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Subject: The Popularity Peaks of 90s Megabands

Written By: Trimac20 on 07/03/06 at 6:56 am

Nirvana: I'd actually say their popularity at Cobain's death in 1994 was near that of their 'peak' period in 1992 in between the release of Nevermind and In Utero - when, with Pearl Jam they were arguably the biggest band on earth. Unlike many other bands, Nirvana's popularity has remained steady since, and has extended into the fanbase of Dave Grohl's Foo Fighters', which definitely reached their popularity c.1998.

Goo Goo Dolls: 1997's 'Slide' one of the best known songs of the 90s. The Goo Goo's album Dizzy Up The Girl was ubiquitous in the late 90s.

Pearl Jam: 'Ten' is often hailed as the definitive Grunge album - it's agreeably a more authentic souvenir of the Grunge movement than the ever-praised Nevermind.

Soundgarden: Rather dissapointing considering the hype - definitely peaked in the summer of 1991 with one of the 90s biggest hits 'Black Hole Sun.' At one time was a rival to Nirvana and Pearl Jam.

Everclear: Moderately popular throughout the 90s, they were popular about 1994 with the single 'Santa Monica', and again in 2000 with the melodramatic 'Wonderful.' Sort of petered out ever since.

Hootie and the Blowfish probably peaked about 1996, at the height of 90s commercial TOR/Indie Rock.

Hole: Though Courtney Love's band consistenty released some decent Grunge/Riot Grrrl in the early 90s, their crowning achievement (on the charts, at least) is still Celebrity Skin.

R.E.M. The most derided 'Happy Shiny People' and the Album 'Green' consolidated R.E.M.'s position in the 89/90 cusp, though I think they were biggest about 1993.

Smashing Pumpkins - 'Mellon Collie' being their defining statement in late 1995 after 'Siamese Dream' exploded them into the consciousness of every angst-ridden teen.

Blur - Their much publicized fued with fellow Brits Oasis didn't seem to have the desired effect. 1994's 'Parklife,' and then 'The Great Escape' probably the apex of their careers. Not so popular over the Atlantic.

Oasis - One of the best debuts in recent memory, before seemingly dropping like a stone after their coupe'de grace 'What's the Story Morning Glory' became the then fastest selling album in Britan, shifting millions of copies. I'd say their peak was about 1996.

Green Day - 'Dookie' caused an absolute sensation when it blitzed on the waves in late 1994 - here was something fresh, a bunch of kids (they were barely into their 20s back then) producing fun, upbeat 'pop punk.' 'Good Riddance' is probably their best known single - 1996's 'Nimrod' and 1998's 'Insomnia' consolidated their position. They were possibly the world's biggest recent band circa 1997.

Third Eye Blind: Few other bands reek of the 90s than T.E.B. 'Semi Charmed Kind of Life', 'Graduation'.etc in the late 90s were defining of late 90s Radio-friendly rock.

Radiohead - Peaked with 'O.K. Computer' in 1997, maintaining a loyal fanbase ever since.

Jane's Addiction - 'Would' was a defining feature of the grungy early 90s sound - I'd say 1996ish.

Silverchair: The teens from Newcastle had a really cracker with their debut Frog Stomp - then they became just a wee bit ostentatious and elaborate with all their fancy orchestral backings with 'Diorama', with hints of it in 'Freakshow.' They were arguably one of the biggest Aussies band in the very late 90s.

Garbage - About 1998 with 'Version 2.0', though the teenyboppers got into 'Beautiful Garbage', they haven't recovered from the radio-friendly 'Cherry Lips' since.


Subject: Re: The Popularity Peaks of 90s Megabands

Written By: chaka on 07/03/06 at 7:41 am


Nirvana: I'd actually say their popularity at Cobain's death in 1994 was near that of their 'peak' period in 1992 in between the release of Nevermind and In Utero - when, with Pearl Jam they were arguably the biggest band on earth. Unlike many other bands, Nirvana's popularity has remained steady since, and has extended into the fanbase of Dave Grohl's Foo Fighters', which definitely reached their popularity c.1998.

