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Subject: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 01/09/15 at 12:43 pm

Many people say that the year 1997 was a year of change from the preceding years in the 90s and that is the year that started millenium culture. While it is commonly noted that 1998-2002 was it's own millenial era, I think 1997 is more of an arguable year in regards to pop culture. If you put into perspective that in 1997 that many 90s things like grunge SNES and Sega genesis were still pretty relevant in 1997 and that millenial era stuff such as Pokemon or Britney Spears weren't around yet in 1997, you could say that 1997 was still strongly a 90s year. People usually say that 1996 was the last "old school" year of the 90s, but I think that rule could be extends to 1997 the latest. I remember back in early 1997 when I was 5 going on 6, I had went into blockbuster and had rented a SNES game(Super Mario RPG I believe it was) and there still tons of SNES games from the shelves that you could rent and I also went into KB toys that same year with endless new Super Nintendo games to choose from. I also had a friend back in the 90s, who I remember had the Lost World Jurassic Park for Sega Genesis brand new that year. So tell me what do you guys think. Do you believe the year 1997 belongs to to the core 90s era or to the millenium era? If you ask me I believe it belonged more to the 90s cultural era.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: KatanaChick on 01/09/15 at 6:33 pm

The 7 year is always the divider between core and late. 1997 was still more 90's than millenium era by far. Most kids who played video games still had the kind that used cartriges instead of disks. Music hadn't gone all teen pop yet either. Plenty of club dance music and singer songwriters were still dominant. I was in the later years of elementary school when kids start dressing a little older, and grunge fashion wasn't present. The wide leg jeans were the big deal then and the hip hop sort of look.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 01/10/15 at 4:42 pm


The 7 year is always the divider between core and late. 1997 was still more 90's than millenium era by far. Most kids who played video games still had the kind that used cartriges instead of disks. Music hadn't gone all teen pop yet either. Plenty of club dance music and singer songwriters were still dominant. I was in the later years of elementary school when kids start dressing a little older, and grunge fashion wasn't present. The wide leg jeans were the big deal then and the hip hop sort of look.
Exactly how I have seen it all this time. It is also important to note that in 1997 Michael Jordan and the Chicago bulls still ruled the NBA, hell even in the first half of 1998 they still were on top. I remember watching some of the NBA playoffs that year and saw some of the NBA finals ceremony. I think 97' and also possibly the first half of 1998 may not be too different culturally different from the mid 90s. I see the summer of 1998 as more of a transitional period, not fully millenium as yet but not all that 90s either. Fall of 1998 is when millenium culture really kicked off. When I hear hip hop songs like hypnotize by the Notorious BIG I don't tend to think of millenium, I think of the real 90s period, whereas when I hear songs like ?money ain't a thang" by Jay Z which came out in the summer of 98' I find that leaning more towards millenium.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: ArcticFox on 01/10/15 at 11:30 pm

Perhaps maybe the 1996-1997 school year is more pop culturally core '90s whereas the 1997-1998 school year is pop culturally more millennium '90s. I wouldn't stretch it into 2002 though. That sounds ridiculous. I'd say the last school year to be of millennium pop culture would be the 2000-2001 school year. There was a really big change in the summer of '01.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 01/11/15 at 12:33 am


Perhaps maybe the 1996-1997 school year is more pop culturally core '90s whereas the 1997-1998 school year is pop culturally more millennium '90s. I wouldn't stretch it into 2002 though. That sounds ridiculous. I'd say the last school year to be of millennium pop culture would be the 2000-2001 school year. There was a really big change in the summer of '01.
But during the 1997-1998 school year there was still no Pokemon and music wasn't entirely teen pop. Plus the NBA was still centered around Michael Jordan at that time. If anything the 1998-1999 school year was the first full school year that felt more so millenial than core 90s imo.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: KatanaChick on 01/11/15 at 5:24 am


Exactly how I have seen it all this time. It is also important to note that in 1997 Michael Jordan and the Chicago bulls still ruled the NBA, hell even in the first half of 1998 they still were on top. I remember watching some of the NBA playoffs that year and saw some of the NBA finals ceremony. I think 97' and also possibly the first half of 1998 may not be too different culturally different from the mid 90s. I see the summer of 1998 as more of a transitional period, not fully millenium as yet but not all that 90s either. Fall of 1998 is when millenium culture really kicked off. When I hear hip hop songs like hypnotize by the Notorious BIG I don't tend to think of millenium, I think of the real 90s period, whereas when I hear songs like ?money ain't a thang" by Jay Z which came out in the summer of 98' I find that leaning more towards millenium.


It's not letting me embed the YT videos so here are links.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Kih3XKF_Mw
En Vogue-Don't Let Go.
Songs like this were more in line with the 90's music scene. A sound that teens could like, but more mature people might listen to as well without feeling too old for it. That was 1997.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6k86Uou3PZg
Kid Rock-Bullgod.
In 1998, I first heard this song shortly after the start of the school year. I know it's not the best comparison because rock vs R&B, but you can hear the rap mixed with rock style in this song and to me it's a sound younger people would appreciate more.

I was in the last year of elementary school in 1997-early 1998 and over the summer there was a definite change. Jr. high was all about teen culture. I don't know why, but I do know alot of 85ers and 86ers were starting 7th grade then and those are core millenial ages, not cusp or early Y. My best guess anyway.  ???


But during the 1997-1998 school year there was still no Pokemon and music wasn't entirely teen pop. Plus the NBA was still centered around Michael Jordan at that time. If anything the 1998-1999 school year was the first full school year that felt more so millenial than core 90s imo.


