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Subject: 1996 and 1997 Billboard charts

Written By: DevoRule on 04/06/05 at 5:17 pm

There indeed was a noticeable difference.  One one artist, Jewel (a bit of a stretch really), would imo fit into the boy/girl group category (not counting R&B-oriented singers).
Grunge also had a big falloff.



Summary:

New School Rap in 1996:
14
White Boy band/girl group 1996 hits:
1
Grunge/Alternative in 1996:
9


New School Rap in 1997:
14

White Boy band/girl group 1997 hits:
8

Grunge/Alternative in 1997:
2

Chart Success of New School Rap change, 1996-1997: 0%
Grunge/Alternative change, 1996-1997: -450%
Boy Band Change, 1996-1997: 800%




Top Songs of 1996

. Macarena (Bayside Boys Mix), Los Del Rio
2. Because You Loved Me, Celine Dion
3. Give Me One Reason, Tracy Chapman
4. Nobody Knows, Tony Rich Project
5. Always Be My Baby, Mariah Carey
6. One Sweet Day, Mariah Carey & Boyz II Men
7. Tha Crossroads, Bone Thugs-N-Harmony
8. I Love You Always Forever, Donna Lewis
9. You're Makin' Me High / Let It Flow, Toni Braxton
10. Twisted, Keith Sweat
11. Sittin' Up In My Room, Brandy
12. Missing, Everything But The Girl
13. Ironic, Alanis Morissette
14. Exhale (Shoop Shoop), Whitney Houston
15. Follow You Down / Til I Hear It From You, Gin Blossoms
16. C'mon N' Ride It (The Train), Quad City Dj's
17. How Do U Want It / California Love, 2Pac
18. It's All Coming Back To Me Now, Celine Dion
19. Hey Lover, LL Cool J
20. Change The World, Eric Clapton

21. Loungin, LL Cool J
22. Insensitive, Jann Arden
23. Be My Lover, La Bouche
24. Name, Goo Goo Dolls
25. Who Will Save Your Soul, Jewel
26. Where Do You Go, No Mercy
27. I Can't Sleep Baby (If I), R. Kelly
28. Counting Blue Cars, Dishwalla
29. You Learn / You Oughta Know, Alanis Morissette
30. One Of Us, Joan Osborne
31. Wonder, Natalie Merchant
32. Not Gon' Cry, Mary J. Blige
33. Gangsta's Paradise, Coolio
34. Only You, 112 Featuring The Notorious B.I.G.
35. Down Low (Nobody Has To Know), R. Kelly
36. You're The One, SWV
37. Sweet Dreams, La Bouche
38. Before You Walk Out Of My Life / Like This And Like That, Monica
39. Breakfast At Tiffany's, Deep Blue Something
40. 1, 2, 3, 4 (Sumpin' New), Coolio
41. The World I Know, Collective Soul
42. No Diggity, BLACKstreet (Featuring Dr. Dre)
43. Anything, 3t
44. 1979, The Smashing Pumpkins
45. Diggin' On You, TLC
46. Why I Love You So Much / Ain't Nobody, Monica
47. Kissin' You, Total
48. Count On Me, Whitney Houston & Cece Winans
49. Fantasy, Mariah Carey
50. Time, Hootie & The Blowfish
51. You'll See, Madonna
52. Last Night, Az Yet
53. Mouth, Merril Bainbridge
54. The Earth, The Sun, The Rain, Color Me Badd
55. All The Things (Your Man Won't Do), Joe
56. Wonderwall, Oasis
57. Woo-hah!! Got You All In Check / Everything Remains Raw, Busta Rhymes
58. Tell Me, Groove Theory
59. Elevators (Me & You), Outkast
60. Hook, Blues Traveler
61. Doin It, LL Cool J
62. Fastlove, George Michael
63. Touch Me Tease Me, Case Featuring Foxxy Brown
64. Tonite's Tha Night, Kris Kross
65. Children, Robert Miles
66. Theme From Mission: Impossible, Adam Clayton & Larry Mullen
67. Closer To Free, Bodeans
68. Just A Girl, No Doubt
69. If Your Girl Only Knew, Aaliyah
70. Lady, D'angelo
71. Key West Intermezzo (I Saw You First), John Mellencamp
72. Pony, Ginuwine
73. Nobody, Keith Sweat
74. Old Man & Me (When I Get To Heaven), Hootie & The Blowfish
75. If It Makes You Happy, Sheryl Crow
76. As I Lay Me Down, Sophie B. Hawkins
77. Keep On, Keepin' On, Mc Lyte
78. Jealousy, Natalie Merchant
79. I Want To Come Over, Melissa Etheridge
80. Who Do U Love, Deborah Cox
81. Runaway, Janet Jackson
82. This Is Your Night, Amber
83. You Remind Me Of Something, R. Kelly
84. Un-Break My Heart, Toni Braxton
85. Back For Good, Take That
86. Hit Me Off, New Edition
87. No One Else, Total
88. I Got Id / Long Road, Pearl Jam
89. Get Money, Junior M.A.F.I.A.
90. That Girl, Maxi Priest Featuring Shaggy
91. Po Pimp, Do Or Die
92. Until It Sleeps, Metallica
93. Hay, Crucial Conflict
94. Beautiful Life, Ace Of Base
95. Set U Free, Planet Soul
96. My Boo, Ghost Town Dj's
97. Soon As I Get Home, Faith Evans
98. Don't Cry, Seal
99. Only Wanna Be With You, Hootie & The Blowfish
100. Macarena, Los Del Rio



