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Subject: To 80's music fans was 1997 some kind of revival year for the 80's?

Written By: tv on 05/09/04 at 2:44 am

Some songs recorded in 1997 could pass for 80's songs:

1.) I want You-Savage Garden-When this song and group came out they were compared to Roxette.

2.) Your Woman-White Town-(one Hit Wonder band) but could easily pass for an 80's new wave song.

3.) Ohhh ah Just a Little Bit-Gina G(one Hit Wonder) sounds like a cross between The Jets and Lisa Lisa.

4.) Return Of The Mack by Mark Morrison-Could pass for a Bobby Brown song circa 1988.


Subject: Re: To 80's music fans was 1997 some kind of revival year for the 80's?

Written By: ultraviolet52 on 07/23/05 at 11:15 pm

Unfortunately, none of those songs sounded reminiscent of the 80's. The "Your Woman" song could pass by a hair, but it had too much 90's synth going on... 1997 was hardly a revival year to me.. it seemed to be more of a time for anti-1980's stuff. Back in 1997, the 1970's were considered the cooler time, not the 1980's. Now the opposite holds true...

Subject: Re: To 80's music fans was 1997 some kind of revival year for the 80's?

Written By: SpaceHog on 07/24/05 at 5:24 pm

I think '97 was like the mid 80's, bcause of the big band revival Ex.: Mighty Mighty Bosstones,Squirrel nut zippers.

They sounded like the stray cats,and adam ant's music.

Subject: Re: To 80's music fans was 1997 some kind of revival year for the 80's?

Written By: Marty McFly on 07/29/05 at 5:06 am

Saw this floating back around on the second page, so I thought I'd respond (funnily enough I could've sworn I already had, as this is the kind of thread that would catch my eye!). :D

I wouldn't say 1997 would pass as 80's music per se, but I definitely see the logic in this thread. To put it another way, let's say a teen of the early 80's came forward and heard a number of the Top 40 songs that year, they'd probably think, "Oh, music in the next decade seems pretty cool," but not a dead ringer for 1983.

Like I've written on here before I think 1996 to '97 was a big shift in pop culture. Like the end of the grunge era to sort of a precursor to what we're living in now. So since an entire "era" had passed since the 80's were around, it was the first year you could really revisit them and 80s-type stuff was beginning to get a resurgence, even if not enough to be called a true comeback.

For the record I've never been a fan of boy bands or "teen pop" stuff. That said though, I really think when the Spice Girls came out that year, it was kind of a rebuttal against the dark, grunge-like rock of late 1991-96. Not that it was a return to an 80's style, but it was more fluffy/innocent/pop-oriented like much of the music then was.

On the movie end, take Romy & Michelle's High School Reunion. I remember seeing it then (liked it right off the bat, not surprisingly!) and thought, from the filmmakers' POV, it was intended to be a "period" movie - kind of like saying "Hey, we're catching up with a couple teens of the 80's a decade later, just to show you they're still not that different and to remind you of some of the pop culture you might've forgotten about."

^ I was only 15 then but it still brought back memories for me in many respects, since I was always "in tune" with the 80's. ;)

Subject: Re: To 80's music fans was 1997 some kind of revival year for the 80's?

Written By: ultraviolet52 on 08/01/05 at 7:27 pm


Saw this floating back around on the second page, so I thought I'd respond (funnily enough I could've sworn I already had, as this is the kind of thread that would catch my eye!). :D

I wouldn't say 1997 would pass as 80's music per se, but I definitely see the logic in this thread. To put it another way, let's say a teen of the early 80's came forward and heard a number of the Top 40 songs that year, they'd probably think, "Oh, music in the next decade seems pretty cool," but not a dead ringer for 1983.

Like I've written on here before I think 1996 to '97 was a big shift in pop culture. Like the end of the grunge era to sort of a precursor to what we're living in now. So since an entire "era" had passed since the 80's were around, it was the first year you could really revisit them and 80s-type stuff was beginning to get a resurgence, even if not enough to be called a true comeback.