Women's R&B groups, singer songwriters, and 90's rap dominated 1997-1998. Fall of 1998 was different, there was alot of teen music coming out and then we have 1999, which was teen music dominated.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 01/11/15 at 7:28 am


Perhaps maybe the 1996-1997 school year is more pop culturally core '90s whereas the 1997-1998 school year is pop culturally more millennium '90s. I wouldn't stretch it into 2002 though. That sounds ridiculous. I'd say the last school year to be of millennium pop culture would be the 2000-2001 school year. There was a really big change in the summer of '01.
2002 I would consider the tail end of millenium culture not peak millenium. The reason I say this is because 2002 still had alot millenial elements. Have you heard the song That's what girls do by the girl group No Secrets? That song screams teen pop also around this time until the middle of the year many kids still traded Pokemon cards in the first half of 2002, but by the 2002-2003 school year the Pokemon fad was out and kids started to move to trading Yugioh cards and the NBA was still dominated by the Los Angeles Lakers in 2002. From what I remember I would say the peak of the millenium era was from about the spring of 1999 to early 2001, however I do understand why you see 2001 as the last year of the millenium culture being that that is the last year when gaming was still dominated by the likes of the PS1, Dreamcast and N64(although they weren't producing many more games for this console anymore at that point) and that it was the the first post 9/11 year so you do have a point with that, I would extend it up until the summer of 2002.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 01/11/15 at 8:04 am


It's not letting me embed the YT videos so here are links.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Kih3XKF_Mw
En Vogue-Don't Let Go.
Songs like this were more in line with the 90's music scene. A sound that teens could like, but more mature people might listen to as well without feeling too old for it. That was 1997.
You are very correct! This song sounds very mature and 90s compared to songs that came out in the later half of 98' and 99'
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6k86Uou3PZg
Kid Rock-Bullgod.
In 1998, I first heard this song shortly after the start of the school year. I know it's not the best comparison because rock vs R&B, but you can hear the rap mixed with rock style in this song and to me it's a sound younger people would appreciate more.
I wasn't able to check this song out on the device I am using currently, however I will check it out once I get to a desktop.
I was in the last year of elementary school in 1997-early 1998 and over the summer there was a definite change. Jr. high was all about teen culture. I don't know why, but I do know alot of 85ers and 86ers were starting 7th grade then and those are core millenial ages, not cusp or early Y. My best guess anyway.  ???
That's about right, although I've heard people say that peak Y are born 1986-1990(more specifically late 85ers-mid 90ers) while some others have said peak Y is 1984-1988. Me being born in 1991 I don't feel far from that parameter at all that is why I relate very well to those who were peak Y. Even though I may be a bit off the peak I am still purely Y.
Women's R&B groups, singer songwriters, and 90's rap dominated 1997-1998. Fall of 1998 was different, there was alot of teen music coming out and then we have 1999, which was teen music dominated.
I remember in the spring of 1999 I heard 702s song Where my girls at and that is a very teen sounding song, same with TLCs No Scrubs that also came out around that time. Do you remember the rebuttal song to No Scrubs "No Pigeons" by Sporty Thievez? I believe that song could of been popular with young black youths and also even those in their young 20s, hell I even loved the song then and I was only 8 at the time.  ;D

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: KatanaChick on 01/11/15 at 8:09 am


I remember in the spring of 1999 I heard 702s song Where my girls at and that is a very teen sounding song, same with TLCs No Scrubs that also came out around that time. Do you remember the rebuttal song to No Scrubs "No Pigeons" by Sporty Thievez? I believe that song could of been popular with young black youths and also even those in their young 20s, hell I even loved the song then and I was only 8 at the time.  ;D

That used to be one of my favorite songs!  ;D I liked that TLC No Scrubs video too. Alot of girls listened to that along with the teen pop idols.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 01/11/15 at 8:58 am


That used to be one of my favorite songs!  ;D I liked that TLC No Scrubs video too. Alot of girls listened to that along with the teen pop idols.
Good times :)

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: KatanaChick on 01/11/15 at 9:10 am


Good times :)

I miss them.  :(

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 01/11/15 at 9:42 am


I miss them.  :(
Busta Rhymes and Janet Jackson also had the song What's it gonna be that same year with a similarly futuristic styled video.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Todd Pettingzoo on 01/11/15 at 10:55 am

At the time, it felt different. The internet was getting bigger and bigger. The Spice Girls, Hanson and The Backstreet Boys.

Looking back, though, it seems a little more core 90's.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: loki 13 on 01/11/15 at 11:11 am


It's not letting me embed the YT videos so here are links.


For youtube videos to work you must delete the s from the https.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Kih3XKF_Mw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6k86Uou3PZg

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Catherine91UK on 01/11/15 at 1:35 pm

I think 1997 was 'pure 90s' and 1998-2001 were 'transition years' into the 00s. I think 2002-2007 were 'pure 00s' and 2008-9 were 'transition years' into the 10s!

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 01/11/15 at 2:34 pm


That used to be one of my favorite songs!  ;D I liked that TLC No Scrubs video too. Alot of girls listened to that along with the teen pop idols.


What was their other hit? ???

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 01/11/15 at 2:35 pm


At the time, it felt different. The internet was getting bigger and bigger. The Spice Girls, Hanson and The Backstreet Boys.

Looking back, though, it seems a little more core 90's.


people were using Windows 95.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 01/11/15 at 5:36 pm


At the time, it felt different. The internet was getting bigger and bigger. The Spice Girls, Hanson and The Backstreet Boys. The internet may have started to become popular then, but it not like in 1997 everybody had a computer with access to the internet in their households.

Looking back, though, it seems a little more core 90's.


The internet may have started to become popular then, but it not like in 1997 everybody had a computer with access to the internet in their households.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: KatanaChick on 01/11/15 at 6:46 pm


What was their other hit? ???

It was one of their hits, they had a few.  :P

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 01/11/15 at 9:48 pm


Waterfalls two years earlier
Waterfalls was from 95'

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 01/11/15 at 11:43 pm

Does anybody remember playing Cruisin USA arcade models? Those were still popular in 1997.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: yelimsexa on 01/12/15 at 8:57 am


I cannot say if I played that or not.


