my childhood. I loved the songs, the quirky art direction by Scarfe, the cuteness of Pain & Panic, the absolute eeriness of the underworld, complete with the souls of the dead floating in the river Styx and three fates who bring humans to this horrifying place by cutting strings; the intimidating yet hysterical Hades, the sassy Megara, the awesome titans who make for one hell of a climax, and the incredible settings, some of the greatest in the Disney canon. I also owned a CD-ROM game, which enhanced my experience with the movie even further, allowing me to know the characters more in depth and also significantly elaborating on all of the iconic mythological figures who only made cameos in the film, such as the rest of the Greek Gods – this was how I first learnt about Poseidon, Athena, Aphrodite, Dionysus, and Narcissus – as well as the canon of mythological creatures in Greek mythology, such as the Nemean Lion (the basis of my zodiac sign), the Minotaur, the Medusa, and the harpy. In my opinion, Hercules was more interesting even than Aladdin, which for some reason everybody seems to far prefer.

It's like they're competing with Crunk! I don't get this new trend of apathetic hipsters with ukuleles or this Drake-style Autotune rap. What's the appeal? The music is garbage, too! These are the worst beats I've heard in years and they're not even fun. These are party songs!?

You could probably record some random Woody Allen-type of neurotic, slap a tambourine or hi-hat loop around it, and get people on the dance floor these days. Alas.

You and me both. I love the rad skateboarder fashion of the time (which is why I continue to wear it). I agree. I don't understand what's called attractive today. Women looked much better in the 90's and early 00's. Today? Why is the colored hair, pierced faced mess so popular? And even for men, if I wanted to be stylish I have to look like Mackelmore! He's a dweeb!

There should seriously be a flea market where you can purchase actual clothes originally produced in past eras, not the "OMG! the 90s are back! :D" revivals of today! I would take that 1999-type of look and apply it to my own free-spirited, vivacious character!

Yeah, it's a really strange year. It's either what-if 00's or real 90's. So many people have different experiences of it, too.

My experience of 1997 and early 1998 was practically indistinguishable from the second half of 1996, due to the fact that I hadn't started kindergarten yet and I wasn't introduced to a lot of important kid culture yet. I also thought the Spice Girls were like a subculture back when they were first famous, not an actual music group, even though I was definitely familiar with the song "Wannabe!"

Yeah, my perspective is that a lot of things for the 1998-2002 era began in 1997 especially with what was going on with TV which extends back to 1996. When it comes to the music and fashion of 1997 to 1998 what I remember is in 1998 is the seniors started jocking the music and fashion trends of us below their age and soon enough they too had skateboarder fashion, frosted tips and chain wallets themselves. We already dressed like this starting around 1995 and the number grew in 1996 and 1997 to the point where it swallowed up the older kids, too. 1997 is the last time I remember Grunge kids with longer hair hanging around in their cars or in the stoner corners (not to be confused with the hip hop corners. Those groups would never mix!) listening to their Nirvana tapes. Hell, even Hip Hop got really sh!tty in 1997, if you ask me. First it was all about MC Master P, then all those guys from Cash Money, Juvnile, etc. Aside from a few bright spots from 1997-2004, 1996 is the last year that I think was really good for Hip Hop.

Yeah, 1997 was a seriously negative turning point in hip hop for so many people, which only adds to the sense that that year was the beginning of a new cultural era, albeit the preliminary stages of it. Rap quickly went from being represented by things like 2Pac's All Eyez on Me, Nas' It Was Written, the Fugees' The Score, OutKast's ATLiens, pre-Can't Nobody Hold Me Down Bad Boy Records, and Death Row Records in 1996 to Puff Daddy's No Way Out (admittedly a complete guilty pleasure of mine), Mase's Harlem World, Master P's Ghetto D, Tru 2 Da Game, post-Can't Nobody Hold Me Down Bad Boy Records, and No Limit Records in 1997. You still had some representatives of the mid-90s, such as Scarface's The Untouchable and Warren G's Take a Look Over Your Shoulder, but even Wu-Tang Forever and Life After Death had much newer sounds than Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers) and Ready to Die, respectively.

This is true but you know I'm just going to perpetuate this madness. ;) ;D On this site, there was this article about 90's drinks and people being hopeful for Josta's comeback and I couldn't help but refer to Pepsi Blue's Rap Metal madness. "If you're gonna bring back 90's drinks, then bring back Pepsi Blue!"

It's really pretty unfair how the in-between periods of decades don't get properly distinguished on their own, since they're so often more memorable in their own right than the core periods of regular decades. Just think about it. The late 30s/early 40s were the definitive years for Golden Age cinema and the initial breakthrough of superhero comics. The late 40s and early 50s, aka the age of McCarthyism, crooners, and suburban migration, were pretty much their own entire decade and shouldn't be completely lumped with the greaser/Elvis/Marilyn Monroe 50s of 1955 to 1962. The late 60s and early 70s (or Nixon era, if that's more straightforward) were the height of classic rock bands like Led Zeppelin and Credence Clearwater Revival, as well as the era of certain key shows like Monty Python's Flying Circus, Scooby Doo, and The Brady Bunch. The late 70s/early 80s were the definitive period for arena bands, the Atari Age of video games, Billy Joel, Blondie, punk, pre-MTV new wave, post-disco, and certain shows like Mork & Mindy and The Dukes of Hazzard. The Bush '41 era I think needs no introduction, same goes with the millennial era. I do feel that the late 2000s/early 2010s have far less of their own distinctive culture than previous in-between periods, but I will at least say that they were the only stretch of time that felt predominantly 2010s yet were mostly good, at least in my opinion. At least emo and snap were has-been fads during that time, while SJW/"individuality" culture hadn't gotten truly rancid yet.


I don't think biased nostalgia would ruin the 2000s for me. Besides, the 2000s are one of the most underrated decades ever, since people mostly focus more on the politics from it. They don't even appreciate the pop culture of the decade.


In retrospect, the 2000s can be considered the golden age of the Internet, beginning with the basic features being fully established by the start of the decade and Web 2.0 sites still being fresh and worthwhile by the end of it. I'm already fondly looking back on Dance Dance Revolution and the PlayStation 2, plus a lot of the independent music that came out of the era. I think the basic facade of the 2000s was negative to a lot of people, culturally and geopolitically, but that the decade actually had an undercurrent of opportunity and variety. It's all very similar to how a lot of people feel about the 80s, whose politics and culture many consider inferior to the 60s and 70s, yet they were also sprawling with technological achievement, thriving underground cultures, and several key foundations for later phenomena.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: SpyroKev on 04/02/16 at 9:37 am


Nope, your computer is glitched....


Alright. Now I see that you edited, translated your post. I figured it had something to do with April fools. Haha

Yeah, my perspective is that a lot of things for the 1998-2002 era began in 1997 especially with what was going on with TV which extends back to 1996. When it comes to the music and fashion of 1997 to 1998 what I remember is in 1998 is the seniors started jocking the music and fashion trends of us below their age and soon enough they too had skateboarder fashion, frosted tips and chain wallets themselves. We already dressed like this starting around 1995 and the number grew in 1996 and 1997 to the point where it swallowed up the older kids, too. 1997 is the last time I remember Grunge kids with longer hair hanging around in their cars or in the stoner corners (not to be confused with the hip hop corners. Those groups would never mix!) listening to their Nirvana tapes. Hell, even Hip Hop got really sh!tty in 1997, if you ask me. First it was all about MC Master P, then all those guys from Cash Money, Juvnile, etc. Aside from a few bright spots from 1997-2004, 1996 is the last year that I think was really good for Hip Hop.

Wait, 400 Dagreez is great. Its brilliant, quirky and memorable. Actually, Juvenile managed to make some memorable hits through 1998-2006. I would agree that majority of the label is terrible aside from their classic beats like Still Fly.

No Limit is too hardcore for my taste.
I really wish I had been born around your time, roughly the late 70s or early 80s! I would have been really content to have had my childhood in the 80s, adolescence in the 90s, and adulthood in the 00s. Popular culture would have basically lined up with my interests perfectly!


Where's the Dragon Balls when you need them. You and me both.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: cool123 on 04/02/16 at 9:43 am


I don't think biased nostalgia would ruin the 2000s for me. Besides, the 2000s are one of the most underrated decades ever, since people mostly focus more on the politics from it. They don't even appreciate the pop culture of the decade.


The 2000s are a pretty underrated decade.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: mqg96 on 04/02/16 at 9:58 am


Many of them not really '90s kids.  I think 1992 is probably the cutoff birth year for actually being a '90s kid.  I cringe when I see people born later jumping on the '90s nostalgia bandwagon, butchering it and throwing in early 2000s fads, not knowing the difference.


I agree, a lot of people tend to lump early 2000's culture with the late 90's, while a lot of people tend to lump mid 2000's culture with the early 2000's. I get tired of this happening.


Because they are very different compared to the '90s.  While some things that were popular in the '90s overstayed their welcome well into the '00s (Exhibit 1: Friends), the overall '90s feel and zeitgeist was gone around the time Bush was inaugurated in 2001.  2000 is the only '00s year that I would lump in with the '90s. 

Kids born in 1995 or 1996 who try to say they are '90s kids because they were into things like Lizzie McGuire and Spongebob Squarepants are what I am talking about.

The last hurrah for '90s kid culture was early Pokemon at its peak, prior to Pokemon The Movie 2000.  Nothing after that can be considered '90s kid culture.


2000 is the only year I wouldn't mind people getting confused with the late 90's, but not 2001-2003 though. Also, just to let you know I'm not one of those 1995 or 1996 born's trying to claim that they were apart of the 90's  ;D, and 1994 born's shouldn't be trying to say they were 90's kids either.


I'd say 1990 is probably the cutoff for being a "true" 90s kid. 1991ers may be called 90s kids, but I guess that's up for debate. But 1992 is a bit too late, in my opinion. There is no huge difference between those born in 1992 and those born in 1993. Having them in separate categories seems odd to me.


To me, a true 90's kid is someone who spent the majority of their peak childhood in the core 90's (1993-1996), so personally I think those born in 1988 or 1989 were the last true 90's kids. The last people to have the majority of their childhood in the 90's decade in general would be 1991 born's, since they were in elementary school from late 1996-early 2002, making them in 3rd grade during the 1999-2000 school year over halfway done with elementary school. I still think it's ok for 1992 born's to call themselves ultimate Y2K kids since their childhoods were a perfect hybrid of late 90's & early 2000's. Especially those born in early or mid 1992 who started elementary school in 1997 and spent a couple of grade school years before 2000.


My interest in pop culture pretty much died after I graduated high school and early 2010s influences started to fade. They were still dominant for most of my first two years of college, but even as early as the last third of 2011, the quality was starting to slip, though still better than the side-buzz/piercing/Instagram/rape culture/selfie/empty-promised social protest/creatively stagnant era of spring 2013 to present.


I'm still into some of the pop culture today. I do I agree that early 2010's culture was better overall, but I don't just focus on the music, I also focus on TV shows and movies as well. I'm one of the few ones on this board who believe TV shows and movies are currently in a golden age right now. Video games are in a dark age right now, but I'm really a casual gamer now so I don't care anymore. I agree that social justice culture, the political culture, and the sensitivity of social media are horrible these days. I still use Facebook and Twitter regularly, but I don't mess with the Instagram, Snapcat, Tumblr, or Vine stuff.


