inthe00s
The Pop Culture Information Society...

These are the messages that have been posted on inthe00s over the past few years.

Check out the messageboard archive index for a complete list of topic areas.

This archive is periodically refreshed with the latest messages from the current messageboard.




Check for new replies or respond here...

Subject: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/02/17 at 1:42 pm

We all know that the 1980s started on January 1, 1980 on 12:00:00 am. However, 1980-1981 were extensions of the late 1970s culturally. 1982 seems to be year that still had late 1970s influence but much less than 1980 and 1981.

http://geekleagueofamerica.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/1982LOGO3.jpg

Here are reasons why 1982 was more '70s:
1. The economy of the US was still stagnant, even going into a severe recession.
2. In 1982...Happy Days, The Jeffersons, M*A*S*H, Laverne & Shirley and Three's Company were still airing.
3. Rap was still mostly underground
4. The Atari 2600 dominated the home video game market but would crash a year later in 1983 (along with the ENTIRE North American video game industry).
NewYorkRaven's points:
5. MTV was still shown by the minority of cable subscribers, along with not having enough black musicians to have their music videos on (e.g. Michael Jackson, Rick James).
6. TV at the time was more 70s, in terms of programming.
7. Betamax tapes was still relevant within the format wars, while VHS tapes were rather more expensive.


Here are reasons why 1982 was more '80s:
1. Ronald Reagan was President for more than a year and his policies started to fully take effect in 1982.
2. MTV would be in it's second year of airing.
3. Disco was dead
4. New Wave and Synth pop started to dominate the music charts
5. The UK and Argentina fight each other in The Falklands War.
6. Classic '80s TV shows such as Family Ties, Cheers, Newhart, Knight Rider and St. Elsewhere started in 1982. Also, another classic '80s show Dynasty exploded in popularity in 1982 (debuted in 1981 however).
7. 1982 is the year of many landmark '80s movies such as Blade Runner, E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, Rocky III, The Thing, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, Tron, Conan the Barbarian, Fast Times at Ridgemont High, Poltergeist, First Blood, Annie, etc.
NewYorkRaven's points:
8. HBO had its first full year being 24/7, compared to showing their programming at a limited time.
9. CDs (or compact discs) were introduced, giving out another format for people to listen.
10. The Commodore 64 (which is one of the most legendary 80s computers) was released, giving out so many people another way to play video games.

I want to know YOUR opinion. Keep in mind, 1982 was 17 years BEFORE my birth in 1999 and 1 year BEFORE the birth of my sister in 1983.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/02/17 at 2:55 pm

Frankly, I see 1982 as a transitional than a full-on cultural year for the 80s. Most of what you said was right, but that didn't really mean 1982 was culturally 80s.

Other reasons why 1982 could be more 70s:
1. MTV was still shown by the minority of cable subscribers, along with not having enough black musicians to have their music videos on (e.g. Michael Jackson, Rick James).
2. TV at the time was more 70s, in terms of programming.
3. Betamax tapes was still relevant within the format wars, while VHS tapes were rather more expensive.

Other reasons why 1982 could be more 80s:
1. HBO had its first full year being 24/7, compared to showing their programming at a limited time.
2. CDs (or compact discs) were introduced, giving out another format for people to listen.
3. The Commodore 64 (which is one of the most legendary 80s computers) was released, giving out so many people another way to play video games.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/02/17 at 3:09 pm


Frankly, I see 1982 as a transitional than a full-on cultural year for the 80s. Most of what you said was right, but that didn't really mean 1982 was culturally 80s.

Other reasons why 1982 could be more 70s:
1. MTV was still shown by the minority of cable subscribers, along with not having enough black musicians to have their music videos on (e.g. Michael Jackson, Rick James).
2. TV at the time was more 70s, in terms of programming.
3. Betamax tapes was still relevant within the format wars, while VHS tapes were rather more expensive.

Other reasons why 1982 could be more 80s:
1. HBO had its first full year being 24/7, compared to showing their programming at a limited time.
2. CDs (or compact discs) were introduced, giving out another format for people to listen.
3. The Commodore 64 (which is one of the most legendary 80s computers) was released, giving out so many people another way to play video games.

Good points, I'll add them to my original post.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/02/17 at 3:37 pm

1982 was roughly the time the 1980s solidified their identity, especially in television in particular. However, I would still argue that the period from late 1979 through 1981 pass fine as 80s, as well. Here's why:

* Disco Demolition Night in mid-1979 signified the end of traditional disco's domination of the pop charts. A few months later, post-disco songs like "Ladies Night" and "I Wanna Be Your Lover" were capturing the public interest. Post-disco is not a 70s genre, it's solidly early 80s.
* Margaret Thatcher became the British Prime Minister in May 1979. She was Britain's equivalent to the Gipper.
* By the second half of 1979, lots of popular songs and albums were quite 80s in style. Pat Benatar's In the Heat of the Night and Blondie's Eat to the Beat contain quite a few tracks that would still sound current as late as the mid-1980s. In plenty of cases, new wave, synthpop, and the aforementioned post-disco were not just moderately popular, but near or at the top of the charts. This was especially true in Britain.
* The USSR invaded Afghanistan in December 1979, kickstarting the 80s era of the Cold War.
* Arcade games and the Atari 2600 started to really explode in popularity, especially with the introduction of Pac-Man and home port of Space Invaders in 1980. Atari video games are not 70s holdovers, they were far, far more relevant during and practically synonymous with the early 1980s. The 2600 may have been released in 1977, but hardly anybody owned it until the 1980s; in the late 70s, video games were still primarily confined to Pong and Pong consoles.
* Yes, Minister and Only Fools and Horses debuted on British television in 1980 and 1981, respectively. The Fifth Doctor also arrived in 1981. The definitive late 70s British series, Fawlty Towers, had ended in 1979.

1980 to 1982 may have had a mostly Gen-Jones cultural bent, but they were still 80s years, all things considered. They weren't like 1960 to 1962, whose new culture didn't do much to affect the feel of the period or forge a distinct identity for the new decade they were a part of.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/02/17 at 4:15 pm


1982 was roughly the time the 1980s solidified their identity, especially in television in particular. However, I would still argue that the period from late 1979 through 1981 pass fine as 80s, as well. Here's why:

* Disco Demolition Night in mid-1979 signified the end of traditional disco's domination of the pop charts. A few months later, post-disco songs like "Ladies Night" and "I Wanna Be Your Lover" were capturing the public interest. Post-disco is not a 70s genre, it's solidly early 80s.
* Margaret Thatcher became the British Prime Minister in May 1979. She was Britain's equivalent to the Gipper.
* By the second half of 1979, lots of popular songs and albums were quite 80s in style. Pat Benatar's In the Heat of the Night and Blondie's Eat to the Beat contain quite a few tracks that would still sound current as late as the mid-1980s. In plenty of cases, new wave, synthpop, and the aforementioned post-disco were not just moderately popular, but near or at the top of the charts. This was especially true in Britain.
* The USSR invaded Afghanistan in December 1979, kickstarting the 80s era of the Cold War.
* Arcade games and the Atari 2600 started to really explode in popularity, especially with the introduction of Pac-Man and home port of Space Invaders in 1980. Atari video games are not 70s holdovers, they were far, far more relevant during and practically synonymous with the early 1980s. The 2600 may have been released in 1977, but hardly anybody owned it until the 1980s; in the late 70s, video games were still primarily confined to Pong and Pong consoles.
* Yes, Minister and Only Fools and Horses debuted on British television in 1980 and 1981, respectively. The Fifth Doctor also arrived in 1981. The definitive late 70s British series, Fawlty Towers, had ended in 1979.

1980 to 1982 may have had a mostly Gen-Jones cultural bent, but they were still 80s years, all things considered. They weren't like 1960 to 1962, whose new culture didn't do much to affect the feel of the period or forge a distinct identity for the new decade they were a part of.

Once again like I said in the very first sentence of this post, we all know that the 1980s started on Jan. 1, 1980. No one is disputing the fact that the years 1980 and 1981 were apart of the 1980s decade. However, those years culturally are still pretty late '70s and 1982 was the year that those late '70s influences started to fade away. Also, in every latter years of decades we see "previews" of the upcoming decade.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 04/02/17 at 6:46 pm


Once again like I said in the very first sentence of this post, we all know that the 1980s started on Jan. 1, 1980. No one is disputing the fact that the years 1980 and 1981 were apart of the 1980s decade. However, those years culturally are still pretty late '70s and 1982 was the year that those late '70s influences started to fade away. Also, in every latter years of decades we see "previews" of the upcoming decade.


What are the late '70s to you?

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/02/17 at 7:01 pm


What are the late '70s to you?

Late 1970s to me is......

1. Jimmy Carter being President (1977-1981)
2. Disco being popular
3. NYC struggling in bankruptcy (post-1975, 1977 blackout)
4. Three's Company and Charlie's Angels being popular TV shows
5. Bell bottoms still being a fashion trend.
6. Punk rock emerging into notoriety
7. The US still being in an economic malaise, stagflation.
8. Michael Jackson's solo career just before "Thriller"
9. The Atari 2600 being popular
10. Hip Hip being an underground movement/musical scene.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/02/17 at 7:05 pm


What are the late '70s to you?


To me, late 70s culture was between late 1976-early 1981. The peak being around 1977-1979.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/02/17 at 11:46 pm


Once again like I said in the very first sentence of this post, we all know that the 1980s started on Jan. 1, 1980. No one is disputing the fact that the years 1980 and 1981 were apart of the 1980s decade. However, those years culturally are still pretty late '70s and 1982 was the year that those late '70s influences started to fade away. Also, in every latter years of decades we see "previews" of the upcoming decade.


I think 1980 and 1981 are both largely 80s years culturally, though. Even late 1979 can be considered 80s to a fair degree. There may have still been a lingering 70s feel to some of their aspects, but a lot had clearly changed since even the bulk of the late 70s. The 80s as people like to stereotype them weren't really fully established until roughly 1983, but 1979-1982 were still an important part of the decade's greater identity.


What are the late '70s to you?


The late '70s, in my opinion, are 1975 through the first two thirds of 1979. Throughout that period, the culture remained largely consistent. The dominant shows were stuff like Happy Days, M*A*S*H, Good Times, Welcome Back, Kotter; and The Jeffersons. Disco was the dominant form of popular music, while rock was represented by Queen, Kiss, Aerosmith, Fleetwood Mac, Bruce Springsteen, and other Gen Jones-targeted groups. 50s nostalgia was at an all-time high. Video games became popular toys for the first time with the advent of Pong consoles. The economy was in ruin due to stagflation, which was already a serious issue under Ford, not just Carter. American confidence was in a rut due to the failure of Vietnam and aftermath of Watergate. Early glam rock was steadily replaced with punk. Blockbuster films become a thing with Jaws, Star Wars, Close Encounters, and the like. 1977 and 1978 may be late 70s years chronologically, but they're hardly distinct from 1975 culturally. It's easier, in my opinion, to just divide the 1970s into two sub-eras rather than three.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: nintieskid999 on 04/02/17 at 11:54 pm

I agree. I divide the 70s into 2 groups rather than 3.
1970-1974 or the post 60s era
and 1975-1979 which would be the late 70s era

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/03/17 at 1:10 am

1982 kept getting more and more 80's as the year went on.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/03/17 at 7:09 am


I agree. I divide the 70s into 2 groups rather than 3.
1970-1974 or the post 60s era
and 1975-1979 which would be the late 70s era


1974 is more core 70s than post 60s to me. 1970-1973 was like the true post 60s era, much like how 1960-1963 is the post 50s era.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 04/03/17 at 9:34 am


I agree. I divide the 70s into 2 groups rather than 3.
1970-1974 or the post 60s era
and 1975-1979 which would be the late 70s era


Well I divide the '70s into groups of 3.

Start of the '70s: 1969 - 1971
Core/Mid '70s: 1972-1974
Late '70s: 1975-1977

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 04/03/17 at 9:57 am

1982 was the 2003 of the '80s.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/03/17 at 9:58 am


1982 was the 2003 of the '80s.


More like 1983.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/03/17 at 10:31 am

1982-1983 was a big transitional period altogether.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: nintieskid999 on 04/03/17 at 11:12 am


1974 is more core 70s than post 60s to me. 1970-1973 was like the true post 60s era, much like how 1960-1963 is the post 50s era.


I guess 1974 is transitory. It seems like a cross between post 60s and core 70s.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: 80sfan on 04/03/17 at 11:14 am


1982-1983 was a big transitional period altogether.


Yeah, but by 1983 you could tell that the 1980's had finally 'arrived'!

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: 2001 on 04/03/17 at 11:20 am


Well I divide the '70s into groups of 3.

Start of the '70s: 1969 - 1971
Core/Mid '70s: 1972-1974
Late '70s: 1975-1977


1972 was still pre-Watergate and Vietnam War was still ongoing. 1973 was when that changed, and 1974 is the other side. ;D

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/03/17 at 11:25 am

The whole period from 1970 to 1972 was a gradual transition out of 60s culture. 1973 was the first full year that was completely and utterly 70s, as direct involvement in Vietnam was over, funk influences and pianos had completely taken over music, the vast bulk of 60s tv shows like Bewitched, My Three Sons, and The Beverly Hillbillies were over, newer shows like All in the Family and M*A*S*H were now the norm, the relevation of Watergate rocked American politics, Pong was out, and fashion had pretty much fully evolved into a 70s aesthetic. I would still say the scale was already tipped around mid-1971, but 1973 was when the sixties were most clearly a bygone era.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/03/17 at 12:52 pm


Well I divide the '70s into groups of 3.

Start of the '70s: 1969 - 1971
Core/Mid '70s: 1972-1974
Late '70s: 1975-1977


I know I probably know this from you, but 1978-1979 feels rather more late 70s than early 80s. Even though 1978-1981 have the same aesthetic feel for the most part.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/03/17 at 12:59 pm


1982 was the 2003 of the '80s.

I agree.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/03/17 at 1:13 pm


I agree.


1982 was much like 2002, as it was like a transitional year with 2003. In other words, 1982/1983 is the 2000s equivalent of 2002/2003.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 04/03/17 at 3:04 pm


I know I probably know this from you, but 1978-1979 feels rather more late 70s than early 80s. Even though 1978-1981 have the same aesthetic feel for the most part.


To some younger people, 1990-1991 feels more like the late '80s than the early '90s.

Superman movies, Jaws sequels, and the original carded Star Wars action figures are all '80s things to children of the 1980s.