And Cruisin' World followed in 1996, so that game was still pretty new. That said, I was 12 years old for most of 1997 so I can give a pretty good insiders' look of what it was like. That said, 1997 songs like many Spice Girls hits, some of Janet Jacksons' hits from The Velvet Rope, and Hansons' MMM Bop all are part of the general "late '90s" atmosphere that can tie right into N'Sync's Bye Bye, Christina Aguilera's Genie in The Bottle or Smash Mouth's All Star. I actually remember hating the song Barbie Girl for my little sisters' talent show at the time! I fondly remember the 1998 and 1999 Teen Pop hits better than the 2000 and 2001 ones, perhaps because it was no longer officially the '90s and the Teen Pop was starting to run its course leaving those years in a culture no-mans land just like 1990 and to a degree 1991 for the '80s-'90s limbo and 1980 and 1981 for the '70s-'80s limbo. I was using the Internet at school all year long in 1997 and knew that before long it will come home. It felt nothing like 1994 at the time and only waning influence from 1995 and 1996. Movies started to focus more on special effects and pop culture was turning trashier. TRL came out in 1998 and is a very Millenial thing (and into the '00s), but MTV by then had already been starting to focus less on music videos (MTV2 was in its prime then though much like MTV Hits has been as of late), and also, the first DVD players came on the market. Dance pop had turned toward electronica (and less mainstream) and Eurodance was almost dead. That said, 1997 shares the "sunnier, optimistic feel" with 1998 and 1999 and part of 2000 as opposed to the angy feel of 1994 and back, with 1995 and 1996 transitional years with the Internet gradually intruding into popular conscience and the economy picking up.

The reputation toward Sega in 1997 was nothing like it was in 1994, its peak year in sales and influence, following the failures of the 32X and Saturn. All the new games I purchased in 1997 were for the original Playstation, some PC games, and would enjoy playing Nintendo 64 games at a friends' house before I got the system in early 1998. The last great SNES games were in 1996 with Super Mario RPG and Donkey Kong Country 3.

In TV, 1997 was the beginning of the ratings system in the US, it was around the time network bugs would remain throughout the show as opposed to just before and after the commercial breaks earlier in the '90s, but before HD became increasingly intrusive c. 2001+. Also, while Power Rangers were still somewhat popular in 1997 and 1998 with Turbo and In Space, it was nothing like their mid-90s peak with MMPR and Zeo, thanks to the poor reviews of the Turbo Movie. South Park and Buffy the Vampire Slayer came out, and Saturday Morning Cartoons were past their peak with the E/I laws taking CBS' lineup off the air.

Therefore, I feel that 1997-summer 1998 are the "real late '90s", with Fall 1998-summer 2001 the "millennial transition", gradually becoming less late '90s and more early '00s as time passes. The mid-90s likewise have two strands, Summer 1993-Spring 1995, with a few early '90s influnences such as grunge and some cassette tapes still being sold, and Summer 1995-1996, with a few late '90s influences such as the Internet. The real early '90s IMO was fall 1989-spring 1993, with fall 1989-summer 1991 having obvious late '80s influences such as neon, 8-bit games, and acid-washed jeans though with some '90s things already present such as Sega Genesis, The Simpsons, hip-hop such as MC Hammer and Vanilla Ice, and fall 1991-spring 1993 being the honest-to-god early '90s with grunge, Super Nintendo, House music pop, and Nicktoons. The '90s was a lot more of a fracutred decade than the '80s and '00s were, due to all of the generational shifts occuring during that decades as Boomers fade out, Xers come and go, and Millenials rise as kids and eventually teens. That's why it is one of my favorite cultural decades.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 01/12/15 at 9:50 am


And Cruisin' World followed in 1996, so that game was still pretty new. That said, I was 12 years old for most of 1997 so I can give a pretty good insiders' look of what it was like. That said, 1997 songs like many Spice Girls hits, some of Janet Jacksons' hits from The Velvet Rope, and Hansons' MMM Bop all are part of the general "late '90s" atmosphere that can tie right into N'Sync's Bye Bye, Christina Aguilera's Genie in The Bottle or Smash Mouth's All Star. I fondly remember the 1998 and 1999 Teen Pop hits better than the 2000 and 2001 ones, perhaps because it was no longer officially the '90s and the Teen Pop was starting to run its course leaving those years in a culture no-mans land just like 1990 and to a degree 1991 for the '80s-'90s limbo and 1980 and 1981 for the '70s-'80s limbo. I was using the Internet at school all year long in 1997 and knew that before long it will come home. It felt nothing like 1994 at the time and only waning influence from 1995 and 1996. Movies started to focus more on special effects and pop culture was turning trashier. TRL came out in 1998 and is a very Millenial thing (and into the '00s), but MTV by then had already been starting to focus less on music videos (MTV2 was in its prime then though much like MTV Hits has been as of late), and also, the first DVD players came on the market. Dance pop had turned toward electronica (and less mainstream) and Eurodance was almost dead. That said, 1997 shares the "sunnier, optimistic feel" with 1998 and 1999 and part of 2000 as opposed to the angy feel of 1994 and back, with 1995 and 1996 transitional years with the Internet gradually intruding into popular conscience and the economy picking up.

The reputation toward Sega in 1997 was nothing like it was in 1994, its peak year in sales and influence, following the failures of the 32X and Saturn. All the new games I purchased in 1997 were for the original Playstation, some PC games, and would enjoy playing Nintendo 64 games at a friends' house before I got the system in early 1998. The last great SNES games were in 1996 with Super Mario RPG and Donkey Kong Country 3.

In TV, 1997 was the beginning of the ratings system in the US, it was around the time network bugs would remain throughout the show as opposed to just before and after the commercial breaks earlier in the '90s, but before HD became increasingly intrusive c. 2001+. Also, while Power Rangers were still somewhat popular in 1997 and 1998 with Turbo and In Space, it was nothing like their mid-90s peak with MMPR and Zeo, thanks to the poor reviews of the Turbo Movie. South Park and Buffy the Vampire Slayer came out, and Saturday Morning Cartoons were past their peak with the E/I laws taking CBS' lineup off the air.

