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Subject: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: bchris02 on 12/14/15 at 5:54 pm

Mods, feel free to move this to politics if you think that's where it belongs.  This has been mentioned in several threads but I think it deserves its own thread.

I think a huge part of the culture of the mid 2010s is the extreme tension between progressive social justice warriors and conservative anti-social justice warriors.  There is an anger and a tension in our culture right now that is unlike anything I've experienced my entire life.  Everybody is offended by everything, from Caitlyn Jenner to Cecil the Lion to the Confederate flag to red Starbucks cups. Question is, how did we get here and where do we go from here?  Does it escalate in 2016?

I believe the current tension is related to significant cultural changes that have been brewing for decades finally being realized and conservative resistance to them.

When 2015 started, things were getting more tense but it was still more easy-going than today.  The fast escalating tension began when Bruce Jenner announced he would become Caitlyn.  Soon after that, there was the Confederate Flag controversy that resulted in South Carolina lowering the flag.  Then a couple of weeks later there was the SCOTUS decision on gay marriage.  June was a terrible month for social conservatives.

Since then, it seems like everyone is offended and angry all the time.  That is why Donald Trump is so popular right now.  While this post is bordering on political, I think its appropriate for the broader discussion of 2010s culture because I think when we look back on the '10s this will be what is remembered.

Does anybody think there is any hope of tensions easing going into the late 2010s?

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: #Infinity on 12/14/15 at 8:55 pm

All of the trends you've described drive home a point that I've made before but only becomes more real with time:  sociopolitical lay, the 2010s are the early 21st century equivalent to the 1960s.  The advent of new technology (television in the buildup to the 60s; social media for the 2010s) has bred a huge wave of socially progressive movements that had been developing for the previous decade and a half, but which peaked in the subsequent decade.  The previous decade had been socially conservative and hyper-patriotic, which promulgated major social protest in the following years.  In both cases, the legiative and societal gains were ginormous, but due to their fast-paced, extreme nature at the time, they ultimately led to a growing backlash that called for a return to an orderly status quo.  Donald Trump is basically the current equivalent to Richard Nixon, although Nixon wasn't nearly as critical of the Johnson administration as Trump was of the Obama presidency.  I think around the beginning of the 2020s, hipsters and social protests will start to lose steam as backlash against social protests become completely dominant, akin to how social movement backlash started to really take off in 1970.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: 80sfan on 12/14/15 at 9:07 pm

I think it will get even more intense next year. Don't know about the 2020s though.

All this social ruckus is very ruckusy!  :D  :D  :D

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: bchris02 on 12/14/15 at 9:21 pm


All of the trends you've described drive home a point that I've made before but only becomes more real with time:  sociopolitical lay, the 2010s are the early 21st century equivalent to the 1960s.  The advent of new technology (television in the buildup to the 60s; social media for the 2010s) has bred a huge wave of socially progressive movements that had been developing for the previous decade and a half, but which peaked in the subsequent decade.  The previous decade had been socially conservative and hyper-patriotic, which promulgated major social protest in the following years.  In both cases, the legiative and societal gains were ginormous, but due to their fast-paced, extreme nature at the time, they ultimately led to a growing backlash that called for a return to an orderly status quo.  Donald Trump is basically the current equivalent to Richard Nixon, although Nixon wasn't nearly as critical of the Johnson administration as Trump was of the Obama presidency.  I think around the beginning of the 2020s, hipsters and social protests will start to lose steam as backlash against social protests become completely dominant, akin to how social movement backlash started to really take off in 1970.


Great points.  There are definitely parallels between the 2010s and the 1960s.  I didn't live through the sixties but from what I know it was a turbulent time with a lot of cultural tension that ultimately led to a harsh reaction during the 1970s that gave us Richard Nixon and the Jesus movement (which led to the Moral Majority during the 1980s).  The more fun, easygoing atmosphere of the 1950s and early 1960s was replaced by an atmosphere of fear, anger, and hate, not too different from what we have today.

If a widespread backlash happens, I don't know if it will even take until the 2020s.  The SCOTUS decision and Caitlyn Jenner have awakened social conservatives and they will be going to the polls, likely in greater numbers than any recent election in 2016.  This election will be the test to see if the backlash is strong enough to swing the overall national pendulum back in the other direction.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: bchris02 on 12/14/15 at 9:38 pm


I think it will get even more intense next year. Don't know about the 2020s though.


I agree.  Next year, with the Presidential election and the fact many state legislatures in conservative states will likely try to ban gay marriage despite the SCOTUS ruling, I think the tension could reach its peak.  The outcome of the election will be a test of where the country is at and should determine where we go from here.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: 80sfan on 12/14/15 at 9:46 pm


I agree.  Next year, with the Presidential election and the fact many state legislatures in conservative states will likely try to ban gay marriage despite the SCOTUS ruling, I think the tension could reach its peak.  The outcome of the election will be a test of where the country is at and should determine where we go from here.


It's an intensity bomb next year! The news should be interesting next year!  :(

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: #Infinity on 12/15/15 at 12:41 am


I agree.  Next year, with the Presidential election and the fact many state legislatures in conservative states will likely try to ban gay marriage despite the SCOTUS ruling, I think the tension could reach its peak.  The outcome of the election will be a test of where the country is at and should determine where we go from here.


I don't think conservative states are going to be successful in their attempts to nullify federal law over gay marriage because public opinion has been consistently trending in favor of gay marriage over the past decade within the Republican Party, which is now pretty divided over the issue, compared to the 2012 Election, when pretty much all of the presidential candidates were full-on anti-gay rights and didn't receive ginormous applause at a debate by stating they would accept their child if he/she were gay.  There are definitely still conservative leaders who are full-on enemies of the LGBT movement (Ted Cruz...*vomits*), but they're basically the equivalent to what George Wallace was in the 1968 Election, aside from not running a third-party campaign.  Nixon was not explicitly racist and supported lots of social programs like affirmative action, even though his platform of law and order resonated with social conservatives who opposed the social movements of the day.  The same type of logic applies with a lot of the current Republican candidates like Ben Carson, Marco Rubio, and Ted Cruz, who are willing to tolerate the gay marriage decision and take moderate stances on other social issues, but still appeal primarily to those sick of the relentlessly liberal culture that has emerged since Obama took office.  Even Donald Trump, shameless as he is of his prejudices against latinos, is still primarily running a campaign against the political correctness and institutionalization of the United States, rather than actively promoting violence and discrimination against social minorities; in many ways, he's the most Nixonian candidate of all.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: bchris02 on 12/15/15 at 2:12 am


I don't think conservative states are going to be successful in their attempts to nullify federal law over gay marriage because public opinion has been consistently trending in favor of gay marriage over the past decade within the Republican Party, which is now pretty divided over the issue, compared to the 2012 Election, when pretty much all of the presidential candidates were full-on anti-gay rights and didn't receive ginormous applause at a debate by stating they would accept their child if he/she were gay.  There are definitely still conservative leaders who are full-on enemies of the LGBT movement (Ted Cruz...*vomits*), but they're basically the equivalent to what George Wallace was in the 1968 Election, aside from not running a third-party campaign.  Nixon was not explicitly racist and supported lots of social programs like affirmative action, even though his platform of law and order resonated with social conservatives who opposed the social movements of the day.  The same type of logic applies with a lot of the current Republican candidates like Ben Carson, Marco Rubio, and Ted Cruz, who are willing to tolerate the gay marriage decision and take moderate stances on other social issues, but still appeal primarily to those sick of the relentlessly liberal culture that has emerged since Obama took office.  Even Donald Trump, shameless as he is of his prejudices against latinos, is still primarily running a campaign against the political correctness and institutionalization of the United States, rather than actively promoting violence and discrimination against social minorities; in many ways, he's the most Nixonian candidate of all.