In the '80s (1978-1989), the general public was moving away from the 70s and getting to the year 1990. 1990 would not be the same if Superman 4: Quest for Peace and Jaws:The Revenge were not being shown on networks like WPIX 11 and those Star Wars PVC exclusives (they resemble the original Kenner action figures) were not released at Disney theme parks. I know that sounds weird, but it all adds up.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 04/03/17 at 3:10 pm


1982 was much like 2002, as it was like a transitional year with 2003. In other words, 1982/1983 is the 2000s equivalent of 2002/2003.


I disagree. 1981 is the 2000s equivalent of 2002 because it was the start of the latter half to the early '80s like 2002 is to the second half of the early '00s.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/03/17 at 4:00 pm

Oh now, we're straying off topic as usual. Get back to 1982, please. Also anyone who says that 1978 and 1979 are apart of the '80s....I'm sorry to say but is just foolish.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/03/17 at 4:48 pm


Oh now, we're straying off topic as usual. Get back to 1982, please. Also anyone who says that 1978 and 1979 are apart of the '80s....I'm sorry to say but is just foolish.


Well you see, The Early 90s Guy has a strange point of view with decades. For instance, he thinks the 80s actually started in 1978, even though everyone thinks that the 80s culturally started around 1982/3. Just arguing against him would make it worse.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 04/03/17 at 4:49 pm


Also anyone who says that 1978 and 1979 are apart of the '80s....I'm sorry to say but is just foolish.


http://i3.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/facebook/000/288/186/d7d

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/03/17 at 4:53 pm


Oh now, we're straying off topic as usual. Get back to 1982, please. Also anyone who says that 1978 and 1979 are apart of the '80s....I'm sorry to say but is just foolish.


Well, that's debatable. I agree 1979 is still mostly 70s, but the second half of the year, in so many ways, can be plausibly considered the start of the 80s zeitgeist.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=gPoiv0sZ4s4

http://youtube.com/watch?v=Hvqgb1D6Opw

http://youtube.com/watch?v=LjG7-5kbevo

http://youtube.com/watch?v=ExYsh1W22Wo

http://youtube.com/watch?v=vy-QmgdUVTI

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/09/Galaxian.png

All from 1979.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 04/03/17 at 4:54 pm


Well you see, The Early 90s Guy has a strange point of view with decades. For instance, he thinks the 80s actually started in 1978, even though everyone thinks that the 80s culturally started around 1982/3. Just arguing against him would make it worse.


https://cdn.meme.am/instances/66189288.jpg

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: 80sfan on 04/03/17 at 4:57 pm

1980- Mostly 70's
1981- Mostly 70's
1982- Mostly 80's
1983- Mostly 80's

etc, etc, etc, etc.

1978- Mostly 70's
1979- Mostly 70's.....

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/03/17 at 5:06 pm


Well, that's debatable. I agree 1979 is still mostly 70s, but the second half of the year, in so many ways, can be plausibly considered the start of the 80s zeitgeist.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=gPoiv0sZ4s4

http://youtube.com/watch?v=Hvqgb1D6Opw

http://youtube.com/watch?v=LjG7-5kbevo

http://youtube.com/watch?v=ExYsh1W22Wo

http://youtube.com/watch?v=vy-QmgdUVTI

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/09/Galaxian.png

All from 1979.

1979 both literally and culturally is the '70s. 1980 and 1981 are not literally but culturally mostly '70s (particularly late 1970s).

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/03/17 at 5:07 pm


1980- Mostly 70's
1981- Mostly 70's
1982- Mostly 80's
1983- Mostly 80's

etc, etc, etc, etc.

1978- Mostly 70's
1979- Mostly 70's.....

Exactly.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: 80sfan on 04/03/17 at 5:14 pm

This movie is from 1979, but does feel/look like it could be released in 1980, or 1981.

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/M/MV5BMTU5NjQxNDM2N15BMl5BanBnXkFtZTYwNDY1MDA5._V1_.jpg

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/03/17 at 6:08 pm


1979 both literally and culturally is the '70s. 1980 and 1981 are not literally but culturally mostly '70s (particularly late 1970s).


But can't you at least see, based on the numerous points I made, how somebody might feel the cultural 80s truly started on time, as opposed to two years late? Late 1979, 1980, and 1981 all had a lot of culture that was hardly relevant even during the 1978-1979 school year, making those trends solidly early 80s by definition.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/03/17 at 6:17 pm


Well, that's debatable. I agree 1979 is still mostly 70s, but the second half of the year, in so many ways, can be plausibly considered the start of the 80s zeitgeist.


Would you consider Mouth to Mouth (the album that contains the song "Funky Town") as 80s?

cdwp_SHzEAU

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/03/17 at 6:30 pm


But can't you at least see, based on the numerous points I made, how somebody might feel the cultural 80s truly started on time, as opposed to two years late? Late 1979, 1980, and 1981 all had a lot of culture that was hardly relevant even during the 1978-1979 school year, making those trends solidly early 80s by definition.

I will admit that early '80s culture didn't pop out of nowhere but I can not classify 1979 as an early 80s year. 1979 was the late 1970s. The years 1977-1981 (especially 1979-1981) had a very similar culture that was much more '70s than '80s.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/03/17 at 7:21 pm


Would you consider Mouth to Mouth (the album that contains the song "Funky Town") as 80s?

cdwp_SHzEAU


First off, that album came out in 1979. Second, "Funky Town" was like the glaring exception to 1980's chart hits, which were almost completely comprised of post-disco and synthpop in the dance category.


I will admit that early '80s culture didn't pop out of nowhere but I can not classify 1979 as an early 80s year. 1979 was the late 1970s. The years 1977-1981 (especially 1979-1981) had a very similar culture that was much more '70s than '80s.


In all fairness, I see late 1979 through early 1982 as being similar to the Bush '41 and Y2K era's in that the period had a sort of distinct in-between culture, but I still wouldn't call those years much more 70s than 80s. Far too much of the biggest music, television shows, video games, political events, and so on from that stretch of time were either exclusive to the 1980s decade or were hardly relevant during the late 70s. Can you seriously classify any of the following things as "70s" or even 1977/1978-like?

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/59/Pac-man.png

http://vignette2.wikia.nocookie.net/althistory/images/7/7e/Reagan_inauguration.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20110609202540

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zRbXMWYMNno

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qYkbTyHXwbs

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IIEVqFB4WUo

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ldyx3KHOFXw


1977 and 1978, on the other hand, were pretty easily more similar to 1975 than they were to the start of the 1980s. The closest things they had to exclusive culture would be the original wave of punk (which was only relevant in Britain and not so much the United States outside of New York), as well as a small handful of TV shows such as Charlie's Angels and The Muppet Show. Still, the parallels are pretty consistent, otherwise.

1975:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oALKAh_bL5g

1977/1978:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ihs-vT9T3Q

1975:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQHe6WbLGuI

1978:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OYJgOt0RQfQ

Mid-1970s:

https://professortaboo.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/gerald-ford.jpg

Mid-1979:

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/kakFDUeoJKM/hqdefault.jpg

1975:

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/74/0b/9e/740b9e10ba1286ccc5d90d6d76363e9b.jpg

http://farm8.static.flickr.com/7190/6877663111_142b64322a.jpg

1978:

http://cdn.pcwallart.com/images/john-travolta-grease-hair-wallpaper-3.jpg

1975:

http://www.filmsquish.com/guts/files/images/jaws_hires.jpg

1978:

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/1a/Jaws2_poster.jpg

1975:

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/7a/Born_to_Run_%28Front_Cover%29.jpg

1978:

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/a/af/BruceSpringsteenDarknessontheEdgeofTown.jpg

1975:

http://68.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_ljt9ucxh5A1qj6oujo1_540.jpg

1978:

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/fb/d0/2c/fbd02c0389dc50fb0603741ad10723ff.jpg


This is just a start, but the general mood, trends, and events of 1977 and 1978, at least in my opinion, seem more tied to 1975 and 1976 than 1980 and 1981.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/03/17 at 8:06 pm


First off, that album came out in 1979. Second, "Funky Town" was like the glaring exception to 1980's chart hits, which were almost completely comprised of post-disco and synthpop in the dance category.


Oh. So I'll take that as a no?

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/03/17 at 8:22 pm


Oh. So I'll take that as a no?


It's not really early 80s-style, but to be fair, it doesn't sound classically 70s either, due to its heavy use of synthesizers in addition to the traditional orchestral backup. It's similar, in that respect, to the Bee Gees' "Tragedy," which was also regular disco but unlike "Stayin' Alive" and "Night Fever" was distinguishable from "Jive Talkin'" because of its heavily synthesized instrumentation.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/03/17 at 8:47 pm


It's not really early 80s-style, but to be fair, it doesn't sound classically 70s either, due to its heavy use of synthesizers in addition to the traditional orchestral backup. It's similar, in that respect, to the Bee Gees' "Tragedy," which was also regular disco but unlike "Stayin' Alive" and "Night Fever" was distinguishable from "Jive Talkin'" because of its heavily synthesized instrumentation.


So it's somewhere in between?

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/03/17 at 10:18 pm


To some younger people, 1990-1991 feels more like the late '80s than the early '90s.

Superman movies, Jaws sequels, and the original carded Star Wars action figures are all '80s things to children of the 1980s.

In the '80s (1978-1989), the general public was moving away from the 70s and getting to the year 1990. 1990 would not be the same if Superman 4: Quest for Peace and Jaws:The Revenge were not being shown on networks like WPIX 11 and those Star Wars PVC exclusives (they resemble the original Kenner action figures) were not released at Disney theme parks. I know that sounds weird, but it all adds up.



I think the 70's were a very distant memory by 1984. Really, the first half of the 90's just felt like the 80's on heroin. Ratt, Warrant and Winger get into smack and turn into Pearl Jam, Alice in Chains and Mudhoney. :P The bulk of both decades fit into one big era, in my opinion. 1982-1989 and 1990-1995.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/03/17 at 10:23 pm

1979-1981 are very in between the decades. A lot of the music either sounds fairly 70's or has a subdued early 80's "things-to-come" sound. 1982 and 1983 are no doubt 80's but they're still early. Early as in a "not quite there yet" sense. I think anyone has a DeLorean and wants the stereotypical 80's in every wacky sense where you could grow out a rat tail and wear baggy loose neon clothes then they should look no further than 1984 thru 1989. Going back to 1980-1982, maybe even '83, would leave some disappointed.

I also agree with 1977 and 1978 being like 1975. It's like how 1987, 1988 and 1989 are still very similar to 1985 and 1986. 

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/03/17 at 10:32 pm


In all fairness, I see late 1979 through early 1982 as being similar to the Bush '41 and Y2K era's in that the period had a sort of distinct in-between culture, but I still wouldn't call those years much more 70s than 80s. Far too much of the biggest music, television shows, video games, political events, and so on from that stretch of time were either exclusive to the 1980s decade or were hardly relevant during the late 70s. Can you seriously classify any of the following things as "70s" or even 1977/1978-like?

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/59/Pac-man.png

http://vignette2.wikia.nocookie.net/althistory/images/7/7e/Reagan_inauguration.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20110609202540

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zRbXMWYMNno

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qYkbTyHXwbs

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IIEVqFB4WUo

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ldyx3KHOFXw

1977 and 1978, on the other hand, were pretty easily more similar to 1975 than they were to the start of the 1980s. The closest things they had to exclusive culture would be the original wave of punk (which was only relevant in Britain and not so much the United States outside of New York), as well as a small handful of TV shows such as Charlie's Angels and The Muppet Show. Still, the parallels are pretty consistent, otherwise.

1975:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oALKAh_bL5g

1977/1978:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ihs-vT9T3Q

1975:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQHe6WbLGuI

1978:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OYJgOt0RQfQ

Mid-1970s:

https://professortaboo.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/gerald-ford.jpg

Mid-1979:

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/kakFDUeoJKM/hqdefault.jpg

1975:

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/74/0b/9e/740b9e10ba1286ccc5d90d6d76363e9b.jpg

http://farm8.static.flickr.com/7190/6877663111_142b64322a.jpg

1978:

http://cdn.pcwallart.com/images/john-travolta-grease-hair-wallpaper-3.jpg

1975:

http://www.filmsquish.com/guts/files/images/jaws_hires.jpg

1978:

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/1a/Jaws2_poster.jpg

1975:

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/7a/Born_to_Run_%28Front_Cover%29.jpg

1978:

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/a/af/BruceSpringsteenDarknessontheEdgeofTown.jpg

1975:

http://68.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_ljt9ucxh5A1qj6oujo1_540.jpg

1978:

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/fb/d0/2c/fbd02c0389dc50fb0603741ad10723ff.jpg

This is just a start, but the general mood, trends, and events of 1977 and 1978, at least in my opinion, seem more tied to 1975 and 1976 than 1980 and 1981.

1. Please don't post such a long post again but if you do then at least put a spoiler on.
2. Jimmy Carter was President for basically of all of 1977-1981. Reagan only came in at the end. Also, here's some things to remember...Reagan's policies didn't start to fully come into effect until 1982. Don't forget his assassination attempt on March 30th just 2 months after he was inaugurated and Reagan was in the hospital until April 11th. Not only that but Reagan's would-be assassin John Hinckley Jr tried to kill The Gipper based on his obsession with late 1970s teen icon Jodie Foster.
3. Ronald Reagan originally ran for President in 1976 and ALMOST won the GOP's nomination but Gerald Ford slightly edged him out. Who knows what would happen if it was Reagan vs. Carter in '76 instead of '80. Carter wouldn't have been President in 1976 and thus not be blamed for most of the country's failures. Carter and many Americans were deeply furious at the Republicans since Nixon & Watergate (1974 when Nixon resigned was still fresh in minds of Americans...it was just 2 years earlier).
4. "Jesse's Girl" by Rick Springfield is very similar to "My Sharona" by The Knack which came out in 1979 and was #1 on Billboard's Year-End Hot 100 Singles Chart for 1979.
5. Jaws doesn't have much relevance to this convo.
6. Many popular mid/late '70s TV shows were still airing or were just ending as 1981 was coming to a close. It wasn't until 1982 in which you started to see a lot of the '80s most popular TV shows pop up (Family Ties, Cheers, Newhart, Knight Rider and St. Elsewhere).
7. Fashion in 1977 and 1981 were very close to each other (not exactly the same but still very, very close). 1982/1983 was when fashion started to branch off and be the iconic '80s fashion that we know today.
8. 1981 was much more similar to 1977 than 1985 (1981 culture was a vastly different to the culture of 1985).

