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Subject: What is the '70s?

Written By: Donnie Darko on 06/17/06 at 2:47 pm

I think of the '70s as spanning from 1971 to 1979.

Subject: Re: What is the '70s?

Written By: bbigd04 on 06/17/06 at 2:50 pm

1970-1979

Subject: Re: What is the '70s?

Written By: Marty McFly on 06/17/06 at 10:57 pm


I think of the '70s as spanning from 1971 to 1979.


I think the '70s is one of the few decades that doesn't really have a "forerunner" in the '60s (e.g. the way that, say 1988 had some very prequel '90s-ish things). Their beginning sort of is the end of the excessive "Woodstock" type '60s, and the general start of the modern political era. Yeah, I agree 1971 was a changeful year on that end.

To be precise, I'd put 1971-mid 1981 as the "70s" even though they peaked more around 1977, and the "80s" starting coming up in 1979.

Subject: Re: What is the '70s?

Written By: velvetoneo on 06/17/06 at 11:13 pm


I think the '70s is one of the few decades that doesn't really have a "forerunner" in the '60s (e.g. the way that, say 1988 had some very prequel '90s-ish things). Their beginning sort of is the end of the excessive "Woodstock" type '60s, and the general start of the modern political era. Yeah, I agree 1971 was a changeful year on that end.

To be precise, I'd put 1971-mid 1981 as the "70s" even though they peaked more around 1977, and the "80s" starting coming up in 1979.


I agree. In alot of ways, you could say the change between the late '60s and the early '70s was more like the change between, say, the early and mid '90s. Nothing groundbreaking, but it was a sea change in terms of the general pop climate, and a big progression. The '70s to me was roughly 1971-mid 1981, though late 1979 was the first period that didn't quite "vibe" '70s, with stuff like "My Sharona" coming up, even though that took alot from glam rock.

One argument is that, really, 1969 or so was the '70slike part of the '60s, and that isn't said much. Bands like Pink Floyd, David Bowie, and the Velvet Underground (who are a prequel to all alt rock and new wave, arguably) started coming out then, and heavy metal started coming out then. The first half of the '70s was a progression of the last part of the '60s, though it was very different in terms of the way people thought and you could say it was a transitional period between the super socially-activist mid-late '60s and the late '70s, which was the beginning of the "me generation." It was the period when the changes of the '60s got absorbed into society, though there was a general feeling of defeat then that was so distinctly un-'60s. Also, the '60s were silly, when you get beyond all the serious stuff they tried to put on, whereas the '70s were high camp, and stuff like Elton John, David Bowie, etc. from the first half of the '70s was very high camp in the vein of disco.

Also, there was some stuff from say 1974 that was "late '70s." Disco first appeared out of the underground then with stuff like "More More More" by Andrea True and there was Kraftwerk around then.

Subject: Re: What is the '70s?

Written By: Marty McFly on 06/17/06 at 11:28 pm


I agree. In alot of ways, you could say the change between the late '60s and the early '70s was more like the change between, say, the early and mid '90s. Nothing groundbreaking, but it was a sea change in terms of the general pop climate, and a big progression. The '70s to me was roughly 1971-mid 1981, though late 1979 was the first period that didn't quite "vibe" '70s, with stuff like "My Sharona" coming up, even though that took alot from glam rock.

One argument is that, really, 1969 or so was the '70slike part of the '60s, and that isn't said much. Bands like Pink Floyd, David Bowie, and the Velvet Underground (who are a prequel to all alt rock and new wave, arguably) started coming out then, and heavy metal started coming out then. The first half of the '70s was a progression of the last part of the '60s, though it was very different in terms of the way people thought and you could say it was a transitional period between the super socially-activist mid-late '60s and the late '70s, which was the beginning of the "me generation." It was the period when the changes of the '60s got absorbed into society, though there was a general feeling of defeat then that was so distinctly un-'60s. Also, the '60s were silly, when you get beyond all the serious stuff they tried to put on, whereas the '70s were high camp, and stuff like Elton John, David Bowie, etc. from the first half of the '70s was very high camp in the vein of disco.