For the record I've never been a fan of boy bands or "teen pop" stuff. That said though, I really think when the Spice Girls came out that year, it was kind of a rebuttal against the dark, grunge-like rock of late 1991-96. Not that it was a return to an 80's style, but it was more fluffy/innocent/pop-oriented like much of the music then was.

On the movie end, take Romy & Michelle's High School Reunion. I remember seeing it then (liked it right off the bat, not surprisingly!) and thought, from the filmmakers' POV, it was intended to be a "period" movie - kind of like saying "Hey, we're catching up with a couple teens of the 80's a decade later, just to show you they're still not that different and to remind you of some of the pop culture you might've forgotten about."

^ I was only 15 then but it still brought back memories for me in many respects, since I was always "in tune" with the 80's. ;)


Hey Marty,

Since I began reading your posts, I'd had to say I agree with you every time - although, for this one, I seem to disagree *mildly* We have something in common here - we were both 15  years old in 1997, and coming from my end - I didn't see a connection between the 1980's and the year 1997. I would say Romy & Michelle's HS Reunion is a slight example. Yet nothing really big seemed to warn us of an impending 1980's pop culture resurrection.

What I find even more interesting is that during this time, from my observations, I found that pop culture was still fascinated with the late 60's and 1970's because the 1980's were still too recent to really want to reminensce about. We still had 1980's shows on air that had started in the 80's, we still had reruns of shows that aired originally in the 80's and we still even dressed a bit 1980-ish.

The 1980's comeback seemed to me to be only all too recent - at least towards the end of 2002 or mid-2003 when VH1 began airing their "I Love the 80's" episodes. All of the sudden the 80's became hip again and remembering certain aspects of pop culture from that time became pretty cool. Even such trends as short skirts, long hair on boys, even all those early 80's clashing colors- are back. Think of all the toys - such as Strawberry Shortcake, Carebears, etc. All that had been forgotten by most of us in 1997. Now they have returned.

So, anyways, that's it.. I've said my piece :0)

Subject: Re: To 80's music fans was 1997 some kind of revival year for the 80's?

Written By: Marty McFly on 08/01/05 at 8:07 pm


Hey Marty,

Since I began reading your posts, I'd had to say I agree with you every time...


Thanks - I've enjoyed reading what you've had to say as well. :)

...although, for this one, I seem to disagree *mildly* We have something in common here - we were both 15 years old in 1997, and coming from my end - I didn't see a connection between the 1980's and the year 1997. I would say Romy & Michelle's HS Reunion is a slight example. Yet nothing really big seemed to warn us of an impending 1980's pop culture resurrection.

What I find even more interesting is that during this time, from my observations, I found that pop culture was still fascinated with the late 60's and 1970's because the 1980's were still too recent to really want to reminensce about. We still had 1980's shows on air that had started in the 80's, we still had reruns of shows that aired originally in the 80's and we still even dressed a bit 1980-ish.

The 1980's comeback seemed to me to be only all too recent - at least towards the end of 2002 or mid-2003 when VH1 began airing their "I Love the 80's" episodes. All of the sudden the 80's became hip again and remembering certain aspects of pop culture from that time became pretty cool. Even such trends as short skirts, long hair on boys, even all those early 80's clashing colors- are back. Think of all the toys - such as Strawberry Shortcake, Carebears, etc. All that had been forgotten by most of us in 1997. Now they have returned.

So, anyways, that's it.. I've said my piece :0)


Good points. I think I was latching onto the "it was the end of grunge, so people wanted happy 80s-like pop again"-thought. To a degree I think it was true, but I tend to more go with what you've said.

In 1997, the end of the 80's were still only 7-8 years in the past, so I guess that would be like if, in only 2 years people got nostalgic for the 90's (when we'll probably STILL have 1999-ish music on the radio, LOL). ;D

I think the culture and styles of a given era make an updated comeback every 20-30 years (some little bits may emerge after 5 or 10, but not fully). In the early and mid 80's, the 50's became cool again. The Stray Cats were very rockability - a number of other songs had a 50's influence. Movies like The Outsiders and, of course BTTF 1 also reinforced this. ;)

The very late 80's and early 90's seemed to have the 60's as its retro decade - psychedelic music made a comeback and people wore tie dye shirts. Heck, I'd even say the grunge era itself was a cultural revolution of sorts. The slacker/angst-types were almost to the time, what flower children were a quarter century before.