I don't even really consider myself a real 90s kid despite being born in 1992, I just see myself purely as a Y2K era kid, since the culture of my period of interest spanned mostly from late 1996 through early 2003, beginning with the release of the Nintendo 64 and several cartoons and educational tools I grew up with, and ending with Yu-Gi-Oh!, Codename: Kids Next Door, and Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire. I played a lot of computer games from the mid-90s and was highly familiar with the Super Nintendo, not to mention I still had a casual interest in some fads through mid-2004 – I remember watching Miguzi a lot, as well as still being highly interested in Codename: Kids Next Door at the time – but it's still primarily the Y2K era, especially 1999-2001-ish in particular that comes to my mind when I think of what made the greatest impact on me at a young age. I know I can't call myself a true 90s kid because I never even knew anything about the Sega Genesis until I watched AVGN, I was familiar with very few kid shows from the mid-90s and earlier, The Hunchback of Notre Dame was the first Disney Renaissance movie I vividly remember being brand new, and I never even got into things like Power Rangers or Full House (though my sister eventually became a fan of the latter). I consider 1994 and 1995 to be tied for quintessential 90s year because late 90s was either very similar to what was still popular during the early 2000s and even mid-2000s, or already had its roots earlier in the 90s; boybands and girl groups were technically already really popular in 1994, during which Color Me Badd, Boyz II Men, All-4-One, and Eternal scored some of the year's biggest hits; none of them, however, were still popular in 2000 or 2001, as *NSYNC and the Backstreet Boys were. So basically, I see the early-mid 90s as the peak of what defined the "nineties," and I can safely say I missed out on the vast bulk of it during my childhood because at that time, I was still into strictly kiddie things like Barney and Sesame Street.


The age you were when you started playing video games was around the age I was when I started watching older kid cartoons or TV shows, and the age you were when it was your peak of interest in cartoons was around the age I was when it was my peak of interest in video games. I consider 1999-2001 as my early childhood, 2002-2006 as my peak childhood, and 2007-2009 as my late childhood. I feel like one of the truest 2000's kids out there since I started preschool in 1999 and finished middle school in 2010, and I'm not ashamed to admit this. Unfortunately, I know many folks around my age who feel insecure saying this.


In retrospect, the 2000s can be considered the golden age of the Internet, beginning with the basic features being fully established by the start of the decade and Web 2.0 sites still being fresh and worthwhile by the end of it. I'm already fondly looking back on Dance Dance Revolution and the PlayStation 2, plus a lot of the independent music that came out of the era. I think the basic facade of the 2000s was negative to a lot of people, culturally and geopolitically, but that the decade actually had an undercurrent of opportunity and variety. It's all very similar to how a lot of people feel about the 80s, whose politics and culture many consider inferior to the 60s and 70s, yet they were also sprawling with technological achievement, thriving underground cultures, and several key foundations for later phenomena.


Really? The 80's inferior to the 70's & 60's is like saying the 2000's was inferior to the 90's? I could see that with the political culture, but I don't know about the pop culture though. I hear a lot of people say that the 2000's didn't really have a cultural identity compared to the 90's, but I think the 80's had a huge identity compared to previous decades since it had a lot of important pop culture from so many sides, like the music being in its golden age according to a lot of people, the thriller movies at the time, the emergence of MTV, the fashion and hairstyles looking so cheesy and corny but still normal to a lot of people at the time. I'm not a big expert on the pop culture prior to the mid/late 90's, but I'd rather live in the 80's any day over the 60's & earlier. Although, I have to give the 60's a lot of credit, since it was definitely one of most important decades in U.S. history without a doubt.


It was around that same age for me, too. I was heavily into pop culture up to 2005, following all the hot music groups, buying trendy band-tees, getting Post-Grunge ringtones for my old flip-phone, watching the latest music videos on Fuse, etc., but I started to gradually lose interest after that. 2006 was the last year that I really followed the Billboard Hot 100 closely, and by 2008 I probably couldn't tell you 2/3rds of the songs on there.

I'm not sure what happened in the late '00s. I don't know if was my own personal tastes maturing or what, but I just started feeling really "out of step" with popular music around 2006-07, and my interest level hasn't even come close to going back to what it was during my high school years.


I could understand why you started losing interest in music around the time. Since you were out of high school by 2005 and I notice a lot of people tend to underestimate how good 2004 & 2005 actually were for music, especially if you ignored the emo/punk rock genres of songs. (no offense to those who liked them) 2006-2007 could have been down years for music for the older crowd but for the younger crowd like me, 2007 was exciting due to Soulja Boy. By the time mainstream music really picked up again for all ages around late 2008 or early 2009, some of y'all don't even realize what's going on because you've already lost interest in mainstream music dating back to 2006.

Music for me nowadays is always a hit or miss now, but I still see many good hits here or there. I don't care what anybody says or criticizes about music, but 2010 will always be my favorite year ever for all the type of music that came out, since it was a really good year for hip-hop and it the last FULL year hip hop and R&B had that clean feel before trap rap took over in late 2011, but at the same time 2010 was the peak of all of the good electropop era of music as well. So those 2 combinations absolutely did it for me. A year that had DJ Khaled - All I Do Is Win and B.O.B.- Airplanes can't be denied. This current season for music hasn't been that bad at all though, in fact, I had to give it a chance at first.


I can't wait for 2000s nostalgia. I already miss that decade a lot. 90s nostalgia sucks, it's very superficial and internet based. So many dumb videos of stuff people think is the 90s but really is only late 90s or 2000s. I hope the 00's get the revival it deserves.


I do too man, it's just that I hope that 2000's nostalgia takes off the proper way, so the excitement of it will pay off. Give it some time. I'd wait until the very end of this decade or the start of the 2020's. I want 2000's nostalgia to be done perfectly, I hope it doesn't become the new 90's nostalgia, in other words I don't want 2000's nostalgia to end up being confused with the late 2000's or early 2010's only, while people forget about the early & mid 2000's, but at the same time I don't want older people who grew up in the 90's or earlier criticizing or bashing 2000's nostalgia either, like they've been doing for the longest.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: SpyroKev on 04/02/16 at 10:00 am

Hercules, much like its character Philoctetes, was the G.O.A.T. to me back when I saw it as a kid. Though I vividly remember owning Hunchback of Notre Dame gargoyle and Frollo toys from Burger King in 1996, Hercules was the first Disney Renaissance film that just swallowed up my childhood. I loved the songs, the quirky art direction by Scarfe, the cuteness of Pain & Panic, the absolute eeriness of the underworld, complete with the souls of the dead floating in the river Styx and three fates who bring humans to this horrifying place by cutting strings; the intimidating yet hysterical Hades, the sassy Megara, the awesome titans who make for one hell of a climax, and the incredible settings, some of the greatest in the Disney canon. I also owned a CD-ROM game, which enhanced my experience with the movie even further, allowing me to know the characters more in depth and also significantly elaborating on all of the iconic mythological figures who only made cameos in the film, such as the rest of the Greek Gods – this was how I first learnt about Poseidon, Athena, Aphrodite, Dionysus, and Narcissus – as well as the canon of mythological creatures in Greek mythology, such as the Nemean Lion (the basis of my zodiac sign), the Minotaur, the Medusa, and the harpy. In my opinion, Hercules was more interesting even than Aladdin, which for some reason everybody seems to far prefer.

I'm just starting to appreciate Hercules. The movie does have a mysterious feel to it. Like every scene in the movie, you feel something is always going on somewhere else in the location. The Lion King, Hercules, A Bug's Life and The Emperor's New Groove have the most fascinating environments in Disney films.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: cool123 on 04/02/16 at 10:04 am

The day late 2000s nostalgia is widely accpted is the day everything will be in it's right place.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: mqg96 on 04/02/16 at 10:07 am


I'm just starting to appreciate Hercules. The movie does have a mysterious feel to it. Like every scene in the movie, you feel something is always going on somewhere else in the location. The Lion King, Hercules, A Bug's Life and The Emperor's New Groove have the most fascinating environments in Disney films.


I remember the Hercules TV show (animated series) too lol.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 04/02/16 at 11:02 am


Baggy jeans (this one's something that both the 90's and early 00's are known for) and tracksuits (rappers started this trend but it also continued on into the 00's, I think. I remember track suits being really popular with some Nu Metal bands like P.O.D. and Hed P.E. too) were definitely popular in the late 90's. By Robot Dogs, you mean the Poo-Chi? That's definitely a 2000-2002 thing. I still saw many teens wearing overalls until 2003 (which I think is the last time anybody ever dared to wear them) and Furbys were still sold until 2002 before coming back in 2005/2012/2013.

Pop Punk definitely did not change until 2003 when Fall Out Boy and blink-182 changed their sounds started the real 00's faux-Emo Pop Punk sound. After those albums, more and more bands imitated this and not shortly after the slaughter of real Emo in June 2004 took place. Before that, the sound was based entirely on Limp's Pop and Disorderly, Home Grown's Act Your Age, blink-182's Enema of the State, Lit's A Place in the Sun and Lagwagon's Let's Talk About Feelings.Other genres like RnB, Hip Hop, Nu Metal, Emo (the pre-historic kind) and Post-Grunge also stayed pretty similar to their late 90's sound. Teen Pop still had remains on the charts and even bands who aren't necessarily Backstreet Boy clones but still had the cheesy boy band stigma (i.e. B2K, who were more RnB based but fit the stereotypes and were seen as a typical boy band) still on charts. Movies were all about teen films like Can't Hardly Wait, American Pie and Something About Mary, a trend which continued on until 2004 (after that, it was all straight-to-DVD films that weren't funny) or superhero films which felt like teen films (i.e. Spider-Man and Daredevil although some like X-Men had more serious tones). Disney Renaissance was done by 1999 so it's not even an early 00's thing, strictly speaking.
Yes that's I'm talking about. I saw that more  than the Furby after 2000 especially considering that the latter was creepy after people finding out it could talk and had evilness.

That's weird. We're both are in the same state and i don't remember anyone in my family, friends or people I knew wearing overalls anymore at that time.

I meant that Pop-Punk was more early 00s than late 90s. In the latter, there there was more of a different sound and vibe than the former.

I don't recall R&B and Hip-hop being the same during both eras. There's definitely a contrast between a song such as Getting Jiggy with It and Always on time for hip-hop and It's all about me and U don't have to call for R&B. Teen pop might have still been on the charts; however, it was less popular after 1999 and 2000.

I do agree that the teen movies stayed the same and the Disney Renaissance was absolutely over by then. That's why I said there was some similarities between both eras, but not much.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/02/16 at 11:21 am


The day late 2000s nostalgia is widely accpted is the day everything will be in it's right place.


That would probably happen in either the very late 2010s or early 2020s. It seems recent to some people like mqg96. Hell, even I don't think the late 2000s are nostalgic as the early/mid 2000s.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 04/02/16 at 11:26 am


Y2K-era fashion just feels so me! It perfectly balances bright, fluffy casualness with that slight touch of spunk that gives it substance! The human mind isn't naturally inclined to plaster tattoos and piercings across the flesh or to shave the side of your head while cutting the rest of your hair to two inches in length!
This 100%! For some reason, the Y2K era fashion had some hidden fantasy to it. It was cool to wear it, but it wasn't overboard either.


I really wish I had been born around your time, roughly the late 70s or early 80s! I would have been really content to have had my childhood in the 80s, adolescence in the 90s, and adulthood in the 00s. Popular culture would have basically lined up with my interests perfectly!

There should seriously be a flea market where you can purchase actual clothes originally produced in past eras, not the "OMG! the 90s are back! :D" revivals of today! I would take that 1999-type of look and apply it to my own free-spirited, vivacious character!
This is the way to go. It would have been amazing the pop culture of those periods like Jordan did.

There should be some. There are plenty of stores that sell vintage clothing. Unfortunately, I don't have the names to them


You and me both. I love the rad skateboarder fashion of the time (which is why I continue to wear it). I agree. I don't understand what's called attractive today. Women looked much better in the 90's and early 00's. Today? Why is the colored hair, pierced faced mess so popular? And even for men, if I wanted to be stylish I have to look like Mackelmore! He's a dweeb!
I agree. They sure were along with the other past eras. There are definitely beautiful women today, but the features seen on them seem to be taking away their natural look.