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/04/17 at 12:33 am


1. Please don't post such a long post again but if you do then at least put a spoiler on.


Sorry, I just feel visual and video representations are usually the most powerful and direct means of communicating points because they're direct examples.

2. Jimmy Carter was President for basically of all of 1977-1981. Reagan only came in at the end.

No, Reagan was inaugurated on January 20, 1981, so Carter wasn't even there for three weeks in 1981.

Also, here's some things to remember...Reagan's policies didn't start to fully come into effect until 1982. Don't forget his assassination attempt on March 30th just 2 months after he was inaugurated and Reagan was in the hospital until April 11th. Not only that but Reagan's would-be assassin John Hinckley Jr tried to kill The Gipper based on his obsession with late 1970s teen icon Jodie Foster.

Early 80s Reagan wasn't as successful as mid-80s Reagan, but the man's inauguration was still a critical turning point in American political history. This extends to the election season of 1980, too, as Reagan absolutely crushed Carter's bid for reelection, so the public mood had changed a lot since the turn of 1977, when Reagan failed to wrest the GOP nomination from Ford and Carter won.

3. Ronald Reagan originally ran for President in 1976 and ALMOST won the GOP's nomination but Gerald Ford slightly edged him out. Who knows what would happen if it was Reagan vs. Carter in '76 instead of '80. Carter wouldn't have been President in 1976 and thus not be blamed for most of the country's failures. Carter and many Americans were deeply furious at the Republicans since Nixon & Watergate (1974 when Nixon resigned was still fresh in minds of Americans...it was just 2 years earlier).

It's likely Reagan would've had a drastically different time as President in the late 1970s because his political philosophy was so radical and his persona set a far different tone than what people perceived out of Carter. I strongly doubt Reagan would've had a Malaise Speech of his own and he likely would've been more decisive over the Iranian Revolution.

4. "Jesse's Girl" by Rick Springfield is very similar to "My Sharona" by The Knack which came out in 1979 and was #1 on Billboard's Year-End Hot 100 Singles Chart for 1979.

First off, are you seriously trying to argue "Jesse's Girl" sounds more 70s than 80s? That song was in constant rotation when MTV came out and basically epitomizes the brisk, futuristic, synth-driven, in-your-face edge of 1980s pop rock. It sounds distinctly newer than "My Sharona."

Actually, "My Sharona" itself is pretty early 80s in style, or at least not a particularly 70s sounding song. Like the songs from the Cars' self-titled debut and Blondie's Parallel Lines (both released in late 1978 but popular in 1979), it's a new wave track, and would not have achieved mainstream success in the United States in 1977 or most of 1978 against the Eagles, Fleetwood Mac, Foghat, Boston, Kansas, Heart, Aerosmith, Kiss, or the like. I've seen "My Sharona" occasionally mistaken for an 80s song the same way "Cars" and "Pop Muzik" are often categorized with the 80s despite being from 1979.

5. Jaws doesn't have much relevance to this convo.

It is significant because it was the first summer blockbuster movie, arriving before Star Wars and Close Encounters of the Third Kind.

6. Many popular mid/late '70s TV shows were still airing or were just ending as 1981 was coming to a close. It wasn't until 1982 in which you started to see a lot of the '80s most popular TV shows pop up (Family Ties, Cheers, Newhart, Knight Rider and St. Elsewhere).

I agree there was a major television shift in 1982, but there were some 80s mainstays at the start of the decade as well, like The Dukes of Hazzard, Dallas, The Facts of Life, and Magnum, P.I. On top of that, late 1978 through early 1982 had a lot of shows exclusive to the 70s-80s transition, such as Taxi, Mork & Mindy, WKRP in Cincinnati, and Buck Rogers.

7. Fashion in 1977 and 1981 were very close to each other (not exactly the same but still very, very close). 1982/1983 was when fashion started to branch off and be the iconic '80s fashion that we know today.

I'd personally say more 1983/1984, but to be fair, fashion was probably one of the most 70s things about the early 1980s. My point was more that the late 1970s weren't really that different from 1975 as far as fashion goes.

8. 1981 was much more similar to 1977 than 1985 (1981 culture was a vastly different to the culture of 1985).

I can possibly agree with that, since it was still a primarily Gen Jones year whereas 1985 was early Gen-X, not to mention the 80s identity was much more fully established by '85, but still I don't think 1981 is necessarily 70s. It definitely had some lingering 70s influences, but it was also full of newer culture, too.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/04/17 at 2:32 am

Just taking a look at both years, it's funny how big of a difference '81 and '85 are when they're just four years apart. 

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Howard on 04/04/17 at 6:48 am


Would you consider Mouth to Mouth (the album that contains the song "Funky Town") as 80s?

cdwp_SHzEAU


When did it come out?

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/04/17 at 10:22 am


When did it come out?


Late 1979

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/04/17 at 1:06 pm


Just taking a look at both years, it's funny how big of a difference '81 and '85 are when they're just four years apart.

1981 and 1985 are worlds apart for real.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/04/17 at 2:23 pm


1981 and 1985 are worlds apart for real.


Now you're saying stuff I agree with! 1985 was a very, very modern year while 1981 still looked and felt really old. The changes from the early to mid 80's were huge! It's 4 years apart from both 1981 and 1989 but if you look at it 1989 and 1985 have a so much common and feel like the same era but 1981, not too much.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/04/17 at 4:19 pm


Now you're saying stuff I agree with! 1985 was a very, very modern year while 1981 still looked and felt really old. The changes from the early to mid 80's were huge! It's 4 years apart from both 1981 and 1989 but if you look at it 1989 and 1985 have a so much common and feel like the same era but 1981, not too much.

Yeah, I absolutely agree.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: 80sfan on 04/04/17 at 10:13 pm

Ugh! I hate 'in-between-ies' 1979 to 1982 are what I call 'in-between-y' years. ::)

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/04/17 at 10:16 pm


Ugh! I hate 'in-between-ies' 1979 to 1982 are what I call 'in-between-y' years. ::)

It's OK. The late 1970s and very early 1980s were an "interesting" time for the United States.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: 80sfan on 04/04/17 at 10:22 pm


It's OK. The late 1970s and very early 1980s were an "interesting" time for the United States.


1982 was/is pretty 80's, but there's a feeling of 'we're not quite there yet' about that year, I can't quite put my finger on it.  :P
It's almost like 1983 was like "Hi, I'm the 1980's and I'm here to rock your world!" That's what 1983 feels like to me!  8)

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/04/17 at 10:23 pm


1982 was/is pretty 80's, but there's a feeling of 'we're not quite there' about that year, I can't quite put my finger on it.  :P
It's almost like 1983 was like "Hi, I'm the 1980's and I'm here to rock your world!" That's what 1983 feels like to me!  8)

Yep, that's what I feel as well.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/05/17 at 12:14 am


1982 was/is pretty 80's, but there's a feeling of 'we're not quite there yet' about that year, I can't quite put my finger on it.  :P
It's almost like 1983 was like "Hi, I'm the 1980's and I'm here to rock your world!" That's what 1983 feels like to me!  8)


1982 was/is pretty 80's, but there's a feeling of 'we're not quite there yet' about that year, I can't quite put my finger on it.  :P
It's almost like 1983 was like "Hi, I'm the 1980's and I'm here to rock your world!" That's what 1983 feels like to me!  8)


I agree with both of you! 1983 may still have one or two 70's vestiges left but I think most agree, along with 1982, it's where we cross into newer 80's territory. The only thing about it is that it's not really stereotypical 80's as 1984 and the next 5 years after that were. Definitely an 80's year, but some stuff still needed to take shape.

You know, I was listening to some Rick Springfield earlier and thought back to this conversation. While I do think Jesse's Girl is totally a building block of the 80's sound, while at the same time seeing the definite lingering 70's influences, it's just so crazy to compare that to a song like Love Somebody from 1984 and see how only 3 years could be such a drastic change. I used to post constantly on this board about how I felt the change from the early 00's to mid 00's were huge but that was nothing compared to how changeful and modern the mid-late 80's feel compared to the early part of the decade.

qYkbTyHXwbs

JIVYW977GVM

The production on Love Somebody doesn't sound that old at all; dated but not old-old. It's loud, in your face and very stereotypical 80's. Jesse's Girl's production is very basic but also sounds pretty old, not only in a dated sense, but just old. You can tell by the songwriting what era the songs are: Jesse's Girl may have the synths in the chorus and a basic template for what would become the 80's formula but it's not quite there yet. The instrumental is too simple and not very layered. On the other hand, you can hear how Love Somebody is a very modern, layered, intricate song. The verses with the palm muted chords and chorus with it's stop-start rhythm guitars and the little lead played over top throughout the song. Other things that really stick out to me are the explosive drums and the way the melodies (especially the bridge) are executed. Pop-rock songs in the 90's, and even 00's, continued these formulas and songwriting styles, if only adapting the sound to whatever the times were. Even the music videos. Jesse's Girl is very grainy old looking video and features people wearing conservative preppy early 80's fashions. They look more like the 70's if the 70's were preppier. Love Somebody's video has some really good quality and the  fashions in the video feature some very outlandish stuff that was rebellious made a statement. It looks really cool! Looks more like stuff we wore in the 90's but a little bit crazier.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: 80sfan on 04/05/17 at 12:16 am


I agree with both of you! 1983 may still have one or two 70's vestiges left but I think most agree, along with 1982, it's where we cross into newer 80's territory. The only thing about it is that it's not really stereotypical 80's as 1984 and the next 5 years after that were. Definitely an 80's year, but some stuff still needed to take shape.

You know, I was listening to some Rick Springfield earlier and thought back to this conversation. While I do think Jesse's Girl is totally a building block of the 80's sound, while at the same time seeing the definite lingering 70's influences, it's just so crazy to compare that to a song like Love Somebody from 1984 and see how only 3 years could be such a drastic change. I used to post constantly on this board about how I felt the change from the early 00's to mid 00's were huge but that was nothing compared to how changeful and modern the mid-late 80's feel compared to the early part of the decade.

qYkbTyHXwbs

JIVYW977GVM

The production on Love Somebody doesn't sound that old at all; dated but not old-old. It's loud, in your face and very stereotypical 80's. Jesse's Girl's production is very basic but also sounds pretty old, not only in a dated sense, but just old. You can tell by the songwriting what era the songs are: Jesse's Girl may have the synths in the chorus and a basic template for what would become the 80's formula but it's not quite there yet. The instrumental is too simple and not very layered. On the other hand, you can hear how Love Somebody is a very modern, layered, intricate song. The verses with the palm muted chords and chorus with it's stop-start rhythm guitars and the little lead played over top throughout the song. Other things that really stick out to me are the explosive drums and the way the melodies (especially the bridge) are executed. Pop-rock songs in the 90's, and even 00's, continued these formulas and songwriting styles, if only adapting the sound to whatever the times were. Even the music videos. Jesse's Girl is very grainy old looking video and features people wearing conservative preppy early 80's fashions. They look more like the 70's if the 70's were preppier. Love Somebody's video has some really good quality and the  fashions in the video feature some very outlandish stuff that was rebellious made a statement. It looks really cool! Looks more like stuff we wore in the 90's but a little bit crazier.


What age was your first memory? What year was it? Since you're born in 1982 and all.  :o

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/05/17 at 12:21 am


What age was your first memory? What year was it? Since you're born in 1982 and all.  :o


The earliest thing I think I remember was Christmas 1984, maybe? I described a couple of things (I don't remember much about it) that happened to my dad once years ago and he was surprised I was able to recall all that since we didn't have any photos of it and he never told me the details. 

Late 1985 is a little more consistent, I guess, around the time I turned 3 but the older I get the more I forget. :-X

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/05/17 at 12:41 am

While we're on the subject, would you believe that this song here is also by Rick Springfield? Not only that, it only came out less than a decade before "Jessie's Girl!"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rWeuvAPVN9Q

As for the "Jessie's Girl" versus "Love Somebody" comparison, I agree the latter is definitely an advancement over the former, but I think you exaggerate "Jessie's Girl's" so-called lingering 70s influences. Aside maybe from the Gen-Jones-style use of harmonizing, it's pretty much solidly early 80s material. It's less 70s than "My Sharona," "Good Times Roll," and "One Way or Another."

Here are a few more songs from before 1982; would you say they're full-on 80s?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KCjMZMxNr-0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zQ41hqlV0Kk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQSn26zCXYQ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QbjfesCI254

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/05/17 at 9:49 am

Based on #Infinity and JordanK1982....Rick Springfield must be the Holy Trinity when it comes to the transition from late 1970s culture to core 1980s culture  :-\\.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Mr Steamer on 04/05/17 at 1:52 pm


Yeah, but by 1983 you could tell that the 1980's had finally 'arrived'!

You know, I just realized in many ways, there's almost a semi regression at the beginning of a decade.

What do I mean? I think it's easy for us to say we're sick of a certain time, and can't wait to see what the next decade has. That's the feeling I got from 1979 in the '70s, and 1988-89 for the '80s. Kind of wanting the current decade to be over and waiting for the next one.

But then when we're in the very early part of the decade, it's like "Whoa wait, let's take a step back at what we're missing before we say goodbye forever."

That's actually why, in many respects 1988 and '89 feel like the 90's whereas 1990 seems more 80s, and why 1979 feels almost more "80s" than 1980 does.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: 80sfan on 04/05/17 at 2:04 pm


You know, I just realized in many ways, there's almost a semi regression at the beginning of a decade.

What do I mean? I think it's easy for us to say we're sick of a certain time, and can't wait to see what the next decade has. That's the feeling I got from 1979 in the '70s, and 1988-89 for the '80s. Kind of wanting the current decade to be over and waiting for the next one.

But then when we're in the very early part of the decade, it's like "Whoa wait, let's take a step back at what we're missing before we say goodbye forever."

That's actually why, in many respects 1988 and '89 feel like the 90's whereas 1990 seems more 80s, and why 1979 feels almost more "80s" than 1980 does.


Yes, that's normal. I can see people in 1989 being like, "Ugh. I'm so sick of this 1980's thing!"
Weird is, 1979 to 1981 isn't really 70's, or 80's, in my eyes, it's like its own era.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: nintieskid999 on 04/05/17 at 2:31 pm

1980 seemed very 70s to me looking at the videos and the music. Not really 80s at all.
1982 seemed a lot more 80s in comparison. Just not "modern 80s" like 1984 would be.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/05/17 at 2:36 pm


1980 seemed very 70s to me looking at the videos and the music. Not really 80s at all.
1982 seemed a lot more 80s in comparison. Just not "modern 80s" like 1984 would be.