Goo Goo Dolls: 1997's 'Slide' one of the best known songs of the 90s. The Goo Goo's album Dizzy Up The Girl was ubiquitous in the late 90s.

Pearl Jam: 'Ten' is often hailed as the definitive Grunge album - it's agreeably a more authentic souvenir of the Grunge movement than the ever-praised Nevermind.

Soundgarden: Rather dissapointing considering the hype - definitely peaked in the summer of 1991 with one of the 90s biggest hits 'Black Hole Sun.' At one time was a rival to Nirvana and Pearl Jam.




Correct me if I'm wrong but wasn't Superunknown released in 1994? So it's impossible for Soundgarden to have peaked in 1991. Plus Soundgarden were NEVER rivals with Pearl Jam (not sure about Nirvana) because Vedder and Cornell were very good friends,Vedder can be heard singing with Cornell on Temple Of The Dog's "Hunger Strike".
As far as I know there was hardly any rivalry between these bands because the "grunge community" was pretty close;everyone knew the other person plus all these bands that exploded into mainstreem hated being popular,so they stuck together.(talking about Seattle based bands here)

Subject: Re: The Popularity Peaks of 90s Megabands

Written By: Trimac20 on 07/03/06 at 8:20 am


Correct me if I'm wrong but wasn't Superunknown released in 1994? So it's impossible for Soundgarden to have peaked in 1991. Plus Soundgarden were NEVER rivals with Pearl Jam (not sure about Nirvana) because Vedder and Cornell were very good friends,Vedder can be heard singing with Cornell on Temple Of The Dog's "Hunger Strike".
As far as I know there was hardly any rivalry between these bands because the "grunge community" was pretty close;everyone knew the other person plus all these bands that exploded into mainstreem hated being popular.


Yes, you're probably the grunge expert here... ;) I guess I'm guessing alot of it, lol, from the little I know about the Grunge movement.

Subject: Re: The Popularity Peaks of 90s Megabands

Written By: chaka on 07/03/06 at 8:25 am


Yes, you're probably the grunge expert here... ;) I guess I'm guessing alot of it, lol, from the little I know about the Grunge movement.

Ey,don't worry,most of what you said was correct;)

Subject: Re: The Popularity Peaks of 90s Megabands

Written By: Satish on 07/03/06 at 9:40 am


Goo Goo Dolls: 1997's 'Slide' one of the best known songs of the 90s. The Goo Goo's album Dizzy Up The Girl was ubiquitous in the late 90s.


Actually, "Slide" and the Dizzy Up the Girl album it's from were released in 1998, not 1997.


Hole: Though Courtney Love's band consistenty released some decent Grunge/Riot Grrrl in the early 90s, their crowning achievement (on the charts, at least) is still Celebrity Skin.


Really? I think Live Through This from 1994/95 was bigger than 1998's Celebrity Skin.


Blur - Their much publicized fued with fellow Brits Oasis didn't seem to have the desired effect. 1994's 'Parklife,' and then 'The Great Escape' probably the apex of their careers. Not so popular over the Atlantic.


Actually, I think Blur's self-titled album from 1997 was bigger than Parklife and The Great Escape. It had their biggest worldwide hit "Song 2" on it.


Garbage - About 1998 with 'Version 2.0', though the teenyboppers got into 'Beautiful Garbage', they haven't recovered from the radio-friendly 'Cherry Lips' since.


Well, I think Garbage was at their peak with their self-titled album from 1995, not Version 2.0.

Subject: Re: The Popularity Peaks of 90s Megabands

Written By: Trimac20 on 07/03/06 at 9:46 am


Actually, "Slide" and the Dizzy Up the Girl album it's from were released in 1998, not 1997.

Really? I think Live Through This from 1994/95 was bigger than 1998's Celebrity Skin.

Actually, I think Blur's self-titled album from 1997 was bigger than Parklife and The Great Escape. It had their biggest worldwide hit "Song 2" on it.

Well, I think Garbage was at their peak with their self-titled album from 1995, not Version 2.0.