I understand what you are saying and public opinion is radically shifting in favor of gay marriage, but we aren't quite to the point where its a non-issue.  Many Republican candidates like Cruz, Huckabee, and Carson are actively campaigning against it and have promised a constitutional amendment to overturn the SCOTUS decision.  It's even worse in the state legislatures.  I am certain that in certain states they will try to nullify marriage equality in 2016. They have already filed a bill to do just that in Tennessee.  A handful of other states will likely follow.  They will not be successful though.  The federal government will have to step in like they did in Alabama earlier this year when they refused to issue same-sex marriage licenses after the ruling.  What effect that will have, I don't know.  States where this ends up happening could see it as further overreach by the federal government and it could even further escalate tensions.  I live in a small town in one of the most conservative states in the union, and many people where I live would go as far as to secede from the Union over gay marriage.

There is a lot of anger right now among social conservatives concerning the SCOTUS decision and the GOP is going to really try to exploit that this next year to drive voter turnout.

I think 2016 will be the last election where gay marriage is a defining issue.  In four more years, most of the country will have accepted it and be ready to move on.  There will probably still be a minority trying to make an issue of it but it won't be a big enough minority to be significant.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: #Infinity on 12/15/15 at 4:35 am


I understand what you are saying and public opinion is radically shifting in favor of gay marriage, but we aren't quite to the point where its a non-issue.  Many Republican candidates like Cruz, Huckabee, and Carson are actively campaigning against it and have promised a constitutional amendment to overturn the SCOTUS decision.  It's even worse in the state legislatures.  I am certain that in certain states they will try to nullify marriage equality in 2016. They have already filed a bill to do just that in Tennessee.  A handful of other states will likely follow.  They will not be successful though.  The federal government will have to step in like they did in Alabama earlier this year when they refused to issue same-sex marriage licenses after the ruling.  What effect that will have, I don't know.  States where this ends up happening could see it as further overreach by the federal government and it could even further escalate tensions.  I live in a small town in one of the most conservative states in the union, and many people where I live would go as far as to secede from the Union over gay marriage.

There is a lot of anger right now among social conservatives concerning the SCOTUS decision and the GOP is going to really try to exploit that this next year to drive voter turnout.

I think 2016 will be the last election where gay marriage is a defining issue.  In four more years, most of the country will have accepted it and be ready to move on.  There will probably still be a minority trying to make an issue of it but it won't be a big enough minority to be significant.


The Bible Belt states are a strange case, as people there are still not comfortable with older social topics like racial integration, even half a century after the 60s civil rights movements.  Like I stated, though, the Republican Party has finally started to become increasingly accepting of gay marriage, or at least tolerant of it (as Jeb Bush and Marco Rubio are).  Ted Cruz, Rick Santorum, and Mike Huckabee are basically this generation's George Wallaces and Strom Thurmonds, representative of the still hateful Dixie states, but not nearly as popular on a national level as more pragmatic Republicans.  Actively campaigning against gay marriage would be just as unpopular now as overturning civil rights legislation for blacks in the 60s, and it represents perfectly just how fractured the Republican Party has become in recent years.  My guess is that racial, women's, and LGBT rights movements will lose momentum around the turn of the 2020s, but particularly as a result of the traditional movement coalitions splintering and legislation becoming more relegated to local politics instead of federal politics.  I agree that the socially conservative wing of the Republican Party will be unsuccessful in nullifying the SCOTUS gay marriage decision; even in 2004/2005, Republicans weren't able to pass a constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage.  Even with the 60s backlash during the 70s and eventual rise of Reagan conservatism in the 80s, black, women's, and gay civil rights didn't really regress so much as they slowed down and encountered new challenges.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: #Infinity on 12/15/15 at 5:53 pm

Apparently now Marco Rubio wants to overturn the Supreme Court's gay marriage decision.  The guy has now completely lost my support as the potential Republican candidate, as until this point he seemed like the less scary alternative to a Ted Cruz in that ruining marriage quality was not part of his presidential agenda (I may have overlooked previous comments he made in-between the decision in June and now, but he didn't originally come off as a George Wallace-type).  He doesn't understand the difference between popular vote and protection of civil liberties; we wouldn't have a Supreme Court in the first place if every state-level public vote was defended against nationwide rulings.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: bchris02 on 12/15/15 at 6:45 pm


Apparently now Marco Rubio wants to overturn the Supreme Court's gay marriage decision.  The guy has now completely lost my support as the potential Republican candidate, as until this point he seemed like the less scary alternative to a Ted Cruz in that ruining marriage quality was not part of his presidential agenda (I may have overlooked previous comments he made in-between the decision in June and now, but he didn't originally come off as a George Wallace-type).  He doesn't understand the difference between popular vote and protection of civil liberties; we wouldn't have a Supreme Court in the first place if every state-level public vote was defended against nationwide rulings.


Gay marriage, gun rights, and Islamic immigration are the three biggest issues for social conservatives, who are base voters in the GOP primary.  The candidate has to tow the party line and tow it hard on those issues to have a chance at getting the nomination.  In fact, he could kiss winning the Bible Belt goodbye if he took a passive stance on the SCOTUS ruling, most of whom view as the worst decision since Dred Scott if not the worst in US history.

I think the anti-gay platform still has more legs today than segregation did when George Wallace ran in 1968.  If you don't live in the Bible Belt, its difficult to comprehend the level of hatred, almost to Hitleresque levels, that people have for the LGBT community.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: 80sfan on 12/15/15 at 7:50 pm

I read one version of the Bible, and there was no homosexual sex in the chapter/section about Sodom and Gomorrah. Perhaps I read a different version?

The impression I got from that early chapter of the bible was that the people were just too proud or something. Mean, snippy. I got nothing about gay sex, or sodomy. :.shrugs shoulders:.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: apollonia1986 on 12/15/15 at 8:13 pm

The only social justice cause I can say I'm "actively' a part of is the Black Lives Matter one. Because I am a Black woman and it just upsets me to think that if I'm in the wrong place at the wrong time, I could be the next hashtag on Twitter. I have several male friends, Black, heavyset. All very sweet, but someone with a narrow mind might consider them a "threat" or "intimidating" and I'm having to buy a black dress. I don't like it. It's not fair. It's bad that even if I don't show it, in the back of my mind I'm worried that some cop will harm me. It's already enough to worry about some strange man trying to catcall me , but then the one who's supposed to protect you?