Top Songs of 1997


1. Candle In The Wind 1997, Elton John
2. Can't Nobody Hold Me Down, Puff Daddy
3. I'll Be Missing You, Puff Daddy & Faith Evans
4. Un-Break My Heart, Toni Braxton
5. Foolish Games / You Were Meant For Me, Jewel
6. Wannabe, Spice Girls
7. Don't Let Go (Love), En Vogue
8. For You I Will, Monica
9. How Do I Live, LeAnn Rimes
10. I Believe I Can Fly, R. Kelly
11. Quit Playing Games (With My Heart), Backstreet Boys
12. MMMBop, Hanson
13. Return Of The Mack, Mark Morrison
14. You Make Me Wanna..., Usher
15. Hard To Say I'm Sorry, Az Yet Featuring Peter Cetera
16. Nobody Keith Sweat
17. Semi-Charmed Life, Third Eye Blind
18. Barely Breathing, Duncan Sheik
19. Bitch, Meredith Brooks
20. Mo Money Mo Problems, Notorious B.I.G.
21. The Freshmen, Verve Pipe
22. I Want You, Savage Garden
23. No Diggity, BLACKstreet Featuring Dr. Dre
24. I Belong To You (Every Time I See Your Face), Rome
25. Hypnotize, Notorious B.I.G.
26. Every Time I Close My Eyes, Babyface
27. In My Bed, Dru Hill
28. Say You'll Be There, Spice Girls
29. Do You Know (What It Takes), Robyn
30. 4 Seasons Of Loneliness, Boyz II Men
31. G.H.E.T.T.O.U.T., Changing Faces
32. Honey, Mariah Carey
33. I Believe In You And Me, Whitney Houston
34. Da' Dip, Freaknasty
35. 2 Become 1, Spice Girls
36. All For You, Sister Hazel
37. Cupid, 112
38. Where Have All The Cowboys Gone?, Paula Cole
39. Sunny Came Home, Shawn Colvin
40. It's Your Love, Tim McGraw & Faith Hill

41. Ooh Aah... Just A Little Bit, Gina G
42. Mouth, Merril Bainbridge
43. All Cried Out, Allure Featuring 112
44. I'm Still In Love With You, New Edition
45. Invisible Man, 98 Degrees
46. Not Tonight, Lil' Kim
47. Look Into My Eyes, Bone Thugs-N-Harmony
48. Get It Together, 702
49. All By Myself, Celine Dion
50. It's All Coming Back To Me Now, Celine Dion
51. My Love Is The Shhh!, Somethin' For The People
52. Where Do You Go, No Mercy
53. I Finally Found Someon, Barbra Streisand & Bryan Adams
54. I'll Be, Foxy Brown Featuring Jay-Z
55. If It Makes You Happy , Sheryl Crow
56. Never Make A Promise, Dru Hill
57. When You Love A Woman, Journey
58. Up Jumps Da Boogie, Magoo And Timbaland
59. I Don't Want To / I Love Me Some Him, Toni Braxton
60. Everyday Is A Winding Road, Sheryl Crow