As for men, you can still be stylish; however, you don't have to look like him. There are plenty of clothing styles to to choose from and still look great without looking like a dweeb.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/02/16 at 12:04 pm


I agree, a lot of people tend to lump early 2000's culture with the late 90's, while a lot of people tend to lump mid 2000's culture with the early 2000's. I get tired of this happening.


Me too. I don't even think most early 2000s culture were somehow related to the 90s. Even before 9/11, it just seemed like the early 2000s were way different than the 90s. Although, the early/mid 2000s were basically like its own era. The late 2000s can be somewhat related to the very early 2010s, since that's when the golden age of YouTube and social media happened.


I do too man, it's just that I hope that 2000's nostalgia takes off the proper way, so the excitement of it will pay off. Give it some time. I'd wait until the very end of this decade or the start of the 2020's. I want 2000's nostalgia to be done perfectly, I hope it doesn't become the new 90's nostalgia, in other words I don't want 2000's nostalgia to end up being confused with the late 2000's or early 2010's only, while people forget about the early & mid 2000's, but at the same time I don't want older people who grew up in the 90's or earlier criticizing or bashing 2000's nostalgia either, like they've been doing for the longest.


Well, at least it wasn't brought up by some social media post, when the 90s were becoming nostalgic. Hell, I don't see a lot of people being nostalgic for the 2000s, aside from the early '00s of course. But hopefully, the late '10s/early '20s would be worth it for 2000s kids.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: cool123 on 04/02/16 at 12:06 pm


That would probably happen in either the very late 2010s or early 2020s. It seems recent to some people like mqg96. Hell, even I don't think the late 2000s are nostalgic as the early/mid 2000s.


Are u even a late 2000s kid?

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/02/16 at 12:14 pm


Are u even a late 2000s kid?


Well yeah. I was born in 1999. What do you think?

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: cool123 on 04/02/16 at 12:17 pm


Well yeah. I was born in 1999. What do you think?


I think your a mid 00s kid. Like I say 1997-1999 are mid 00s kids while 2000-2002 are late 00s kids.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/02/16 at 12:23 pm


I think your a mid 00s kid. Like I say 1997-1999 are mid 00s kids while 2000-2002 are late 00s kids.


Dude, I was 7-10 (since I turned 10 in December of 2009) in the late 2000s. That makes me a mid-late 2000s kid.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: mqg96 on 04/02/16 at 12:28 pm


I think your a mid 00s kid. Like I say 1997-1999 are mid 00s kids while 2000-2002 are late 00s kids.


1996-1998 born's are the main mid 2000's kids. 1999-2001 are the main late 2000's kids. 2002 born's are late 2000's/early 2010's hybrids. However, a 1996 born could be seen as an early/mid 2000's hybrid while a 1999 born could be seen as a mid/late 2000's hybrid. That's just my opinion. I notice from the majority of people that age 8 seems to be the absolute peak of their childhood.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: cool123 on 04/02/16 at 12:29 pm


Dude, I was 7-10 (since I turned 10 in December of 2009) in the late 2000s. That makes me a mid-late 2000s kid.


I'm just saying that you seem to identify more with being a mid 00s kid than a late 00s kid.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/02/16 at 12:37 pm


I'm just saying that you seem to identify more with being a mid 00s kid than a late 00s kid.


Well.. since I was born in 1999, I'm more of a mid/late 2000s hybrid. For instance, I spent 3 years of elementary school in the mid 2000s, while I spent 3 more years in the late 2000s. Making me a mid/late 2000s hybrid, since people usually take their peak childhood as their elementary school years.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: cool123 on 04/02/16 at 12:51 pm


Well.. since I was born in 1999, I'm more of a mid/late 2000s hybrid. For instance, I spent 3 years of elementary school in the mid 2000s, while I spent 3 more years in the late 2000s. Making me a mid/late 2000s hybrid, since people usually take their peak childhood as their elementary school years.


You think the 06-07 school year is mid 2000s?

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/02/16 at 1:04 pm


You think the 06-07 school year is mid 2000s?


Kinda. It was half mid 2000s/late 2000s. Same with the 2009-2010 school year was half late 2000s/early 2010s, considering it's not recent as 2011-present.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/02/16 at 6:17 pm

Really? The 80's inferior to the 70's & 60's is like saying the 2000's was inferior to the 90's? I could see that with the political culture, but I don't know about the pop culture though. I hear a lot of people say that the 2000's didn't really have a cultural identity compared to the 90's, but I think the 80's had a huge identity compared to previous decades since it had a lot of important pop culture from so many sides, like the music being in its golden age according to a lot of people, the thriller movies at the time, the emergence of MTV, the fashion and hairstyles looking so cheesy and corny but still normal to a lot of people at the time. I'm not a big expert on the pop culture prior to the mid/late 90's, but I'd rather live in the 80's any day over the 60's & earlier. Although, I have to give the 60's a lot of credit, since it was definitely one of most important decades in U.S. history without a doubt.

I don't mean to say the 80s had less of an identity than the 70s; if anything it has pretty much the most obvious culture of any decade in history. However, I've heard a lot of people complain about how much they despise the 80s and how the 90s basically revitalized popular culture. The 1980s were basically the first decade that commercialism started to really dominate popular culture, and this sentiment was exposed in pretty much every corner of society, from the in-your-face synthesized music, bands being popular heavily based on image, to the formulaic television shows, to the onslaught of toy lines and tie-in side products, to the expansion of big business in general, to the spike in mall culture, especially among adolescent women. A lot of people I know think the 60s and 70s were a period of creative flourishing, while the 80s were just a soulless product of corporate exploitation. In addition, a lot of people despise Ronald Reagan for his poor handling of the AIDS crisis, callousness towards racial minorities, voodoo economics, international blunders like Iran-Contra, and other controversial policies that George W. Bush would later try to articulate. The 2000s, like the 1980s, saw both the vast expansion of commercialism in mainstream culture, as well as the development of several significant technological breakthroughs and underground cultures.

I meant that Pop-Punk was more early 00s than late 90s. In the latter, there there was more of a different sound and vibe than the former.

Well, it was different in terms of levels of success – the genre became much bigger after Enema of the State came out and especially around mid-2001, becoming a staple of the Mainstream Top 40 and not just the Modern Rock Chart, but the actual style of pop punk changed quite little between 1997 and early 2003, which is the main point Jordan is trying to convey. Stuff from even the first half of 1997 such as the Offspring's Ixnay on the Hombre, the Ataris' Anywhere but Here, and blink-182's Dude Ranch are pretty much in the same general vein as Bowling for Soup and Good Charlotte's albums from late 2002, even if they're just slightly rawer.

I don't recall R&B and Hip-hop being the same during both eras. There's definitely a contrast between a song such as Getting Jiggy with It and Always on time for hip-hop and It's all about me and U don't have to call for R&B. Teen pop might have still been on the charts; however, it was less popular after 1999 and 2000.

Actually, I could easily imagine "U Don't Have to Call" being made as early as 1997. Its production style is really quite similar to both of these songs from Usher's My Way album from that year:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bQRzrnH6_HY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dthjojjVhDo

They're not identical, of course, but they all share the same basic type of syncopated shuffle-beat rhythms with lots of treble.

While the Neptunes are definitely most easily associated with the early 2000s, which was their commercial peak, they had basically already developed their identifiable production style by the late 90s that was clearly inspired by Timbaland, who rose to fame in 1996. They produced "Lookin' at Me" from Mase's Harlem World album.

Will Smith, on the other hand, was indeed pretty outdated by the time the early 2000s took off; he was pretty much strictly a late 90s artist, similar to Master P and the Spice Girls. He had a brief comeback in 2005, but only because Timbaland produced his new hit, with the album itself otherwise performing quite marginally.

Still, even with the strictly late 90s Puff Daddy/Will Smith type of urban music fading out by the new millennium, early 2000s-type of music was already highly prevalent by the second half of 1997. The main differences in music, in my opinion, between the millennial era and the early 2000s, were, firstly, the decline of classic teen pop and the rise of more pop rock-oriented teen artists like Avril Lavigne and Hilary Duff, and, secondly, the rise of garage rock bands like the Strokes and the White Stripes. Otherwise, the early 2000s were pretty much dominated by movements that already existed in the Y2K era, even if there was more of a chart focus on rap and pop punk than before.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/02/16 at 6:54 pm


I don't mean to say the 80s had less of an identity than the 70s; if anything it has pretty much the most obvious culture of any decade in history. However, I've heard a lot of people complain about how much they despise the 80s and how the 90s basically revitalized popular culture. The 1980s were basically the first decade that commercialism started to really dominate popular culture, and this sentiment was exposed in pretty much every corner of society, from the in-your-face synthesized music, bands being popular heavily based on image, to the formulaic television shows, to the onslaught of toy lines and tie-in side products, to the expansion of big business in general, to the spike in mall culture, especially among adolescent women. A lot of people I know think the 60s and 70s were a period of creative flourishing, while the 80s were just a soulless product of corporate exploitation. In addition, a lot of people despise Ronald Reagan for his poor handling of the AIDS crisis, callousness towards racial minorities, voodoo economics, international blunders like Iran-Contra, and other controversial policies that George W. Bush would later try to articulate. The 2000s, like the 1980s, saw both the vast expansion of commercialism in mainstream culture, as well as the development of several significant technological breakthroughs and underground cultures.


Both also had Republican presidents throughout the majority of their decades, which then led to conflict between various countries.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: the2001 on 04/02/16 at 7:32 pm

early 2000s is already becoming a thing now aha

https://soundcloud.com/stevespeeps

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Slim95 on 04/02/16 at 7:53 pm

The early and mid 00's are pretty alike. The late 2000s are very different though. I hope the nostalgia is focused on the early and mid 00's. The early 00's are different from the late 90s too except for maybe until mid 2001.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: cool123 on 04/02/16 at 10:30 pm

Is the 2010-2011 school years bit dated now?

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Slim95 on 04/02/16 at 11:07 pm


Is the 2010-2011 school years bit dated now?

I would say it is a bit dated. I'm pretty sure most people still didn't have smartphones during that school year. I think smartphones started to really take off that summer of 2011.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/03/16 at 12:27 am


I really wish I had been born around your time, roughly the late 70s or early 80s! I would have been really content to have had my childhood in the 80s, adolescence in the 90s, and adulthood in the 00s. Popular culture would have basically lined up with my interests perfectly!


It was a pretty good time to grow up and I'm glad I got to experience the 80's to early 00's before things got pretty bad. I miss being excited for new releases of movies, music, video games and TV but I guess everybody has their time.


Haha, Hong Kong 97 is a riot! Some of my other recommendations of his include Plumbers Don't Wear Ties (an obscure 3DO game that has to be seen to be believed), Ghostbusters, Silver Surfer, The Simpsons, Nintendo Power, Dragon's Lair NES, The Wizard/Super Mario Bros. 3, Superman 64, the CD-i reviews, Transformers, Cheetahmen, Back to the Future Re-Revisited, Steven Spielberg Games, Dark Castle, Schwarzenegger Games, Ghosts n' Goblins, Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure, Tiger Electronics Games, AVGN Games!, Big Rigs: Over the Road Racing, and Universal Studios Theme Park Adventure. Frankly, I recommend just marathoning through all episodes of the series, but those are the must-see's if time is short!


I'm watching Plumbers Don't Wear Ties right now. I've known about the 3DO and it's Zelda and Mario games and this is just as much of a trainwreck. His reactions to the games are perfect. It's frustration that everyone who's ever played a sh!tty game can relate to and turned all the way up to 11! Definitely gonna do some marathones. Thanks!