I don't know I just wish it would stop. And then there's the media coverage of it. They even painted that 12 year old, Tamir Rice as some kind of outlaw--a CHILD. I kind of wonder what will be said about me should something like that happen. There's no "bad" pictures of me available. I don't have any strikes against me other than 2 suspensions in junior year in high school. I've never broken the law. I made a few to the left remarks about a certain pop star but that's about it. It just all worries me and scares me.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: #Infinity on 12/15/15 at 8:16 pm

I think the anti-gay platform still has more legs today than segregation did when George Wallace ran in 1968.  If you don't live in the Bible Belt, its difficult to comprehend the level of hatred, almost to Hitleresque levels, that people have for the LGBT community.


Good lord, I can't imagine the Republican Party as a whole being worse than the Dixiecrats were in 1948 and 1968.  There are definitely hateful extremists in the coalition, but "almost to Hitleresque levels" is an exaggeration because that would practically imply most Republicans openly embrace the Ku Klux Klan and hope for an outright genocide or imprisonment of all LGBT Americans, as opposed to just making bullsheesh "tradition" and "family values" arguments against protective legislation.  As a transgendered lesbian living in Northern San Diego, which has far more registered Republicans than Democrats, I never feel scared for my life and feel tolerated or accepted by almost everyone, even my mom's ultra-Christian friend from Fallbrook.  Granted, I still present myself very femininely (as opposed to dressing butch or having rainbow accessories all over my purse), not to mention I pass well enough as a woman that people never confuse me for a man and never question whether I'm really female, but there are still plenty of Republicans I know who are completely cool with my being queer, including those at my mom's presbyterian church.  The majority opinion in the GOP these days is basically opposition to gay marriage, but still respect to the LGBT community in general.  You living in a small Missouri town has clearly biased your perception of Republicans as a whole.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: musicguy93 on 12/15/15 at 10:36 pm


Mods, feel free to move this to politics if you think that's where it belongs.  This has been mentioned in several threads but I think it deserves its own thread.

I think a huge part of the culture of the mid 2010s is the extreme tension between progressive social justice warriors and conservative anti-social justice warriors.  There is an anger and a tension in our culture right now that is unlike anything I've experienced my entire life.  Everybody is offended by everything, from Caitlyn Jenner to Cecil the Lion to the Confederate flag to red Starbucks cups. Question is, how did we get here and where do we go from here?  Does it escalate in 2016?

I believe the current tension is related to significant cultural changes that have been brewing for decades finally being realized and conservative resistance to them.

When 2015 started, things were getting more tense but it was still more easy-going than today.  The fast escalating tension began when Bruce Jenner announced he would become Caitlyn.  Soon after that, there was the Confederate Flag controversy that resulted in South Carolina lowering the flag.  Then a couple of weeks later there was the SCOTUS decision on gay marriage.  June was a terrible month for social conservatives.

Since then, it seems like everyone is offended and angry all the time.  That is why Donald Trump is so popular right now.  While this post is bordering on political, I think its appropriate for the broader discussion of 2010s culture because I think when we look back on the '10s this will be what is remembered.

Does anybody think there is any hope of tensions easing going into the late 2010s?



To be honest, I really don't know. It could get worse in the late 2010s, or it could get better. It's really up in the air. It's possible that it'll peak around 2016, but whatever. Though I'm curious as to why you think the anti-social justice warriors are automatically conservatives. Now it depends on your definition of SJWs, but I consider myself a moderate liberal, yet I think both progressive (personally I don't consider progressive to be synonymous with liberal) and conservative extremists are acting crazy. What we're seeing with the whole outrage culture are two extreme sides of the spectrum.

On the progressive side, there was the whole fiasco at Netroots Nation where protesters from the Black Lives Matter movement were pissed off at Bernie Sanders and Martin O'Malley, which is ironic, because both of them are supporters of the Black Lives Matter movement. On the other hand, we have the conservatives who are pissed at the SCOTUS decision on gay marriage. Then there's the confederate flag where both sides were offended for different reasons.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: #Infinity on 12/15/15 at 11:11 pm



To be honest, I really don't know. It could get worse in the late 2010s, or it could get better. It's really up in the air. It's possible that it'll peak around 2016, but whatever. Though I'm curious as to why you think the anti-social justice warriors are automatically conservatives. Now it depends on your definition of SJWs, but I consider myself a moderate liberal, yet I think both progressive (personally I don't consider progressive synonymous with liberal) and conservative extremists are acting crazy. What we're seeing with the whole outrage culture are two extreme sides of the spectrum.

On the progressive side, there was the whole fiasco at Netroots Nation where protesters from the Black Lives Matter movement were pissed off at Bernie Sanders and Martin O'Malley, which is ironic, because both of them are supporters of the Black Lives Matter movement. On the other hand, we have the conservatives who are pissed at the SCOTUS decision on gay marriage. Then there's the confederate flag where both sides were offended for different reasons.


I feel the same way about the current SJW movement, even though I'm a double-minority (triple, if you also factor in my isolated interests and experiences from most LGBT people).  As much as I want everybody to have fair and respectful treatment, immune from violence and discrimination, current liberals seem to take the whole thing to an uncomfortable extreme that makes it all too easy to be vilified in spite of your pure intentions.  I see the trend of progress as a very gradual thing, one in which people in general start to learn about minorities in ways they hadn't in the past, but not as a battlefield of distrust and violence.  Social media has caused our current generation, especially, to become abnormally impatient about transforming complex institutions that don't topple smoothly through direct confrontation alone.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: musicguy93 on 12/15/15 at 11:39 pm


I feel the same way about the current SJW movement, even though I'm a double-minority (triple, if you also factor in my isolated interests and experiences from most LGBT people).  As much as I want everybody to have fair and respectful treatment, immune from violence and discrimination, current liberals seem to take the whole thing to an uncomfortable extreme that makes it all too easy to be vilified in spite of your pure intentions.  I see the trend of progress as a very gradual thing, one in which people in general start to learn about minorities in ways they hadn't in the past, but not as a battlefield of distrust and violence.  Social media has caused our current generation, especially, to become abnormally impatient about transforming complex institutions that don't topple smoothly through direct confrontation alone.


Yeah I know what you mean. I'm also a minority (Asian-Indian), and yet I don't feel comfortable around SJWs, especially when they try to speak for me. There's something almost robotic in their world view.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: Baltimoreian on 12/16/15 at 8:47 pm

I don't know why do people became social justice warriors in the first place? I don't really pay that much attention over this decade's culture, since it's filled with overrated stuff from everything that I see nowadays.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: bchris02 on 12/16/15 at 9:05 pm


I don't know why do people became social justice warriors in the first place? I don't really pay that much attention over this decade's culture, since it's filled with overrated stuff from everything that I see nowadays.


The echo chamber of social media has a lot to do with it.  It has pushed both sides to the extreme on cultural issues and has made them unable to empathize with the other side.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: Baltimoreian on 12/16/15 at 9:07 pm


The echo chamber of social media has a lot to do with it.  It has pushed both sides to the extreme on cultural issues and has made them unable to empathize with the other side.