I agree.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/05/17 at 10:23 pm


While we're on the subject, would you believe that this song here is also by Rick Springfield? Not only that, it only came out less than a decade before "Jessie's Girl!"

As for the "Jessie's Girl" versus "Love Somebody" comparison, I agree the latter is definitely an advancement over the former, but I think you exaggerate "Jessie's Girl's" so-called lingering 70s influences. Aside maybe from the Gen-Jones-style use of harmonizing, it's pretty much solidly early 80s material. It's less 70s than "My Sharona," "Good Times Roll," and "One Way or Another."

Here are a few more songs from before 1982; would you say they're full-on 80s?


Yeah, that's an even bigger change! You can see the progression from Jesse's Girl to Love Somebody but Speak to The Sky is like a completely different singer in general. The production is the biggest factor in why I think it still has some 70's influences. It has this "70's trying to sound like the 80's" sound that  I often find early 80's songs sometimes have. Compare that to another song from 1981 that's more flashy like, say, Loverboy's Working for the Weekend. The production is more stripped down and doesn't really, in my opinion, foreshadow what was to come.*

(*The songwriting, however, definitely does)

Girls on Film, Abacab and Young Turks sound very early 80's but Hungry Heart's still sounds a bit in between the decades to me.


Based on #Infinity and JordanK1982....Rick Springfield must be the Holy Trinity when it comes to the transition from late 1970s culture to core 1980s culture  :-\\.


http://www.rickspringfield.us/library/images/1980/1984/80s2.jpg

"Damn right I am!!"


You know, I just realized in many ways, there's almost a semi regression at the beginning of a decade.

What do I mean? I think it's easy for us to say we're sick of a certain time, and can't wait to see what the next decade has. That's the feeling I got from 1979 in the '70s, and 1988-89 for the '80s. Kind of wanting the current decade to be over and waiting for the next one.

But then when we're in the very early part of the decade, it's like "Whoa wait, let's take a step back at what we're missing before we say goodbye forever."

That's actually why, in many respects 1988 and '89 feel like the 90's whereas 1990 seems more 80s, and why 1979 feels almost more "80s" than 1980 does.


Yes, that's normal. I can see people in 1989 being like, "Ugh. I'm so sick of this 1980's thing!"
Weird is, 1979 to 1981 isn't really 70's, or 80's, in my eyes, it's like its own era.


I disagree. I think 1988 and 1989 are still very 80's. Sometimes the XXX9 year feel more like they lead onto the next decade rather than contributing to it's own decade's feel but not always. 1999? Definitely. 1979? So-so. 1989? A little bit, sure, but for the most part I find it's ties to the 80's identity are very strong -- it still feels like a definitive 80's year more than anything else.


1980 seemed very 70s to me looking at the videos and the music. Not really 80s at all.
1982 seemed a lot more 80s in comparison. Just not "modern 80s" like 1984 would be.


I agree with this 100%.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/05/17 at 10:39 pm


http://www.rickspringfield.us/library/images/1980/1984/80s2.jpg

"Damn right I am!!"

I disagree. I think 1988 and 1989 are still very 80's. Sometimes the XXX9 year feel more like they lead onto the next decade rather than contributing to it's own decade's feel but not always. 1999? Definitely. 1979? So-so. 1989? A little bit, sure, but for the most part I find it's ties to the 80's identity are very strong -- it still feels like a definitive 80's year more than anything else.

Yeah, I agree. 1989 was still a very '80s year.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/05/17 at 10:59 pm


Yeah, that's an even bigger change! You can see the progression from Jesse's Girl to Love Somebody but Speak to The Sky is like a completely different singer in general. The production is the biggest factor in why I think it still has some 70's influences. It has this "70's trying to sound like the 80's" sound that  I often find early 80's songs sometimes have. Compare that to another song from 1981 that's more flashy like, say, Loverboy's Working for the Weekend. The production is more stripped down and doesn't really, in my opinion, foreshadow what was to come.*

(*The songwriting, however, definitely does)


I think "Jessie's Girl" and "Working for the Weekend" are in the same basic category. They're both clearly trying to be 80s, like you said, but they both have that muffled drum/fat bass instrumentation style that was characteristic of a lot of new wave from the end of the 1970s. Both songs could have been mainstream hits in 1979, albeit not really 1977 or 1978. In addition to the aforementioned "My Sharona," they're pretty similar to these songs that were popular in 1979 in their transitional sound:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aYm8HYi5tIk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4nQ9PlLW4Gc

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ExYsh1W22Wo


Even 1982 still had the occasional hit song that followed this same in-between style, like this (though it was from an album released in late 1981):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6WTdTwcmxyo

I personally prefer to classify the transitional style as 80s instead of 70s because its peak was really the second half of 1979 through the first half of 1982, which is more chronologically confined to the 80s than the 70s, but I definitely agree it sounds quite a bit older than classic 80s music, in the same way "I Want It That Way" and "I'm Too Sexy" embody two distinct sounds, yet are both representative of the 1990s.

However, I still think stuff like Pat Benatar's "If You Know How to Love Me" and Blondie's "Union City Blue," both from 1979, would still sound quite current as late as 1985 or maybe even 1986. They're really not that stylistically distant from, say, Heart's self-titled or Bryan Adams' Reckless. All the basic elements of 80s music already existed by late 1979, they were just really sporadic until roughly 1983.

Girls on Film, Abacab and Young Turks sound very early 80's but Hungry Heart's still sounds a bit in between the decades to me.

I think Bruce Springsteen's The River album in general is stylistically closer to Born in the U.S.A. than it is to Darkness on the Edge of Town, which is basically like Born to Run but with quirkier, less grandiose songwriting.

"Girls on Film" sounds just as new as the rest of Seven and the Ragged Tiger, which came out in 1983 but produced a British and American #1 in 1984 with "The Reflex," which employs pretty much the exact same production style.

I disagree. I think 1988 and 1989 are still very 80's. Sometimes the XXX9 year feel more like they lead onto the next decade rather than contributing to it's own decade's feel but not always. 1999? Definitely. 1979? So-so. 1989? A little bit, sure, but for the most part I find it's ties to the 80's identity are very strong -- it still feels like a definitive 80's year more than anything else.

1988 is hardly 90s in the least, but 1989 did contain a few things that were already pretty 90s:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TB54dZkzZOY

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/75/Movie_poster_the_little_mermaid.jpg

https://app.onlinephotofiler.com/Img1/A_0/0/5/5/5500/add58e3f3140464d8f4247da8402418b.Large.jpg?u=c699cb58-52f1-4187-9b77-f06ca4e576f8

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/05/17 at 11:36 pm


I think "Jessie's Girl" and "Working for the Weekend" are in the same basic category. They're both clearly trying to be 80s, like you said, but they both have that muffled drum/fat bass instrumentation style that was characteristic of a lot of new wave from the end of the 1980s. Both songs could have been mainstream hits in 1979, albeit not really 1977 or 1978. In addition to the aforementioned "My Sharona," they're pretty similar to these songs that were popular in 1979 in their transitional sound:

Even 1982 still had the occasional hit song that followed this same in-between style, like this (though it was from an album released in late 1981):

I personally prefer to classify the transitional style as 80s instead of 70s because its peak was really the second half of 1979 through the first half of 1982, which is more chronologically confined to the 80s than the 70s, but I definitely agree it sounds quite a bit older than the classic 80s sound, in the same way "I Want It That Way" and "I'm Too Sexy" represent two distinct sounds, yet are both representative of the 1990s.


I'd say Working for the Weekend sounds bit more flashy and slightly newer than Jesse's Girl but I definitely can't see either of those songs coming out in 1977 or '78 at all. Overall, leaning towards the 80's is a fair way to put it as the songs are still building blocks towards the then-upcoming decade. Since the style's so in between I could go either way, really. It sounds like the 70's turning into the 80's.


However, I still think stuff like Pat Benatar's "If You Know How to Love Me" and Blondie's "Union City Blue," both from 1979, would still sound quite current as late as 1985 or maybe even 1986. They're really not that stylistically distant from, say, Heart's self-titled or Bryan Adams' Reckless. All the basic elements of 80s music already existed by late 1979, they were just really sporadic until roughly 1983.


I'd can see it with Union City Blue but not so much with If You Think You Know How to Love Me. Union City Blue is pretty close to songs from the mid-late 80's like Head Over Heels, In Your Room or Roam, if just not as slick. If You Think You Know How To Love Me, however, still sounds much more like a transitional 70's-to-80's song whenever I listen to it. Either way, I think for both songs, you'd have to up the production for '85 and '86. They still sound a bit old when compared to the mid 80's. Heart's self-titled in general just sounds like them latching onto the glam metal trend; it's more like a Ratt or Bon Jovi record than like Blondie and Pat Benatar and I'd say Bryan Adams would probably fit more alongside somebody like, I dunno, 80's holy trinity god-emperor Rick Springfield. ;D


I think Bruce Springsteen's The River album in general is stylistically closer to Born in the U.S.A. than it is to Darkness on the Edge of Town, which is basically like Born to Run but with quirkier, less grandiose songwriting.

"Girls on Film" sounds just as new as the rest of Seven and the Ragged Tiger, which came out in 1983 but produced a British and American #1 in 1984 with "The Reflex," which employs pretty much the exact same production style.


Maybe a bit but The River still sounds fairly in between. And I'll say this: Girls on Film actually does sound very new for a 1981 song especially when compared to both Jesse's Girl and Working For The Weekend.


1988 is hardly 90s in the least, but 1989 did contain a few things that were already pretty 90s:


Of course but I'd say 1989 had a lot of things that were very 80's, too. Compared to years like 1979, 1999 and 2009? 1989 is the year that still retained a strong old on it's own decade's identity, even without the comparisons to other XXX9 years.


Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/06/17 at 12:23 am


I think "Jessie's Girl" and "Working for the Weekend" are in the same basic category. They're both clearly trying to be 80s, like you said, but they both have that muffled drum/fat bass instrumentation style that was characteristic of a lot of new wave from the end of the 1970s. Both songs could have been mainstream hits in 1979, albeit not really 1977 or 1978. In addition to the aforementioned "My Sharona," they're pretty similar to these songs that were popular in 1979 in their transitional sound:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aYm8HYi5tIk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4nQ9PlLW4Gc

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ExYsh1W22Wo

Even 1982 still had the occasional hit song that followed this same in-between style, like this (though it was from an album released in late 1981):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6WTdTwcmxyo

I personally prefer to classify the transitional style as 80s instead of 70s because its peak was really the second half of 1979 through the first half of 1982, which is more chronologically confined to the 80s than the 70s, but I definitely agree it sounds quite a bit older than classic 80s music, in the same way "I Want It That Way" and "I'm Too Sexy" embody two distinct sounds, yet are both representative of the 1990s.

However, I still think stuff like Pat Benatar's "If You Know How to Love Me" and Blondie's "Union City Blue," both from 1979, would still sound quite current as late as 1985 or maybe even 1986. They're really not that stylistically distant from, say, Heart's self-titled or Bryan Adams' Reckless. All the basic elements of 80s music already existed by late 1979, they were just really sporadic until roughly 1983.

I think Bruce Springsteen's The River album in general is stylistically closer to Born in the U.S.A. than it is to Darkness on the Edge of Town, which is basically like Born to Run but with quirkier, less grandiose songwriting.

"Girls on Film" sounds just as new as the rest of Seven and the Ragged Tiger, which came out in 1983 but produced a British and American #1 in 1984 with "The Reflex," which employs pretty much the exact same production style.

1988 is hardly 90s in the least, but 1989 did contain a few things that were already pretty 90s:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TB54dZkzZOY

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/75/Movie_poster_the_little_mermaid.jpg

https://app.onlinephotofiler.com/Img1/A_0/0/5/5/5500/add58e3f3140464d8f4247da8402418b.Large.jpg?u=c699cb58-52f1-4187-9b77-f06ca4e576f8

Didn't I say either to not make long posts again or put a spoiler up?  >:(

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/06/17 at 12:38 am


I'd say Working for the Weekend sounds bit more flashy and slightly newer than Jesse's Girl but I definitely can't see either of those songs coming out in 1977 or '78 at all. Overall, leaning towards the 80's is a fair way to put it as the songs are still building blocks towards the then-upcoming decade. Since the style's so in between I could go either way, really. It sounds like the 70's turning into the 80's.

I'd can see it with Union City Blue but not so much with If You Think You Know How to Love Me. Union City Blue is pretty close to songs from the mid-late 80's like Head Over Heels, In Your Room or Roam, if just not as slick. If You Think You Know How To Love Me, however, still sounds much more like a transitional 70's-to-80's song whenever I listen to it. Either way, I think for both songs, you'd have to up the production for '85 and '86. They still sound a bit old when compared to the mid 80's. Heart's self-titled in general just sounds like them latching onto the glam metal trend; it's more like a Ratt or Bon Jovi record than like Blondie and Pat Benatar and I'd say Bryan Adams would probably fit more alongside somebody like, I dunno, 80's holy trinity god-emperor Rick Springfield. ;D


I think you could easily compare "If You Think You Know How to Love Me" specifically to "Nothin' At All" or "What He Don't Know" from Heart's self-titled or "Run to You" from Reckless. It has that crunchy guitar sound and prominent reverb in its percussion that are typical of music from the early-mid-1980s and set it far apart from the fatter, more muffled approach found in "My Sharona" or "867-5309/Jenny." It's also quite similar in style to Scandal's The Warrior album, which again doesn't go balls-to-the-wall hair metal/gated drums like most late 80s rock, but is still indisputably 80s. I really don't hear what's so old-fashioned about it.

Maybe a bit but The River still sounds fairly in between.

It doesn't have quite the same anthemic robustness as Born in the U.S.A., but the arena-style percussion and use synthesizers make it fit pretty comfortably with the 80s. It doesn't sound quite as much like something that would still seem current beyond the early 80s, but it's undoubtedly a dramatic shift from Springsteen's previous effort from a mere two years prior.

Of course but I'd say 1989 had a lot of things that were very 80's, too. Compared to years like 1979, 1999 and 2009? 1989 is the year that still retained a strong old on it's own decade's identity, even without the comparisons to other XXX9 years.