Hercules, much like its character Philoctetes, was the G.O.A.T. to me back when I saw it as a kid. Though I vividly remember owning Hunchback of Notre Dame gargoyle and Frollo toys from Burger King in 1996, Hercules was the first Disney Renaissance film that just swallowed up my childhood. I loved the songs, the quirky art direction by Scarfe, the cuteness of Pain & Panic, the absolute eeriness of the underworld, complete with the souls of the dead floating in the river Styx and three fates who bring humans to this horrifying place by cutting strings; the intimidating yet hysterical Hades, the sassy Megara, the awesome titans who make for one hell of a climax, and the incredible settings, some of the greatest in the Disney canon. I also owned a CD-ROM game, which enhanced my experience with the movie even further, allowing me to know the characters more in depth and also significantly elaborating on all of the iconic mythological figures who only made cameos in the film, such as the rest of the Greek Gods – this was how I first learnt about Poseidon, Athena, Aphrodite, Dionysus, and Narcissus – as well as the canon of mythological creatures in Greek mythology, such as the Nemean Lion (the basis of my zodiac sign), the Minotaur, the Medusa, and the harpy. In my opinion, Hercules was more interesting even than Aladdin, which for some reason everybody seems to far prefer.


Yeah, I agree with that. I think Aladdin is a really good movie but Hercules has something special about it. One of my favorite characters was Hades! Man, I thought he was a totally rad villain and to this day he's up there as some of my favorite Disney villains next to Ezma and Kronk. The art also stuck out to me. It was so interesting and well done. The way they designed the characters is how I think is true and representative of who they are. It's such a fun movie and I don't think it ever drags along or gets boring.


You could probably record some random Woody Allen-type of neurotic, slap a tambourine or hi-hat loop around it, and get people on the dance floor these days. Alas.


You can add even more appeal if you add some cowbell. The kids love cowbell! ;D What an era of musical creativity we're in!


There should seriously be a flea market where you can purchase actual clothes originally produced in past eras, not the "OMG! the 90s are back! :D" revivals of today! I would take that 1999-type of look and apply it to my own free-spirited, vivacious character!


There should be! My problem with clothing today is the fit, especially shirts. My style is the usual sh!ts: loose T-Shirts that go down to my elbow. When I go to the store today, the shirts are always ill-fitted and tight (and buying bigger sizes doesn't help but make it look worse) with sleeves to high and a torso that goes waayyy to low. Like, what the hell? It looks awful! Before, I never really payed attention because clothes were clothes and they fit fine but today? Clothing today has really bad shaping that I can't help but hate it.


My experience of 1997 and early 1998 was practically indistinguishable from the second half of 1996, due to the fact that I hadn't started kindergarten yet and I wasn't introduced to a lot of important kid culture yet. I also thought the Spice Girls were like a subculture back when they were first famous, not an actual music group, even though I was definitely familiar with the song "Wannabe!"


Oh man, I dunno if I could take a whole subculture based around the Spice Girls. Those rap guys were bad enough. I just thought about how weird 1997 was with the kids at school. Grunge kids playing Nirvana and Pearl Jam in one area and Hip Hoppers playing Cash Money rap in another during the same year.


Yeah, 1997 was a seriously negative turning point in hip hop for so many people, which only adds to the sense that that year was the beginning of a new cultural era, albeit the preliminary stages of it. Rap quickly went from being represented by things like 2Pac's All Eyez on Me, Nas' It Was Written, the Fugees' The Score, OutKast's ATLiens, pre-Can't Nobody Hold Me Down Bad Boy Records, and Death Row Records in 1996 to Puff Daddy's No Way Out (admittedly a complete guilty pleasure of mine), Mase's Harlem World, Master P's Ghetto D, Tru 2 Da Game, post-Can't Nobody Hold Me Down Bad Boy Records, and No Limit Records in 1997. You still had some representatives of the mid-90s, such as Scarface's The Untouchable and Warren G's Take a Look Over Your Shoulder, but even Wu-Tang Forever and Life After Death had much newer sounds than Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers) and Ready to Die, respectively.


Two songs from 1997 really stick out to me: Juvnile's "HA!" and Master P's "Make 'Em Say Uhh!" They're some songs I'd hear a lot which made me think "Huh? What happened?" When Cash Money got popular, man, I hated them! For me, pre-1997 Hip Hop had much better beats and groves. I'm glad 1998 and 2004 had some really good Beasties records, though. Those are among my favorite Hip Hop records (Paul's Boutique and Check Your Head will always be my tops, though). I play bass so what got me interested in hip hop, aside from the Beasties (who opened me up to checking out different genres), was a lot of the cool samples they'd use for different songs and how it all flowed together. Doggystyle, for example, is totally rad just for it's beats alone. What's My Name and Serial Killa are a few favorites of mine. Tha Doggfather was pretty lame but it wasn't until Da Game that Snoop turned to the dumps.


It's really pretty unfair how the in-between periods of decades don't get properly distinguished on their own, since they're so often more memorable in their own right than the core periods of regular decades. Just think about it. The late 30s/early 40s were the definitive years for Golden Age cinema and the initial breakthrough of superhero comics. The late 40s and early 50s, aka the age of McCarthyism, crooners, and suburban migration, were pretty much their own entire decade and shouldn't be completely lumped with the greaser/Elvis/Marilyn Monroe 50s of 1955 to 1962. The late 60s and early 70s (or Nixon era, if that's more straightforward) were the height of classic rock bands like Led Zeppelin and Credence Clearwater Revival, as well as the era of certain key shows like Monty Python's Flying Circus, Scooby Doo, and The Brady Bunch. The late 70s/early 80s were the definitive period for arena bands, the Atari Age of video games, Billy Joel, Blondie, punk, pre-MTV new wave, post-disco, and certain shows like Mork & Mindy and The Dukes of Hazzard. The Bush '41 era I think needs no introduction, same goes with the millennial era. I do feel that the late 2000s/early 2010s have far less of their own distinctive culture than previous in-between periods, but I will at least say that they were the only stretch of time that felt predominantly 2010s yet were mostly good, at least in my opinion. At least emo and snap were has-been fads during that time, while SJW/"individuality" culture hadn't gotten truly rancid yet.


I totally agree. The late 00's and early 10's are a weird limbo period where faux-Emo (though, I think this still had some hold on kids back then because I still saw the look around but it definitely was reaching "has-been" status) and Snap weren't as big as they used to be but the toxic SJW culture was only in it's early stages and had not reached the heights that it would in 2013.


Wait, 400 Dagreez is great. Its brilliant, quirky and memorable. Actually, Juvenile managed to make some memorable hits through 1998-2006. I would agree that majority of the label is terrible aside from their classic beats like Still Fly.

No Limit is too hardcore for my taste.


I dunno, I've always hated Juvnile. I remember when I first heard his raps I thought he was super drunk or something. That style of rap with the beats and all that stuff really isn't my thing. I don't know why Cash Money even exists. They popularized the worst style of rap.

Not a big fan of No Limit, either.


Yes that's I'm talking about. I saw that more  than the Furby after 2000 especially considering that the latter was creepy after people finding out it could talk and had evilness.

That's weird. We're both are in the same state and i don't remember anyone in my family, friends or people I knew wearing overalls anymore at that time.

I meant that Pop-Punk was more early 00s than late 90s. In the latter, there there was more of a different sound and vibe than the former.

I don't recall R&B and Hip-hop being the same during both eras. There's definitely a contrast between a song such as Getting Jiggy with It and Always on time for hip-hop and It's all about me and U don't have to call for R&B. Teen pop might have still been on the charts; however, it was less popular after 1999 and 2000.

I do agree that the teen movies stayed the same and the Disney Renaissance was absolutely over by then. That's why I said there was some similarities between both eras, but not much.


That's true but you'd both see the Poo-Chi in 2000 and you'd still see the Furby after 2000. The Gremlins comparisons were a good laugh.

I knew quite a few people who still did but I didn't see it after 2003.

Most people I know into Pop Punk see the slicker millennium sound (which is pretty much a very slightly updated version of Dookie with a blend of NoFX and Lagwagon) as both a late 90's and early 00's thing. The Pop Punk vibe changed in 2003, like I stated before. Pop Punk in the late 90's and early 00's was more light-hearted and more rebellious. They were obnoxious zit-faced slackers with spiky hair who couldn't get laid or kept getting dumped. 2003 changed all that when Fall Out Boy released Take This To Your Grave. That album began a shift to from I-Don't-Care voices to singers who sounded like they belonged in theater musicals and play productions. Sensitive guys who wrote a lot of seemingly deep (but really stupid and shallow) poetry to their online girlfriends rather than the care-free vibes of Sum 41 and The Riddlin' Kids. This trend continued with blink's untitled which ultimately contributed to the death of the traditional styles of Emo, Pop Punk and Post-Hardcore in June of 2004.

Yes, but Always On Time isn't a huge departure from what Cash Money records was releasing at the time and Getting Jiggy With It isn't too far off from Black Suits Comin'. U Don't Have To Call isn't really all that different from another song of his like You Make Me Wanna... and It's All About pretty similar to a song like B2K's Gots ta Be. This is true, teeny pop had lost popularity but it was still hanging around.

I think the early 00's have more similarities to the late 90's than anything.


I agree. They sure were along with the other past eras. There are definitely beautiful women today, but the features seen on them seem to be taking away their natural look.

As for men, you can still be stylish; however, you don't have to look like him. There are plenty of clothing styles to to choose from and still look great without looking like a dweeb.


Yeah, today's era has a very strange look that I can't wrap my head around.

Well, I guess but it seems today the fashionable look is the Mackelmore.


Well, it was different in terms of levels of success – the genre became much bigger after Enema of the State came out and especially around mid-2001, becoming a staple of the Mainstream Top 40 and not just the Modern Rock Chart, but the actual style of pop punk changed quite little between 1997 and early 2003, which is the main point Jordan is trying to convey. Stuff from even the first half of 1997 such as the Offspring's Ixnay on the Hombre, the Ataris' Anywhere but Here, and blink-182's Dude Ranch are pretty much in the same general vein as Bowling for Soup and Good Charlotte's albums from late 2002, even if they're just slightly rawer.


This is true. The attitude, sound and style of Pop Punk stayed consistent from 1997 until 2003 when the changes that I mentioned above started to take place.


Will Smith, on the other hand, was indeed pretty outdated by the time the early 2000s took off; he was pretty much strictly a late 90s artist, similar to Master P and the Spice Girls. He had a brief comeback in 2005, but only because Timbaland produced his new hit, with the album itself otherwise performing quite marginally.

Still, even with the strictly late 90s Puff Daddy/Will Smith type of urban music fading out by the new millennium, early 2000s-type of music was already highly prevalent by the second half of 1997. The main differences in music, in my opinion, between the millennial era and the early 2000s, were, firstly, the decline of classic teen pop and the rise of more pop rock-oriented teen artists like Avril Lavigne and Hilary Duff, and, secondly, the rise of garage rock bands like the Strokes and the White Stripes. Otherwise, the early 2000s were pretty much dominated by movements that already existed in the Y2K era, even if there was more of a chart focus on rap and pop punk than before.


Black Suits Comin' was a pretty decent hit. Even though it's not the same level of success as his 1998 and 1999 songs, it's chart presence is comparable to 2000's Freakin' It. The album itself also went Gold and got to 13 on both the Billboard 200 and Hot RnB/Hip Hop charts which I think is pretty good. Definitely not as good of a success as his previous but still quite a noticeable presence, especially with all the MIB II advertizements going on. Avril Lavigne to me seemed like both a pop rock teen artist (blink-182 4 kidz, if you will ;D) and a continuation of that female singer-songwriter trend that started around 1997-ish.


The early and mid 00's are pretty alike. The late 2000s are very different though. I hope the nostalgia is focused on the early and mid 00's. The early 00's are different from the late 90s too except for maybe until mid 2001.


I don't think the early 00's and mid 00's were very much alike at all.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/03/16 at 4:14 am

I'm watching Plumbers Don't Wear Ties right now. I've known about the 3DO and it's Zelda and Mario games and this is just as much of a trainwreck. His reactions to the games are perfect. It's frustration that everyone who's ever played a sh!tty game can relate to and turned all the way up to 11! Definitely gonna do some marathones. Thanks!