Starting toward the end of the 90's, with things like That 70's Show, and the clothing styles, the 70's became retro-cool. It's still going on today but starting to fade. Since things like electropop and VH1 retro shows are gaining popularity, the 80's comeback will probably be full-blown by 2008-10.

^ I hope they do at least! :)

Subject: Re: To 80's music fans was 1997 some kind of revival year for the 80's?

Written By: Cafe80s on 08/02/05 at 12:05 am

Quite simply put i can't agree. None of the 1990s was even remotely like the 80s, music, culture or fashion wise. There seems to be a bit of a 70s & 80s revival going on at the moment though, maybe not in terms of musicly, but look at all the remakes & old TV shows turned movies at the moment & old TV show cast reunions etc etc. Lots of 80s TV shows being celebrated & getting DVD releases. Also i noticed tight stretch jeans have come back in & are being made for the guys & a see a lot of people wearing them in trendy parts of the city here in Melbourne. I haven't seen a guy wear tight stretch jeans since early 1990. I went & grabbed a pair straight away because they aren't hard to find at all at the moment. Also i noticed that  lot of younger dudes are now choosing to wear smaller t-shirts over long & loose, almost like babydoll small. Retro is in & the term retro is now a cool clitche' with some kids, eg: young girls wearing stuff like Jem t-shirts not because they liked the show or even know what it is or grew up with it, but because retro is "cool" & it's in. There's plenty more stuff i've observed, but i can't think of at the moment.  It definatly started to make me think, "hang on what the hell is happening here".  You know it's time to start feeling old when stuff you grew up with is considered "classic" or "retro".   

Subject: Re: To 80's music fans was 1997 some kind of revival year for the 80's?

Written By: ultraviolet52 on 08/02/05 at 12:22 am


Thanks - I've enjoyed reading what you've had to say as well. :)


Thank you :0)

Good points. I think I was latching onto the "it was the end of grunge, so people wanted happy 80s-like pop again"-thought. To a degree I think it was true, but I tend to more go with what you've said.

In 1997, the end of the 80's were still only 7-8 years in the past, so I guess that would be like if, in only 2 years people got nostalgic for the 90's (when we'll probably STILL have 1999-ish music on the radio, LOL). ;D


Yeah, that is true. I think in 1997 I was actually trying to remove myself from the 1980's as much as possible - and I think pop culture was, too. But, now, in a sense - I think people are growing especially fond of that time - because I think every generation does this because of the so-called "innocence" of the time. I think as humans, we tend to want to think of the past often because it's something we're more familiar with.

I think the culture and styles of a given era make an updated comeback every 20-30 years (some little bits may emerge after 5 or 10, but not fully). In the early and mid 80's, the 50's became cool again. The Stray Cats were very rockability - a number of other songs had a 50's influence. Movies like The Outsiders and, of course BTTF 1 also reinforced this. ;)

Yeah, I totally see that about the 1950's having a resurrection in the 1980's. I even noticed it as a child. I think especially since the baby boomers  had grown up, they were now reliving their childhood memories and putting those 1950's ideals into us. So music by the Stray Cats, etc., sort of reflected this new interest in 1950's culture.

The very late 80's and early 90's seemed to have the 60's as its retro decade - psychedelic music made a comeback and people wore tie dye shirts. Heck, I'd even say the grunge era itself was a cultural revolution of sorts. The slacker/angst-types were almost to the time, what flower children were a quarter century before.

I really saw the 1990's bringing back the 1960's culture and a bit of 1970's with a lot of things - especially clothing. But, to be honest, the 1990's really just doesn't have a place of it's own. Nothing seems real definitive about that decade to me. It's strange..

