inthe00s
The Pop Culture Information Society...

These are the messages that have been posted on inthe00s over the past few years.

Check out the messageboard archive index for a complete list of topic areas.

This archive is periodically refreshed with the latest messages from the current messageboard.




Check for new replies or respond here...

Subject: When did post-grunge become popular?

Written By: Visor765 on 07/21/14 at 11:16 am

It emerged in the mid 1990s after Kurt Cobain dies, but when? When did it first become popular? When I hear post-grunge I generally think of Creed and Nickelback. Is Post-Grunge really even a 90s thing?

Subject: Re: When did post-grunge become popular?

Written By: yelimsexa on 07/21/14 at 7:06 pm

IMO Post-Grunge is the more poppish version of grunge. According to VF's chart, Post-Grunge didn't really emerge into mainstream popularity until around 1999/2000, with its popularity roughly coinciding with the 2000s decade (which is what I associate part of the 2000s with(, though it faded quickly in 2009. The 1995-1998 was simply more of a standard alternative rock that hardly had much from the grunge scene, though the post-grunge did remain underground. Some traditional grunge artist bands such as Pearl Jam and Nine Inch Nails transitioning into post-grunge.

Subject: Re: When did post-grunge become popular?

Written By: KatanaChick on 07/21/14 at 11:44 pm


It emerged in the mid 1990s after Kurt Cobain dies, but when? When did it first become popular? When I hear post-grunge I generally think of Creed and Nickelback. Is Post-Grunge really even a 90s thing?

Creed is labelled post-grunge, but why? Their sound to me doesn't have similarities with grunge to begin with. They're alternative metal, though rock would be more appropriate because I don't think them or Nickelback are hard enough to be metal.

Subject: Re: When did post-grunge become popular?

Written By: Visor765 on 07/24/14 at 9:31 am


IMO Post-Grunge is the more poppish version of grunge. According to VF's chart, Post-Grunge didn't really emerge into mainstream popularity until around 1999/2000, with its popularity roughly coinciding with the 2000s decade (which is what I associate part of the 2000s with(, though it faded quickly in 2009. The 1995-1998 was simply more of a standard alternative rock that hardly had much from the grunge scene, though the post-grunge did remain underground. Some traditional grunge artist bands such as Pearl Jam and Nine Inch Nails transitioning into post-grunge.


Alanis Morissette released "Jagged Little Pill" in 1995 and that was Post-Grunge. Also the song "Bitch" from Meredith Brooks is Post-Grunge too. Don't forget Foo Fighters too.

Subject: Re: When did post-grunge become popular?

Written By: Todd Pettingzoo on 07/25/14 at 12:40 pm

I consider Alanis alternative or pop-rock.

Subject: Re: When did post-grunge become popular?

Written By: bchris02 on 07/28/14 at 12:33 pm

Some very early post-grunge hits came in the '90s, but for the most part it was a purely '00s fad. 

Subject: Re: When did post-grunge become popular?

Written By: sonikuu on 07/29/14 at 1:17 am

I think of Post-Grunge definitely a 90s thing, but one that went on until very, very far into the 00s.  Post-Grunge was probably around for a full ten years or so, though by the tail end in the mid-00s, all its fans were aging.  Certainly nobody in my high school liked it.

That said, the line between Post-Grunge and "90s Alt Rock" is very thin at times.  That said, according to stuff like Wikipedia and allmusic and such, a lot of the stuff on Alternative Rock radio in the mid-90s could be classified as Post-Grunge: Foo Fighters, Stone Temple Pilots, Bush, Live, Collective Soul, and others.  Though I'd argue there is a difference in sound between mid-90s Post-Grunge and mid-00s Post-Grunge

Subject: Re: When did post-grunge become popular?

Written By: bchris02 on 07/29/14 at 3:50 pm

As this thread has shown, post-grunge is a very wide genre that long overstayed its welcome, lasting from the mid'90s through the late '00s.  Most people however when they hear the term, think of Nickelback, Daughtry, and the ilk which is distinctly '00s.  The last huge Top 40 post-grunge song I remember is September by Daughtry in 2010.

Subject: Re: When did post-grunge become popular?

Written By: Visor765 on 07/29/14 at 9:16 pm

So should this be moved to the 2000s board?

Subject: Re: When did post-grunge become popular?

Written By: joeman on 08/03/14 at 9:17 am


It emerged in the mid 1990s after Kurt Cobain dies, but when? When did it first become popular? When I hear post-grunge I generally think of Creed and Nickelback. Is Post-Grunge really even a 90s thing?


Depends really.  You could say that Post-Grunge really happened around 1991, when all the original Grunge bands became popular and corporations have been pimping them out.  But for the sake of the argument, I'd say around 1995 when bands like SilverChair start appearing on the scene.