1989 was quite easily a lot more 80s than 90s, it's just that the basic elements were slowly starting to take fold, even if most were still in their larvae stages.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: HazelBlue99 on 04/06/17 at 12:48 am


Didn't I say either to not make long posts again or put a spoiler up?  >:(


That's a bit rude. Just because you don't like it, doesn't mean that Infinity has to make a spoiler or shorten her posts.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/06/17 at 1:31 am


That's a bit rude. Just because you don't like it, doesn't mean that Infinity has to make a spoiler or shorten her posts.

What are you talking about? I tell her to shorten her post or put spoiler because long posts makes the page take long to load...not because I don't like it. Please don't take my post out of context and I already previously told her to not do it.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/06/17 at 1:38 am


That's a bit rude. Just because you don't like it, doesn't mean that Infinity has to make a spoiler or shorten her posts.


I can understand honestly because I've had my Internet constantly act up on my iPhone when I try to read a page here with lots of video links. I didn't add spoiler tags in the more recent post of mine because it felt like it was definitely shorter than the original one TheReignMan99 complained about, but since it's apparently still too long, I decided I may as well go back.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/06/17 at 1:44 am


I can understand honestly because I've had my Internet constantly act up on my iPhone when I try to read a page here with lots of video links. I didn't add spoiler tags in the more recent post of mine because it felt like it was definitely shorter than the original one TheReignMan99 complained about, but since it's apparently still too long, I decided I may as well go back.

I'm sorry if I seem a bit angry. It's just that my phone acts up when there is a long post.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: 80sfan on 04/06/17 at 3:27 am

Oh yeah, Girls on film sounds like it came out between 1984 and 1985, not 1981.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Howard on 04/06/17 at 5:11 am


Oh yeah, Girls on film sounds like it came out between 1984 and 1985, not 1981.


and the video had a bit of brief nudity in it.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: 80sfan on 04/06/17 at 12:59 pm


and the video had a bit of brief nudity in it.


:o

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: bchris02 on 04/06/17 at 2:03 pm

This is an interesting question.  I think in terms of music, technology, and politics, the 1980s arrived right on time.  There is a significant difference between the sound of music in 1981 vs 1978.  Politically, I don't think you can say any moment of Reagan's Presidency was culturally 1970s.

TV and movies on the other hand was still living in the 70s until around 1982.  Also, the consumer culture commonly associated with the '80s didn't fully arrive until after the 1982 recession.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: 80sfan on 04/06/17 at 2:44 pm

If I were to pick 1982 as a cultural starting date for the 1980's, I would pick late 1982. Like around October, or November.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Howard on 04/06/17 at 4:52 pm


:o


I will have to find the video.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Mr Steamer on 04/06/17 at 5:14 pm


If I were to pick 1982 as a cultural starting date for the 1980's, I would pick late 1982. Like around October, or November.

Definitely November. Since this is when Michael Jackson released the Thriller album, which made MTV popular.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: 80sfan on 04/06/17 at 5:43 pm


Definitely November. Since this is when Michael Jackson released the Thriller album, which made MTV popular.


Also, the stock market was at the beginning of a bull market in August of 1982.  :-X

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: nintieskid999 on 04/07/17 at 3:38 am

1980 and 1982 seem worlds apart to me. 1982 is clearly 80s but not as modern. 1980 seems full on late 70s.

RQH7XrCmWBA

EU8qWB2K9xw

3qI8t3PDWIw


1981 was a mix of cutting edge 80s music and culture and leftover 70s. It was the transitional year between the 70s and 80s.

I'd say 1980 is late 70s. It was the last year without AIDS, the last year without MTV, and the last year of Jimmy Carter as president. It was also the last year with John Lennon around.

1981 is a cross between cutting edge 80s and late 70s. It was the year of transition.
1982 is 80s.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/07/17 at 5:00 am


I think you could easily compare "If You Think You Know How to Love Me" specifically to "Nothin' At All" or "What He Don't Know" from Heart's self-titled or "Run to You" from Reckless. It has that crunchy guitar sound and prominent reverb in its percussion that are typical of music from the early-mid-1980s and set it far apart from the fatter, more muffled approach found in "My Sharona" or "867-5309/Jenny." It's also quite similar in style to Scandal's The Warrior album, which again doesn't go balls-to-the-wall hair metal/gated drums like most late 80s rock, but is still indisputably 80s. I really don't hear what's so old-fashioned about it.


I wouldn't say it has that much reverb at all and the guitars aren't even that crunchy; it sounds like a clean tone played with a bit of overdrive over top of it and at times it sounds a bit muddy, too. For an 80's track, especially, the guitars are buried so far in the back of the mix. While there's a solo near the end, it doesn't feature melodic guitar leads wailing every 5 seconds like The Warrior and Run To You do. Same with the effects. Really, none of these songs really have big crunchy tones, especially compared to other songs of the time (Run To You and The Warrior that is), but there's obvious differences. Run To You has chorus running through the entire song with heavily reverbed lead guitars playing over it (it sounds like the producer tried to fit as many effects and licks as he possibly could) but If You Think... makes sparing use of these effects. The Warrior's mixing and recording is a lot different, too. If You Think... sounds like they recorded about 2-4 rhythm tracks stereo and one lead track over top. It sounds rawer, as early Pat Benetar in general doesn't really sound as overproduced as her later stuff. The Warrior sounds like they overdubbed the hell out of it. Could even be around 10-16 rhythm tracks overdubbed and split between each ear to give it a bigger and louder sound, a LOT of compression is used and a ton reverb on the leads (I can say the exact same about Run to You as well). The reverb is very, very apparent on the drums as well on The Warrior. If You Think You Know How to Love Me is way too stripped down. And Heart's self-titled just sounds like balls to the walls gated drums glam. Part one of their Star Wars prequel arena rock trilogy that was continued by Bad Animals and Brigade.

It's comparable because it's an early version of the 80's pop rock sound, yes, but it's still not entirely there yet.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Howard on 04/07/17 at 7:07 am


Definitely November. Since this is when Michael Jackson released the Thriller album, which made MTV popular.


and don't forget Madonna's music also had soared as well in 1982 going into 1983.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/07/17 at 8:18 am


I wouldn't say it has that much reverb at all and the guitars aren't even that crunchy; it sounds like a clean tone played with a bit of overdrive over top of it and at times it sounds a bit muddy, too. For an 80's track, especially, the guitars are buried so far in the back of the mix.


I still don't hear the muddiness you're talking about. "Muddy" is far more what I'd use to describe something like "Is She Really Going Out with Him?," "My Sharona," and The Cars' "Let's Go." It has a lot more echo than other new wave songs from the same year and isn't even borderline 70s, even if you confine it to only the early 80s.

While there's a solo near the end, it doesn't feature melodic guitar leads wailing every 5 seconds like The Warrior and Run To You do. Same with the effects. Really, none of these songs really have big crunchy tones, especially compared to other songs of the time (Run To You and The Warrior that is), but there's obvious differences. Run To You has chorus running through the entire song with heavily reverbed lead guitars playing over it (it sounds like the producer tried to fit as many effects and licks as he possibly could) but If You Think... makes sparing use of these effects. The Warrior's mixing and recording is a lot different, too. If You Think... sounds like they recorded about 2-4 rhythm tracks stereo and one lead track over top. It sounds rawer, as early Pat Benetar in general doesn't really sound as overproduced as her later stuff. The Warrior sounds like they overdubbed the hell out of it. Could even be around 10-16 rhythm tracks overdubbed and split between each ear to give it a bigger and louder sound, a LOT of compression is used and a ton reverb on the leads (I can say the exact same about Run to You as well). The reverb is very, very apparent on the drums as well on The Warrior. If You Think You Know How to Love Me is way too stripped down. And Heart's self-titled just sounds like balls to the walls gated drums glam. Part one of their Star Wars prequel arena rock trilogy that was continued by Bad Animals and Brigade.

It's comparable because it's an early version of the 80's pop rock sound, yes, but it's still not entirely there yet.


Fair enough. I do think "If You Think..." sounds a bit gentler than the examples I listed, if you know what I mean, but I still think it definitely captures the basic elements of real 80s rock despite being from 1979. It really wouldn't sound like it's from a truly bygone time in 1984 or 1985 the way "My Sharona" or "867-5309/Jenny" would've. I can't describe it as 70s in any way except for the decade during which it came out.

To be fair, not all of the songs on Pat Benatar's debut sound comparable to mid-80s rock, but I think all of them are at least stylistically early 80s and not late 70s. "My Clone Sleeps Alone," for instance, is a rock opera-style number that has the same basic sound as "Promises in the Dark" from Benatar's third album from 1981, as well as Frank Stallone's "Far from Over" in 1983, but it sounds clearly dated beyond that. "Rated X" has actually a 70s tone to its composition, even though I still think the instrumentation is much more modern than your typical Kiss or T. Rex song from the 70s. "We Live for Love" actually sounds full-on 80s with its extreme reverb and synths – I'd be curious to know your take on that song – but it's still a little idiosyncratic compared to more traditional 1980s rock and more closely resembles Blondie. Regardless, as my favorite Pat Benatar album and actually one of my favorite pop rock records ever, I always subconsciously want to call In the Heat of the Night one of my go-to 80s albums because it's so much more in-line with stuff from the first half of the 80s than it is with my favorite 70s albums like Darkness on the Edge of Town, Selling England by the Pound, or Aja.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: musicguy93 on 04/07/17 at 2:12 pm


Oh yeah, Girls on film sounds like it came out between 1984 and 1985, not 1981.


Naw, Girls on Film definitely had an early 80s sound, in that it followed a more subdued synthpop style. By 1983/1984ish, the upbeat, obviously 80s, synthpop sound had come into the mainstream. Compare Girls on Film to The Reflex (which is from their 1983 album, Seven and the Ragged Tiger) . They sound worlds apart:

KCjMZMxNr-0

oDnNF5cHCdo

Even the songs from their second album Rio (which came out in 1982), were different from songs from their self titled album.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Howard on 04/07/17 at 2:43 pm


:o


There is an uncensored version of "Girls On Film" somewhere lurking around the internet.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/07/17 at 3:06 pm


Naw, Girls on Film definitely had an early 80s sound, in that it followed a more subdued synthpop style. By 1983/1984ish, the upbeat, obviously 80s, synthpop sound had come into the mainstream. Compare Girls on Film to The Reflex (which is from their 1983 album, Seven and the Ragged Tiger) . They sound worlds apart:

KCjMZMxNr-0

oDnNF5cHCdo

Even the songs from their second album Rio (which came out in 1982), were different from songs from their self titled album.


Are you serious? "Girls on Film" is so much snappier, boomier, and more energized than other synthpop and new wave songs coming out of 1981 like "Don't You Want Me" and "Just Can't Get Enough." How on earth is it worlds apart from "The Reflex?" I can definitely differentiate it from "Notorious" or even "The Wild Boys," but there's absolutely no stylistic difference in comparison to "The Reflex."

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: yelimsexa on 04/07/17 at 5:28 pm

ears earlier).
6. Many popular mid/late '70s TV shows were still airing or were just ending as 1981 was coming to a close. It wasn't until 1982 in which you started to see a lot of the '80s most popular TV shows pop up (Family Ties, Cheers, Newhart, Knight Rider and St. Elsewhere).


I'd pretty much agree that the "80s TV world" lasted from the fall of 1982 up until the spring of 1992. You had The Golden Girls, The Cosby Show, the original MacGyver, Growing Pains, Who's The Boss, The Tonight Show starring Johnny Carson, and Night Court, all long-running gems that were popular or premiered during the core '80s say farewell in less than a month's time. The Real World on MTV also premiered the day before Johnny Carson's final episode. That said, there were still some '70s shows as mentioned as late as 1986, while the first shows that would be seen as more '90s premiered in 1987, meaning that the '80s TV scene honestly didn't peak until around the 1986-87 season. I'd say the summer of 1992 was pretty much the first season that felt that truly belonged to the '90s, especially considering Bill Clinton's nomination for President and his growing popularity. Also, Windows 3.1 was also released, and CD-ROM was becoming popular, two major '90s computing trends. The difference though with '90s TV is that the shows seemed to premiere gradually from 1987 up through 1996 or so to define the decade, compared to a big onslaught of '80s shows from 1982-85. Remember, Murder She Wrote was on the air later than Rocko's Modern Life, Blossom, and Northern Exposure.

Musically though, the '80s more or less coincided with the chronological definition with some transitional influence 18 months outside the decade, and the same could be said about the '90s.

Politically, I'd consider the Iran Hostage crisis the pivotal event between the '70s and '80s, with the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan and start of the Iran-Iraq War the beginning of the decade, and ending sometime between China's Tinneman Square in June 1989 and the Soviet coup in August 1991, with the official Germany Reunification and John Major the PM the approximate changing of the guard. The Falklands War in 1982 was a solidly early 1980s event pertaining to the Commonwealth and the Falklands.

That said, I find the video game industry considerably more mainstream in 1982 based on the advertising extent and pop cultural references around that time compared to 1980 and early 1981, where it was gradually building in popularity. Finally, Time Magazine voted the Computer as its Person of the Year, a sure time that the Atomic Age had given way to the Information Age. 

Therefore, I'd say that 1982 that the overall '70s influences finally became insignificant enough where that the age of yuppies, Reaganomics (the economy started its then-record 96 month expansion that August as pointed out before), Valley Girl slang (the movie was filmed that year), and a point where the Vietnam/hippie era started to feel distant for the first time and led a feel to a new era that had truly formed itself.



Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/07/17 at 5:42 pm


ears earlier).
6. Many popular mid/late '70s TV shows were still airing or were just ending as 1981 was coming to a close. It wasn't until 1982 in which you started to see a lot of the '80s most popular TV shows pop up (Family Ties, Cheers, Newhart, Knight Rider and St. Elsewhere).


I'd pretty much agree that the "80s TV world" lasted from the fall of 1982 up until the spring of 1992. You had The Golden Girls, The Cosby Show, the original MacGyver, Growing Pains, Who's The Boss, The Tonight Show starring Johnny Carson, and Night Court, all long-running gems that were popular or premiered during the core '80s say farewell in less than a month's time. The Real World on MTV also premiered the day before Johnny Carson's final episode. That said, there were still some '70s shows as mentioned as late as 1986, while the first shows that would be seen as more '90s premiered in 1987, meaning that the '80s TV scene honestly didn't peak until around the 1986-87 season. I'd say the summer of 1992 was pretty much the first season that felt that truly belonged to the '90s, especially considering Bill Clinton's nomination for President and his growing popularity. Also, Windows 3.1 was also released, and CD-ROM was becoming popular, two major '90s computing trends. The difference though with '90s TV is that the shows seemed to premiere gradually from 1987 up through 1996 or so to define the decade, compared to a big onslaught of '80s shows from 1982-85. Remember, Murder She Wrote was on the air later than Rocko's Modern Life, Blossom, and Northern Exposure.