The 80's comeback may last awhile - it has actually lasted a lot longer than I ever saw it coming. I think people are just truly missing a time that they once had. I think they're realising that maybe all this tech stuff is actually too far fetched for a lot of people and that we'd really just like to go back to simpler times.

Subject: Re: To 80's music fans was 1997 some kind of revival year for the 80's?

Written By: robby76 on 08/02/05 at 3:27 am

Gina G sounded like The Jets... that's blasphemous!!! As an avid Jets fan I'd have to strongly disagree. Gina G was more cheesy Euro house, whilst Jets were US pop/soul (albeit later leaning towards a bit more bubblegum pop).

Return of the Mac - Bobby Brown??? Not really, that's too much of a generalisation i.e black solo male - that's it.

Roxette's first single was released in April 89... so it's really pushing the boundaries by calling them an 80's group.

I respect your opinion and not everyone "hears" the same thing, but I can't see any connection with 97 and the 80's.

Fashion wise: the 80's are the 00's... mullets are back, pedal-pushers with stiletto's, pink shirts! It's all here!

Subject: Re: To 80's music fans was 1997 some kind of revival year for the 80's?

Written By: BCRichrocker on 08/02/05 at 9:33 pm

ultraviolet52 - I really saw the 1990's bringing back the 1960's culture and a bit of 1970's with a lot of things - especially clothing. But, to be honest, the 1990's really just doesn't have a place of it's own. Nothing seems real definitive about that decade to me. It's strange..


I love to see people from that generation see what us '80s children have observed about the '90s all along. It was the "nothing" decade. Even a signature show such as Seinfeld was a show about "nothing". How apropos.

And from my observation the "baby boomer" hippies had an influence on the 1990's not the 1980's. I mean look at the 90's styles and culture. They brought back the bellbottoms, bandanas, straight limp hair with no bangs, etc. And the music, more "organic", more acoustic, and less produced. The '80s were none of these. And guess what? Those styles still haven't left in the middle of the next decade. Talk about a generation who can't let go....

robby76  Fashion wise: the 80's are the 00's... mullets are back, pedal-pushers with stiletto's, pink shirts! It's all here!

Wow. What can I say? While I respect your opinion, I wish with everything I have that you were right. But alas, it isn't so. The 80s styles have been trying to make their way back and have to a very small degree, but the 70s/90s generation won't let their styles go. How very sad indeed.

Subject: Re: To 80's music fans was 1997 some kind of revival year for the 80's?

Written By: ultraviolet52 on 08/03/05 at 12:07 am

I love to see people from that generation see what us '80s children have observed about the '90s all along. It was the "nothing" decade. Even a signature show such as Seinfeld was a show about "nothing". How apropos.

And from my observation the "baby boomer" hippies had an influence on the 1990's not the 1980's. I mean look at the 90's styles and culture. They brought back the bellbottoms, bandanas, straight limp hair with no bangs, etc. And the music, more "organic", more acoustic, and less produced. The '80s were none of these. And guess what? Those styles still haven't left in the middle of the next decade. Talk about a generation who can't let go....


Yes, you have a point there, BC. Seinfeld was really a show about "nothing" and being that it was practically the show of the 1990's, it seems to reflect the times. I think the 90's also pushed a lot of boundaries and people were a bit lost in that decade (not that we're not lost now, lol).

My main point about the 50's being a decade of preference in the 1980's is that a lot of the baby boomers (i.e. 1945-1965) kids had grown up and were sharing this time through either music, political ideas, social norms, and etc. Now being that the baby boomer generation lasted 20 years, there's going to be an obvious shift in attitude during that time - depending on when the baby boomer grew up. Obviously the baby boomer from 1949 *hence my Dad's birth year* is going to have a more 1950's outlook and attitude, while the kid born in let's say, 1963 (someone whom I know very well), will have some differences with that person born in 1949 - especially cultural attitudes and social mores. So, anyway, yeah, the baby boomers were still making their mark in the 1990's due to the long expansion of years that the baby boomer bracket falls into. 