Okay, much of what I'm saying is a bit of guess-work  ;D, I have to admit I haven't heard all these album's I've mentioned.

Subject: Re: The Popularity Peaks of 90s Megabands

Written By: chaka on 07/03/06 at 10:56 am


Okay, much of what I'm saying is a bit of guess-work  ;D, I have to admit I haven't heard all these album's I've mentioned.

lol...you're getting a bit of a hammering there  ;)
maybe the next time you could do with a little researching!

Subject: Re: The Popularity Peaks of 90s Megabands

Written By: velvetoneo on 07/03/06 at 12:03 pm


Nirvana: I'd actually say their popularity at Cobain's death in 1994 was near that of their 'peak' period in 1992 in between the release of Nevermind and In Utero - when, with Pearl Jam they were arguably the biggest band on earth. Unlike many other bands, Nirvana's popularity has remained steady since, and has extended into the fanbase of Dave Grohl's Foo Fighters', which definitely reached their popularity c.1998.

Goo Goo Dolls: 1997's 'Slide' one of the best known songs of the 90s. The Goo Goo's album Dizzy Up The Girl was ubiquitous in the late 90s.

Pearl Jam: 'Ten' is often hailed as the definitive Grunge album - it's agreeably a more authentic souvenir of the Grunge movement than the ever-praised Nevermind.

Soundgarden: Rather dissapointing considering the hype - definitely peaked in the summer of 1991 with one of the 90s biggest hits 'Black Hole Sun.' At one time was a rival to Nirvana and Pearl Jam.

Everclear: Moderately popular throughout the 90s, they were popular about 1994 with the single 'Santa Monica', and again in 2000 with the melodramatic 'Wonderful.' Sort of petered out ever since.

Hootie and the Blowfish probably peaked about 1996, at the height of 90s commercial TOR/Indie Rock.

Hole: Though Courtney Love's band consistenty released some decent Grunge/Riot Grrrl in the early 90s, their crowning achievement (on the charts, at least) is still Celebrity Skin.

R.E.M. The most derided 'Happy Shiny People' and the Album 'Green' consolidated R.E.M.'s position in the 89/90 cusp, though I think they were biggest about 1993.

Smashing Pumpkins - 'Mellon Collie' being their defining statement in late 1995 after 'Siamese Dream' exploded them into the consciousness of every angst-ridden teen.

Blur - Their much publicized fued with fellow Brits Oasis didn't seem to have the desired effect. 1994's 'Parklife,' and then 'The Great Escape' probably the apex of their careers. Not so popular over the Atlantic.

Oasis - One of the best debuts in recent memory, before seemingly dropping like a stone after their coupe'de grace 'What's the Story Morning Glory' became the then fastest selling album in Britan, shifting millions of copies. I'd say their peak was about 1996.

Green Day - 'Dookie' caused an absolute sensation when it blitzed on the waves in late 1994 - here was something fresh, a bunch of kids (they were barely into their 20s back then) producing fun, upbeat 'pop punk.' 'Good Riddance' is probably their best known single - 1996's 'Nimrod' and 1998's 'Insomnia' consolidated their position. They were possibly the world's biggest recent band circa 1997.

Third Eye Blind: Few other bands reek of the 90s than T.E.B. 'Semi Charmed Kind of Life', 'Graduation'.etc in the late 90s were defining of late 90s Radio-friendly rock.

Radiohead - Peaked with 'O.K. Computer' in 1997, maintaining a loyal fanbase ever since.

Jane's Addiction - 'Would' was a defining feature of the grungy early 90s sound - I'd say 1996ish.

Silverchair: The teens from Newcastle had a really cracker with their debut Frog Stomp - then they became just a wee bit ostentatious and elaborate with all their fancy orchestral backings with 'Diorama', with hints of it in 'Freakshow.' They were arguably one of the biggest Aussies band in the very late 90s.

Garbage - About 1998 with 'Version 2.0', though the teenyboppers got into 'Beautiful Garbage', they haven't recovered from the radio-friendly 'Cherry Lips' since.