Musically though, the '80s more or less coincided with the chronological definition with some transitional influence 18 months outside the decade, and the same could be said about the '90s.

Politically, I'd consider the Iran Hostage crisis the pivotal event between the '70s and '80s, with the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan and start of the Iran-Iraq War the beginning of the decade, and ending sometime between China's Tinneman Square in June 1989 and the Soviet coup in August 1991, with the official Germany Reunification and John Major the PM the approximate changing of the guard. The Falklands War in 1982 was a solidly early 1980s event pertaining to the Commonwealth and the Falklands.

That said, I find the video game industry considerably more mainstream in 1982 based on the advertising extent and pop cultural references around that time compared to 1980 and early 1981, where it was gradually building in popularity. Finally, Time Magazine voted the Computer as its Person of the Year, a sure time that the Atomic Age had given way to the Information Age. 

Therefore, I'd say that 1982 that the overall '70s influences finally became insignificant enough where that the age of yuppies, Reaganomics (the economy started its then-record 96 month expansion that August as pointed out before), Valley Girl slang (the movie was filmed that year), and a point where the Vietnam/hippie era started to feel distant for the first time and led a feel to a new era that had truly formed itself.

Very good and detailed post. Nice.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: musicguy93 on 04/07/17 at 7:38 pm


Are you serious? "Girls on Film" is so much snappier, boomier, and more energized than other synthpop and new wave songs coming out of 1981 like "Don't You Want Me" and "Just Can't Get Enough." How on earth is it worlds apart from "The Reflex?" I can definitely differentiate it from "Notorious" or even "The Wild Boys," but there's absolutely no stylistic difference in comparison to "The Reflex."


Okay, maybe not stylistically "worlds apart". But I do think that the production of both songs are quiet different. Sure, "Girls on Film" is snappier and boomier than most early 80s new wave/synthpop songs, but the production does seem more raw and grainy in comparison to music from 1984/1985. Perhaps it wasn't the best example, but it definitely doesn't sound like a mid 80s song.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: 80sfan on 04/07/17 at 8:16 pm


and don't forget Madonna's music also had soared as well in 1982 going into 1983.


Madonna wasn't really famous until, like, late 1984. She was definitely fully famous in 1985.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/07/17 at 9:11 pm


Okay, maybe not stylistically "worlds apart". But I do think that the production of both songs are quiet different. Sure, "Girls on Film" is snappier and boomier than most early 80s new wave/synthpop songs, but the production does seem more raw and grainy in comparison to music from 1984/1985. Perhaps it wasn't the best example, but it definitely doesn't sound like a mid 80s song.


It's still essentially just like "The Reflex" and sounds distinctly newer than typical early 80s music. It's pretty 1983/early 1984-ish.


Madonna wasn't really famous until, like, late 1984. She was definitely fully famous in 1985.


Actually, she became famous around the very beginning of 1984, as that's when her song "Holiday" finally broke into the top 20 on the Billboard Hot 100. However, it was particularly in 1985 that she fully established herself as the biggest pop diva in the world.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: 80sfan on 04/07/17 at 9:36 pm


It's still essentially just like "The Reflex" and sounds distinctly newer than typical early 80s music. It's pretty 1983/early 1984-ish.

Actually, she became famous around the very beginning of 1984, as that's when her song "Holiday" finally broke into the top 20 on the Billboard Hot 100. However, it was particularly in 1985 that she fully established herself as the biggest pop diva in the world.


I don't know, it's hard for me to see Madonna famous in early 1984, maybe like summer/mid 1984?? In America, her Borderline (#10) and Lucky Star (#4) songs went top 10.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/07/17 at 11:20 pm


I don't know, it's hard for me to see Madonna famous in early 1984, maybe like summer/mid 1984?? In America, her Borderline (#10) and Lucky Star (#4) songs went top 10.


"Holiday" peaked at #16 on January 28, 1984.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Howard on 04/08/17 at 4:59 am


Madonna wasn't really famous until, like, late 1984. She was definitely fully famous in 1985.


Her videos soared to the top of the charts in 1984 and 1985, "Like A Virgin", "Borderline" and "Material Girl" to name a few.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 04/08/17 at 7:38 am


This is an interesting question.  I think in terms of music, technology, and politics, the 1980s arrived right on time.  There is a significant difference between the sound of music in 1981 vs 1978.  Politically, I don't think you can say any moment of Reagan's Presidency was culturally 1970s.

TV and movies on the other hand was still living in the 70s until around 1982.  Also, the consumer culture commonly associated with the '80s didn't fully arrive until after the 1982 recession.


"Happy Days", "M*A*S*H", and "Charlie's Angels" are all '70s AND '80s TV shows. They were brand new in the '70s and 'beyond the shark' (they went further downhill) by the time they went off the air in the 1980s.

1978 to 1981 were not '70s years because the '60s and '70s shows (I.e.- "Bewitched",    "The Beverly Hillbillies", and "Hogan's Heroes") were cancelled by then.

I completely agree with you on your statement regarding Reagan's presidency.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: nintieskid999 on 04/08/17 at 8:07 am


"Happy Days", "M*A*S*H", and "Charlie's Angels" are all '70s AND '80s TV shows. They were brand new in the '70s and 'beyond the shark' (they went further downhill) by the time they went off the air in the 1980s.

1978 to 1981 were not '70s years because the '60s and '70s shows (I.e.- "Bewitched",    "The Beverly Hillbillies", and "Hogan's Heroes") were cancelled by then.

I completely agree with you on your statement regarding Reagan's presidency.


All 3 of those shows are 60s shows. They mostly aired in the 60s and even the portion of the 70s they were made in was the early 70s, which was an extension of the 60s. Those shows being cancelled doesn't mean it was no longer the 70s.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 04/08/17 at 8:26 am


All 3 of those shows are 60s shows. They mostly aired in the 60s and even the portion of the 70s they were made in was the early 70s, which was an extension of the 60s. Those shows being cancelled doesn't mean it was no longer the 70s.


All three of those shows aired in the 60s. They are '60s and '70s shows because they first aired in the '60s and ended in the early '70s. Whether you think of the early '70s as an extension to the late '60s or not, they were still '70s years.

If those shows being cancelled means nothing, then when did the '70s ever end? In 1981? I'm sorry, but that makes absolutely no sense.
To me, the '70s came to close in the fall of '78, after the final " '60s and '70s shows" (I.e. - The Carol Burnett Show, Columbo, and Spotlight) went off the air. There were some programs from the late '60s, like Hawaii Five-O, that lasted into the early '80s, but they are the exception to the rule.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: nintieskid999 on 04/08/17 at 9:25 am


All three of those shows aired in the 60s. They are '60s and '70s shows because they first aired in the '60s and ended in the early '70s. Whether you think of the early '70s as an extension to the late '60s or not, they were still '70s years.

If those shows being cancelled means nothing, then when did the '70s ever end? In 1981? I'm sorry, but that makes absolutely no sense.
To me, the '70s came to close in the fall of '78, after the final " '60s and '70s shows" (I.e. - The Carol Burnett Show, Columbo, and Spotlight) went off the air. There were some programs from the late '60s, like Hawaii Five-O, that lasted into the early '80s, but they are the exception to the rule.


But why does something have to have 60s influence to be 70s? That doesn't make sense. 1980 had Jimmy Carter as president and there was no HIV. In 1980 John Lennon existed. There was even disco on the charts. The fashion was 70s too. There were some 80s influences but the biggest ones hand't come yet. It was the recession and people felt the malaise.

MTV didn't exist until 1981. The list goes on. It's clear that 1981 was the transition from the 1970s into the 1980s. Reagan wasn't in office until 1981.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 04/08/17 at 10:08 am


But why does something have to have 60s influence to be 70s?


If nothing new happened in the '70s, the '70s would be the time of "60s holdovers".

That's why I see it like this:

"60s holdovers" (I.e. - Bewitched) = early '70s culture (thus making it '70s culture)
"70s holdovers" (I.e. - Happy Days) = early/mid '80s culture (making it '80s culture)
"80s holdovers" (I.e. - Saved by the Bell) = early '90s culture (so it is '90s)

And etc. etc.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/08/17 at 11:30 am

1978 to 1981 were not '70s years because the '60s and '70s shows (I.e.- "Bewitched",    "The Beverly Hillbillies", and "Hogan's Heroes") were cancelled by then.

Bewitched was a very different show from 1969 through the end of its run, since Dick York left and the baby was born. All three programs you listed were on television for a far greater percentage of the 60s than the 70s.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: 80sfan on 04/08/17 at 1:14 pm


"Holiday" peaked at #16 on January 28, 1984.


Hmmmmm, I'm not trying to be contrary just for contrary sake. I remember Britney Spears's song Baby One More Time hit number one in late January and early February of 1999. And her album even hit number one in January 1999. But it can take a while to build up a fan base, even with a number one hit song.

I'd say it wasn't until roughly March of 1999, when I could call Britney Spears genuinely 'famous'. Her song had already hit number 17 (close to Madonna's 'Holiday' peak in 1984) in November of 1998, but I wouldn't call her famous yet until the spring of 1999. For me, personally it was around March of 1999 when Britney was famous.

I mean, look at the song Black Beatles by the duo Rae Sremmurd, the Black Beatles song went number one, but I'd say they're not truly famous yet. More people would know who Arianna Grande is than them. And even Rae Sremmurd had a song that hit number 16 in 2014, their song 'No Type'. And I doubt most people knew who they were in 2014.

It can take time for a person, even a band, to build up a fan base, and for word of mouth to spread. I'd say if you're first single goes number one and you stick out enough, it would take a few months, like six, for you to be well known worldwide.

And I'd say it would depend on how much you stick out too. Mariah Carey's voice was so extraordinary, that high whistle voice so different and talented, that it was obvious she was going to break through. Same with Britney, her dancing skills, use of Lolita-esque sexual imagery, the fact that she became famous before Christina Aguilera, Jessica Simpson, and Mandy Moore, and her nack for picking a very catchy and fitting song (Baby One More Time), she stuck out.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 04/08/17 at 4:10 pm


All three programs you listed were on television for a far greater percentage of the 60s than the 70s.


That is a valid point, but those programs still ran into the 70s. So, they are 60s and 70s TV shows.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Howard on 04/08/17 at 4:59 pm


"Holiday" peaked at #16 on January 28, 1984.


and when did "Everybody" peak? ???

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Tyrannosaurus Rex on 04/10/17 at 7:26 pm


1982 was much like 2002, as it was like a transitional year with 2003. In other words, 1982/1983 is the 2000s equivalent of 2002/2003.


I would actually disagree here. I think that 70's influence in 1982 was stronger than 90's influence in 2002.

1982 was probably around 30-37.5% 70's
2002 was probably around 20-25% 90's

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/10/17 at 7:43 pm


I would actually disagree here. I think that 70's influence in 1982 was stronger than 90's influence in 2002.

1982 was probably around 30-37.5% 70's
2002 was probably around 20-25% 90's


Then I guess 2002 was the '00s equivalent of 1983.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Tyrannosaurus Rex on 04/10/17 at 7:49 pm


Then I guess 2002 was the '00s equivalent of 1983.


Agree.

1996 was a 90's equivalent of 1978 (last pure years of their decades)

1998 was probably a 90's equivalent to 1980, as both were the last years where the decade had a very noticeable impact.

1999 was probably a 90's equivalent to 1981, both are undecided and very odd years when it comes to grouping to which decade they belong in when it comes to pop culture

2000-2001 was probably like a giant, stretched 1982. By the time 9/11 happens, it becomes more of a 1983 equivalent.

2002 was probably a 00's equivalent of 1983.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/10/17 at 7:59 pm


Agree.

1996 was a 90's equivalent of 1978 (last pure years of their decades)

1998 was probably a 90's equivalent to 1980, as both were the last years where the decade had a very noticeable impact.

1999 was probably a 90's equivalent to 1981, both are undecided and very odd years when it comes to grouping to which decade they belong in when it comes to pop culture

2000-2001 was probably like a giant, stretched 1982. By the time 9/11 happens, it becomes more of a 1983 equivalent.

2002 was probably a 00's equivalent of 1983.

1996 = 1977
1997 = 1978 & 1979
1998 = 1980 & 1981
1999 = It's own f*cking world

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/10/17 at 8:04 pm

1978: 10% 80s
1979: 35% 80s
1980: 55% 80s
1981: 65% 80s
1982: 80% 80s
1983: 95% 80s
1984: 100% 80s
1985: 100% 80s
1986: 100% 80s
1987: 95% 80s
1988: 85% 80s
1989: 75% 80s

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 04/10/17 at 8:20 pm


1996 = 1977
1997 = 1978 & 1979
1998 = 1980 & 1981
1999 = It's own f*cking world


1978 = 1990
1979 = 1991
1980 = 1992
1981 = 1993
1982 = 1994
1983 = 1995
1984/1987= 1996
1985/1988 = 1997
1986/1989= 1998

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/10/17 at 8:23 pm


1978 = 1990
1979 = 1991
1980 = 1992
1981 = 1993
1982 = 1994
1983 = 1995
1984/1987= 1996
1985/1988 = 1997
1986/1989= 1998

Oh no. I've seen earlier posts from you. I'm not getting into that...nice try though.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 04/10/17 at 8:58 pm


1978: 10% 80s
1979: 35% 80s
1980: 55% 80s
1981: 65% 80s
1982: 80% 80s
1983: 95% 80s
1984: 100% 80s
1985: 100% 80s
1986: 100% 80s
1987: 95% 80s
1988: 85% 80s
1989: 75% 80s


1978 = 100% '80s (the year of Star Wars mania)
1979 = 95% '80s (the year of the pop rocks and coke story)
1980 = 85% '80s (the year of Love Boat being popular)
1981 = 75% '80s (the year of Kool and the Gang's "Celebration" playing on radios everywhere)
1982 = 65% '80s (the year when RPG fans everywhere were playing "Dungeons and Dragons)
1983 = 55% '80s (the year when boys everywhere started dressing like Michael Jackson/the year when Muppet Magazine was new to stores)
1984 = 45% '80s (the year of Breakin' and Breakin' 2: Electric Boogaloo)
1985 = 40% '80s (the year when Alice went off the air)
1986 = 35% '80s (the year when more teens started wearing Ocean Pacific)
1987 = 25% '80s (the year when Fleetwood Mac released "Little Lies")
1988 = 20% '80s (the year when the blaxploitation movie "Action Jackson" was released in theaters)
1989 = 10% '80s (The year when it was last acceptable to wear rugby sweaters)

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/10/17 at 11:28 pm

If 1978 is 100% 80's than the 80's kinda sucked. What happened to all that color?