61. Cold Rock A Party, Mc Lyte
62. Pony, Ginuwine
63. Building A Mystery, Sarah McLachlan
64. I Love You Always Forever, Donna Lewis
65. Your Woman, White Town
66. C U When U Get There, Coolio
67. Change The World, Eric Clapton
68. My Baby Daddy, B-Rock & The Bizz
69. Tubthumping, Chumbawamba
70. Gotham City, R. Kelly
71. Last Night, Az Yet
72. ESPN Presents The Jock Jam, Various Artists
73. Big Daddy, Heavy D
74. What About Us, Total
75. Smile, Scarface
76. What's On Tonight, Montell Jordan
77. Secret Garden, Bruce Springsteen
78. The One I Gave My Heart, w Aaliyah
79. Fly Like An Eagle, Seal
80. No Time, Lil' Kim
81. One More Time, Real McCoy
82. Butta Love, Next
83. On & On, Erykah Badu
84. Don't Wanna Be A Player, Joe
85. I Shot The Sheriff, Warren G
86. You Should Be Mine (Don't Waste Your Time), Brian McKnight Featuring Mase
87. Don't Cry For Me Argentina, Madonna
88. Someone, SWV
89. Go The Distance, Michael Bolton
90. Naked Eye, Luscious Jackson
91. Macarena (Bayside Boys Mix), Los Del Rio
92. Coco Jamboo, Mr. President
93. Let It Go, Ray J
94. You Must Love Me, Madonna
95. When You're Gone / Free To Decide, Cranberries
96. Let Me Clear My Throat, DJ Kool
97. I Like It, Blackout Allstars
98. You're Makin' Me High / Let It Flow, Toni Braxton
99. Barbie Girl, Aqua
100. Twisted, Keith Sweat


Subject: Re: 1996 and 1997 Billboard charts

Written By: Marty McFly on 04/08/05 at 4:43 pm

Yep, for sure 1996 to 97 was a big difference.

I won't say the pop music of '96 was "80's sounding" per se, but it still retained a very faint 80's catchiness to some of the songs, such as "Follow you Down" from the Gin Blossoms. It was a distinct year (as was '95 - both were fairly identical musically) where we were shaking our Grunge hangover, Alternative was going strong (I stand by my statement that Alt & Grunge are different genres!) but nothing new had yet taken the charts by storm.

I would consider it the last year that pop ballad love songs would freely hit the airwaves ("Noboy Knows" from Tony Rich, for example. I know that was huge in around February or March). I also think songs like that were part of the big R & B foundation - there wasn't much "rock" in 1996 at all. Well, not mainstream pop/rock. Hootie & the Blowfish maybe was the only big rock band.

In short, 1996 was the last gasp of old school. Coincidentally, this was also the last year that I found myself fond of and familiar with most of what came out. 1997-2003 was more "scattered" with new bands I was into, but I think 2004/05 is improving again.

Subject: Re: 1996 and 1997 Billboard charts

Written By: DevoRule on 04/08/05 at 5:57 pm


Yep, for sure 1996 to 97 was a big difference.

I won't say the pop music of '96 was "80's sounding" per se, but it still retained a very faint 80's catchiness to some of the songs, such as "Follow you Down" from the Gin Blossoms. It was a distinct year (as was '95 - both were fairly identical musically) where we were shaking our Grunge hangover, Alternative was going strong (I stand by my statement that Alt & Grunge are different genres!) but nothing new had yet taken the charts by storm.

I would consider it the last year that pop ballad love songs would freely hit the airwaves ("Noboy Knows" from Tony Rich, for example. I know that was huge in around February or March). I also think songs like that were part of the big R & B foundation - there wasn't much "rock" in 1996 at all. Well, not mainstream pop/rock. Hootie & the Blowfish maybe was the only big rock band.

In short, 1996 was the last gasp of old school. Coincidentally, this was also the last year that I found myself fond of and familiar with most of what came out. 1997-2003 was more "scattered" with new bands I was into, but I think 2004/05 is improving again.




Yeah.  Even the lifestyle and feel up to 1996 had a tinge of 80s to it.  Well not really exactly "eighties", it just felt old school. And I was born in 1990! The only year of the 90s I think really seems MORE 80s than 90s is 1990.  1991 is about half and half but leaning on the 90s side.