You're welcome! You are right about everything!

Yeah, I agree with that. I think Aladdin is a really good movie but Hercules has something special about it. One of my favorite characters was Hades! Man, I thought he was a totally rad villain and to this day he's up there as some of my favorite Disney villains next to Ezma and Kronk. The art also stuck out to me. It was so interesting and well done. The way they designed the characters is how I think is true and representative of who they are. It's such a fun movie and I don't think it ever drags along or gets boring.

This all! It's a shame it never gets appreciated so much as it's just called weird, forgettable, or structurally generic. Aladdin is solid and all, but what does it have that Hercules doesn't?

There should be! My problem with clothing today is the fit, especially shirts. My style is the usual sh!ts: loose T-Shirts that go down to my elbow. When I go to the store today, the shirts are always ill-fitted and tight (and buying bigger sizes doesn't help but make it look worse) with sleeves to high and a torso that goes waayyy to low. Like, what the hell? It looks awful! Before, I never really payed attention because clothes were clothes and they fit fine but today? Clothing today has really bad shaping that I can't help but hate it.

People who wear their clothing tight are being their true selves and should thus be applauded. If you think otherwise, then you're being rude and close-minded and probably support Trump.

Oh man, I dunno if I could take a whole subculture based around the Spice Girls. Those rap guys were bad enough. I just thought about how weird 1997 was with the kids at school. Grunge kids playing Nirvana and Pearl Jam in one area and Hip Hoppers playing Cash Money rap in another during the same year.

Since the Spice Girls were already this huge cultural phenomenon, beginning with the nicknames given to all five members, there was, at the very least, a ton of Spice Girls merchandise that came out in 1997 and the rest of the late 90s. This article puts it into the perfect perspective. Don't forget, either, this masterpiece:

https://static.spiceworks.com/attachments/post/0000/3384/spiceworld.jpg

Two songs from 1997 really stick out to me: Juvnile's "HA!" and Master P's "Make 'Em Say Uhh!" They're some songs I'd hear a lot which made me think "Huh? What happened?" When Cash Money got popular, man, I hated them!

Juvenile's "HA!" is actually from late 1998, by which point No Limit was just starting to decline in popularity. Cash Money basically took the New Orleans hip hop baton from No Limit as the 1998-1999 school year drew to a close, with "Back That Thang Up" becoming an especially huge hit in late 1999.

For me, pre-1997 Hip Hop had much better beats and groves. I'm glad 1998 and 2004 had some really good Beasties records, though. Those are among my favorite Hip Hop records (Paul's Boutique and Check Your Head will always be my tops, though). I play bass so what got me interested in hip hop, aside from the Beasties (who opened me up to checking out different genres), was a lot of the cool samples they'd use for different songs and how it all flowed together. Doggystyle, for example, is totally rad just for it's beats alone. What's My Name and Serial Killa are a few favorites of mine. Tha Doggfather was pretty lame but it wasn't until Da Game that Snoop turned to the dumps.

Yeah, the turn of spring 1997 was such a dramatic turning point for rap in general. Not only did it see the release of Puff Daddy & Mase's game-changing "Can't Nobody Hold Me Down," the first true rap megahit for the millennial generation, it also had the release of Tru 2 da Game, the breakthrough album for No Limit Records that cemented the label as Bad Boy Records' new main rival after the implosion of Death Row Records. Master P's Ice Cream Man from mid-1996 was also moderately successful, but at that time Death Row was still seen as the primary juggernaut for gangsta rap. The No Limit soldiers basically took the West Coast template, added a heavier street slang, introduced a cruder cover art style, and cranked up the repetition, though to be fair a lot of their songs still accurately chronicled the real-life struggles of surviving in the ghetto.

It's sadly true though that Da Game Is to Be Sold, Not to Be Told was a huge step down from Doggystyle and even Tha Doggfather. It may have made sense on paper for Snoop to have moved to No Limit, since as I just said, they basically replaced the now-dormant Death Row as the main juggernaut of gangsta rap, but the general approaches to the two labels were actually still quite different, and No Limit's repetitious, hyper-aggressive character was hardly the right match for Snoop's unmistakable flow as Death Row's snarling, groovy, sophisticated, funk was. He just sounded unusually tired throughout his first whole record record there, unable to keep up with the frantic pace. I especially love the song "Woof," which features the two loudest No Limit Soldiers (Fiend and Mystikal) screaming their throats out and spontaneous barking noises in the backdrop, while Snoop is just sleepily chanting "bow wow wow yippie yo yippie yay," and then pretty much just casually speed-talking during his own verse towards the end. I can understand why No Limit would have thought his laid-back approach to spitting verses would make him seem particularly icy on the mic – he was already intimidating in his unaffected confidence at Death Row – but throughout Da Game Is to be Sold, Not to Be Told, he just sounds like he's throwing in the towel, like he doesn't care one bit about what he's rhyming about. Alas, the most memorable thing about that album is the hokey cover art.

I suppose I shouldn't be surprised about Snoop venturing into bizarre territory, though, considering his later escapades:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R2R_xIYzEbA

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F57P9C4SAW4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWCa3GvbNUE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-MI3CKL4NMI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0kRAKXFrYQ4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HkMNOlYcpHg

In retrospect, it's hard to even believe this was once what Snoop Dogg was all about:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_CL6n0FJZpk

I totally agree. The late 00's and early 10's are a weird limbo period where faux-Emo (though, I think this still had some hold on kids back then because I still saw the look around but it definitely was reaching "has-been" status) and Snap weren't as big as they used to be but the toxic SJW culture was only in it's early stages and had not reached the heights that it would in 2013.

I suppose there were certain identifiers for that era of popular culture, like Lady Gaga, the Great Recession, Breaking Bad, and Glee, but most of it either just leaned comfortably either towards the 2010s side for music and tv shows or the 2000s for video games and fashion, although the latter was really neutral more than anything else.

I dunno, I've always hated Juvnile. I remember when I first heard his raps I thought he was super drunk or something. That style of rap with the beats and all that stuff really isn't my thing. I don't know why Cash Money even exists. They popularized the worst style of rap.

They also gave birth to Lil Wayne.

Most people I know into Pop Punk see the slicker millennium sound (which is pretty much a very slightly updated version of Dookie with a blend of NoFX and Lagwagon) as both a late 90's and early 00's thing. The Pop Punk vibe changed in 2003, like I stated before. Pop Punk in the late 90's and early 00's was more light-hearted and more rebellious. They were obnoxious zit-faced slackers with spiky hair who couldn't get laid or kept getting dumped. 2003 changed all that when Fall Out Boy released Take This To Your Grave. That album began a shift to from I-Don't-Care voices to singers who sounded like they belonged in theater musicals and play productions. Sensitive guys who wrote a lot of seemingly deep (but really stupid and shallow) poetry to their online girlfriends rather than the care-free vibes of Sum 41 and The Riddlin' Kids. This trend continued with blink's untitled which ultimately contributed to the death of the traditional styles of Emo, Pop Punk and Post-Hardcore in June of 2004.

As much as I love theatre and consider it one of my primary passions, I've still always considered the faux-emo of the mid-late 2000s to be laughably pretentious more than anything else. Shakespeare could express the intricacies of human nature just by his witty, fluid prose, but bands like Fall Out Boy and Panic! at the Disco pretty much just rambled a bunch of supposed metaphoric images at a frenetic pace. When you have song titles like "There's a Good Reason These Tables Are Numbered Honey, You Just Haven't Thought of It Yet," "I'm Like a Lawyer with the Way I'm Always Trying to Get You Off (Me & You)," and "I've Got a Dark Alley and a Bad Idea That Says You Should Shut Your Mouth (Summer Song)," that pretty obviously means you're overshooting everything.

Black Suits Comin' was a pretty decent hit. Even though it's not the same level of success as his 1998 and 1999 songs, it's chart presence is comparable to 2000's Freakin' It. The album itself also went Gold and got to 13 on both the Billboard 200 and Hot RnB/Hip Hop charts which I think is pretty good. Definitely not as good of a success as his previous but still quite a noticeable presence, especially with all the MIB II advertizements going on.

"Freakin' It" was pretty much around the time Will Smith was becoming outdated, especially as artists like Eminem were huger than ever before. Especially during the age of Eminem, Ja Rule, and the like, clean, light, party rap was becoming pretty unpopular. The MIB II soundtrack certainly did decently enough to be considered a success, but that was largely the result of the advertisements, as you mentioned.

Avril Lavigne to me seemed like both a pop rock teen artist (blink-182 4 kidz, if you will ;D) and a continuation of that female singer-songwriter trend that started around 1997-ish.

True, but she was also a much more significant fashion icon for adolescent girls than Jewel, Shawn Colvin, and Paula Cole ever were. She basically expanded already-existent trends to a newer demographic, which in turn eventually led to artists like Hilary Duff and Ashlee Simpson being more popular than the neo-new jack swing teen pop of the Y2K era.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/03/16 at 7:51 am


Is the 2010-2011 school years bit dated now?


Kind of, but it's not as dated as the 2009-2010 school year.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: mqg96 on 04/03/16 at 12:30 pm

Until Barack Obama leaves office, anything after 2008 is recent to me.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: cool123 on 04/03/16 at 12:34 pm


Until Barack Obama leaves office, anything after 2008 is recent to me.


Come on man even 2009 is looking a bit dated by this point.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/03/16 at 12:37 pm


Come on man even 2009 is looking a bit dated by this point.


Well, some people disagree with that. Hell, I wouldn't even think 2009 is that dated compared to 2007 and 2008.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: cool123 on 04/03/16 at 12:40 pm


Well, some people disagree with that. Hell, I wouldn't even think 2009 is that dated compared to 2007 and 2008.


I'm not saying 2009 is as dated as 2007/2008. Of course 2009 is still somewhat recent because 2010s culture began that year.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/03/16 at 12:44 pm


I'm not saying 2009 is as dated as 2007/2008. Of course 2009 is still somewhat recent because 2010s culture began that year.


Yeah, but I'm saying that because 2009 was Obama's first year as president.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: cool123 on 04/03/16 at 12:52 pm

Barack Obama

2008 vs 2016

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Slim95 on 04/03/16 at 1:17 pm

I don't think Obama is enough for a basis whether something is recent or not.  ;D Not everyone lives in America.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: cool123 on 04/03/16 at 1:20 pm


I don't think Obama is enough for a basis whether something is recent or not.  ;D Not everyone lives in America.


What are you Canadian?

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Slim95 on 04/03/16 at 2:03 pm


What are you Canadian?

Yes I am.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/03/16 at 2:10 pm


I don't think Obama is enough for a basis whether something is recent or not.  ;D Not everyone lives in America.


True. Since we do have some users that are not American.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: SpyroKev on 04/03/16 at 2:21 pm

Yeah, I agree with that. I think Aladdin is a really good movie but Hercules has something special about it. One of my favorite characters was Hades! Man, I thought he was a totally rad villain and to this day he's up there as some of my favorite Disney villains next to Ezma and Kronk. The art also stuck out to me. It was so interesting and well done. The way they designed the characters is how I think is true and representative of who they are. It's such a fun movie and I don't think it ever drags along or gets boring.

Haha Kronk is awesome. He became one of Kuzco's assistants in Emperor's New School that made him more interesting.

I dunno, I've always hated Juvnile. I remember when I first heard his raps I thought he was super drunk or something. That style of rap with the beats and all that stuff really isn't my thing. I don't know why Cash Money even exists. They popularized the worst style of rap.

Not a big fan of No Limit, either.


I guess you have to be from the South.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Howard on 04/03/16 at 2:27 pm


Barack Obama

2008 vs 2016



He's getting grayer.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: musicguy93 on 04/03/16 at 5:11 pm


Barack Obama

2008 vs 2016


Does anyone else notice how pale-looking photos are in the 2010s?