Hopefully the 1970's kids and 1980's kids can sort of rid us of some of that leftover 90's acoustic, "organic" music. Not that it's bad, but music today needs something truly new and exciting. Something extraordinary as The Beatles may never happen again - but maybe I can see that in my lifetime (hopefully.)

Subject: Re: To 80's music fans was 1997 some kind of revival year for the 80's?

Written By: Cafe80s on 08/03/05 at 12:26 pm


Hopefully the 1970's kids and 1980's kids can sort of rid us of some of that leftover 90's acoustic, "organic" music. Not that it's bad, but music today needs something truly new and exciting. Something extraordinary as The Beatles may never happen again - but maybe I can see that in my lifetime (hopefully.)

You made some good points but i can't totally agree with the last portion. There really isn't a lot of  leftover 90's acoustic, "organic" music. Right now all i see is crass & materialistic rap, rnb, dance/techno inspired pop & really bad pop music with "supposed" artists/fashion victims that look like they are modelling for a recent Myer or Westco cataloge. The bands that are even remotely guitar driven or accoustic over the past few years or so are bands that rock radio has been swarmed by, trying to mix early-90's alternative rock with pop sensibilities, but most of these acts tend to come off as almost appallingly indistinguished (think Nickelback). The bands in the early 90s did it a hell of a lot better & really aren't really much like what's out there now. Less production is not a bad thing anyway. The 80s was not all highly produced music & arena rock, raw lowfi punk bands low production thrash & metal bands were popping up  from everywhere & less production is what gave that music it's appeal. Top 40 music & fashion (which seem to go hand in hand) are like a food chain & the most popular & commonly consumed is usually junk & crap. It has become a consumer industry of disposable icons. The Beatles were quite extraordinary, i agree but seeing how crass & discusting the music industry is now (& only getting worse) i don't think we'll live to see anything like that again. I mean look at these shows like American Idol & Australian Idol. Are the public & masses that stupid, don't people know what happens to these applicants. Their CDs end up in bargain bins & second hand stores & most people who were gulable enough buy into it usually end up too embarrassed to admit it in a couple of years. Just look at Milli Vanilli as an example, those who do not remember the past are condemed to repeat it. The other day i just decided to watch Idol for a bit just to see how gay & crass it is & i saw them knock back one girl because her look was as the judge said "too disturbing", yet this girl sang just as good if not better than the the the other Ken & Barbie doll, Jay Jays catalogue model wannabes. Believe me she had an amazing voice. She had a few piecings (nothing too extreme) & an old school punk style denim jacket with some badges & writing on it. So basicly the moral of the story is anyone with a sense of individuality & a sense of their own idendity & style need not apply because all they want is clones. Attack Of The Clones Part 12  ::)

Subject: Re: To 80's music fans was 1997 some kind of revival year for the 80's?

Written By: ultraviolet52 on 08/03/05 at 5:36 pm


You made some good points but i can't totally agree with the last portion. There really isn't a lot of  leftover 90's acoustic, "organic" music. Right now all i see is crass & materialistic rap, rnb, dance/techno inspired pop & really bad pop music with "supposed" artists/fashion victims that look like they are modelling for a recent Myer or Westco cataloge...... So basicly the moral of the story is anyone with a sense of individuality & a sense of their own idendity & style need not apply because all they want is clones. Attack Of The Clones Part 12   ::)


I agree, Cafe 80's. I think what I really meant about the "organic" music of today is that it's rather bland - to me, it's just as bad as the pop acts when it comes to originality. It may appear original, but to me, it sounds like a watered down version of a poorly written pop song. That's not to say that ALL are like that. I have been able to come across many acts performing today that are true songwriters, but I have yet to come across artists that seem really inspired by what they do. The music industry is haunted by the extreme use of chord progression and there are rarely anything that goes off the beaten track or that sounds experimental.

Subject: Re: To 80's music fans was 1997 some kind of revival year for the 80's?