Also, there was some stuff from say 1974 that was "late '70s." Disco first appeared out of the underground then with stuff like "More More More" by Andrea True and there was Kraftwerk around then.


Agreed. I once read a book that said "Born to Be Wild" was the first true heavy metal song and that was from '68. I suppose in some slight ways, 1968 and '69 are like a "heavier, more gritty" 1967.

You could argue 1968-74/75 was sort of a mini era unto itself.

Yeah, the political and social ideas which got rolling in the mid '60s (as well as earlier) really got "secured" by 1971 or so. I'm sure by then, people knew we weren't going to be dealing with segregation or colored water fountains and sections of busses anymore.

Subject: Re: What is the '70s?

Written By: velvetoneo on 06/17/06 at 11:33 pm


Agreed. I once read a book that said "Born to Be Wild" was the first true heavy metal song and that was from '68. I suppose in some slight ways, 1968 and '69 are like a "heavier, more gritty" 1967.

You could argue 1968-74/75 was sort of a mini era unto itself.

Yeah, the political and social ideas which got rolling in the mid '60s (as well as earlier) really got "secured" by 1971 or so. I'm sure by then, people knew we weren't going to be dealing with segregation or colored water fountains and sections of busses anymore.


Yeah...even 1968 was different from 1972 in a ton of ways. Like, back then, in my mom's school system (in a well-to-do suburb) girls had to wear skirts to school. By 1972, that seemed pretty far off.

There were some "'70s songs in the '60s." "Born to be Wild" definitely falls into this category, and so does something like "Inna Gadda Da Vida" or "Mississippi Queen", or any early Bowie or Floyd or Iggy Pop stuff from around 1969.

Do you agree about that shift, from whimsy to camp? The 1964-1966 period with all the Motown and British Invasion, and to a lesser extent, the psychedelic pop and bubblegum pop of the late '60s (most of which was pretty light and insubstantial), had a major sea change to heavy camp like Black Sabbath c. 1971.

Subject: Re: What is the '70s?

Written By: Marty McFly on 06/17/06 at 11:41 pm


Yeah...even 1968 was different from 1972 in a ton of ways. Like, back then, in my mom's school system (in a well-to-do suburb) girls had to wear skirts to school. By 1972, that seemed pretty far off.

There were some "'70s songs in the '60s." "Born to be Wild" definitely falls into this category, and so does something like "Inna Gadda Da Vida" or "Mississippi Queen", or any early Bowie or Floyd or Iggy Pop stuff from around 1969.

Do you agree about that shift, from whimsy to camp? The 1964-1966 period with all the Motown and British Invasion, and to a lesser extent, the psychedelic pop and bubblegum pop of the late '60s (most of which was pretty light and insubstantial), had a major sea change to heavy camp like Black Sabbath c. 1971.


Definitely. I think the mid '60s pop was alot more "innocent/lighthearted". I was also thinking not too long ago about how I always felt the '50s ended when JFK was shot in late '63. While I think a good bulk of it did end then, I actually think some stuff up through 1966 is a bit "quasi '50s" - songs like "Baby Love" by the Supremes.

Even though the '60s pretty much began when the Beatles appeared on Ed Sullivan (exploding them and starting Beatlemania) in Feb. 1964, I don't think the '50s totally ended until 1967. 1968 was a more "dark, intense" 60s.

Subject: Re: What is the '70s?

Written By: velvetoneo on 06/17/06 at 11:45 pm


Definitely. I think the mid '60s pop was alot more "innocent/lighthearted". I was also thinking not too long ago about how I always felt the '50s ended when JFK was shot in late '63. While I think a good bulk of it did end then, I actually think some stuff up through 1966 is a bit "quasi '50s" - songs like "Baby Love" by the Supremes.