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/03/16 at 5:13 pm


Does anyone else notice how pale-looking photos are in the 2010s?


I guess it's because they're trying to get the HD look.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: musicguy93 on 04/03/16 at 5:14 pm


I guess it's because they're trying to get the HD look.


I know, but I just don't understand the appeal of that pale style. I hope it's not here to stay.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/03/16 at 6:08 pm


I know, but I just don't understand the appeal of that pale style. I hope it's not here to stay.


The hell if I know. We live in a decade where people put in weird Snapchat/Instagram filters on their pictures. So I don't know why there's a pale look in today's pictures.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Slim95 on 04/03/16 at 10:41 pm


Does anyone else notice how pale-looking photos are in the 2010s?

I noticed that too. Just another trend I think.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/05/16 at 3:05 am


You're welcome! You are right about everything!


I just found out he's released a movie. Would you say it's worth watching?


This all! It's a shame it never gets appreciated so much as it's just called weird, forgettable, or structurally generic. Aladdin is solid and all, but what does it have that Hercules doesn't?


I agree! I don't see why it's ignored in favor of the others when it's a good fun movie. Just comparing the two, Aladdin doesn't have the same colorful adventure as Hercules. Jarfar is a great villain but there's no way he's as menacing and cool as Hades. How can you beat the flaming hair??


People who wear their clothing tight are being their true selves and should thus be applauded. If you think otherwise, then you're being rude and close-minded and probably support Trump.


I should feel bad for speaking out against tight clothing as it is a diverse form of expression and sends a strong message of individuality. Donald Trump can sit on his tower of bigotry with his XXL dickies but I'd rather sit with the contrarians at Starbucks with SM jeans and hoodies.


Since the Spice Girls were already this huge cultural phenomenon, beginning with the nicknames given to all five members, there was, at the very least, a ton of Spice Girls merchandise that came out in 1997 and the rest of the late 90s. This article puts it into the perfect perspective. Don't forget, either, this masterpiece:

https://static.spiceworks.com/attachments/post/0000/3384/spiceworld.jpg
 

Oh no! Not Buzzfeed! Yeah, I remember seeing a lot of this stuff on TV ads and in the stores. Limited edition Spice Girls candy... I just don't understand it!


Juvenile's "HA!" is actually from late 1998, by which point No Limit was just starting to decline in popularity. Cash Money basically took the New Orleans hip hop baton from No Limit as the 1998-1999 school year drew to a close, with "Back That Thang Up" becoming an especially huge hit in late 1999.

Yeah, the turn of spring 1997 was such a dramatic turning point for rap in general. Not only did it see the release of Puff Daddy & Mase's game-changing "Can't Nobody Hold Me Down," the first true rap megahit for the millennial generation, it also had the release of Tru 2 da Game, the breakthrough album for No Limit Records that cemented the label as Bad Boy Records' new main rival after the implosion of Death Row Records. Master P's Ice Cream Man from mid-1996 was also moderately successful, but at that time Death Row was still seen as the primary juggernaut for gangsta rap. The No Limit soldiers basically took the West Coast template, added a heavier street slang, introduced a cruder cover art style, and cranked up the repetition, though to be fair a lot of their songs still accurately chronicled the real-life struggles of surviving in the ghetto.


Oh yeah, you're right! That song is one that signified the end of good hip hop. No grooves, no nothin'. That sounds about right. I remember around that time when Cash Money continued on the terrible garbage that No Limit started then you'd see the likes of the Hot Boyz and their funky crew taking over the airwaves. Juvenile's singles are some of the worst. He sounds drunker than Barney Gumble on those recordings...




It's sadly true though that Da Game Is to Be Sold, Not to Be Told was a huge step down from Doggystyle and even Tha Doggfather. It may have made sense on paper for Snoop to have moved to No Limit, since as I just said, they basically replaced the now-dormant Death Row as the main juggernaut of gangsta rap, but the general approaches to the two labels were actually still quite different, and No Limit's repetitious, hyper-aggressive character was hardly the right match for Snoop's unmistakable flow as Death Row's snarling, groovy, sophisticated, funk was. He just sounded unusually tired throughout his first whole record record there, unable to keep up with the frantic pace. I especially love the song "Woof," which features the two loudest No Limit Soldiers (Fiend and Mystikal) screaming their throats out and spontaneous barking noises in the backdrop, while Snoop is just sleepily chanting "bow wow wow yippie yo yippie yay," and then pretty much just casually speed-talking during his own verse towards the end. I can understand why No Limit would have thought his laid-back approach to spitting verses would make him seem particularly icy on the mic – he was already intimidating in his unaffected confidence at Death Row – but throughout Da Game Is to be Sold, Not to Be Told, he just sounds like he's throwing in the towel, like he doesn't care one bit about what he's rhyming about. Alas, the most memorable thing about that album is the hokey cover art.

I suppose I shouldn't be surprised about Snoop venturing into bizarre territory, though, considering his later escapades:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R2R_xIYzEbA

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F57P9C4SAW4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWCa3GvbNUE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-MI3CKL4NMI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0kRAKXFrYQ4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HkMNOlYcpHg

In retrospect, it's hard to even believe this was once what Snoop Dogg was all about:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_CL6n0FJZpk


Yep and it just kept getting worse and worse from there. I remember hearing My Name Is Part 2. when it came out and thought "Huh?? Is... Is he even trying to stay on time??" and all he's done ever since are those stupid mumbles that he tries to pass off as "rap". On Doggystyle, he sounded like a tough street smart dogg. Now he sounds like he belongs in the old folks home. All that pot he smokes has really gotten to his head to be doing all this awful crap.


I suppose there were certain identifiers for that era of popular culture, like Lady Gaga, the Great Recession, Breaking Bad, and Glee, but most of it either just leaned comfortably either towards the 2010s side for music and tv shows or the 2000s for video games and fashion, although the latter was really neutral more than anything else.


Pretty much. Such a bland, bland time.


They also gave birth to Lil Wayne.


Yeah, him and the awful Hot Boyz! 8-P You know what was hilarious? That Rap Rock album he tried to do a few years ago. One of the worst parts was that faux-Pop Punk song he tried to do. All the reviewers said "Lil Wayne tackles blink-182 Pop Punk excellently with his new track." But no! It was terrible! I can't believe anyone would buy that crap.


As much as I love theatre and consider it one of my primary passions, I've still always considered the faux-emo of the mid-late 2000s to be laughably pretentious more than anything else. Shakespeare could express the intricacies of human nature just by his witty, fluid prose, but bands like Fall Out Boy and Panic! at the Disco pretty much just rambled a bunch of supposed metaphoric images at a frenetic pace. When you have song titles like "There's a Good Reason These Tables Are Numbered Honey, You Just Haven't Thought of It Yet," "I'm Like a Lawyer with the Way I'm Always Trying to Get You Off (Me & You)," and "I've Got a Dark Alley and a Bad Idea That Says You Should Shut Your Mouth (Summer Song)," that pretty obviously means you're overshooting everything.


Oh yeah, you and me both. The Pop Punk I grew up with in the 90's to early 00's was really simple, fun and interesting. It was loud and feel good music for slackers and Dell Dude lookalikes. When bands like Sum 41 had break up songs, they were usually loud songs about not giving a sh!t or twisted into a goofy situation like Lit would do. A lot of those bands weren't afraid to add some Metal influence into their music, too, and that was pretty cool. The real 00's faux-Emo like Fall Out Boy would go off on long diatribes that always consisted of taking a thesaurus and combining random words together. "These are confabulations that caustically pierce through my skin and constrict my heart together." Look, I've just come up with a title for a Fall Out Boy song! And Panic! at the Disco have got to be one of the worst bands I've ever heard, too. They're everything bad about Fall Out Boy but turned up to 11 as if it couldn't have gotten more awful. I like the early Fall Out Boy that released Evening Out because it was true to what Pop Punk was but ever since Take This to Your grave... No thank you! Pop Punk went from being a really cool and fun thing to being one of the worst rock music genres on the radio. It sucked because I loved everything about it.


"Freakin' It" was pretty much around the time Will Smith was becoming outdated, especially as artists like Eminem were huger than ever before. Especially during the age of Eminem, Ja Rule, and the like, clean, light, party rap was becoming pretty unpopular. The MIB II soundtrack certainly did decently enough to be considered a success, but that was largely the result of the advertisements, as you mentioned.


Eminem's peak was pretty much from 1999 to 2002 so I definitely see how Will Smith was pushed off to the side for who was probably the biggest rapper of that time span. Personally, I'd still consider him and songs like Freakin' It and Black Suits decent successes (just based off what I saw on MTV and the radio) and still having to do with the culture (as opposed to a major flop that nobody cared about) but Eminem is really the big rap star during that era. And I gotta admit, the three Shady anthems rule. SSLP to Eminem Show are a few of the last great hip hop albums in my eyes.


True, but she was also a much more significant fashion icon for adolescent girls than Jewel, Shawn Colvin, and Paula Cole ever were. She basically expanded already-existent trends to a newer demographic, which in turn eventually led to artists like Hilary Duff and Ashlee Simpson being more popular than the neo-new jack swing teen pop of the Y2K era.


I can see your point here. When I look at her and her music compared to what she influenced, I put early Avril on a different class than Hilary Duff and Ashlee Simpson. Just her whole vibe and attitude felt more on par with music that was more for all people and not just tweens (aside from Sk8r Boi).  When she came out, she was known more for being on par with stuff like Alanis Morissette than simply just a pop artist for teens. I feel like Complicated or I'm With You were songs that reached out to many people. For the most part, she escaped that teen pop stigma that really got a hold of Ashley and Hilary. She had both the rebellious and home grown aspects of different styles of popular music that people liked and wasn't just a play it safe (she wasn't really controversial but she wasn't afraid to flip off a camera or so) Disney teen. Not to mention on her first tour she'd bring a lot of diverse heavier acts with her. Both Pop Punk like Autopilot Off and Hip Hop Swollen Members. Stuff like that really separates her further from the stuff she inspired which was pretty much made for Disney and only tweens listened to (i.e. Hilary Duff). Just comparing her during the Let Go era to Best Damn Thing... Jesus, it's a whole world of change! She went from touring with Gob, Simple Plan and Sum 41 to the Jonas Bros and Boys Like Girls.


Haha Kronk is awesome. He became one of Kuzco's assistants in Emperor's New School that made him more interesting.

I guess you have to be from the South.


Kronk is one of the best Disney characters of all time! I heard Emperor's New School wasn't that great of a show...

Yeah, I guess so. Maybe that's where most of the appeal comes from and I just can't relate to the stuff.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/05/16 at 5:06 am


I just found out he's released a movie. Would you say it's worth watching?


I personally enjoyed it, but a lot of AVGN fans didn't care for it, particularly criticizing the flat side-characters who never ever had anything to do with the web show, including a stock black best friend, a token female, a love arc between the two side characters, and only brief cameos by key Cinemassacre figures like Kyle Justin, Mike Matei, and the Nostalgia Critic. A lot of outside reviewers also criticized it for the self-immortalization of the Nerd character. I think people were disappointed that there weren't nearly as many references as you would expect from an AVGN movie, though to be fair, based on the videos on his site (not just AVGN-related), I think James simply wanted to make a classic b-flick ala Roger Corman, and developing a thought-provoking story wasn't nearly as much on his mind as was paying homage to his filmmaking inspirations. I'd personally recommend it if you're a fan of James as an overall person as I am, but if you're specifically in it for the Nerd, then you'll probably be disappointed.

I agree! I don't see why it's ignored in favor of the others when it's a good fun movie. Just comparing the two, Aladdin doesn't have the same colorful adventure as Hercules. Jarfar is a great villain but there's no way he's as menacing and cool as Hades. How can you beat the flaming hair??

Just imagine if Aladdin didn't have the Robin Williams Genie. That was pretty much half of what factored into the movie's success.