Therefore, I feel that 1997-summer 1998 are the "real late '90s", with Fall 1998-summer 2001 the "millennial transition", gradually becoming less late '90s and more early '00s as time passes. The mid-90s likewise have two strands, Summer 1993-Spring 1995, with a few early '90s influnences such as grunge and some cassette tapes still being sold, and Summer 1995-1996, with a few late '90s influences such as the Internet. The real early '90s IMO was fall 1989-spring 1993, with fall 1989-summer 1991 having obvious late '80s influences such as neon, 8-bit games, and acid-washed jeans though with some '90s things already present such as Sega Genesis, The Simpsons, hip-hop such as MC Hammer and Vanilla Ice, and fall 1991-spring 1993 being the honest-to-god early '90s with grunge, Super Nintendo, House music pop, and Nicktoons. The '90s was a lot more of a fracutred decade than the '80s and '00s were, due to all of the generational shifts occuring during that decades as Boomers fade out, Xers come and go, and Millenials rise as kids and eventually teens. That's why it is one of my favorite cultural decades.
I understand what you are saying, but you have to understand that 1997 overall had more of a 90s atmosphere than millenial. Grunge was still pretty big that year and while DVD technology may have been invented in 1997 its not like many people started using them right away or everybody knew of them when they were just released because DVD technology was still in it's infancy. And with the internet in 1997, although more people may have started becoming aware of the internet by then, really only small minority of the population had access to it, and not everybody and not everybody made the switch right away to N64 and Saturn right away when they just came out although I would agree with you that by 1998 SNES and Genesis were definitely out of style and no longer relevant because I remember going to a cousin my cousins house in 1998 and he owned an N64 with games such as Diddy kong racing and Goldeneye and was no longer playing the genesis he had before and I myself got an N64 later on that year for my birthday. I wouldn't say 1997 overall any culturally closer to 1999 than it was to 1995.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 01/12/15 at 2:28 pm


The internet may have started to become popular then, but it not like in 1997 everybody had a computer with access to the internet in their households.


most people started out with Windows 95.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 01/12/15 at 2:29 pm


Waterfalls two years earlier


Thanks I almost forgot.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 01/12/15 at 2:34 pm


most people started out with Windows 95.
I know. People actually started getting internet access by 1995 or so, but yelimsexa was saying that the internet started getting popular by 1997, and I told her it was still not  a household necessity then. With that said I actually remember in school back in 1997 my school principal was teaching our class how to use windows 95, two years after it's initial release.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 01/12/15 at 3:34 pm


I know. People actually started getting internet access by 1995 or so, but yelimsexa was saying that the internet started getting popular by 1997, and I told her it was still not  a household necessity then. With that said I actually remember in school back in 1997 my school principal was teaching our class how to use windows 95, two years after it's initial release.


and also people were using AOL.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Arrowstone on 01/12/15 at 6:12 pm

Only thing I remember of 1997 are Backstreet Boys.

Though I remember a scene in 1996. I was in after school care with some kids who were already 12 years (and I was 4), and in fact nothing happened. Everyone just discussed with each other what the h* they would do with each other. No internet, not even computers, so they just went to play outside (again). I remember the atmosphere very clearly. It was laid back, it was as if time was eternal, and somehow it felt very "earthy". Anyways, this may be my only memory of the "real" mid-90s.

1997 was a transition year. In Europe, Spice Girls were already popular.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 01/13/15 at 10:14 am


Only thing I remember of 1997 are Backstreet Boys.

Though I remember a scene in 1996. I was in after school care with some kids who were already 12 years (and I was 4), and in fact nothing happened. Everyone just discussed with each other what the h* they would do with each other. No internet, not even computers, so they just went to play outside (again). I remember the atmosphere very clearly. It was laid back, it was as if time was eternal, and somehow it felt very "earthy". Anyways, this may be my only memory of the "real" mid-90s.

1997 was a transition year. In Europe, Spice Girls were already popular.
While 1997 may have had some cultural similarities to 1999, I would say much of that year was culturally closer to that of 1995 than 1999.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 01/13/15 at 2:15 pm

1997 was a transition year. In Europe, Spice Girls were already popular.

and they had plenty of hits.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 01/14/15 at 12:26 am


and they had plenty of hits.
I believe that the 7 year of a decade culturally ties in more with middle part of the decade and the 8 year of the decade is the last year to have some traces of culture from the middle part of the decade although that year becomes late decade culture and the 9 year of a decade is solidly late decade culture with no cultural influence from the mid decade at all.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 01/14/15 at 2:22 pm


Which Spice Girls hit is this about?


Say You'll Be There
2 Becomes 1
Wannabe
Spice Up Your Life

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: KatanaChick on 01/14/15 at 7:18 pm


Say You'll Be There
2 Becomes 1
Wannabe
Spice Up Your Life


You know your Spice Girls songs!  :P Girls who were 11 back then would be proud. I did like the video to Say You'll Be There.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: KatanaChick on 01/14/15 at 8:13 pm


Did you see "Spice World", despite being a box office success, the film received primarily negative reviews.

I never saw it, movies like that usually come out as flops.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: KatanaChick on 01/14/15 at 8:16 pm


Let's just say that everything about it was dire.

You watched it?

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: KatanaChick on 01/14/15 at 8:17 pm


Lets say it was on television...

;D

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Foo Bar on 01/14/15 at 11:37 pm


And Cruisin' World followed in 1996, so that game was still pretty new.


Fun game.  Cruisin' USA and World had the same concept as Sega's Out Run from the 80s, but Williams had advanced both the hardware sufficiently to make it new, and they'd deepened the gameplay with the addition of vehicle enhancements.  If you had sufficient upgrades, you could just barely keep pace with the game's difficulty, and that was a great inducement to putting in the next quarter (er, $0.50, and at many locations $1.00...)  Wish I'd played it more back in the day.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 01/15/15 at 3:08 pm


You know your Spice Girls songs!  :P Girls who were 11 back then would be proud. I did like the video to Say You'll Be There.


Hey Katana, I lived the 90's. ;)

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 01/15/15 at 3:09 pm


Did you see "Spice World", despite being a box office success, the film received primarily negative reviews.


No I didn't.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 01/15/15 at 4:41 pm


No I didn't.
I saw some of the movie Spice World in 1999, 2 years after the movie came out.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 01/15/15 at 5:58 pm

Does anybody here believe that 1997 for the most part was culturally closer to 1995 than to 1999?

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: KatanaChick on 01/15/15 at 6:48 pm


Does anybody here believe that 1997 for the most part was culturally closer to 1995 than to 1999?

I can believe it. I was in 5th grade then for the '96/'97 school year and 1999 had more differences.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 01/16/15 at 7:13 am


I saw some of the movie Spice World in 1999, 2 years after the movie came out.


How was it?

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 01/16/15 at 8:10 am


How was it?
Well the parts that I saw were ok. I never got to watch much of it because I was actually being given a haircut that evening by my dad but one song that sticks out in my memory from that movie is their hit "Say you'll always be there".