I think the 90s influence today is about 90% gone.  A lot of the acts out now that some consider 90s holdovers, like Korn, Blink 182, Eminem, even Green Day, are imo more precursors to 2000s music.  As for style, today ain't much different from 1997.  I think the 00s began in a cultural sense in 1997 and I'm serious, but I wouldn't say it was full-blown in 2000 or 2001.  I consider 2001 the beginning of the 2000s primarily for 9/11, aside from that it wasn't much different from mid-late 2000. Actually I'd say the 2000s begun in January 2001 when Bush was elected and inaugurated, so in fact this decade happened FASTER the 80s to 90s, but the late 90s is a lot like today. 

The main differences besides politics between 1997-2000 and 2001-2004 I'd say are Reality TV, the commercialization of Rap and its culture (it was getting that way in the late 90s but is nothing compared to the last 3-5 years), numetal (really only present in 1999 and a little in 98), and also DVD players, CDs, and Internet, while around and popular in the 90s, became about as essential as cable by 2000 or so.  Before 2000 you could go with or without them and before 1994 you probably didn't have them except for CD.

Subject: Re: 1996 and 1997 Billboard charts

Written By: Marty McFly on 04/08/05 at 6:22 pm


Yeah.  Even the lifestyle and feel up to 1996 had a tinge of 80s to it.  Well not really exactly "eighties", it just felt old school. And I was born in 1990! The only year of the 90s I think really seems MORE 80s than 90s is 1990.  1991 is about half and half but leaning on the 90s side.


Yeah - I guess you could say 1995 and 96 ties to the 80's in the same way 2005 does to the 90's (they're not cool or as remembered anymore, but the feel is still somewhat there. The 90's fading out are slower -- no real backlash, so to speak -- so I don't think the feel will be 100% gone until around 2008-10. In 2010, the kids who were 10 in 1990 will be 30 and starting their own families.

The main differences besides politics between 1997-2000 and 2001-2004 I'd say are Reality TV, the commercialization of Rap and its culture (it was getting that way in the late 90s but is nothing compared to the last 3-5 years), numetal (really only present in 1999 and a little in 98), and also DVD players, CDs, and Internet, while around and popular in the 90s, became about as essential as cable by 2000 or so.  Before 2000 you could go with or without them and before 1994 you probably didn't have them except for CD.


Yeah. Having worked at Blockbuster since mid '99, I can say that we started getting DVD's overtaking VHS in about late 2001/early '02. I almost think 2001 was the last 90's-like year (even with Bush in office, it didn't change that much till 9/11).

I don't think today is too much different than 1999 (or even '97) but one clear thing about the 90's is that is was very liberal -- almost like a reborn 60's in certain ways, whereas now it's turning more Conservative again (we had a Democrat president all through most of the 90's -- I still like Clinton myself!). Politically, 2005 is way different than the 90's, but pop culture-wise, 1997 is only maybe 25% different, 1999 only 10% different, and 2001 only 5% of a change.

On an off note, it does seem that many 90's artists are just as forgotten as 80's artists now! I think oftentimes, when people laugh at 80's music, it's just because it's "old", whereas if they laugh at 90's music, it's merely because they've never heard it, not because it's that different sounding.

Rap/metal was late 1998 to 2001 (though it held on till maybe 2003). Alanis hasn't had a hit in 6 years, Collective Soul's new album (though I really like it - one of their best, just too late!) seems to be bombing, and most of the grunge bands are either disbanded or not very successful today. I bet the average 12-year-old kid today wouldn't have heard of any of them, other than Nirvana and maybe Pearl Jam.

Subject: Re: 1996 and 1997 Billboard charts

Written By: Chrisrj on 04/08/05 at 7:32 pm

I would NEVER call 1996 "80s" styled music.  80s styled music died in 1992.

Sorry, but being born in 80 and reading this makes me feel old.

Subject: Re: 1996 and 1997 Billboard charts

Written By: Marty McFly on 04/08/05 at 8:15 pm

^ I have to run out the door in about 4 seconds to go to work, so I can't get into a discussion now, however, I'll say that I do agree that music that distinctly sounds 80's died out in 1991 (a little was still around in '92).