I guess that can explain why SJWs exist a little bit. I still don't know who made it popular besides Tumblr members.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: sonikuu on 12/18/15 at 8:35 am

So I've been spending the mid-2010s in Japan, where social justice warrior culture doesn't even exist.  It was around back when I left the country in 2013, but it seems to blown up in the couple years since.  Or, at least, so the internet and tv news from America tells me.  Is it really as big as these outlets make it out to be or is it much ado about nothing?  Because, from afar, it looks like America is in a New 60s and is heading towards 1968.  But since I'm not actually in America, it's hard for me to really say anything.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: ocarinafan96 on 12/18/15 at 11:11 am

Yeah I agree with all of this, it's almost as if we're in a new 60's

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: ocarinafan96 on 12/18/15 at 11:14 am


So I've been spending the mid-2010s in Japan, where social justice warrior culture doesn't even exist.  It was around back when I left the country in 2013, but it seems to blown up in the couple years since.  Or, at least, so the internet and tv news from America tells me.  Is it really as big as these outlets make it out to be or is it much ado about nothing?  Because, from afar, it looks like America is in a New 60s and is heading towards 1968.  But since I'm not actually in America, it's hard for me to really say anything.


I have a question, since your in Japan is it true that Japan, especially big cities like Tokyo, are cutting edge and more liberal than American cities and such? Because I hear mixed reviews from a lot of people.

Some claim Japan is very conservative especially with their culture, religion, ethics, etc.

However others believe Japan is very Liberal, with some of the reason I already laid out based on what I heard from others.

Also what is Japan's current viewpoint of Americans?

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: mach!ne_he@d on 12/19/15 at 9:28 pm


All of the trends you've described drive home a point that I've made before but only becomes more real with time:  sociopolitical lay, the 2010s are the early 21st century equivalent to the 1960s.  The advent of new technology (television in the buildup to the 60s; social media for the 2010s) has bred a huge wave of socially progressive movements that had been developing for the previous decade and a half, but which peaked in the subsequent decade.  The previous decade had been socially conservative and hyper-patriotic, which promulgated major social protest in the following years.  In both cases, the legiative and societal gains were ginormous, but due to their fast-paced, extreme nature at the time, they ultimately led to a growing backlash that called for a return to an orderly status quo.  Donald Trump is basically the current equivalent to Richard Nixon, although Nixon wasn't nearly as critical of the Johnson administration as Trump was of the Obama presidency.  I think around the beginning of the 2020s, hipsters and social protests will start to lose steam as backlash against social protests become completely dominant, akin to how social movement backlash started to really take off in 1970.


That's a great comparison. I've seen so many people comparing Donald Trump's campaign to George Wallace's independent run in 1968, but to me, the way in which Trump is exploiting the conservative backlash against "political correctness" and 2010's socials movements is also very reminiscent of the way Nixon exploited white working class anger over inner city rioting and anti-Vietnam protests in '68. The way in which Trump promises to easily fix problems like ISIS and corruption in government is also similar to the way Nixon promised "peace with honor" in Vietnam and a return to "law and order" domestically.

Also, the '50s and '00s do have some similarities now that I think about it. Both were more conservatively slanted decades, Bush was basically Ike for a few years with his sky-high approval ratings and the '00s kinda had it's own version of the "red scare" (with terrorists replacing communists).

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: 80sfan on 12/19/15 at 10:10 pm


I feel the same way about the current SJW movement, even though I'm a double-minority (triple, if you also factor in my isolated interests and experiences from most LGBT people).  As much as I want everybody to have fair and respectful treatment, immune from violence and discrimination, current liberals seem to take the whole thing to an uncomfortable extreme that makes it all too easy to be vilified in spite of your pure intentions.  I see the trend of progress as a very gradual thing, one in which people in general start to learn about minorities in ways they hadn't in the past, but not as a battlefield of distrust and violence.  Social media has caused our current generation, especially, to become abnormally impatient about transforming complex institutions that don't topple smoothly through direct confrontation alone.


Preach to the choir, please! Preach, preach!

http://feistythoughts.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/images-147.jpeg

I may be Asian/Vietnamese, but I would hate it if some of my white friends become vilified because they have different points of views, or were taken out of context.
I'm quite aware that racism still exists and is more subtle/hidden these days, but that's another thread/subject for another day.

I think these Social Justice Warriors have great intentions, but their execution is terrible and only breeds more fire, and not the good kind of fire either.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 12/19/15 at 10:40 pm


That's a great comparison. I've seen so many people comparing Donald Trump's campaign to George Wallace's independent run in 1968, but to me, the way in which Trump is exploiting the conservative backlash against "political correctness" and 2010's socials movements is also very reminiscent of the way Nixon exploited white working class anger over inner city rioting and anti-Vietnam protests in '68. The way in which Trump promises to easily fix problems like ISIS and corruption in government is also similar to the way Nixon promised "peace with honor" in Vietnam and a return to "law and order" domestically.

Also, the '50s and '00s do have some similarities now that I think about it. Both were more conservatively slanted decades, Bush was basically Ike for a few years with his sky-high approval ratings and the '00s kinda had it's own version of the "red scare" (with terrorists replacing communists).y

You're comparing Bush to Eisnehower? Looking back on the 2000s, I don't see how they were similar to the 50s. 2000s were not THAT conservative.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: #Infinity on 12/19/15 at 11:15 pm


You're comparing Bush to Eisnehower? Looking back on the 2000s, I don't see how they were similar to the 50s. 2000s were not THAT conservative.


Actually, Eisenhower was pretty socially conservative.  He was unabashedly anti-gay and endorsed anti-Communist policies throughout his administration despite abstaining from armed conflict as much as possible.  He did send federal troops to resolve the Little Rock conflict, but otherwise he was far less of a black civil rights activist than FDR, Truman, JFK, LBJ, and even Nixon were.

The thing about the 50s is that it was primarily a socially conservative decade but pretty moderate on fiscal issues, in contrast to the 80s, which were only truly conservative on the economic side but far more mixed in terms of its social environment.  The 50s were an atrocious time to be a minority because even the slightest suspicion of cultural deviance could lead to interrogation by the FBI, but on the other hand, they upheld the post-New Deal socioeconomic policies and emphasized the middle class far more than big business, not to mention the gigantic Highway Act was issued during the decade as well.  As for the 80s, despite the rise of televangelists and conservative talk radio, that decade saw much more of a liberalization of social expression than a contraction, thanks to eccentric MTV personalities like Cyndi Lauper and Madonna, as well as tv shows like The Cosby Show); its conservatism was far more rooted in the strong opposition to federal involvement in daily lives, as well as the desire to restore strength in the United States as a world leader after a long string of embarrassments in the 70s.  The backlash against 60s progressivism had already occurred in the 1970s, but the 80s did far more to break boundaries and loosen the United States' social environment than send things backwards, even though this social liberalization would become even more pronounced in the 90s.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: bchris02 on 12/20/15 at 12:08 am

The 2000s was post civil-rights era and post-sexual revolution so of course it was not as conservative as the 1950s.  However, it was about as conservative as you can get post 1960s.  There was a heavy emphasis on social conformity and patriotism.  A majority of people still strongly opposed LGBT rights.  In the middle part of the decade to even question Bush and the Iraq war called your patriotism into question.  On fiscal issues, Bush wasn't really that conservative, much like Ike.  Unlike the '50s, the backlash in the 2000s which took our culture in a more liberal direction happened in the late '00s.  The '50s were pretty conservative and placid all the way through, with the social revolution not reaching a tipping point until the mid 60s.