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Inlandsvägen1986 on 01/16/15 at 9:27 am


Does anybody here believe that 1997 for the most part was culturally closer to 1995 than to 1999?


I don't think so. Back in 1999, 1997 seemed very recent and in 1997, 1995 did aswell. However, 1995 was quite dated in 1999. Windows 95 for example looked very old by then and I had access to a lot of software from the mid 90s around 1999. You could clearly see the difference.

It was more or less a gradial development in multimedia between 1995 and 2000. 1997 probably seems like a year of change because it was pretty much in the middle.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 01/16/15 at 9:42 am


I can believe it. I was in 5th grade then for the '96/'97 school year and 1999 had more differences.
I wanted to ask you if from your experience, if you still saw the SNES and Genesis as somewhat relevant in 1997. Looking back to when I was a kid I think it was still somewhat relevant even though the N64 and Saturn were already out, and X and Y culture. Do you believe the Gen Y culture began in 1997 or do you think it was a mixture of X and Y culture?

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 01/16/15 at 3:45 pm


I don't think so. Back in 1999, 1997 seemed very recent and in 1997, 1995 did aswell. However, 1995 was quite dated in 1999. Windows 95 for example looked very old by then and I had access to a lot of software from the mid 90s around 1999. You could clearly see the difference.

It was more or less a gradual development in multimedia between 1995 and 2000. 1997 probably seems like a year of change because it was pretty much in the middle.


and Windows 98 would be coming out a year later.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Inlandsvägen1986 on 01/17/15 at 4:21 am

Talking about handheld game consoles, the original Game Boy was also still very relevant in 1997. I played with it the same way I did in 1993/94. Game Boy Color came out a year later and by 1999, the original GB was obsolete.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 01/17/15 at 6:48 am


Talking about handheld game consoles, the original Game Boy was also still very relevant in 1997. I played with it the same way I did in 1993/94. Game Boy Color came out a year later and by 1999, the original GB was obsolete.


I still own an original Gameboy from 1989.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: KatanaChick on 01/17/15 at 7:00 am


I wanted to ask you if from your experience, if you still saw the SNES and Genesis as somewhat relevant in 1997. Looking back to when I was a kid I think it was still somewhat relevant even though the N64 and Saturn were already out, and X and Y culture. Do you believe the Gen Y culture began in 1997 or do you think it was a mixture of X and Y culture?

Still relevant because many kids still had them! In fact I played my Super Nintendo in 1997 still quite a bit. I never knew anyone with a Saturn. Y culture to me began in 1998 when the music changed to be hip hop and teen pop dominant. 1997 was the last of the X/Y mix. Not that the youngest of X couldn't like our generations culture at the time, but up until then most of our culture was the kids stuff.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: ArcticFox on 01/17/15 at 11:14 am


Still relevant because many kids still had them! In fact I played my Super Nintendo in 1997 still quite a bit. I never knew anyone with a Saturn. Y culture to me began in 1998 when the music changed to be hip hop and teen pop dominant. 1997 was the last of the X/Y mix. Not that the youngest of X couldn't like our generations culture at the time, but up until then most of our culture was the kids stuff.


I think Generation X was still the dominant generation in mainstream until 2001. The late '90s and early 2000s were different from each other pop culturally, but it wasn't an overnight thing. 2001 was when hip hop started to sound like it did in the mid 2000s.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: bchris02 on 01/17/15 at 1:55 pm


Many people say that the year 1997 was a year of change from the preceding years in the 90s and that is the year that started millenium culture. While it is commonly noted that 1998-2002 was it's own millenial era, I think 1997 is more of an arguable year in regards to pop culture. If you put into perspective that in 1997 that many 90s things like grunge SNES and Sega genesis were still pretty relevant in 1997 and that millenial era stuff such as Pokemon or Britney Spears weren't around yet in 1997, you could say that 1997 was still strongly a 90s year. People usually say that 1996 was the last "old school" year of the 90s, but I think that rule could be extends to 1997 the latest. I remember back in early 1997 when I was 5 going on 6, I had went into blockbuster and had rented a SNES game(Super Mario RPG I believe it was) and there still tons of SNES games from the shelves that you could rent and I also went into KB toys that same year with endless new Super Nintendo games to choose from. I also had a friend back in the 90s, who I remember had the Lost World Jurassic Park for Sega Genesis brand new that year. So tell me what do you guys think. Do you believe the year 1997 belongs to to the core 90s era or to the millenium era? If you ask me I believe it belonged more to the 90s cultural era.


I would say that describes 1998, not 1997.  '97 was about as '90s as it gets.  I will say that the transition from 90s to 2000s wasn't as defined as the transition from '00s to '10s, and there was a separate "millennial era" between the two decades.  However, the transition was so gradual its not easy to define where it began and ended.  I would say 1998-2001 was that distinct era.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 01/17/15 at 5:46 pm


I would say that describes 1998, not 1997.  '97 was about as '90s as it gets.  I will say that the transition from 90s to 2000s wasn't as defined as the transition from '00s to '10s, and there was a separate "millennial era" between the two decades.  However, the transition was so gradual its not easy to define where it began and ended.  I would say 1998-2001 was that distinct era.
I agree with you, I see the 1998-2001 period as the millenial transition period between 90s culture and 00s culture. 2002 may have still had some millenial elements, but I tend to the of 2002 as the first year that felt more 2000s than it did millenium.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: KatanaChick on 01/17/15 at 6:07 pm


I think Generation X was still the dominant generation in mainstream until 2001. The late '90s and early 2000s were different from each other pop culturally, but it wasn't an overnight thing. 2001 was when hip hop started to sound like it did in the mid 2000s.

The first millenials were in high school before millenial culture became dominant. By the time mid 80's borns got to middle school, their teenage years were entirely their culture. The 1998 and 1999 would be those years. Busta Rhymes, Nelly, Ludacris to name a few rappers were widely heard on the radio. The mid 2000's doesn't soley define millenial music, it was part of growing up then but something has to be the start of it. Boy bands and teen pop replaced the Lilith Fair style female artists and dance music as most popular.