I should feel bad for speaking out against tight clothing as it is a diverse form of expression and sends a strong message of individuality. Donald Trump can sit on his tower of bigotry with his XXL dickies but I'd rather sit with the contrarians at Starbucks with SM jeans and hoodies.

If you're a guy and you wear dickies, spiked hair, and baggy clothing, you're probably a prejudiced bro and part of the reason for everything unfair in the world. If you're a lesbian and you like having long hair and wearing dresses, then you're just caving in to patriarchal customs and allowing women to be treated as objects. However, if you're a guy and buy clothes at your local thrift shop and sport a Macklemore fade cut, you're taking a brave stand against evil traditions. Furthermore, if you're a lesbian, then bravo for cutting your hair to inch-length, wearing "90s revival" flannel shirts, piercing your nose, and sporting a rebellious tattoo to show your support for proper representation of women! God forbid if you had decided to dress like a lady when you're attracted to other females!

Yeah, I know it's unfair to act so judgmentally about fashion when a lot of people don't even feel the need to give it second thought, I just hope this world offers me opportunities for love even though I'm a feminine lesbian who isn't at all into mid-2010s SJW/hipster/EDM/OitNB/etc. culture.

Oh no! Not Buzzfeed! Yeah, I remember seeing a lot of this stuff on TV ads and in the stores. Limited edition Spice Girls candy... I just don't understand it!

Yeah, they really sold a lot of girl power merchandise back in the Y2K era. It's still better than idolizing Kim Kardashian and Miley Cyrus, though!

Oh yeah, you're right! That song is one that signified the end of good hip hop. No grooves, no nothin'. That sounds about right. I remember around that time when Cash Money continued on the terrible garbage that No Limit started then you'd see the likes of the Hot Boyz and their funky crew taking over the airwaves. Juvenile's singles are some of the worst. He sounds drunker than Barney Gumble on those recordings...

Somehow, he even made a comeback in (fittingly) 2004 with a song that reached #1:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BumcoxotNb0

Yep and it just kept getting worse and worse from there. I remember hearing My Name Is Part 2. when it came out and thought "Huh?? Is... Is he even trying to stay on time??" and all he's done ever since are those stupid mumbles that he tries to pass off as "rap". On Doggystyle, he sounded like a tough street smart dogg. Now he sounds like he belongs in the old folks home. All that pot he smokes has really gotten to his head to be doing all this awful crap.

Before you know it, he'll probably be recording children's music. His newest album Bush doesn't even have a parental advisory label. Back in the 90s, it would have been completely unfathomable to imagine a Snoop album so soft it doesn't have a parental advisory label. In all fairness, Snoop had a major revelation after he just barely escaped a murder conviction in 1996 – it soured his embrace of the gangsta lifestyle and was really the beginning of his evolution from menacing LBC gangster to the free-spirited cosmopolitan he is today. Apparently, Tha Doggfather was supposed to be a more positively themed record, featuring, among other things, a skit in which Snoop tells a kid to never grow up to be like him. Still, the problem was that he never really invested any focus in his work from that point on. He still tried to pass himself off as hardcore during his No Limit era, with marginal results, and was only able to stay relevant into the 2010s thanks to a handful of pop hits during the 2000s.

Pretty much. Such a bland, bland time.

Still, it was much, much more bearable than the hideous world of today. It was the last time I felt I could still be truly individualistic and find a flourishing online community to match. Nowadays, pretty much every online niche community is either near-vacant or infected by social media crap.

Yeah, him and the awful Hot Boyz! 8-P You know what was hilarious? That Rap Rock album he tried to do a few years ago. One of the worst parts was that faux-Pop Punk song he tried to do. All the reviewers said "Lil Wayne tackles blink-182 Pop Punk excellently with his new track." But no! It was terrible! I can't believe anyone would buy that crap.

Ugh, I can't believe the youth of America opted to listen to all the ridiculous stuff Lil Wayne released instead of the electronic and alternative acts that thrived in Europe. Shame.

Oh yeah, you and me both. The Pop Punk I grew up with in the 90's to early 00's was really simple, fun and interesting. It was loud and feel good music for slackers and Dell Dude lookalikes. When bands like Sum 41 had break up songs, they were usually loud songs about not giving a sh!t or twisted into a goofy situation like Lit would do. A lot of those bands weren't afraid to add some Metal influence into their music, too, and that was pretty cool. The real 00's faux-Emo like Fall Out Boy would go off on long diatribes that always consisted of taking a thesaurus and combining random words together. "These are confabulations that caustically pierce through my skin and constrict my heart together." Look, I've just come up with a title for a Fall Out Boy song! And Panic! at the Disco have got to be one of the worst bands I've ever heard, too. They're everything bad about Fall Out Boy but turned up to 11 as if it couldn't have gotten more awful. I like the early Fall Out Boy that released Evening Out because it was true to what Pop Punk was but ever since Take This to Your grave... No thank you! Pop Punk went from being a really cool and fun thing to being one of the worst rock music genres on the radio. It sucked because I loved everything about it.

I can write an album just as witty as Panic and Fall Out combined. Here's the track list to my upcoming EP, Only the Indignant Arouse Admiration:

1. The Indecent Anticipation of Decent Anti-Heroes (And Why Our Suspicions Pervert the Masses)
2. Pardon My Impertinent Tainting of Thee, but That Burgundy Petticoat Cleanses Any Potential Inkling of Your Plausibility
3. Under the Bloody Sofa (Insanity Is Philosophy to the Quick)
4. Running with Red Withered Roses without a Wisp of Withdrawal (We Won with White Willows Wrapped withal Wonderful Weddings)
5. Lyrical Armageddon (If You Are Still Reading This, Your Shrewdness Has Faltered)

Perchance this miniature collection of intrinsic soliloquies will finally lead to my triumphant discovery of a fellow female who fawns over my sickly, tortured soul.

Eminem's peak was pretty much from 1999 to 2002 so I definitely see how Will Smith was pushed off to the side for who was probably the biggest rapper of that time span. Personally, I'd still consider him and songs like Freakin' It and Black Suits decent successes (just based off what I saw on MTV and the radio) and still having to do with the culture (as opposed to a major flop that nobody cared about) but Eminem is really the big rap star during that era. And I gotta admit, the three Shady anthems rule. SSLP to Eminem Show are a few of the last great hip hop albums in my eyes.

(getting out of pretentious poet mode)

Yeah, it's actually kind of hard to perfectly measure the influences of one type of music over another, since while a certain few songs will sell the most copies and play on most people radios, there's still always the existence of something less successful on the charts but still beloved by a serious fanbase. There are a lot of r&b songs that made it into the top 20 throughout the 90s and 2000s, yet hardly anybody still remembers them compared to stuff like "Would?," "Sabotage," and even "My Name Is," none of which did that well on the charts.

I can see your point here. When I look at her and her music compared to what she influenced, I put early Avril on a different class than Hilary Duff and Ashlee Simpson. Just her whole vibe and attitude felt more on par with music that was more for all people and not just tweens (aside from Sk8r Boi).  When she came out, she was known more for being on par with stuff like Alanis Morissette than simply just a pop artist for teens. I feel like Complicated or I'm With You were songs that reached out to many people. For the most part, she escaped that teen pop stigma that really got a hold of Ashley and Hilary. She had both the rebellious and home grown aspects of different styles of popular music that people liked and wasn't just a play it safe (she wasn't really controversial but she wasn't afraid to flip off a camera or so) Disney teen. Not to mention on her first tour she'd bring a lot of diverse heavier acts with her. Both Pop Punk like Autopilot Off and Hip Hop Swollen Members. Stuff like that really separates her further from the stuff she inspired which was pretty much made for Disney and only tweens listened to (i.e. Hilary Duff). Just comparing her during the Let Go era to Best Damn Thing... Jesus, it's a whole world of change! She went from touring with Gob, Simple Plan and Sum 41 to the Jonas Bros and Boys Like Girls.

I don't know, I just remember my younger sister was a huge fan of Avril Lavigne back when Let Go came out, and she was only 7½ at the time. She listened heavily to Avril while simultaneously being into things like the Cheetah Girls, S Club, and the soundtracks to The Princess Diaries and Freaky Friday. I think even though Avril Lavigne had a lot of pretty mature music that's more comparable to Sarah McLachlan, Alanis Morissette, and Paula Cole, she still had a specific appeal that reached out to both older listeners, as well as much younger ones, and a lot of that, I think, has to do with her image. At least, after she blew up, pop rock basically became the new norm for teen pop for a time rather than new jack swing and Babyface-esque r&b.

Kronk is one of the best Disney characters of all time!

Aw yes!

https://s3.amazonaws.com/colorslive/jpg_512x512/119696-35qjhlUHGpRlFcw-.jpg

Aw YEAH!

http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01158/arts-graphics-2005_1158595a.jpg

OH YEAH!!!

http://wac.450f.edgecastcdn.net/80450F/92moose.fm/files/2013/04/kool-aid.jpg

Yeah, I guess so. Maybe that's where most of the appeal comes from and I just can't relate to the stuff.

Yet such a huge chunk of who bought their stuff was white suburban male adolescents. Sigh...

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: aja675 on 04/05/16 at 5:12 am



Since the Spice Girls were already this huge cultural phenomenon, beginning with the nicknames given to all five members, there was, at the very least, a ton of Spice Girls merchandise that came out in 1997 and the rest of the late 90s. This article puts it into the perfect perspective. Don't forget, either, this masterpiece:

https://static.spiceworks.com/attachments/post/0000/3384/spiceworld.jpg

My first musical memory was Mama by the Spice Girls.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: mach!ne_he@d on 04/05/16 at 11:46 am


I could understand why you started losing interest in music around the time. Since you were out of high school by 2005 and I notice a lot of people tend to underestimate how good 2004 & 2005 actually were for music, especially if you ignored the emo/punk rock genres of songs. (no offense to those who liked them) 2006-2007 could have been down years for music for the older crowd but for the younger crowd like me, 2007 was exciting due to Soulja Boy. By the time mainstream music really picked up again for all ages around late 2008 or early 2009, some of y'all don't even realize what's going on because you've already lost interest in mainstream music dating back to 2006.


Thank you for pointing out that the 2004-05 school year had some great music! Despite the mid '00s bashing that seems so popular these days, I'll take any year that's got everything from "Take Me Out" to "Honest Mistake", and "Mr. Brightside" to "Float On". It wasn't quite as good as 2003-04 (which had "Hey Ya!" and "Stacy's Mom", alone making it one of my all-time favorite musical school years), but still solid in it's own right. My personal opinion is that rock went into a decline starting in 2005-06 due to the rise of Emo, so (to me at least) 2004-05 was the last great year for rock.

As far as 2006-07, I think it was a better year musically than 2005-06. I actually think that 2005-06 is one of the worst school years ever for music. Between that horrible Snap Rap craze taking off (think "Laffy Taffy") and Emo wiping out the last vestiges of the early '00s Garage Rock revolution, mainstream music went through a fairly low point at that time for me.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/05/16 at 4:09 pm


Thank you for pointing out that the 2004-05 school year had some great music! Despite the mid '00s bashing that seems so popular these days, I'll take any year that's got everything from "Take Me Out" to "Honest Mistake", and "Mr. Brightside" to "Float On". It wasn't quite as good as 2003-04 (which had "Hey Ya!" and "Stacy's Mom", alone making it one of my all-time favorite musical school years), but still solid in it's own right. My personal opinion is that rock went into a decline starting in 2005-06 due to the rise of Emo, so (to me at least) 2004-05 was the last great year for rock.

As far as 2006-07, I think it was a better year musically than 2005-06. I actually think that 2005-06 is one of the worst school years ever for music. Between that horrible Snap Rap craze taking off (think "Laffy Taffy") and Emo wiping out the last vestiges of the early '00s Garage Rock revolution, mainstream music went through a fairly low point at that time for me.