Umm...wasn't Jane's Addiction like, not around after 1992?

Subject: Re: The Popularity Peaks of 90s Megabands

Written By: Mmm Bop on 07/03/06 at 8:07 pm

Silverchair took a shower and became Hanson  ::) :D

Subject: Re: The Popularity Peaks of 90s Megabands

Written By: Red Ant on 07/03/06 at 9:54 pm



Soundgarden: Rather dissapointing considering the hype - definitely peaked in the summer of 1991 with one of the 90s biggest hits 'Black Hole Sun.' At one time was a rival to Nirvana and Pearl Jam.



Soundgarden's break-up in 1997 was considered by many as the final nail in the Grunge coffin. Until then, they were solid, and "Down On The Upside" (1996 release) is a great CD, and better than "SuperUnknown" (1994 release, which has "Black Hole Sun"). They were just beginning to get big in 1991 with "Outshined", "Jesus Christ Pose" and "Rusty Cage" from the Badmotorfinger album.



Jane's Addiction - 'Would' was a defining feature of the grungy early 90s sound - I'd say 1996ish.



Whoa, dude! You're way off here! First of all, Jane's Addiction was late80s/early90s, and they were broken up by 1992. Furthermore, "Would?" is an Alice in Chains song, off the "Dirt" CD (1992).


Umm...wasn't Jane's Addiction like, not around after 1992?


Yeah. After that, Perry did Porno for Pyros, though I only remember "Pets".

BTW, pretty good list, though leaving out STP and AiC is heresy!

Subject: Re: The Popularity Peaks of 90s Megabands

Written By: Trimac20 on 07/03/06 at 9:56 pm

Yeah sorry, I got 'Alice and Chains' and 'Jane's Addiction' mixed up  :D, I guess they do sound similar...

Subject: Re: The Popularity Peaks of 90s Megabands

Written By: Red Ant on 07/03/06 at 10:01 pm


Yeah sorry, I got 'Alice and Chains' and 'Jane's Addiction' mixed up  :D, I guess they do sound similar...


They sound nothing alike, really. You might have gotten them mixed up from people who didn't like AiC calling them "Layne's Addiction".

Subject: Re: The Popularity Peaks of 90s Megabands

Written By: Trimac20 on 07/03/06 at 10:03 pm


They sound nothing alike, really. You might have gotten them mixed up from people who didn't like AiC calling them "Layne's Addiction".


I meant more their names...Though there music sounds vaguely alike...

Subject: Re: The Popularity Peaks of 90s Megabands

Written By: Red Ant on 07/03/06 at 10:05 pm

Also, Metallica's "Metallica" was released in 1991, undoubtedly the height of their popularity.

Guns N' Roses "Use Your Illusion" 1&2 were released in 1992, which was probably the peak of their popularity as well.

Subject: Re: The Popularity Peaks of 90s Megabands

Written By: Trimac20 on 07/03/06 at 10:08 pm


Also, Metallica's "Metallica" was released in 1991, undoubtedly the height of their popularity.

Guns N' Roses "Use Your Illusion" 1&2 were released in 1992, which was probably the peak of their popularity as well.


Yeah, G'n'R were very popular in the early 90s (who said Grunge killed Hair-metal?), despite the fact I, along with most people, think of them as an 80s band.

Subject: Re: The Popularity Peaks of 90s Megabands

Written By: velvetoneo on 07/03/06 at 11:48 pm

Does anybody else agree there was a resurgence in true heavy metal c. 1991, as part of the hair metal backlash? The resurgence continued through the '90s in general, with speed metal and thrash metal getting really huge, along with "alternative metal" like Tool.

Subject: Re: The Popularity Peaks of 90s Megabands

Written By: chaka on 07/04/06 at 9:52 am


I meant more their names...Though there music sounds vaguely alike...

No way,Staley's voice is unique,once you've heard it you'll always know it's him.
His voice is amazing.
And in general I don't think Jane's Addiction has anything in common with AiC..the mood,the style - completely different.