:P

1978 - 5%
1979 - 25% (by the end of the year)
1980 - 30%
1981 - 44%
1982 - 65% (by the end of the year)
1983 - 85% (by the end of the year)
First half of 1984 - 95% (complete and totally definitive 80's, of course, but not as completely developed as the second half of the year)
Summer of  '84 thru fall of '87 100% (the epitome of the decade)
Winter '87 to summer '88 - 98.5%
Summer '88 to early winter '90 - 96.5%

Roughly. These percentages are kinda silly because it's just guessing random numbers but it looked like fun and I thought I'd join in. :D

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/10/17 at 11:57 pm

You know what? I changed my mind. After doing some research it seems the early part of the 80's is the most definitive part and as time went on, things got more and more 90's. Proof?

Here is Depeche Mode in 1982:

http://www.tiptopwebsite.com/photos3/depechemodefile/framepic.jpg

Since they're all fresh-faced and happy (unlike the Depeche Mode we all know from later on) it's clear from the look on their faces that they are still living in 80's times. Now take a look at what they looked like in 1990:

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/71/26/4f/71264fb7555ea316bef23e91a1f32185.jpg

You can see they're living in the 90's since they've all got glum pouty faces due to all the grunge in the water. Case closed.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: robby76 on 04/11/17 at 12:05 am

ReignMann and JordanK... I love you both and your posts but please please could you reduce the size of your signatures. It makes reading threads really difficult.

I always discount 1982 as a full 80s year - as we do with most of the first 2 years of a decade. However, ET was very 80s. I never knew Knight Rider started in 1982 either - though it premiered late in September.

1983 will still remain the full revolutionary 80s year... A-Team, He-Man, rise of Thriller etc.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/11/17 at 12:14 am


ReignMann and JordanK... I love you both and your posts but please please could you reduce the size of your signatures. It makes reading threads really difficult.

I'm sorry. When I get the chance...I'll make my signature smaller (later today).

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/11/17 at 12:18 am


ReignMann and JordanK... I love you both and your posts but please please could you reduce the size of your signatures. It makes reading threads really difficult.

I always discount 1982 as a full 80s year - as we do with most of the first 2 years of a decade. However, ET was very 80s. I never knew Knight Rider started in 1982 either - though it premiered late in September.

1983 will still remain the full revolutionary 80s year... A-Team, He-Man, rise of Thriller etc.


Sorry, got a bit carried away. Was due for a change sooner or later, though. :P

I've always felt like 1984 was the most revolutionary year of the 80's. 1983 was pretty big but 1984 always seemed like an explosion to me. The Macintosh, Madonna, Discman, John Hughes, Miami Vice, The Cosby Show, etc. Everything seemed to happen all at once that year.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/11/17 at 12:21 am


Sorry, got a bit carried away. Was due for a change sooner or later, though. :P

I've always felt like 1984 was the most revolutionary year of the 80's. 1983 was pretty big but 1984 always seemed like an explosion to me. The Macintosh, Madonna, Discman, John Hughes, Miami Vice, The Cosby Show, etc. Everything seemed to happen all at once that year.

Definitely. 1984 was a great year.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: nintieskid999 on 04/11/17 at 1:44 am

1982 seemed more 80s to me than the year 1990. Am I the only one who thinks this way?

However, 1990 seemed a lot more 80s than 1980.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/11/17 at 6:15 am


Definitely. 1984 was a great year.


One of my all time favorites. 8)


1982 seemed more 80s to me than the year 1990. Am I the only one who thinks this way?

However, 1990 seemed a lot more 80s than 1980.


I agree with 1990 seeming "more 80's" than 1980 itself but 1982 was still fairly primitive. While 1990 was the start of society leaving the 80's, it was still fairly deep in the era and had the history and remains of the fully developed identity that persisted through the previous 6 years to contribute to it's own feel; 1982 was too early and the decade still had a lot of developing to do.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 04/11/17 at 6:38 am


1982 seemed more 80s to me than the year 1990. Am I the only one who thinks this way?

However, 1990 seemed a lot more 80s than 1980.


Incoming '90s Culture by the Year

1978: The TV show Dallas (ended in '91)/Cyclist hat (worn by both Will Smith and Westley Snipes in the early '90s) trend
1979: Strawberry Shortcake (revived in '91)/Trival Pursuit (still in stores to this very day)
1980: Pac Man (released for the Game Boy in the early '90s)
1981: The TV show "The Smurfs" (last seen in the spring of 1990)
1982: ET: The Extra-Terristrial (the video was last sold in stores during the '90s)
1983: Masters of the Universe (the action figures from 1987 were last sold at Toys "R" Us and Dollar General in the early '90s)
1984: Miami Vice (Lost episode shown on USA in 1990/pastels were still popular throughout the '90s)/Transformers G1(Transformers Micromasters and Action Masters were in stores in the early '90s)/Ghostbusters (the last series of toys, Slimer toothpaste, and fruit snacks were all released in the early '90s)/Gremlins (Gremlins 2 in 1990)/Nightmare on Elm Street (National Freddy Day was in 1991)/Terminator (T2 in 1991)
1985: MacGuyver (cancelled in 1992)/ Back to the Future (Back to the Future 3/Double Feature - 2 and 3 were shown in theaters in 1990)/NES (extremely popular after Super Mario Bros. 3 was sold in stores)
1986: Ferris Bueller (unsuccessful TV show in 1990)/ALF (cancelled in 1990, merchandise still in stores in the early '90s )
1987: Full House (ran until 1995), A Different World (flip-up shades worn until late '95, show cancelled in 1993), Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles cartoon (very popular in the '89-'90 school year, cancelled in 1991), Robocop (Robocop 2 in 1990, Robocop 3 in 1993, unsuccessful '90s TV show, merchandise in stores all throughout the '90s)/Married with Children (cancelled in 1997)
1988: Who Framed Roger Rabbit (people did the Roger Rabbit dance in the early '90s, last seen in "Rollercoast Rabbit" before Dick Tracy by general public, comic book series in the '90s, sequel to the book released in '91)/Beetlejuice (action figures released in 1990, and cartoon series cancelled in '92)/Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles action figures (the must have action figures of 1990)/ The Wonder Years (cancelled in 1993)/ Child's Play (Child's Play 2 in 1990 and Child's Play 3 in 1991)/Roseanne (cancelled in the late '90s)
1989: Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure (Bill and Ted's Bogus Journey in 1991, action figures, t-shirts, and cereal in the early '90s)/Tetris (extremely popular in the spring of 1990 for the Game Boy and NES)/New Kids on the Block (they called it quits in 1994)/Tim Burton's Batman (Batman Returns in 1992)

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: nintieskid999 on 04/11/17 at 12:10 pm


One of my all time favorites. 8)

I agree with 1990 seeming "more 80's" than 1980 itself but 1982 was still fairly primitive. While 1990 was the start of society leaving the 80's, it was still fairly deep in the era and had the history and remains of the fully developed identity that persisted through the previous 6 years to contribute to it's own feel; 1982 was too early and the decade still had a lot of developing to do.


But 1982 had far more cutting edge 80s things and things people remember from the 80s than 1990.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Howard on 04/11/17 at 3:53 pm


If 1978 is 100% 80's than the 80's kinda sucked. What happened to all that color?

:P

1978 - 5%
1979 - 25% (by the end of the year)
1980 - 30%
1981 - 44%
1982 - 65% (by the end of the year)
1983 - 85% (by the end of the year)
First half of 1984 - 95% (complete and totally definitive 80's, of course, but not as completely developed as the second half of the year)
Summer of  '84 thru fall of '87 100% (the epitome of the decade)
Winter '87 to summer '88 - 98.5%
Summer '88 to early winter '90 - 96.5%

Roughly. These percentages are kinda silly because it's just guessing random numbers but it looked like fun and I thought I'd join in. :D


What are these percentages about? ???

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Howard on 04/11/17 at 3:54 pm


Definitely. 1984 was a great year.


1984 was a great year for family sitcoms.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/11/17 at 4:01 pm


1984 was a great year for family sitcoms.

You're absolutely correct.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Tyrannosaurus Rex on 04/11/17 at 4:45 pm


1978 = 100% '80s (the year of Star Wars mania)
1979 = 95% '80s (the year of the pop rocks and coke story)
1980 = 85% '80s (the year of Love Boat being popular)
1981 = 75% '80s (the year of Kool and the Gang's "Celebration" playing on radios everywhere)
1982 = 65% '80s (the year when RPG fans everywhere were playing "Dungeons and Dragons)
1983 = 55% '80s (the year when boys everywhere started dressing like Michael Jackson/the year when Muppet Magazine was new to stores)
1984 = 45% '80s (the year of Breakin' and Breakin' 2: Electric Boogaloo)
1985 = 40% '80s (the year when Alice went off the air)
1986 = 35% '80s (the year when more teens started wearing Ocean Pacific)
1987 = 25% '80s (the year when Fleetwood Mac released "Little Lies")
1988 = 20% '80s (the year when the blaxploitation movie "Action Jackson" was released in theaters)
1989 = 10% '80s (The year when it was last acceptable to wear rugby sweaters)


1978 - 95% 70's
1979 - 75% 70's
1980 - 65% 70's
1981 - 50% 70's
1982 - 30% 70's
1983 - 10% 70's
1984 - 70's elements are in general insignificant by this point

And how could you forget Back to the Future?

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/11/17 at 5:48 pm


1978 - 95% 70's
1979 - 75% 70's
1980 - 65% 70's
1981 - 50% 70's
1982 - 30% 70's
1983 - 10% 70's
1984 - 70's elements are in general insignificant by this point

And how could you forget Back to the Future?


Back to the Future is a 90s franchise to him. What matters most is the third movie, the animated series, the Universal ride, and Back to the Future Part II & III on the NES. The first two movies were apparently only builup.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/11/17 at 5:49 pm


Back to the Future is a 90s franchise to him. What matters most is the third movie, the animated series, the Universal ride, and Back to the Future Part II & III on the NES. The first two movies were apparently only builup.

Yeah, I saw earlier threads where he said that. However, I don't want to get involved in that though...:-X :-X.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Tyrannosaurus Rex on 04/11/17 at 6:03 pm


Back to the Future is a 90s franchise to him. What matters most is the third movie, the animated series, the Universal ride, and Back to the Future Part II & III on the NES. The first two movies were apparently only builup.


Everything from 1979-1990 is a 90's franchise in his eyes...I guess?

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/11/17 at 6:05 pm


Everything from 1979-1990 is a 90's franchise in his eyes...I guess?

Yes, literally. I'm not even joking (and he isn't either :-\\).

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 04/11/17 at 6:08 pm


Everything from 1979-1990 is a 90's franchise in his eyes...I guess?



Yes, literally. I'm not even joking (and he isn't either :-\\).
I swear, he spews so much BS. It's amazing. ::)

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Tyrannosaurus Rex on 04/11/17 at 6:09 pm


Yes, literally. I'm not even joking (and he isn't either :-\\).


The most definitive 90's movie to The Early 90's Guy - The 1990 TMNT movie released in March of that year?

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/8/8d/Teenage_Mutant_Ninja_Turtles_%281990_film%29_poster.jpg/220px-Teenage_Mutant_Ninja_Turtles_%281990_film%29_poster.jpg

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/11/17 at 6:10 pm


I swear, he spews so much BS. It's amazing. ::)

The only thing we agree on is our like of the early '90s...:-X :-X.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/11/17 at 6:11 pm


The most definitive 90's movie to The Early 90's Guy - The 1990 TMNT movie released in March of that year?

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/8/8d/Teenage_Mutant_Ninja_Turtles_%281990_film%29_poster.jpg/220px-Teenage_Mutant_Ninja_Turtles_%281990_film%29_poster.jpg

I'm not....wow...I will just stay quit on that.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/11/17 at 6:28 pm


The most definitive 90's movie to The Early 90's Guy - The 1990 TMNT movie released in March of that year?

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/8/8d/Teenage_Mutant_Ninja_Turtles_%281990_film%29_poster.jpg/220px-Teenage_Mutant_Ninja_Turtles_%281990_film%29_poster.jpg


Well, I think so.

BTW, nice Goofy Goober avatar.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/11/17 at 6:29 pm


Well, I think so.

BTW, nice Goofy Goober avatar.

TMNT from 1990 is the most definite '90s movie to you?...........................:o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Tyrannosaurus Rex on 04/11/17 at 6:33 pm


Well, I think so.

BTW, nice Goofy Goober avatar.


Thank you my good gentleman.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/11/17 at 6:33 pm


TMNT from 1990 is the most definite '90s movie to you?...........................:o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o.


No, I meant to Early 90s Guy's perspective that it's the most definitive movie of the 90s. There's no way in hell that I would consider 1990 to have a lot of definitive movies from the 90s.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/11/17 at 6:36 pm


No, I meant to Early 90s Guy's perspective that it's the most definitive movie of the 90s. There's no way in hell that I would consider 1990 to have a lot of definitive movies from the 90s.

Oh OK, I was worried for a sec.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Tyrannosaurus Rex on 04/11/17 at 6:38 pm


Oh OK, I was worried for a sec.


I have always thought that the most definitive 90's movie was Forrest Gump for some reason.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/11/17 at 6:40 pm

Oh NO. Here we go.............:-X :-X :-X.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 04/11/17 at 6:43 pm


Everything from 1979-1990 is a 90's franchise in his eyes...I guess?


I think you meant to say that everything made from 1978-1990 is a '90s franchise to me. What's wrong with believing that?

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/11/17 at 6:46 pm


I think you meant to say that everything made from 1978-1990 is a '90s franchise to me. What's wrong with believing that?