I wouldn't really compare Trump as much to Wallace as I would to Nixon.  A true Wallace candidate would be if somebody like Mike Huckabee decided to run third party on an explicitly anti-gay platform.  I really think that is a possibility either in 2016 or 2020 and he will likely take a few Bible Belt states, handing the election decisively to the Democrats.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: 80sfan on 12/20/15 at 12:39 am


The 2000s was post civil-rights era and post-sexual revolution so of course it was not as conservative as the 1950s.  However, it was about as conservative as you can get post 1960s.  There was a heavy emphasis on social conformity and patriotism.  A majority of people still strongly opposed LGBT rights.  In the middle part of the decade to even question Bush and the Iraq war called your patriotism into question.  On fiscal issues, Bush wasn't really that conservative, much like Ike.  Unlike the '50s, the backlash in the 2000s which took our culture in a more liberal direction happened in the late '00s.  The '50s were pretty conservative and placid all the way through, with the social revolution not reaching a tipping point until the mid 60s.

I wouldn't really compare Trump as much to Wallace as I would to Nixon.  A true Wallace candidate would be if somebody like Mike Huckabee decided to run third party on an explicitly anti-gay platform.  I really think that is a possibility either in 2016 or 2020 and he will likely take a few Bible Belt states, handing the election decisively to the Democrats.


Were the 1980's conservative?  ???

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: musicguy93 on 12/20/15 at 1:46 am


Preach to the choir, please! Preach, preach!

http://feistythoughts.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/images-147.jpeg

I may be Asian/Vietnamese, but I would hate it if some of my white friends become vilified because they have different points of views, or were taken out of context.
I'm quite aware that racism still exists and is more subtle/hidden these days, but that's another thread/subject for another day.

I think these Social Justice Warriors have great intentions, but their execution is terrible and only breeds more fire, and not the good kind of fire either.


I think SJWs truly believe they are making the world a better place, but they are so convinced by everything their political science/sociology/liberal arts professors feed them, that they are kind of out of touch with reality. They all have the exact same opinion on things, and go on a crusade on anyone with even a slightly different opinion. These are the same people who call themselves "progressive". Yeah right.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: 80sfan on 12/20/15 at 2:24 am


I think SJWs truly believe they are making the world a better place, but they are so convinced by everything their political science/sociology/liberal arts professors feed them, that they are kind of out of touch with reality. They all have the exact same opinion on things, and go on a crusade on anyone with even a slightly different opinion. These are the same people who call themselves "progressive". Yeah right.


Some feminists and social justice warriors are okay. A lot of Left leaning people are okay. I did have a bad run-in with a Social justice warrior roughly four years ago, in College. She was really, really, aggressive and didn't like to listen. Not all are like her, but it made me not want to listen to her viewpoints, and this was after three chances with her. I didn't dismiss her presence right off the bat. I was in a bad place in my life, and she didn't seem to want to listen that I was not in a good place, mentally and emotionally, to argue, or have a diplomatic debate with her.

You'd be surprised that some feminists have quite a good sense of humor, and aren't as politically correct as we'd like to think. But yes, sometimes the shadow side of these SJW are a bit scary. :.ducks:.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: musicguy93 on 12/20/15 at 3:24 am


Some feminists and social justice warriors are okay. A lot of Left leaning people are okay. I did have a bad run-in with a Social justice warrior roughly four years ago, in College. She was really, really, aggressive and didn't like to listen. Not all are like her, but it made me not want to listen to her viewpoints, and this was after three chances with her. I didn't dismiss her presence right off the bat. I was in a bad place in my life, and she didn't seem to want to listen that I was not in a good place, mentally and emotionally, to argue, or have a diplomatic debate with her.

You'd be surprised that some feminists have quite a good sense of humor, and aren't as politically correct as we'd like to think. But yes, sometimes the shadow side of these SJW are a bit scary. :.ducks:.


I agree, I'm actually perfectly fine with the moderate feminists. I mostly have issues with the extreme feminists who perpetuate weird theories and buzzwords like "rape culture" and "patriarchy", and who use phrases like "check your privileges".

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: #Infinity on 12/20/15 at 3:41 am


I agree, I'm actually perfectly fine with the moderate feminists. I mostly have issues with the extreme feminists who perpetuate weird theories and buzzwords like "rape culture" and "patriarchy", and who use phrases like "check your privileges".


At the core of it, they're really just against the idea that men are so entitled to women that social standards indirectly lead them to grow aggressive when they're turned down.  It makes reasonable sense when you examine things that actively endorse this behavior, like Ne-Yo's rotten 2006 hit When You're Mad, but you start to feel like you're unfairly stepping on eggshells when almost any casual representation of female sexuality is perceived as promoting this "rape culture."  Honestly, if the standards are that strict, it just infuriates sexually frustrated men more, furthering the idea that they have to destroy a bulwark of resistance so that they can get their sexual relief.  I definitely believe there's a lot society can do to tone down the media's obsession with sex, but I feel there should at least be some freedom for people to express lust, so long as the intentions are truly positive and not for the sake of dehumanizing women.  Striking the balance between free speech and a culture of respect is a much more complicated task, but the cynical extremes to which the most prominent feminists and social justice warriors take the issue is certainly not effective.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: musicguy93 on 12/20/15 at 4:32 pm


At the core of it, they're really just against the idea that men are so entitled to women that social standards indirectly lead them to grow aggressive when they're turned down.  It makes reasonable sense when you examine things that actively endorse this behavior, like Ne-Yo's rotten 2006 hit When You're Mad, but you start to feel like you're unfairly stepping on eggshells when almost any casual representation of female sexuality is perceived as promoting this "rape culture."  Honestly, if the standards are that strict, it just infuriates sexually frustrated men more, furthering the idea that they have to destroy a bulwark of resistance so that they can get their sexual relief.  I definitely believe there's a lot society can do to tone down the media's obsession with sex, but I feel there should at least be some freedom for people to express lust, so long as the intentions are truly positive and not for the sake of dehumanizing women.  Striking the balance between free speech and a culture of respect is a much more complicated task, but the cynical extremes to which the most prominent feminists and social justice warriors take the issue is certainly not effective.


I agree, we do need to strive for a more balanced society. Unfortunately it's probably not something that we will be able to achieve any time soon, given the current situation (it's possible that this "culture war" is going to get even more intense in the late 2010s), but it's certainly not impossible.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: tv on 12/20/15 at 10:19 pm


Gay marriage, gun rights, and Islamic immigration are the three biggest issues for social conservatives, who are base voters in the GOP primary.  The candidate has to tow the party line and tow it hard on those issues to have a chance at getting the nomination.  In fact, he could kiss winning the Bible Belt goodbye if he took a passive stance on the SCOTUS ruling, most of whom view as the worst decision since Dred Scott if not the worst in US history.