Even though the '60s pretty much began when the Beatles appeared on Ed Sullivan (exploding them and starting Beatlemania) in Feb. 1964, I don't think the '50s totally ended until 1967. 1968 was a more "dark, intense" 60s.


Yeah...though it wasn't influenced so much by the "'50s" '50s, like say 1955, it was influenced by stuff from around 1961 or 1962 like the Shirelles and the Ronettes heavily.

Some other stuff I'd put as the '70s in the '60s, to a degree:
-Sly and the Family Stone.
-Some of the Rolling Stone's and the Who's stuff from c. 1969.
-The Velvet Underground (White Light White Heat has a very intense, unlistenable "noise" feel to it)

When I think of something archetypically '60s, it's the Mamas and the Papas, the mid-'60s Beatles stuff like Rubber Soul and Revolver, or SPLHCB, or Motown.

Subject: Re: What is the '70s?

Written By: Marty McFly on 06/17/06 at 11:51 pm


Yeah...though it wasn't influenced so much by the "'50s" '50s, like say 1955, it was influenced by stuff from around 1961 or 1962 like the Shirelles and the Ronettes heavily.

Some other stuff I'd put as the '70s in the '60s, to a degree:
-Sly and the Family Stone.
-Some of the Rolling Stone's and the Who's stuff from c. 1969.
-The Velvet Underground (White Light White Heat has a very intense, unlistenable "noise" feel to it)

When I think of something archetypically '60s, it's the Mamas and the Papas, the mid-'60s Beatles stuff like Rubber Soul and Revolver, or SPLHCB, or Motown.


Yeah, that was more like an evolution of what I call "the quiet era" (1959-most of '63) like the calm before the storm in that the teen rebellion, rock and rolling, malt shop '50s was declined, but before the "60s" 60s exploded.

If someone from 1962 woke up in 1965, they would probably think "My Girl" or some of the more poppy, early Beatles (i.e. "I Wanna Hold Your Hand") was a natural evolution of their current music, whereas they would not expect something like The Kinks or the Stones.

Subject: Re: What is the '70s?

Written By: velvetoneo on 06/17/06 at 11:53 pm


Yeah, that was more like an evolution of what I call "the quiet era" (1959-most of '63) like the calm before the storm in that the teen rebellion, rock and rolling, malt shop '50s was declined, but before the "60s" 60s exploded.

If someone from 1962 woke up in 1965, they would probably think "My Girl" or some of the more poppy, early Beatles (i.e. "I Wanna Hold Your Hand") was a natural evolution of their current music, whereas they would not expect something like The Kinks or the Stones.


Yeah, exactly. All of that was an evolution of stuff from around 1962. Like "Shop Around" was from around then, and it's barely distinguishable from something from 1965. The Stones, however, were hard-rocking and bluesy and very far from anything from 1961 or 1962.

Subject: Re: What is the '70s?

Written By: Marty McFly on 06/17/06 at 11:59 pm


Yeah, exactly. All of that was an evolution of stuff from around 1962. Like "Shop Around" was from around then, and it's barely distinguishable from something from 1965. The Stones, however, were hard-rocking and bluesy and very far from anything from 1961 or 1962.


Even though Beatlemania and the 1964ish era in general marked a new pop culture and sort of made the '50s look "older", I almost think it was sort of a mainstream-ized '50s that was finally allowed to exist freely.

In other words, sure, rock and roll was existant in the '50s, but I almost get the feel part of its appeal was a rebellion against the conservative feel of the times. Like it was more the 15 and 17 year olds of 1956 who dug it, but guys like James Dean and Elvis were too "on the edge" and rebels to really break through. Whereas by 1964 it was more like kids, some older people and middle America were finally starting to "accept/embrace" it if that makes any sense.

Subject: Re: What is the '70s?

Written By: velvetoneo on 06/18/06 at 12:01 am


Even though Beatlemania and the 1964ish era in general marked a new pop culture and sort of made the '50s look "older", I almost think it was sort of a mainstream-ized '50s that was finally allowed to exist freely.