Written By: Marty McFly on 08/03/05 at 8:08 pm


I agree, Cafe 80's. I think what I really meant about the "organic" music of today is that it's rather bland - to me, it's just as bad as the pop acts when it comes to originality. It may appear original, but to me, it sounds like a watered down version of a poorly written pop song. That's not to say that ALL are like that. I have been able to come across many acts performing today that are true songwriters, but I have yet to come across artists that seem really inspired by what they do. The music industry is haunted by the extreme use of chord progression and there are rarely anything that goes off the beaten track or that sounds experimental.


Interesting discussion here. Again I agree with this!

I used to always think of 80's vs 90's rock as fun vs angry, but now that I think about it, a good chunk of 90's (and even more today's) music is very "stripped down" - especially rap, and alot of R+B. Grunge, despite being the other side of the fence, fit this description too.

^ Although grunge itself is long gone, I think "nu metal" bands like Nickelback are keeping that general sound alive now.

I think one thing that always drew me into 80's music was that was very produced - almost meant to be sing-along - synthesizers, big guitars, studio trickery, etc. That sort of rendered it "cheesy" after late 1991.

I would argue that things coming out today are largely accoustic, maybe that's why it frequently has that "samey" feeling to me. Of everything out now, my favorite would be the pop/punk bands - even though it tends to be like the same song, at least it's somewhat happy/fun. Of course THOSE bands are largely a ripoff of Green Day, etc.

But anyway, I wonder what'll happen when people born in 1970 (pure 80's teens!) start getting into their 40's and are dominant over almost everything in the industry in the 2010's. They'll probably try and get rid of the "sequel mania" in movies and all traces of 90's/grunge rock.

Subject: Re: To 80's music fans was 1997 some kind of revival year for the 80's?

Written By: Cafe80s on 08/04/05 at 11:40 am


I agree, Cafe 80's. I think what I really meant about the "organic" music of today is that it's rather bland - to me, it's just as bad as the pop acts when it comes to originality. It may appear original, but to me, it sounds like a watered down version of a poorly written pop song. That's not to say that ALL are like that. I have been able to come across many acts performing today that are true songwriters, but I have yet to come across artists that seem really inspired by what they do. The music industry is haunted by the extreme use of chord progression and there are rarely anything that goes off the beaten track or that sounds experimental.

Yep i totally agree. Although originality isn't neccesarily the remedy. Just something inspired that's not teen oriented or crass & boring or something good by actual musicians would be nice. Originality is usually a product of revolutionary ideas & once you win a revolution what then? Where do you go from there? Evolution more than often is the problem. For example just look at the pop/punk bands that Marty Mcfly is talking about. No offense but i can't stand those bands. Punk was anti establishment & non commercial & somewhere along the lines "the revolution" was succeeding so now it's come full circle & become a contridiction & a parody of itself.  It's now become a crass consumer product. Instead of being music for the lower class people who want to escape the popular & maistream crap made by the lower class people who want to escape the popular & maistream crap, it's now become absolutely the opposite of what it was about in the first place. Once the people let go of control of how they want their "scene" evolve & be shaped & stop doing it themselves & put it in the hands of the media, the media takes over & takes control they shape it & "package" it into a watered down safe for the kiddies consumer product & turn it into some kind of crass fashion statement (like they do with everything) rather than a way of thinking & a lifestyle for inteligent individuals. I hate little tryhard mall punks with a passion. Sorry but punk didn't originate in America it came from England in a time when the ecconomy was almost colapsing, unemployment was at an alltime high  & there was a massive garbage strike & the streets were full of stinking garbage to top it all off. Skateboards had nothing to do with it. I think the mall punks think they're being rebelious & individual when in actual fact they're just being sheep & cosumers & the mall is the last place anyone with any kind of a punk mindset would hangout. Now that the damage is done it's hard for the people to take their music & culture back becuse it's already been shaped into a joke. That's why revolutions, musical or of any kind & the changes they create are usually pointless. Round & round we go.

Subject: Re: To 80's music fans was 1997 some kind of revival year for the 80's?