I think the anti-gay platform still has more legs today than segregation did when George Wallace ran in 1968.  If you don't live in the Bible Belt, its difficult to comprehend the level of hatred, almost to Hitleresque levels, that people have for the LGBT community.
I do think Gun Rights and Islamic Immigration are important to Republican Voters nationally but Gay Marriage? Gay Marriage may just be a "Bible Belt Issue" and not an issue revelant to Republican Primary Voters in the rest of the country but the "Bible Belt".

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: tv on 12/20/15 at 10:28 pm


Mods, feel free to move this to politics if you think that's where it belongs.  This has been mentioned in several threads but I think it deserves its own thread.

I think a huge part of the culture of the mid 2010s is the extreme tension between progressive social justice warriors and conservative anti-social justice warriors.  There is an anger and a tension in our culture right now that is unlike anything I've experienced my entire life.  Everybody is offended by everything, from Caitlyn Jenner to Cecil the Lion to the Confederate flag to red Starbucks cups. Question is, how did we get here and where do we go from here?  Does it escalate in 2016?

I believe the current tension is related to significant cultural changes that have been brewing for decades finally being realized and conservative resistance to them.

When 2015 started, things were getting more tense but it was still more easy-going than today.  The fast escalating tension began when Bruce Jenner announced he would become Caitlyn.  Soon after that, there was the Confederate Flag controversy that resulted in South Carolina lowering the flag.  Then a couple of weeks later there was the SCOTUS decision on gay marriage. June was a terrible month for social conservatives.

Since then, it seems like everyone is offended and angry all the time.  That is why Donald Trump is so popular right now. While this post is bordering on political, I think its appropriate for the broader discussion of 2010s culture because I think when we look back on the '10s this will be what is remembered.

Does anybody think there is any hope of tensions easing going into the late 2010s?
The lowering of the Confederate Flag happened in Mississippi and Virginia too not just in South Carolina.

The reason why Donald Trump is because Republicans didn't like the Bush W. Presidency and totally dislike the Obama Presidency.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: tv on 12/20/15 at 10:38 pm


The 2000s was post civil-rights era and post-sexual revolution so of course it was not as conservative as the 1950s.  However, it was about as conservative as you can get post 1960s.  There was a heavy emphasis on social conformity and patriotism.  A majority of people still strongly opposed LGBT rights.  In the middle part of the decade to even question Bush and the Iraq war called your patriotism into question.  On fiscal issues, Bush wasn't really that conservative, much like Ike.  Unlike the '50s, the backlash in the 2000s which took our culture in a more liberal direction happened in the late '00s.  The '50s were pretty conservative and placid all the way through, with the social revolution not reaching a tipping point until the mid 60s.

I wouldn't really compare Trump as much to Wallace as I would to Nixon.  A true Wallace candidate would be if somebody like Mike Huckabee decided to run third party on an explicitly anti-gay platform.  I really think that is a possibility either in 2016 or 2020 and he will likely take a few Bible Belt states, handing the election decisively to the Democrats.
Mike Huckabee has ran for President twice now he didn't win the nomination in 2008 because he didn't have the appeal of John McCain to Republican Primary Voters. He is pretty much a non-factor in this years Republican Field. He looks like an also-ran in this years Republican Presidential Primary Cycle. He is not even in the main debate stage anymore he is being kicked back to the "Kiddie Pool Debate".

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: tv on 12/20/15 at 10:53 pm


The Bible Belt states are a strange case, as people there are still not comfortable with older social topics like racial integration, even half a century after the 60s civil rights movements.  Like I stated, though, the Republican Party has finally started to become increasingly accepting of gay marriage, or at least tolerant of it (as Jeb Bush and Marco Rubio are).  Ted Cruz, Rick Santorum, and Mike Huckabee are basically this generation's George Wallaces and Strom Thurmonds, representative of the still hateful Dixie states, but not nearly as popular on a national level as more pragmatic Republicans.  Actively campaigning against gay marriage would be just as unpopular now as overturning civil rights legislation for blacks in the 60s, and it represents perfectly just how fractured the Republican Party has become in recent years. My guess is that racial, women's, and LGBT rights movements will lose momentum around the turn of the 2020s, but particularly as a result of the traditional movement coalitions splintering and legislation becoming more relegated to local politics instead of federal politics.  I agree that the socially conservative wing of the Republican Party will be unsuccessful in nullifying the SCOTUS gay marriage decision; even in 2004/2005, Republicans weren't able to pass a constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage.  Even with the 60s backlash during the 70s and eventual rise of Reagan conservatism in the 80s, black, women's, and gay civil rights didn't really regress so much as they slowed down and encountered new challenges.
Santorum-Weird you say that since Santorum is not a Southerner he is from "The Pittsburgh Suburbs in  Pennsylvania". Cruz on social issues doesn't bother me its his too conservative views on economic issues that bug me that's why I would go for Rubio.

The Republican Party is more fractured in terms of what wing of the party will control the fiscal agenda and over immigration reform than it is over gay marriage. The gay marriage issue might affect the election I'm not sure.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: Zelek2 on 12/20/15 at 11:58 pm

I've noticed that ever since the rise of the "SJW" culture, the Internet seems to have taken a far-right bent, especially those on the comments of YouTube or political sites ("Dark pigment is the reason blacks commit more crime", "Women are manipulative ice queens who destroy good men", "Being transgender is a mental illness", "Muslims are scum", "Jews control everything", etc.)

Of course, these people have always been around, but it seems that ever since sites like Tumblr went crazy, they usually fall back on "Shut up, SJW" or "Sorry, did I trigger/oppress you?" as retorts.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: 80sfan on 12/21/15 at 12:21 am


I've noticed that ever since the rise of the "SJW" culture, the Internet seems to have taken a far-right bent, especially those on the comments of YouTube or political sites ("Dark pigment is the reason blacks commit more crime", "Women are manipulative ice queens who destroy good men", "Being transgender is a mental illness", "Muslims are scum", "Jews control everything", etc.)

Of course, these people have always been around, but it seems that ever since sites like Tumblr went crazy, they usually fall back on "Shut up, SJW" or "Sorry, did I trigger/oppress you?" as retorts.


I do see those comments on Youtube, and used to thumb them down when you still could thumb them down. They're really offensive. I don't go on political forums, so I don't know. I do see some anti-SJW sites though.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: 2001 on 12/21/15 at 12:23 am


I've noticed that ever since the rise of the "SJW" culture, the Internet seems to have taken a far-right bent, especially those on the comments of YouTube or political sites ("Dark pigment is the reason blacks commit more crime", "Women are manipulative ice queens who destroy good men", "Being transgender is a mental illness", "Muslims are scum", "Jews control everything", etc.)

Of course, these people have always been around, but it seems that ever since sites like Tumblr went crazy, they usually fall back on "Shut up, SJW" or "Sorry, did I trigger/oppress you?" as retorts.