This is too trival anyways, as original Grunge bands thought they were playing traditional Heavy Metal or Punk in the beginning(despite being isolated in Seattle).

Subject: Re: When did post-grunge become popular?

Written By: SiderealDreams on 08/03/14 at 7:22 pm


This is too trival anyways, as original Grunge bands thought they were playing traditional Heavy Metal or Punk in the beginning(despite being isolated in Seattle).


Exactly, I've long argued that besides playing some kind of loud rock and being from Seattle, there weren't really any unifying sound characteristics among grunge bands. I'm from Seattle, so I've always seen grunge as more of a regional rock scene rather than a true genre.

Subject: Re: When did post-grunge become popular?

Written By: KatanaChick on 08/03/14 at 8:33 pm


Exactly, I've long argued that besides playing some kind of loud rock and being from Seattle, there weren't really any unifying sound characteristics among grunge bands. I'm from Seattle, so I've always seen grunge as more of a regional rock scene rather than a true genre.

Like how Desert Rock is a type of stoner rock from Palm Desert, but sometimes is used interchangable.

Subject: Re: When did post-grunge become popular?

Written By: Jquar on 08/05/14 at 12:53 am


Exactly, I've long argued that besides playing some kind of loud rock and being from Seattle, there weren't really any unifying sound characteristics among grunge bands. I'm from Seattle, so I've always seen grunge as more of a regional rock scene rather than a true genre.


Yeah, Alice in Chains and Nirvana for example sound nothing alike. And yet they're both labeled grunge? I think of grunge as a MTV/media promotional tactic more than an actual defined music genre. There certainly was a culture associated with the whole early 90s alt-rock movement, but it was broad and varied while the media tried to focus on a very small segment of it post Smells Like Teen Spirit.

Subject: Re: When did post-grunge become popular?

Written By: joeman on 08/05/14 at 9:30 am


Yeah, Alice in Chains and Nirvana for example sound nothing alike. And yet they're both labeled grunge? I think of grunge as a MTV/media promotional tactic more than an actual defined music genre. There certainly was a culture associated with the whole early 90s alt-rock movement, but it was broad and varied while the media tried to focus on a very small segment of it post Smells Like Teen Spirit.


My opinion is that corporations needed a similiar heavy rock product as Hair Metal died and something needed to be replaced.

Also, there were many other different rock genre's that were getting pushed back in the early 90s, such as more aggressive Heavy Metal(Death Metal and the like) which you can find in MTV's HeadBangers Ball. 

Subject: Re: When did post-grunge become popular?

Written By: mach!ne_he@d on 08/09/14 at 7:54 pm

The answer to this question depends entirely on who you ask, but I have heard alot of people say that this Candlebox hit from 1993 is the first true "post-grunge" song:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eu3EuWg2qNI

Personally, I've always considered 1995 as the year that post-grunge really took off. I mean, the Foo Fighters debut album, "Cumbersome", and "Breakfast at Tiffany's" all came out that year. Plus you had this little gem:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xsJ4O-nSveg

Subject: Re: When did post-grunge become popular?

Written By: Visor765 on 08/09/14 at 10:45 pm


Some very early post-grunge hits came in the '90s, but for the most part it was a purely '00s fad.


A fad is something that last for only a very short while. Dubstep was a 2012 fad. It became popular in 2012 by Skrillex and it continued to be popular into early 2013, but it died by April I would say. Post-Grunge was a major trend.

Subject: Re: When did post-grunge become popular?

Written By: bchris02 on 08/11/14 at 12:13 pm


A fad is something that last for only a very short while. Dubstep was a 2012 fad. It became popular in 2012 by Skrillex and it continued to be popular into early 2013, but it died by April I would say. Post-Grunge was a major trend.


I get what you are saying.  Post-grunge was more than a fad because it lasted so long.  I would say dubstep started in 2011 though.  It didn't last near as long as I thought it would.

Subject: Re: When did post-grunge become popular?

Written By: XYkid on 08/11/14 at 8:24 pm


I get what you are saying.  Post-grunge was more than a fad because it lasted so long.  I would say dubstep started in 2011 though.  It didn't last near as long as I thought it would.
Post grunge lasted from the mid-90s to about 2009, whereas dubstep became a fad in 2010, it peaked around 2011/12, and has been losing popularity since then.

Subject: Re: When did post-grunge become popular?

Written By: valyriansteele on 08/14/14 at 8:06 pm

I'd say post grunge lasted roughly from 1994 to 2009.

Subject: Re: When did post-grunge become popular?

Written By: Visor765 on 08/19/14 at 2:17 pm


I'd say post grunge lasted roughly from 1994 to 2009.


Post-grunge didn't exist in 1994, it started in 1995.

Check for new replies or respond here...