In other words, sure, rock and roll was existant in the '50s, but I almost get the feel part of its appeal was a rebellion against the conservative feel of the times. Like it was more the 15 and 17 year olds of 1956 who dug it, but guys like James Dean and Elvis were too "on the edge" and rebels to really break through. Whereas by 1964 it was more like kids, some older people and middle America were finally starting to "accept/embrace" it if that makes any sense.


Yeah. Like people from my mother's sister's age, who was 6 in 1965, to people my grandmother's age, who were 37 in 1965, all liked some stuff like the Beatles and Motown, or Petula Clark and whatnot.

Subject: Re: What is the '70s?

Written By: Marty McFly on 06/18/06 at 12:06 am


Yeah. Like people from my mother's sister's age, who was 6 in 1965, to people my grandmother's age, who were 37 in 1965, all liked some stuff like the Beatles and Motown, or Petula Clark and whatnot.


Same here. My mom was 10 in 1964 and really liked the early Beatles and all that. So did my grandma, who was born in 1928 (mid 30s at the time), although my 1915er grandpa (who died before I was born), apparently thought it was noise. ;D He didn't hate it or anything, but thought it was just silly stuff kids were into.

I would argue the '60s were the very beginning of the over 26 crowd getting into music and pop culture (since it was now "safer" than it was in the '50s), although it's probably more like 1937ers+ who are guaranteed to enjoy some pop culture from their adult years (i.e. anyone who was under 18 when Elvis got popular).

Subject: Re: What is the '70s?

Written By: velvetoneo on 06/18/06 at 12:08 am


Same here. My mom was 10 in 1964 and really liked the early Beatles and all that. So did my grandma, who was born in 1928 (mid 30s at the time), although my 1915er grandpa (who died before I was born), apparently thought it was noise. ;D He didn't hate it or anything, but thought it was just silly stuff kids were into.

I would argue the '60s were the very beginning of the over 26 crowd getting into music and pop culture (since it was now "safer" than it was in the '50s), although it's probably more like 1937ers+ who are guaranteed to enjoy some pop culture from their adult years (i.e. anyone who was under 18 when Elvis got popular).


There was definitely an adult pop culture of the late '50s and early '60s, though-lounge jazz, film noir movies, Peggy Lee. And meanwhile, the under 26 crowd tended to like rock.

Our grandparents are actually the same age....my grandmother was born in 1928, and my grandfather was born in 1914 or so. I think somebody born in 1928 can relate more to that sort of music, since they were teens during the Sinatra era.

Subject: Re: What is the '70s?

Written By: Marty McFly on 06/18/06 at 12:16 am


There was definitely an adult pop culture of the late '50s and early '60s, though-lounge jazz, film noir movies, Peggy Lee. And meanwhile, the under 26 crowd tended to like rock.

Our grandparents are actually the same age....my grandmother was born in 1928, and my grandfather was born in 1914 or so. I think somebody born in 1928 can relate more to that sort of music, since they were teens during the Sinatra era.


Yeah, I'd say 1925-35 born folks are sort of the "mild rock fan/accepting of it" range. Even though Sinatra was more old-styled in sound, his lifestyle was sort of a precursor to the rock era, and he was kind of a rebel. Right after he died, in fact (back in '98) I read some stuff about his earlier life and it actually sounded pretty cutting edge for its time.

It's weird how different some late 30s people are. My dad is a 1938er and centers on the 60s (as far as pop and rock music goes) although enjoys some things up through 1986/87. However, his best friend, also a '38er never made it much past the '50s pop culturally and even views the Beatles and such as slightly past his time, from what I recall (don't get me wrong, he's a really nice guy, one of those "play cards with the boys and have a beer" types, but isn't as liberal or pop culture centered).

Subject: Re: What is the '70s?

Written By: GoodRedShirt on 06/18/06 at 3:48 am

1970-1979

Subject: Re: What is the '70s?

Written By: Philip Eno on 06/18/06 at 4:18 am

I really think that 1970 has been neglected here, a lot happened back then.

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