YouTube and news comments were always terrible. They're both age extremes really. On YouTube it is mostly 9-15 year old kids who're trolling and have nothing better to do. On news sites it's mostly retired 65+ year olds who watch so much news all day that their perception of reality has become really warped.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: apollonia1986 on 12/21/15 at 12:49 am


At the core of it, they're really just against the idea that men are so entitled to women that social standards indirectly lead them to grow aggressive when they're turned down.  It makes reasonable sense when you examine things that actively endorse this behavior, like Ne-Yo's rotten 2006 hit When You're Mad, but you start to feel like you're unfairly stepping on eggshells when almost any casual representation of female sexuality is perceived as promoting this "rape culture."  Honestly, if the standards are that strict, it just infuriates sexually frustrated men more, furthering the idea that they have to destroy a bulwark of resistance so that they can get their sexual relief.  I definitely believe there's a lot society can do to tone down the media's obsession with sex, but I feel there should at least be some freedom for people to express lust, so long as the intentions are truly positive and not for the sake of dehumanizing women.  Striking the balance between free speech and a culture of respect is a much more complicated task, but the cynical extremes to which the most prominent feminists and social justice warriors take the issue is certainly not effective.


I agree. Because I remember being EIGHT and wearing a shorts set at school my mom had bought me and the shorts rode up while I was doing something, but my teacher told me to pull them back in place cause "the boys would get the wrong idea" I was EIGHT. But I literally I don't know how its going to be changed because this is a male-dominant society....

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: bchris02 on 12/21/15 at 10:37 am


I've noticed that ever since the rise of the "SJW" culture, the Internet seems to have taken a far-right bent, especially those on the comments of YouTube or political sites ("Dark pigment is the reason blacks commit more crime", "Women are manipulative ice queens who destroy good men", "Being transgender is a mental illness", "Muslims are scum", "Jews control everything", etc.)


Depends on the site.  Places like Reddit are pretty left-leaning.  YouTube and local media sites are the same.  Facebook is an echo chamber so if you are liberal and have liberal friends, you will see left-wing extremist memes and if you are conservative with right wing friends, you will see memes about guns, Obama being muslim, gays going to hell, etc.  City-Data forums used to be very left-leaning but now it leans to the right.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: musicguy93 on 12/21/15 at 12:30 pm


Depends on the site.  Places like Reddit are pretty left-leaning.  YouTube and local media sites are the same.  Facebook is an echo chamber so if you are liberal and have liberal friends, you will see left-wing extremist memes and if you are conservative with right wing friends, you will see memes about guns, Obama being muslim, gays going to hell, etc.  City-Data forums used to be very left-leaning but now it leans to the right.


Also, there are a lot of commentators on Youtube like TL;DR and Sargon of Akkad, whom are both liberal (or at least left leaning).

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: 2001 on 12/21/15 at 3:25 pm


Also, there are a lot of commentators on Youtube like TL;DR and Sargon of Akkad, whom are both liberal (or at least left leaning).


Are we talking commentators as in people who use the comment section, or people with a YouTube channel commenting on things? Because those are two rather different things haha ;D

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: KatanaChick on 12/22/15 at 3:44 am


Preach to the choir, please! Preach, preach!

http://feistythoughts.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/images-147.jpeg

I may be Asian/Vietnamese, but I would hate it if some of my white friends become vilified because they have different points of views, or were taken out of context.
I'm quite aware that racism still exists and is more subtle/hidden these days, but that's another thread/subject for another day.

I think these Social Justice Warriors have great intentions, but their execution is terrible and only breeds more fire, and not the good kind of fire either.

Social justice warriors are ironically racist themselves when they blame everything on white people and generalize all of them to be part of the problem and origin of the world's ills. They ignore the fact this is nothing new to societies all over the world no matter how remote. All their guilt tripping and blame upsets people who otherwise might listen to what they had to say were it not said accusingly.


Some feminists and social justice warriors are okay. A lot of Left leaning people are okay. I did have a bad run-in with a Social justice warrior roughly four years ago, in College. She was really, really, aggressive and didn't like to listen. Not all are like her, but it made me not want to listen to her viewpoints, and this was after three chances with her. I didn't dismiss her presence right off the bat. I was in a bad place in my life, and she didn't seem to want to listen that I was not in a good place, mentally and emotionally, to argue, or have a diplomatic debate with her.

You'd be surprised that some feminists have quite a good sense of humor, and aren't as politically correct as we'd like to think. But yes, sometimes the shadow side of these SJW are a bit scary. :.ducks:.

There's a difference between left leaning and going to extremes. The latter has gone off the deep and and can't be reasoned with.


I've noticed that ever since the rise of the "SJW" culture, the Internet seems to have taken a far-right bent, especially those on the comments of YouTube or political sites ("Dark pigment is the reason blacks commit more crime", "Women are manipulative ice queens who destroy good men", "Being transgender is a mental illness", "Muslims are scum", "Jews control everything", etc.)

Of course, these people have always been around, but it seems that ever since sites like Tumblr went crazy, they usually fall back on "Shut up, SJW" or "Sorry, did I trigger/oppress you?" as retorts.

The whole triggering thing is to not have to face reality and just hide in a comfort zone as much as possible. I think it's generational, with today's college age people. The polar opposite on the right tend to be older and are equally ignorant people who can't tolerate anything less than 100% agreeing with them or they become "triggered" as well. Out of all the outrageousness they spout, they ignore things like history, human nature, and how it all works. And that's both ends of the spectrum. One side tries to silence the other, and that causes them to lash out. "Your rights end where my feelings begin" is exactly what sums up the way some people think now.


I agree, I'm actually perfectly fine with the moderate feminists. I mostly have issues with the extreme feminists who perpetuate weird theories and buzzwords like "rape culture" and "patriarchy", and who use phrases like "check your privileges".

"Check your privilege" is a phrase used to shut down a debate. It's the equivalent of sticking your fingers in your ears so to speak. I have a problem with the term privilege being thrown around so freely because if you listen to what they're saying, it becomes clear it's just a case of sour grapes. Male privelege, thin privelege, cis privelege, etc.


At the core of it, they're really just against the idea that men are so entitled to women that social standards indirectly lead them to grow aggressive when they're turned down.  It makes reasonable sense when you examine things that actively endorse this behavior, like Ne-Yo's rotten 2006 hit When You're Mad, but you start to feel like you're unfairly stepping on eggshells when almost any casual representation of female sexuality is perceived as promoting this "rape culture."  Honestly, if the standards are that strict, it just infuriates sexually frustrated men more, furthering the idea that they have to destroy a bulwark of resistance so that they can get their sexual relief.  I definitely believe there's a lot society can do to tone down the media's obsession with sex, but I feel there should at least be some freedom for people to express lust, so long as the intentions are truly positive and not for the sake of dehumanizing women.  Striking the balance between free speech and a culture of respect is a much more complicated task, but the cynical extremes to which the most prominent feminists and social justice warriors take the issue is certainly not effective.

The loveshies and MRA groups are the male equivalent of Tumblr SJW feminists. They all pass the blame on others for "oppressing" them when they can't get away with something. Men don't need to be taught not to rape. People in their right mind know that such things are wrong and don't have an urge to go out and commit a heinous crime. Third wave feminists play the perpetual victim and mens rights activists feel entitled to women. And you know what both have in common? They all feel inadequate in some way and offline they tend to be socially awkward people who are bitter at the world without trying to fix their problems first. Trouble getting noticed by the opposite sex isn't the main problem. Outside of Tumblr or the forum that has become their hugbox many of them tend not to have much interaction with people. SJW's think they should be accepted as is without self improvement (health at any size and so forth, while donning outrageous styles) and men are shallow if they don't like it. MRA guys blame feminists for when women are put off by their crass behavior and how they come onto and objectify women, (rating scale, FTW?) when in reality so called "beta males" are just boys and men who were raised right and act like one should among people. Loveshies hate the very thing they want the most, and who would fall for someone who hates them? Then the whole matter of the sex thing fuels it all and boils down to this: you're damned if you do, and damned if you don't.