Written By: tv on 08/05/05 at 1:17 pm

To me todays music is not as good as music was in the 80's or early to mid 90's period. I agree with one of the posters that today;s music needs something new and exciting to spice the scene a little up. I agree to Nickleback has sort of a stripped down grunge sound to it too. I think the difference is rap music is the mainstream today where as it wasn;t in the 80's or early to mid 90's.  Most 80's music fans don;t like rap(from what I notice on these boards anyway.) I think 1990 when MC hammer came out like it or not Rap music began to penetrate with the pop minstream. A few years later DR. Dre and Snop Dogg popularized gangsta rap along with Tupac. Still Grunge was on top. Ater Biggie;s and Tupac;s death alternative music basically died from 1996 to 1997. Remember East Coast/West Coast fued in rap music around 1995-1996. I mean in 1997-1998 Puff Daddy was the music's world popular act. I mean look at mainstream music after 97 with rappers: Eminem came out, Ja Rule, 50 Cent Came out, and Ludircas came out. I don;t think 80's music fans who grew up on pop/R&b or early to mid 90's alternative music fans would ever think either in 1986 or 1994 that rap music of today that talkes about sex, vilonence, and money would be acceptable today. I think this type of music basically scares parents of teenagers today the same way Madonna pushed boundaries in the 80's with her controversial image or Kurt Cobain that scared parents of teenagers of the early 90's.

Subject: Re: To 80's music fans was 1997 some kind of revival year for the 80's?

Written By: BCRichrocker on 08/05/05 at 7:56 pm



But anyway, I wonder what'll happen when people born in 1970 (pure 80's teens!) start getting into their 40's and are dominant over almost everything in the industry in the 2010's. They'll probably try and get rid of the "sequel mania" in movies and all traces of 90's/grunge rock.


I'm one of those people. I always thought when we got into our 30s then it'll be our time for nastalgia and to be "dominant" over everything in the industry. Well that never really came to pass. And as each year goes by and I am getting less and less optimistic that this will ever happen.  :(

Subject: Re: To 80's music fans was 1997 some kind of revival year for the 80's?

Written By: Marty McFly on 08/05/05 at 8:44 pm


I'm one of those people. I always thought when we got into our 30s then it'll be our time for nastalgia and to be "dominant" over everything in the industry. Well that never really came to pass. And as each year goes by and I am getting less and less optimistic that this will ever happen. :(


I totally know what you mean, as a guy who's been missing stuff from his childhood since like age 12 or 13 (barely after it even ended, LOL).

But I think it still could. I think the age people start becoming "the adults" is around 30, but doesn't really kick in full force until the 40s. That's kind of why I thought of 2010 as the beginning of 80's teens taking over the industry.

But hey, if it doesn't happen, I promise to do what I can about it in the 2025-30 time frame! ;)

Subject: Re: To 80's music fans was 1997 some kind of revival year for the 80's?

Written By: Cafe80s on 08/07/05 at 1:41 pm


I mean look at mainstream music after 97 with rappers: Eminem came out, Ja Rule, 50 Cent Came out, and Ludircas came out. I don;t think 80's music fans who grew up on pop/R&b or early to mid 90's alternative music fans would ever think either in 1986 or 1994 that rap music of today that talkes about sex, vilonence, and money would be acceptable today. I think this type of music basically scares parents of teenagers today the same way Madonna pushed boundaries in the 80's with her controversial image or Kurt Cobain that scared parents of teenagers of the early 90's.

Nah, i'm not a parent, but i think those who are don't find it scary they just find it crass & repulsive. I know i do. As for Madona pushing the boundaries & scaring parents, maybe to a very small degree but the most feared music by parents in the 80s i think was heavy metal. Just look at the Judus Priest trial with the 2 kids who killed them selves because sublininals supposedly placed in one of the band's songs made the kids do it. Parents (especially religious) were in fear that there kids were going to get into Satanism & kill themselves & whatever else. Then you had Ozzy Osbourne biting off the head off a rabid bat & also a dove possibly in drug fueled frenzies. Now he's just a demented old timer who's the subject of many a joke & he doesn't look like he could harm a fly (mainly due to lack of co-ordination). My how times have changed.

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