Subject: Re: The Popularity Peaks of 90s Megabands

Written By: Trimac20 on 07/04/06 at 10:46 pm


Does anybody else agree there was a resurgence in true heavy metal c. 1991, as part of the hair metal backlash? The resurgence continued through the '90s in general, with speed metal and thrash metal getting really huge, along with "alternative metal" like Tool.


What do you define as 'true' heavy metal? Early 70s stadium rock like Led Zep, Uriah Heep, Jethro Tull? Cos the 80s saw alot of 'metal' music like Judas Priest, Iron Maiden.etc, so how can there be a 'backlash' if metal was popular throughout the decade?

Subject: Re: The Popularity Peaks of 90s Megabands

Written By: Red Ant on 07/05/06 at 12:45 am


What do you define as 'true' heavy metal? Early 70s stadium rock like Led Zep, Uriah Heep, Jethro Tull? Cos the 80s saw alot of 'metal' music like Judas Priest, Iron Maiden.etc, so how can there be a 'backlash' if metal was popular throughout the decade?


IMHO, Hair Metal, to a large extent, pushed aside true Heavy Metal in the 80s. The backlash was against hair metal, not heavy metal.

True heavy metal would also have to include Black Sabbath, AC/DC, Slayer, Pantera, Megadeth and early Metallica, for starters.

Subject: Re: The Popularity Peaks of 90s Megabands

Written By: Red Ant on 07/05/06 at 12:46 am


No way,Staley's voice is unique,once you've heard it you'll always know it's him.
His voice is amazing.
And in general I don't think Jane's Addiction has anything in common with AiC..the mood,the style - completely different.


I agree 100%

Subject: Re: The Popularity Peaks of 90s Megabands

Written By: Satish on 07/07/06 at 8:21 pm


Well, I think Garbage was at their peak with their self-titled album from 1995, not Version 2.0.


After looking up Wikipedia and a few other sources, it seems as if I was wrong and you were right, after all. Version 2.0 probably was Garbage's biggest album.

Subject: Re: The Popularity Peaks of 90s Megabands

Written By: velvetoneo on 07/07/06 at 11:08 pm


IMHO, Hair Metal, to a large extent, pushed aside true Heavy Metal in the 80s. The backlash was against hair metal, not heavy metal.

True heavy metal would also have to include Black Sabbath, AC/DC, Slayer, Pantera, Megadeth and early Metallica, for starters.


Yeah...around 1991, there was a big revival in "true metal" like Black Sabbath, Pantera, Megadeth, etc. And their mainstreaming as their image superseded hair metal...that sort of metal was a big influence on grunge and alt hard rock like the Smashing Pumpkins, for one.

Subject: Re: The Popularity Peaks of 90s Megabands

Written By: Trimac20 on 07/07/06 at 11:12 pm


Yeah...around 1991, there was a big revival in "true metal" like Black Sabbath, Pantera, Megadeth, etc. And their mainstreaming as their image superseded hair metal...that sort of metal was a big influence on grunge and alt hard rock like the Smashing Pumpkins, for one.


'Hair Metal' is not really a musical genre - it's more a stage style, or presence which was used by all sorts of bands - from pure Rock like Van Halen, to Guns 'n' Roses and their ilk. True, long, wild hair, overblown posturing, and show-off guitar-work were characteristic of that guitar sound, but as far as I'm concerned (and despite what others say) 'Hair metal' is merely long-haired people playing Metal music.

Subject: Re: The Popularity Peaks of 90s Megabands

Written By: velvetoneo on 07/07/06 at 11:19 pm


'Hair Metal' is not really a musical genre - it's more a stage style, or presence which was used by all sorts of bands - from pure Rock like Van Halen, to Guns 'n' Roses and their ilk. True, long, wild hair, overblown posturing, and show-off guitar-work were characteristic of that guitar sound, but as far as I'm concerned (and despite what others say) 'Hair metal' is merely long-haired people playing Metal music.


There's definitely a difference between true hair metal and hair metal-styled music, just as there's a difference between true emo and stuff that's emo-styled.

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