I agree. Because I remember being EIGHT and wearing a shorts set at school my mom had bought me and the shorts rode up while I was doing something, but my teacher told me to pull them back in place cause "the boys would get the wrong idea" I was EIGHT. But I literally I don't know how its going to be changed because this is a male-dominant society....

The good old days of school dress codes!  :o Every forbidden fashion statement was so because it was a "distraction." I get the fact you should look presentable, but kids need the freedom to express themselves too before they're in a work setting and can't. I'm talking more teenage years here as opposed to grade school, but still. Out and about you see people of all kinds and they're not a "distraction" from going about the day. My school allowed piercings and colored hair, but girls couldn't wear tank tops with skinny straps or spandex pants. No one could wear t-shirts with offensive sayings, but it seemed at any school more of the clothing rules picked on what girls wore.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: Shemp97 on 12/30/15 at 2:38 pm


The only social justice cause I can say I'm "actively' a part of is the Black Lives Matter one. Because I am a Black woman and it just upsets me to think that if I'm in the wrong place at the wrong time, I could be the next hashtag on Twitter. I have several male friends, Black, heavyset. All very sweet, but someone with a narrow mind might consider them a "threat" or "intimidating" and I'm having to buy a black dress. I don't like it. It's not fair. It's bad that even if I don't show it, in the back of my mind I'm worried that some cop will harm me. It's already enough to worry about some strange man trying to catcall me , but then the one who's supposed to protect you?

I don't know I just wish it would stop. And then there's the media coverage of it. They even painted that 12 year old, Tamir Rice as some kind of outlaw--a CHILD. I kind of wonder what will be said about me should something like that happen. There's no "bad" pictures of me available. I don't have any strikes against me other than 2 suspensions in junior year in high school. I've never broken the law. I made a few to the left remarks about a certain pop star but that's about it. It just all worries me and scares me.

Very much this.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: 80sfan on 12/30/15 at 3:00 pm


Social justice warriors are ironically racist themselves when they blame everything on white people and generalize all of them to be part of the problem and origin of the world's ills. They ignore the fact this is nothing new to societies all over the world no matter how remote. All their guilt tripping and blame upsets people who otherwise might listen to what they had to say were it not said accusingly.
There's a difference between left leaning and going to extremes. The latter has gone off the deep and and can't be reasoned with.
The whole triggering thing is to not have to face reality and just hide in a comfort zone as much as possible. I think it's generational, with today's college age people. The polar opposite on the right tend to be older and are equally ignorant people who can't tolerate anything less than 100% agreeing with them or they become "triggered" as well. Out of all the outrageousness they spout, they ignore things like history, human nature, and how it all works. And that's both ends of the spectrum. One side tries to silence the other, and that causes them to lash out. "Your rights end where my feelings begin" is exactly what sums up the way some people think now.
"Check your privilege" is a phrase used to shut down a debate. It's the equivalent of sticking your fingers in your ears so to speak. I have a problem with the term privilege being thrown around so freely because if you listen to what they're saying, it becomes clear it's just a case of sour grapes. Male privelege, thin privelege, cis privelege, etc.
The loveshies and MRA groups are the male equivalent of Tumblr SJW feminists. They all pass the blame on others for "oppressing" them when they can't get away with something. Men don't need to be taught not to rape. People in their right mind know that such things are wrong and don't have an urge to go out and commit a heinous crime. Third wave feminists play the perpetual victim and mens rights activists feel entitled to women. And you know what both have in common? They all feel inadequate in some way and offline they tend to be socially awkward people who are bitter at the world without trying to fix their problems first. Trouble getting noticed by the opposite sex isn't the main problem. Outside of Tumblr or the forum that has become their hugbox many of them tend not to have much interaction with people. SJW's think they should be accepted as is without self improvement (health at any size and so forth, while donning outrageous styles) and men are shallow if they don't like it. MRA guys blame feminists for when women are put off by their crass behavior and how they come onto and objectify women, (rating scale, FTW?) when in reality so called "beta males" are just boys and men who were raised right and act like one should among people. Loveshies hate the very thing they want the most, and who would fall for someone who hates them? Then the whole matter of the sex thing fuels it all and boils down to this: you're damned if you do, and damned if you don't.
The good old days of school dress codes!  :o Every forbidden fashion statement was so because it was a "distraction." I get the fact you should look presentable, but kids need the freedom to express themselves too before they're in a work setting and can't. I'm talking more teenage years here as opposed to grade school, but still. Out and about you see people of all kinds and they're not a "distraction" from going about the day. My school allowed piercings and colored hair, but girls couldn't wear tank tops with skinny straps or spandex pants. No one could wear t-shirts with offensive sayings, but it seemed at any school more of the clothing rules picked on what girls wore.


I understand that there are a lot of racist police officers out there that treat minorities like dirt, especially black men. It's just sooooooo unfair. They even kill these black men, and other minorities.

But yeah, a lot of these social justice warriors, maybe even most, lack debate and communication skills. I really do think a lot of them have their hearts in the right place. But being a great communicator is imperative.

Subject: Re: Social Justice culture of the 2010s

Written By: KatanaChick on 01/01/16 at 6:36 am


I understand that there are a lot of racist police officers out there that treat minorities like dirt, especially black men. It's just sooooooo unfair. They even kill these black men, and other minorities.

But yeah, a lot of these social justice warriors, maybe even most, lack debate and communication skills. I really do think a lot of them have their hearts in the right place. But being a great communicator is imperative.

That's true about the profiling and it's not something new, just something coming to light more. Times have come a ways from what they were, but they're still not perfectly fair. Part of it I see class factoring into the matter and not just race alone. It's a problem that can't be swept under the rug, the fact some people who abuse the power they have. This isn't Nazi Germany and we're supposed to be living in more enlightened times.

World events are sparking alot of bitterness and bringing prejudice people out of the woodwork too, more so when you've got people who stir them up.

Social Justice Warriors concerns are valid, but they take them to such wild extremes they can't be taken seriously, especially when they refuse to discuss anything if you have a different opinion. They'll make mountains out of molehills. LGBTQ issues are real, but ranting on about misgendering people like everyone's supposed to be a mind reader, or that otherkin are a valid thing jut because they think themselves to be so makes them look nuts! DIE CIS SCUM!!! Makes enemies rather than allies. Then you've got the fat acceptance movement who demand people to accomodate them while insisting they're perfectly healthy being morbidly obese and shame  their average sized counterparts makes it clear they're not so confident or happy with themselves as they put on. The way they attack other people for anything just indicates their problems are their own first. Hearing privelege this and privelege that doesn't make me want to sympathize with anyone for the reason it's akin to sticking a finger in someone's face in an accusatory manner.

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