I agree with you, I see the 1998-2001 period as the millenial transition period between 90s culture and 00s culture. 2002 may have still had some millenial elements, but I tend to the of 2002 as the first year that felt more 2000s than it did millenium.

The transitional period was still Y culture focused though, just the start of it being so. When I say millenial I mean the generation, not the time.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 01/17/15 at 7:07 pm


Still relevant because many kids still had them! In fact I played my Super Nintendo in 1997 still quite a bit. I never knew anyone with a Saturn. Y culture to me began in 1998 when the music changed to be hip hop and teen pop dominant. 1997 was the last of the X/Y mix. Not that the youngest of X couldn't like our generations culture at the time, but up until then most of our culture was the kids stuff.
Yeah, songs from 1997 like the rain from Missy Elliot or quit playing games by the backstreet boys you can say leaned more towards the Y demographic, while songs such as hypnotize by the Notorious BIG probably leans more towards X although older yet could of certainly enjoyed that song too. The generation X birth year span you can say is probably 1965-1980/81 with 78ers-81ers being on the cusp between generation x and Y and generation y being 1982-1996/1997 with 94ers-97ers being on the cusp between generation y and z. I don't think anybody born in 1977 and before should really be associated with Gen y and nobody born in the early 90s should be associated or lumped into generation z, although I have came across some people who have said generation z starts with early 90s births which I believe is ridiculous, I think all early 90s birth years are purely Y. Right now we might be in a mix of tail end Y and z culture. I think z culture will take full force sometime between 2017 and 2020. How is that for a generational analysis?

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: ArcticFox on 01/17/15 at 7:39 pm


The first millenials were in high school before millenial culture became dominant. By the time mid 80's borns got to middle school, their teenage years were entirely their culture. The 1998 and 1999 would be those years. Busta Rhymes, Nelly, Ludacris to name a few rappers were widely heard on the radio. The mid 2000's doesn't soley define millenial music, it was part of growing up then but something has to be the start of it. Boy bands and teen pop replaced the Lilith Fair style female artists and dance music as most popular.


Actually Nelly and Ludacris didn't hit it big until 2000 when they debuted. Busta Rhymes did become popular in the '90s, but in '96. Afterwards he had some sporadic hits until about 2001-ish. 2002 and 2003 were his heyday and that's when he was at the top of his game. As a matter of fact, all three of those rappers peaked in that period.

As for the teen pop, it wasn't the most popular genre, although it got a lot of mainstream attention. If teen pop was the most popular, then the majority of the pop songs would have been teen pop. In 1999, only 13 songs made the Billboard Hot 100 Year-End list. Some songs probably didn't make it because they weren't successful for a long enough period of time.

I'm guessing the radio stations you listened to played that stuff the most? People tend to subconsciously "choose" their surroundings and this includes the culture they are involved in. To Generation Y, the most dominant music of the late '90s was teen pop and boy bands. From Generation X's perspective, the most dominant music was a lot of one-hit wonders, compromising of rock, hip-hop, and R&B. It's all relative...

http://longboredsurfer.com/charts/1999

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 01/18/15 at 1:17 am


The first millenials were in high school before millenial culture became dominant. By the time mid 80's borns got to middle school, their teenage years were entirely their culture. The 1998 and 1999 would be those years. Busta Rhymes, Nelly, Ludacris to name a few rappers were widely heard on the radio. The mid 2000's doesn't soley define millenial music, it was part of growing up then but something has to be the start of it. Boy bands and teen pop replaced the Lilith Fair style female artists and dance music as most popular.
The transitional period was still Y culture focused though, just the start of it being so. When I say millenial I mean the generation, not the time.
I knew that 1998-2001 was definetly a Y dominated era towards generation Y or millenials as they are also known as, when I said "millenial" I meant the cultural era from 1998-2001/2002 which people often refer to as the millenium era between quintessential cultural years of the 90s and the quintessential cultural years of the 2000s. Sorry if I caused any confusion there.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: popguru85 on 01/20/15 at 11:55 am

I remember N64 and Playstation 1 being the systems that were everywhere. There was Final Fantasy VII, Resident Evil 2, Tomb Raider 1 & 2, WCW wrestling games, Duke Nukem 3D, Mario 64, Mario Kart 64, Star Fox 64, Goldeneye,

South Park premiered this year and a lot of kids in school weren't allowed to watch it, but we all snuck around and did anyways. :P.

Spice Girls and Hanson were big musically.

The big movies were Titanic, Liar Liar, Men in Black, Austin Powers, Good Will Hunting, The Lost World Jurassic Park, Batman & Robin, Disney's Hercules, The Lost World Jurrassic Park, Anaconda.

Princess Diana, Chris Farley, the Notroious B.I.G, Jimmy Stewart all died this year.

I also remember Star Wars getting big with the re-releases of the original trilogy.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 01/20/15 at 2:32 pm


I remember N64 and Playstation 1 being the systems that were everywhere. There was Final Fantasy VII, Resident Evil 2, Tomb Raider 1 & 2, WCW wrestling games, Duke Nukem 3D, Mario 64, Mario Kart 64, Star Fox 64, Goldeneye,

South Park premiered this year and a lot of kids in school weren't allowed to watch it, but we all snuck around and did anyways. :P.

Spice Girls and Hanson were big musically.

The big movies were Titanic, Liar Liar, Men in Black, Austin Powers, Good Will Hunting, The Lost World Jurassic Park, Batman & Robin, Disney's Hercules, The Lost World Jurrassic Park, Anaconda.

Princess Diana, Chris Farley, the Notroious B.I.G, Jimmy Stewart all died this year.

I also remember Star Wars getting big with the re-releases of the original trilogy.
The Lost World Jurassic Park, one of my favorites from 1997. I actually went to see that movie in the cinemas back then, and also remember ads for disney's Hercules and a cousin of mine talking about the movie Liar Liar that same year.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Inlandsvägen1986 on 01/20/15 at 3:47 pm

I also wouldn't say that 1997 was a millennial year. I would say late 1998-early 2001 was the millennial era, pop culturally. 1997 was just a very digital modern 90s year with a lot old school stuff still being around.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: 80sfan on 01/20/15 at 9:56 pm

It was a very fun year for pop culture. I got into Top 40 music late that year.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Dudefromthe 90s on 01/20/15 at 11:34 pm


It was a very fun year for pop culture. I got into Top 40 music late that year.