They're more like 80s franchises if the majority of 1978-1990 came from that decade by that statement.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 04/11/17 at 6:56 pm


The most definitive 90's movie to The Early 90's Guy - The 1990 TMNT movie released in March of that year?

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/8/8d/Teenage_Mutant_Ninja_Turtles_%281990_film%29_poster.jpg/220px-Teenage_Mutant_Ninja_Turtles_%281990_film%29_poster.jpg


No. My pick for the most definitive movie of the '90s is Terminator 2: Judgement Day. I'll never forget seeing the standee for it in the mall. Great times.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Tyrannosaurus Rex on 04/11/17 at 6:57 pm


No. My pick for the most definitive movie of the '90s is Terminator 2: Judgement Day. I'll never forget seeing the standee for it in the mall. Great times.


But it came out in 1991, and to you, that's 00's material.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 04/11/17 at 6:57 pm


I swear, he spews so much BS. It's amazing. ::)


How are you today, UltraGameDog?

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 04/11/17 at 6:59 pm


But it came out in 1991, and to you, that's 00's material.


It was a Terminator sequel, like Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines, but you have to admit everything about it screams '90s.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Tyrannosaurus Rex on 04/11/17 at 7:00 pm


It was a Terminator sequel, like Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines, but you have to admit everything about it screams '90s.


"1990 was 100% 90's"

"Back to the Future was a 90's movie"

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/11/17 at 7:03 pm


Were you alive in the '70s? How can you say '78-'81 was '70s when you were not even there?

I didn't say anything regarding the topic and please don't try to be condescending towards me because of my age. Please, I personally chose not to say anything because of this specific reason.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/11/17 at 7:43 pm



"Late 1970s to me is......

1. Jimmy Carter being President (1977-1981)
2. Disco being popular
3. NYC struggling in bankruptcy (post-1975, 1977 blackout)
4. Three's Company and Charlie's Angels being popular TV shows
5. Bell bottoms still being a fashion trend.
6. Punk rock emerging into notoriety
7. The US still being in an economic malaise, stagflation.
8. Michael Jackson's solo career just before "Thriller"
9. The Atari 2600 being popular
10. Hip Hip being an underground movement/musical scene."

I was talking about the current conversation..not that and either way...you're still a person who likes to be very condescending towards people.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 04/11/17 at 7:44 pm


"Back to the Future was a 90's movie"


I never called it a '90s film. The movie series is a popular '80s and '90s franchise.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Tyrannosaurus Rex on 04/11/17 at 7:46 pm


I was talking about the current conversation..not that and either way...you're still a person who likes to be very condescending towards people.


He may also just simply have low self esteem.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/11/17 at 7:49 pm


He may also just simply have low self esteem.

Maybe, who knows. I would like to converse about it but not with a person who will look down on me.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 04/11/17 at 7:51 pm


I was talking about the current conversation..not that and either way...you're still a person who likes to be very condescending towards people.


I removed the post. My apologies for being condescending to you and everyone else on this board. You're right, I was rude and I very much regret being that way towards you all. I'm sorry.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/11/17 at 7:55 pm


I removed the post. My apologies for being condescending to you and everyone else on this board. You're right, I was rude and I very much regret being that way towards you all. I'm sorry.

OK, I accept your apology.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 04/11/17 at 8:35 pm


How are you today, UltraGameDog?
I'm great.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/12/17 at 12:34 am

Early 90's Guy is the one who showed me the video for New Order's True Faith so he is always cool in my book. 8)

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Howard on 04/12/17 at 6:38 am


I have always thought that the most definitive 90's movie was Forrest Gump for some reason.


I liked that film.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: NewMedalz on 04/14/17 at 3:30 am

On the U.S. charts, 1980 was still undeniably similar to the previous few years. In fact, only a dozen or so of the top 20-30 hits on the U.S. charts that year really even evoke a discernible sense of the decade to come. Cars, Brass in Pocket, Whip It, Misunderstanding, Hit Me With Your Best Shot, Into the Night, Any Way You Want It, I'm Alright, He's So Shy, The Wanderer, Everybody's Got to Learn Sometime, and that's about it.

I mean, disco was still fairly big in 1980 even if it was waning, and soft rock/country were the two biggest genres outside of that. Very little synthpop, in contrast to the UK which embraced New Wave much sooner than the U.S. did. It took until MTV got big in late 1981-early 1982 for New Wave to really take over the States. There's not much reason to group 1980 in with 1982 onwards musically in terms of identifying what was mainstream. 1981-82 were the obvious transition years into the new decade's sound.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Howard on 04/14/17 at 5:13 am


On the U.S. charts, 1980 was still undeniably similar to the previous few years. In fact, only a dozen or so of the top 20-30 hits on the U.S. charts that year really even evoke a discernible sense of the decade to come. Cars, Brass in Pocket, Whip It, Misunderstanding, Hit Me With Your Best Shot, Into the Night, Any Way You Want It, I'm Alright, He's So Shy, The Wanderer, Everybody's Got to Learn Sometime, and that's about it.

I mean, disco was still fairly big in 1980 even if it was waning, and soft rock/country were the two biggest genres outside of that. Very little synthpop, in contrast to the UK which embraced New Wave much sooner than the U.S. did. It took until MTV got big in late 1981-early 1982 for New Wave to really take over the States. There's not much reason to group 1980 in with 1982 onwards musically in terms of identifying what was mainstream. 1981-82 were the obvious transition years into the new decade's sound.


Would you say the same for the funk sound? ???

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: NewMedalz on 04/14/17 at 4:56 pm


Would you say the same for the funk sound? ???


Synthfunk didn't really get going until 1981 or so. Prior to that the genre still retained the P-Funk and disco styles it was known for in the 1970s.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Howard on 04/14/17 at 5:31 pm


Synthfunk didn't really get going until 1981 or so. Prior to that the genre still retained the P-Funk and disco styles it was known for in the 1970s.


synthesizers were used in music after 1981.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Philip Eno on 04/14/17 at 11:27 pm


synthesizers were used in music after 1981.
... and before!

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Tyrannosaurus Rex on 04/15/17 at 5:47 pm


I liked that film.


"I must have drank me about 15 Dr. Peppers"

Dr. Pepper, if anything, is one of my favorite soda brands.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/15/17 at 5:50 pm


"I must have drank me about 15 Dr. Peppers"

Dr. Pepper, if anything, is one of my favorite soda brands.

I like Dr. Pepper but then again I like pretty much every noteworthy soda brand.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 04/18/17 at 11:38 pm


I think 1980 and 1981 are both largely 80s years culturally, though. Even late 1979 can be considered 80s to a fair degree. There may have still been a lingering 70s feel to some of their aspects, but a lot had clearly changed since even the bulk of the late 70s. The 80s as people like to stereotype them weren't really fully established until roughly 1983, but 1979-1982 were still an important part of the decade's greater identity.

The late '70s, in my opinion, are 1975 through the first two thirds of 1979. Throughout that period, the culture remained largely consistent. The dominant shows were stuff like Happy Days, M*A*S*H, Good Times, Welcome Back, Kotter; and The Jeffersons. Disco was the dominant form of popular music, while rock was represented by Queen, Kiss, Aerosmith, Fleetwood Mac, Bruce Springsteen, and other Gen Jones-targeted groups. 50s nostalgia was at an all-time high. Video games became popular toys for the first time with the advent of Pong consoles. The economy was in ruin due to stagflation, which was already a serious issue under Ford, not just Carter. American confidence was in a rut due to the failure of Vietnam and aftermath of Watergate. Early glam rock was steadily replaced with punk. Blockbuster films become a thing with Jaws, Star Wars, Close Encounters, and the like. 1977 and 1978 may be late 70s years chronologically, but they're hardly distinct from 1975 culturally. It's easier, in my opinion, to just divide the 1970s into two sub-eras rather than three.


I agree. I divide the 70s into 2 groups rather than 3.
1970-1974 or the post 60s era
and 1975-1979 which would be the late 70s era


I aint sure about that one. I don't view the 70s as a split decade AT ALL. I view the 70s eras with the presidencies. Early 70s= Nixon years, mid 70s= Ford years, Late 70s= Carter Years.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/18/17 at 11:56 pm

Funny how the 70's are the only recent decade were you can actually split it up by presidencies and use that for early/mid/late boundaries.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/18/17 at 11:58 pm


Funny how the 70's are the only recent decade were you can actually split it up by presidencies and use that for early/mid/late boundaries.

That is true.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 04/18/17 at 11:58 pm


Funny how the 70's are the only recent decade were you can actually split it up by presidencies and use that for early/mid/late boundaries.

Yea, my friend it is CRAZY!!! :o :D

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 04/18/17 at 11:59 pm


Funny how the 70's are the only recent decade were you can actually split it up by presidencies and use that for early/mid/late boundaries.

Although... you could do it for the 10s. But that would make it a split, in a way. :o ;D

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/19/17 at 12:01 am


Although... you could do it for the 10s. But that would make it a split, in a way. :o ;D

How could you do it for the 2010s?. There has only been 2 Presidents this decade and one of them was in office from 2010-early 2017.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 04/19/17 at 12:06 am


How could you do it for the 2010s?. There has only been 2 Presidents this decade and one of them was in office from 2010-early 2017.

Early-mid 10s= Obama years, Late 10s= Trump years. That simple.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/19/17 at 12:07 am


Although... you could do it for the 10s. But that would make it a split, in a way. :o ;D


The 70's actually had three presidents, though. :P


Early-mid 10s= Obama years, Late 10s= Trump years. That simple.


That's true but it's not as cool as having three presidents for each sub-era. 8)

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/19/17 at 12:08 am


The 70's actually had three presidents, though. :P

That's true but it's not as cool as having three presidents for each sub-era. 8)

Yes, I agree with the legend Jordan 8). Sorry Eric.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 04/19/17 at 12:13 am


The 70's actually had three presidents, though. :P

That's true but it's not as cool as having three presidents for each sub-era. 8)


Yea you're right! ::) ;)

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/19/17 at 12:16 am

8)

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: nintieskid999 on 04/19/17 at 12:19 am


Yea, my friend it is CRAZY!!! :o :D


I'd split the 70s in 1970-1973, 1974 would be the bridge year, and 1975-1979 would be the third split.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 04/19/17 at 12:27 am


I'd split the 70s in 1970-1973, 1974 would be the bridge year, and 1975-1979 would be the third split.

I'm still going by the presidency's on this one. ::)

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/19/17 at 12:28 am


I'm still going by the presidency's on this one. ::)

Me too bud.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/19/17 at 12:51 am


I aint sure about that one. I don't view the 70s as a split decade AT ALL. I view the 70s eras with the presidencies. Early 70s= Nixon years, mid 70s= Ford years, Late 70s= Carter Years.


The beginning of Ford's term was really just the wrapping up of Nixon's presidency (pardoning the former President, Vietnam officially ending), while the later part was more or less just like Carter's presidency, rocked by a pessimistic American society, stagflation, and institutional discord. Besides that, the 1974-1975 shift was much bigger than any shift between 1976 and 1978 or even 1970 and 1973 (1973 comes close because that's when Watergate was revealed, the first "disco" song hit #1, and direct Vietnam involvement ended).

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Mr Steamer on 04/19/17 at 6:56 am


(1973 comes close because that's when Watergate was revealed, the first "disco" song hit #1, and direct Vietnam involvement ended).

Might I ask what that first "disco" hit was?

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/19/17 at 8:21 am


Might I ask what that first "disco" hit was?


"Love Train" by the O'Jays.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 04/19/17 at 2:39 pm


The beginning of Ford's term was really just the wrapping up of Nixon's presidency (pardoning the former President, Vietnam officially ending), while the later part was more or less just like Carter's presidency, rocked by a pessimistic American society, stagflation, and institutional discord. Besides that, the 1974-1975 shift was much bigger than any shift between 1976 and 1978 or even 1970 and 1973 (1973 comes close because that's when Watergate was revealed, the first "disco" song hit #1, and direct Vietnam involvement ended).

Yea you're right on that one.  Ford's term was basically filling the gap between Nixon and Carter. I've just always viewed his brief stay as the brief mid part of the era, and then... Jimmy Carter taking office, and the release of Atari 2600; Three's Company, CHIPS, Hulk, Love Boat, Star Wars, & Saturday Night Fever premiering, and Disco being at it's peak made it seem like the start of a new era.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/19/17 at 2:40 pm


Yea you're right on that one.  Ford's term was basically filling the gap between Nixon and Carter. I've just always viewed his brief stay as the brief mid part of the era, and then... Jimmy Carter taking office, and the release of Atari 2600; Three's Company, CHIPS, Hulk, Love Boat, Star Wars, & Saturday Night Fever premiering, and Disco being at it's peak made it seem like the start of a new era.

I agree.

Subject: Re: Was 1982 the year the 1980s culturally became the 1980s?

Written By: #Infinity on 04/19/17 at 5:30 pm


Yea you're right on that one.  Ford's term was basically filling the gap between Nixon and Carter. I've just always viewed his brief stay as the brief mid part of the era, and then... Jimmy Carter taking office, and the release of Atari 2600; Three's Company, CHIPS, Hulk, Love Boat, Star Wars, & Saturday Night Fever premiering, and Disco being at it's peak made it seem like the start of a new era.


I don't think it was really the start of a new era because the things you listed, for the most part, were already strongly rooted in 1975 culture or weren't in their prime yet. In my opinion 1974 and 1975 were much bigger years for television debuts because not only did you get the generation-defining Happy Days, Good Times, and The Jeffersons, you also had the premiere of SNL, by far one of the most iconic and influential TV programs of all time. 1977 doesn't really compare. Disco was also already very much in its peak in 1975 and 1976, with almost all of the genre's biggest stars being already relevant by that point. Meanwhile, rock was also primarily represented by the same bands that caught on around 1975, such as Aerosmith, Queen, and Fleetwood Mac; there were only a few minor exceptions to the rule, like Foreigner, as well as the primarily British and New York-centric punk bands of the late 70s. John Travolta was already a huge star prior to Saturday Night Fever because of his role in Welcome Back, Kotter, which also premiered in 1975. The Atari 2600 was completely insignificant upon its launch in September 1977 and would take a few more years to catch on with the mainstream; rather, 1977 was the peak of Pong consoles, which started being sold in 1975. Finally, Star Wars may be one of the most important movies of all time, but its direct impact on popular cn new media wasn't quite felt overnight. Also, it was not the first summer blockbuster; that trend began with 1975's Jaws.

Check for new replies or respond here...