Alas, I totally feel your pain. I just recently stated 2005-2006 was an absolutely horrible school year for popular music and caused me to stop following mainstream musical trends. Despite this, however, the school year was actually excellent in Great Britain, where snap fell by the wayside and indie rock drew some attention away from the dull post-post-grunge and faux-emo that was huge in the United States. I just got the British Now 62 (released November 2005) last week, and it's an excellent compilation. I already brought up "Push the Button" and "Tripping" as being some of the best pop songs of the 2000s, but there are a lot of other phenomenal hits that I so wish had made it overseas, such as "I Predict a Riot," "I Said Never Again (But Here We Are)," "Biology," "Can I Have It Like That," "Ooh La La," "You Raise Me Up," "Doctor Pressure," and "The Importance of Being Idle." Instead, its American equivalent featured such classics as "I Think They Like Me" and "Like You;" the following release was even worse, with "Grillz," "My Humps," Lean wit It, Rock wit It," "Fresh AZMIZ," and "Stay Fly."

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/06/16 at 10:41 pm


I personally enjoyed it, but a lot of AVGN fans didn't care for it, particularly criticizing the flat side-characters who never ever had anything to do with the web show, including a stock black best friend, a token female, a love arc between the two side characters, and only brief cameos by key Cinemassacre figures like Kyle Justin, Mike Matei, and the Nostalgia Critic. A lot of outside reviewers also criticized it for the self-immortalization of the Nerd character. I think people were disappointed that there weren't nearly as many references as you would expect from an AVGN movie, though to be fair, based on the videos on his site (not just AVGN-related), I think James simply wanted to make a classic b-flick ala Roger Corman, and developing a thought-provoking story wasn't nearly as much on his mind as was paying homage to his filmmaking inspirations. I'd personally recommend it if you're a fan of James as an overall person as I am, but if you're specifically in it for the Nerd, then you'll probably be disappointed.


That seems to be the general consensus. I was reading a bit about James and the criticisms of the movie and it seems fora lot of people the problems fans have are basically what you just mentioned with it being for of a homage to the b-films and other classics he's into rather than an hour long episode of the AVGN. I might give it a shot but knowing it's not as AVGN as maybe it should of been is kinda disappointing because so far I'm really liking the Nerd.


Just imagine if Aladdin didn't have the Robin Williams Genie. That was pretty much half of what factored into the movie's success.


Things would of turned out a lot differently for that movie for sure. The Genie basically represents what everyone loves about Aladdin! It's too bad that it's success had to push Hercules out of the way, though. It's like they say those Taco commercials: why not both?


If you're a guy and you wear dickies, spiked hair, and baggy clothing, you're probably a prejudiced bro and part of the reason for everything unfair in the world. If you're a lesbian and you like having long hair and wearing dresses, then you're just caving in to patriarchal customs and allowing women to be treated as objects. However, if you're a guy and buy clothes at your local thrift shop and sport a Macklemore fade cut, you're taking a brave stand against evil traditions. Furthermore, if you're a lesbian, then bravo for cutting your hair to inch-length, wearing "90s revival" flannel shirts, piercing your nose, and sporting a rebellious tattoo to show your support for proper representation of women! God forbid if you had decided to dress like a lady when you're attracted to other females!

Yeah, I know it's unfair to act so judgmentally about fashion when a lot of people don't even feel the need to give it second thought, I just hope this world offers me opportunities for love even though I'm a feminine lesbian who isn't at all into mid-2010s SJW/hipster/EDM/OitNB/etc. culture.


If you don't dress like tumblr, you're just conforming to evil social norms that oppress the weak!! But yeah, it's sucks to hear that you're having all these troubles with love. Finding people who you connect with and relate to can be a really tough thing especially with today's weird and awkward climate. The 2010's are supposed to be this "wonderfully diverse time that celebrates uniqueness" yet it's only if you look like a stereotypical tumblr Starbucks clone. People these days are making themselves more like caricatures built up off of stereotypical rather than being people who have their own sets of interests and tastes. Social Media might have to do with this homogeneous mindset since so many young kids go on these sites and get so easily influenced by ignorant people who are so stuck in their little bubbles of the world.


Yeah, they really sold a lot of girl power merchandise back in the Y2K era. It's still better than idolizing Kim Kardashian and Miley Cyrus, though!


Totally. I'd take the Spice Girls over them any day! Hell, Kardashian doesn't even do anything! She is one person who should definitely not get the limelight under any circumstances...


Somehow, he even made a comeback in (fittingly) 2004 with a song that reached #1:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BumcoxotNb0


Of course, out of all years, his comeback is in 2004! That Juvenile, oh boy, he is full of surprises.


Before you know it, he'll probably be recording children's music. His newest album Bush doesn't even have a parental advisory label. Back in the 90s, it would have been completely unfathomable to imagine a Snoop album so soft it doesn't have a parental advisory label. In all fairness, Snoop had a major revelation after he just barely escaped a murder conviction in 1996 – it soured his embrace of the gangsta lifestyle and was really the beginning of his evolution from menacing LBC gangster to the free-spirited cosmopolitan he is today. Apparently, Tha Doggfather was supposed to be a more positively themed record, featuring, among other things, a skit in which Snoop tells a kid to never grow up to be like him. Still, the problem was that he never really invested any focus in his work from that point on. He still tried to pass himself off as hardcore during his No Limit era, with marginal results, and was only able to stay relevant into the 2010s thanks to a handful of pop hits during the 2000s.


Oh man, I remember the skit.... Snoop's gotten super weird these days. Snoop Lion (that doesn't even make sense)? Snoopzilla? I dunno but I think all that pot's gotten to his head. He even had that awful movie a couple years back that was dedicated to being a "pot smokin' thug" which pretty much proves his lack of focus into being a more "positive role model".


Still, it was much, much more bearable than the hideous world of today. It was the last time I felt I could still be truly individualistic and find a flourishing online community to match. Nowadays, pretty much every online niche community is either near-vacant or infected by social media crap.


By then I was already pretty jaded about... ahem... "those damn kids and their techno music!!" but I definitely see your point. Social Media wasn't as awful back then as it's become today and people didn't have too many SJW's to worry about.


Ugh, I can't believe the youth of America opted to listen to all the ridiculous stuff Lil Wayne released instead of the electronic and alternative acts that thrived in Europe. Shame.


Yeah, I don't get that either! Europe actually had some pretty good stuff during those times whereas America was all about awful rap music. I don't get it, did America just stop caring about good music?? I listened to the songs you've linked below and while they're not really my thing, they're a lot more upbeat and try to be fun (and I can tolerate them as they're not really bad songs) where as America wanted to be anti-diversity as possible. I hated it! Rock was literally two things back then: faux-Emo and Post-Post-Grunge and then you had your Rap made for Ringtones and Crunk. 8-P 8-P 8-P


I can write an album just as witty as Panic and Fall Out combined. Here's the track list to my upcoming EP, Only the Indignant Arouse Admiration:

1. The Indecent Anticipation of Decent Anti-Heroes (And Why Our Suspicions Pervert the Masses)
2. Pardon My Impertinent Tainting of Thee, but That Burgundy Petticoat Cleanses Any Potential Inkling of Your Plausibility
3. Under the Bloody Sofa (Insanity Is Philosophy to the Quick)
4. Running with Red Withered Roses without a Wisp of Withdrawal (We Won with White Willows Wrapped withal Wonderful Weddings)
5. Lyrical Armageddon (If You Are Still Reading This, Your Shrewdness Has Faltered)

Perchance this miniature collection of intrinsic soliloquies will finally lead to my triumphant discovery of a fellow female who fawns over my sickly, tortured soul.


My review:
Oh, how this EP speaks to my soul. Like dark lovers in the night it ceases my very heartbeat at the sound of every drum beat. Each note is like a creek on the linoleum of the bitter halls of depression while dashing wistfully though every door and window of the human mind. I listen to this and am reminded of the glory days of Emotive music; when Fall Out Boy reached to the masses with their joy-wilted words, when Panic! at the Disco preformed great acts of cantillation to the choir as their bashful partners in crime, Paramore, graced audiences with cunning wit. This EP is nothing short of a paramount effort and deserves no more than 5 out of 5 stars. 


(getting out of pretentious poet mode)

Yeah, it's actually kind of hard to perfectly measure the influences of one type of music over another, since while a certain few songs will sell the most copies and play on most people radios, there's still always the existence of something less successful on the charts but still beloved by a serious fanbase. There are a lot of r&b songs that made it into the top 20 throughout the 90s and 2000s, yet hardly anybody still remembers them compared to stuff like "Would?," "Sabotage," and even "My Name Is," none of which did that well on the charts.


;D

That's too true. I feel like as time goes by there's a certain context that gets lost along with it. There's so much stuff that I remember being really  popular and influential during it's time that's now being referred to as "obscure" or on the flipside, like the songs you've mentioned, have huge legacies and are known for being "huge influential successes".  It's strange how that happens with music.


I don't know, I just remember my younger sister was a huge fan of Avril Lavigne back when Let Go came out, and she was only 7½ at the time. She listened heavily to Avril while simultaneously being into things like the Cheetah Girls, S Club, and the soundtracks to The Princess Diaries and Freaky Friday. I think even though Avril Lavigne had a lot of pretty mature music that's more comparable to Sarah McLachlan, Alanis Morissette, and Paula Cole, she still had a specific appeal that reached out to both older listeners, as well as much younger ones, and a lot of that, I think, has to do with her image. At least, after she blew up, pop rock basically became the new norm for teen pop for a time rather than new jack swing and Babyface-esque r&b.


Yeah, I can see that being the case. Avril was pretty out of the ordinary for a teen artist because she wasn't just specifically for teens. You could really go either way about her, at least during the Let Go era (hell, even Under My Skin). She definitely had a lot of appeal to younger kids while at the same time she'd write a lot of mature, thoughtful songs and would tour with bands like Swollen Members and appeared in Treble Charger videos (curse heavy bands that are marketed towards other teens-young adults). It's kinda cool how she actually did something different, get known as a legitimate artist and had the ability to appeal to all these audiences, something her imitators could not do whatsoever. Then she completely regresses, Best Damn Thing Happens and she's touring with the Jonas Brothers.


Aw yes!

https://s3.amazonaws.com/colorslive/jpg_512x512/119696-35qjhlUHGpRlFcw-.jpg

Aw YEAH!

http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01158/arts-graphics-2005_1158595a.jpg

OH YEAH!!!

http://wac.450f.edgecastcdn.net/80450F/92moose.fm/files/2013/04/kool-aid.jpg


Oh hey, that's the Justice Friends! Those guys were a crazy buncha dudes!


Yet such a huge chunk of who bought their stuff was white suburban male adolescents. Sigh...


Haha, then I should be the target audience for this stuff! But I could never get into it. There is no substance with any of that music. 8-P

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/09/16 at 6:32 am


I just found out he's released a movie. Would you say it's worth watching?


To get a different perspective from somebody who watched the movie, I don't think it matters. In fact, the movie isn't really that good compared to the AVGN reviews. It's basically a goofy plot to get a copy of the infamous "E.T." for the Atari 2600, while the AVGN and his friends just put in several childish jokes for the sake of whomever watches his crap.

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/09/16 at 10:02 am


To get a different perspective from somebody who watched the movie, I don't think it matters. In fact, the movie isn't really that good compared to the AVGN reviews. It's basically a goofy plot to get a copy of the infamous "E.T." for the Atari 2600, while the AVGN and his friends just put in several childish jokes for the sake of whomever watches his crap.


So, in your opinion, would you say I just shouldn't bother with the movie?

Subject: Re: What do you think the 00's nostalgia will look like in the 20's?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/09/16 at 11:42 am


So, in your opinion, would you say I just shouldn't bother with the movie?


Don't bother with watching the movie. It's not as good as his original reviews.

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