I also got into music again later in 1997, after a lull during the previous year. I liked a lot of music from 1996, but I just didn't keep up with it. Starting around fall 1997 I began watching VH1 music countdowns of the popular songs, and they were things like Sugar Ray, Matchbox 20, Chumbawumba, Sarah McLachlan. What got me into it at this particular time, I can't recall, and generally I prefer music from earlier in the decade. But the music of fall 1997 stands out in my memory.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 01/22/15 at 11:05 am

The only great thing about 1997 was Joel and Ethan Coen filming 'The Big Lebowski'. Let's not kid ourselves, 'The Big Lebowski' could of had more props in it to remind us the film was set in the early 1990s when Bush 1 was President. Us, early 90s fans, have yet to see a film or television show that really gives the viewers an idea of what it was like to be alive in the early 1990s. The movie 'Towelhead' and show 'Surviving Jack' only came close.

Other than that, 1997 stunk. It was another year of the boring 90s to those old enough to see it for what it was.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 01/24/15 at 5:26 pm

Somebody keeps on deleting my post. Who is doing that?

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: 80sfan on 01/24/15 at 6:23 pm


I also got into music again later in 1997, after a lull during the previous year. I liked a lot of music from 1996, but I just didn't keep up with it. Starting around fall 1997 I began watching VH1 music countdowns of the popular songs, and they were things like Sugar Ray, Matchbox 20, Chumbawumba, Sarah McLachlan. What got me into it at this particular time, I can't recall, and generally I prefer music from earlier in the decade. But the music of fall 1997 stands out in my memory.


I hated that Chumbawumba song though!  8)  8)

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 01/25/15 at 2:38 pm


I hated that Chumbawumba song though!  8)  8)


I thought Tubthumping was cool.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 01/26/15 at 5:54 pm


It was a very fun year for pop culture. I got into Top 40 music late that year.


Really?

I guess I was too much of an 80s child and early 90s teen to enjoy it.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Inlandsvägen1986 on 01/27/15 at 5:14 am


Really?

I guess I was too much of an 80s child and early 90s teen to enjoy it.


There were people who only were 9, 10 or 11 years old in 1997, so the year was somewhat the peak of their childhood.
No wonder that 1997 nostalgic to them - me included.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 01/27/15 at 10:11 am


There were people who only were 9, 10 or 11 years old in 1997, so the year was somewhat the peak of their childhood.
No wonder that 1997 nostalgic to them - me included.


Were you a Spice Girl fan? Did you go to see the movie that year?

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 02/02/15 at 5:13 pm

I remember my cousin was a spice girls fan back in 97/98.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 02/02/15 at 5:15 pm


I don't think so. Back in 1999, 1997 seemed very recent and in 1997, 1995 did aswell. However, 1995 was quite dated in 1999. Windows 95 for example looked very old by then and I had access to a lot of software from the mid 90s around 1999. You could clearly see the difference.

It was more or less a gradial development in multimedia between 1995 and 2000. 1997 probably seems like a year of change because it was pretty much in the middle.
Well of course that is because 1997 from 1999 is only 2 years whereas 1995 from 1999 is 4 years. As time passes things start to look older and more dated.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 02/02/15 at 7:09 pm

In 1997, the culture dish (or Petri dish), a shallow cylindrical glass or plastic lidded dish that biologists use to culture cells, looked very much the same when first invented by German scienitst Julius Richard Petri in 1887.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: J. Rob on 02/05/15 at 9:19 pm

1997......probably the second most nostalgia year for me after 1993. It just felt different, very unique.....for me it felt like a weird (but very cool) transition year that had it's own vibe that was separate from 95/96 and 98/99

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DRN_kOcQrUc
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CTY8hrvFck8

This two commercials perfectly define the vibe I got from 1997

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: 80sfan on 02/05/15 at 10:17 pm


Were you a Spice Girl fan? Did you go to see the movie that year?


I was not and still am not a Spice Girl fan. Partly because I'm a guy but also partly because they were too commercial for me. At least they could sing so I'll talk nicely about them for that.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: 80sfan on 02/05/15 at 10:20 pm

I have a love for the 1996 to 1998 years!

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 02/07/15 at 9:06 pm


I was not and still am not a Spice Girl fan. Partly because I'm a guy but also partly because they were too commercial for me. At least they could sing so I'll talk nicely about them for that.
There was always the off switch on the radio.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: SiderealDreams on 02/16/15 at 11:30 am


Us, early 90s fans, have yet to see a film or television show that really gives the viewers an idea of what it was like to be alive in the early 1990s. The movie 'Towelhead' and show 'Surviving Jack' only came close.


What about The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air? Even after the early 90's were over, the characters' fashions and attitudes didn't really seem to change much.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 02/16/15 at 2:17 pm


What about The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air? Even after the early 90's were over, the characters' fashions and attitudes didn't really seem to change much.


I'm sorry, I meant a period piece set in the early 90s that was made more recently.

While the characters' attitudes on Fresh Prince didn't change much, the fashions were extremely bland from '93 to '96. As Will aged, I noticed the comedy just wasn't there anymore. It didn't help when the original Vivian left the show and what's her name came a board.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 02/16/15 at 2:40 pm


I'm sorry, I meant a period piece set in the early 90s that was made more recently.

While the characters' attitudes on Fresh Prince didn't change much, the fashions were extremely bland from '93 to '96. As Will aged, I noticed the comedy just wasn't there anymore. It didn't help when the original Vivian left the show and what's her name came a board.


I guess the show got tiring itself after many years.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: bchris02 on 02/16/15 at 4:47 pm


There were people who only were 9, 10 or 11 years old in 1997, so the year was somewhat the peak of their childhood.
No wonder that 1997 nostalgic to them - me included.


That's a good way of putting it.

Pop culturally 1997 wasn't really a very memorable year.  Musically I remember it being mostly post grunge, lingering mid 90s euro-dance, R&B, and adult contemporary ballads, with the boy band craze in its infancy but not huge yet.  1998 and 1999 were much more memorable in that aspect.  Euro-dance was gone, teen pop exploded, and hip-hop evolved into the sound it kept through most of the '00s. 