However, 1993-96 music had a certain catchiness to it that was reminiscent of 80's, not that it sounded 80's per se. Kind of like how alot of 80's is considered in the same "classic rock" league as 70's rock, even if it's not the exact same sound.

Also, technology up through 1996 was closer to the 80's then today -- audio tapes were still pretty popular until about 1996-98 (for the record, I was 14 in '96 so I remember, but even if I was not around then, you can still get a feel for any era).

Subject: Re: 1996 and 1997 Billboard charts

Written By: DevoRule on 04/08/05 at 8:24 pm


Yeah - I guess you could say 1995 and 96 ties to the 80's in the same way 2005 does to the 90's (they're not cool or as remembered anymore, but the feel is still somewhat there. The 90's fading out are slower -- no real backlash, so to speak -- so I don't think the feel will be 100% gone until around 2008-10. In 2010, the kids who were 10 in 1990 will be 30 and starting their own families.

Yeah. Having worked at Blockbuster since mid '99, I can say that we started getting DVD's overtaking VHS in about late 2001/early '02. I almost think 2001 was the last 90's-like year (even with Bush in office, it didn't change that much till 9/11).

I don't think today is too much different than 1999 (or even '97) but one clear thing about the 90's is that is was very liberal -- almost like a reborn 60's in certain ways, whereas now it's turning more Conservative again (we had a Democrat president all through most of the 90's -- I still like Clinton myself!). Politically, 2005 is way different than the 90's, but pop culture-wise, 1997 is only maybe 25% different, 1999 only 10% different, and 2001 only 5% of a change.

On an off note, it does seem that many 90's artists are just as forgotten as 80's artists now! I think oftentimes, when people laugh at 80's music, it's just because it's "old", whereas if they laugh at 90's music, it's merely because they've never heard it, not because it's that different sounding.

Rap/metal was late 1998 to 2001 (though it held on till maybe 2003). Alanis hasn't had a hit in 6 years, Collective Soul's new album (though I really like it - one of their best, just too late!) seems to be bombing, and most of the grunge bands are either disbanded or not very successful today. I bet the average 12-year-old kid today wouldn't have heard of any of them, other than Nirvana and maybe Pearl Jam.


The reason the 90s don't get backlash today, I think, is that the 90s were so diverse that it's hard to pick on them.  Also, like the 60s, they're generally considered to be a "good" decade, whereas the 70s and 80s are seen as an embarrasment, but fun to look back on. 90s music does sound different from today, but not the way the 80s do.  90s music has a different vibe, but because of the booming technology in the decade no type of music really dominated the 90s, whereas pretty much all 80s music shares certain elements, such as synths, drum loops, and old school guitar riffs, that are seen as "cheesy" and "outdated" today.

To put a long story short, 90s music isn't hated the way 80s music was throughout most of the 90s, especially 1993-1996. 1997 saw a bit of a comeback to 80s music, although I think most of it is shhh (I do like a lot of numetal though).   Most 90s music is merely forgotten and the music that isn't it seen as "classic".

The main differences between 90s and 2000s are, in order:

1. Politics
2. Atmosphere (the clothes are like 1997 but the air is very different.  Try watching Arrested Development and then watching Third Rock from the Sun. It'll pop right at you.)
3. Attitude (today is less controversial as we have just accepted all the information in the media)
4. TV (way different, esp with Reality)
5.Music (a lot more rap, even compared to the 90s, more synthy music also today)
6.Fashion (not much different, but sunglasses and backwards caps are way out.  Also, people don't wear flannel and tropical-style shirts as much)

Subject: Re: 1996 and 1997 Billboard charts

Written By: Brian06 on 10/25/06 at 9:06 pm

Overall 1996 and 1997 were dominated by hip-hop/r&b just like today, better urban music yes, but still basically similar genres, when you really think about it, it hasn't changed all that much really. The only thing remotely grunge and popular on the 1996 charts was smashing pumpkins.

Subject: Re: 1996 and 1997 Billboard charts

Written By: batfan2005 on 10/26/06 at 12:12 pm

It seems like what started in 1997 with the style of music, clothes, etc. lasted until 2004. 2005 was when everything seemed to change, and I think the new (current) styles will be around until 2012. Meanwhile, 1996 still had traces of the styles that started in 1989. Therefore, everything is in an 8 year cycle, which is why I think 2013 will be our next pivotal year in our culture.

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