I like the Surge commercial above because Surge is something I distinctly associate with the summer of 1997.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 02/16/15 at 5:03 pm


What about The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air? Even after the early 90's were over, the characters' fashions and attitudes didn't really seem to change much.


Most people don't realize the magnitude of Fresh Prince, but you can really see the conversion of the late 80s and early 90s into the mid 90s from the clothes Will wore. You won't see anyone else on TV go from wearing UMEN to Yaga.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: ArcticFox on 02/16/15 at 8:31 pm


Pop culturally 1997 wasn't really a very memorable year.  Musically I remember it being mostly post grunge, lingering mid 90s euro-dance, R&B, and adult contemporary ballads, with the boy band craze in its infancy but not huge yet.


Really? 1997 was a very memorable year. I'd say one of the very best years. What radio stations did you listen to anyway? Did they play mostly rock? Who did you hang out with? Because rock wasn't a very dominant genre in 1997. It was popular, but not the biggest. R&B received the biggest chart success, with Hip-Hop being a very close second.

Here are the 100 most successful songs if the year 1997:
http://longboredsurfer.com/charts/1997

It had some of the most memorable hits of the entire decade. It prominently featured Jewel, one of the most respected artists of the entire '90s. Alanis Morissette was at the peak of her popularity in '97, despite releasing only one single, "Uninvited", which peaked at #4 on the Billboard Hot 100 Airplay. No Doubt was super successful that year too, and people pretty much worship them these days.

Buffy the Vampire Slayer, my favorite TV show of all time, premiered in March of that year. Season 2 also premiered in September.

Overall, I'd say for a Millennial it probably wasn't a very memorable year, as Generation Y hadn't taken over for pop culture yet. For Generation X, on the other hand, 1997 was probably a very important year for them. 1997 screams Generation X.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 02/16/15 at 10:52 pm


I agree with you, I see the 1998-2001 period as the millenial transition period between 90s culture and 00s culture. 2002 may have still had some millenial elements, but I tend to the of 2002 as the first year that felt more 2000s than it did millenium.

This is my cultural Opinion school year wise.
97-98 transition
98-99 millineal
99-00 millenial
00-01 millineal
01-02 transition from millineal to the early00s culture
02-03 early 00s culture
03-04 00s culture peaks
04-05 core 00s
05-06 core 00s
06-07 00s culture changes a bit
07-08 evolved 00s
08-09 transition from 00s culture to early 10s culture
09-10 early 10s era
10-11 early 10s era
11-12 10s culture peaks
12-13 core 10s
13-14 core 10s
14-15 core 10s

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Inlandsvägen1986 on 02/17/15 at 6:00 am


01-02 transition from millineal to the early00s culture


Actually, millennial culture is part of the early 00s culture...


11-12 10s culture peaks


Early 10s culture peaked then maybe. But we're only halfway through the decade, yet, so the 10s might be peaking this or next year. We'll finally see by 2020.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 02/17/15 at 9:05 am


Actually, millennial culture is part of the early 00s culture...

Early 10s culture peaked then maybe. But we're only halfway through the decade, yet, so the 10s might be peaking this or next year. We'll finally see by 2020.


Ehh... form my perspective when I think of the early 00s culture I think of 9/11, Bush's first few years in office, the reality tv's popularity, nu metal, glam and bling bling rap music,from WWF to WWE,Lord of the rings, Harry Potter films. when I think of the millenial era I think of Late 1998-August 2001. late 2001-mid 2003 will always be the true early 2000s to me. I have always seen it that way.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: bchris02 on 02/17/15 at 9:16 am


Ehh... form my perspective when I think of the early 00s culture I think of 9/11, Bush's first few years in office, the reality tv's popularity, nu metal, glam and bling bling rap music,from WWF to WWE,Lord of the rings, Harry Potter films. when I think of the millenial era I think of Late 1998-August 2001. late 2001-mid 2003 will always be the true early 2000s to me. I have always seen it that way.


Completely agree with this.  There was a distinct culture in the late '90s and very early '00s.  It started in 1998 and lasted through the around the summer of 2001.  You had Destiny's Child, not Beyonce.  You had N'Sync, not Justin Timberlake.  Nobody knew who Nickelback was.  Computers came with Windows 98 or ME, not XP.  Who Wants To Be A Millionaire was a national sensation and was hosted by Regis Philbin.  Bill Clinton was still President.  It was the golden age of the CD as the dominant form of audio media.  VHS was still the dominant way to watch movies.

To the poster who mentioned GenX culture above, I guess that may be the simplest way to define 1997.  It was the last year dominated by Generation X culture.  In 1998 things shifted to Gen Y.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Inlandsvägen1986 on 02/17/15 at 9:28 am

Ok, if you only consider 02-03 as early 00s culture, than I will have to agree. But you could also argue that early 00s culture started together with millennial culture in the late 90s.

Most of 2003 I don't associate with early 00s anymorre, so there would only be one year of early 00s culture...

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 02/17/15 at 9:42 am


Really? 1997 was a very memorable year. I'd say one of the very best years. What radio stations did you listen to anyway? Did they play mostly rock? Who did you hang out with? Because rock wasn't a very dominant genre in 1997. It was popular, but not the biggest. R&B received the biggest chart success, with Hip-Hop being a very close second.

Here are the 100 most successful songs if the year 1997:
http://longboredsurfer.com/charts/1997

It had some of the most memorable hits of the entire decade. It prominently featured Jewel, one of the most respected artists of the entire '90s. Alanis Morissette was at the peak of her popularity in '97, despite releasing only one single, "Uninvited", which peaked at #4 on the Billboard Hot 100 Airplay. No Doubt was super successful that year too, and people pretty much worship them these days.

Buffy the Vampire Slayer, my favorite TV show of all time, premiered in March of that year. Season 2 also premiered in September.

Overall, I'd say for a Millennial it probably wasn't a very memorable year, as Generation Y hadn't taken over for pop culture yet. For Generation X, on the other hand, 1997 was probably a very important year for them. 1997 screams Generation X.

I still say 97 was a mix between x and y
98 and 99 was just full y/millennial 

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 02/17/15 at 10:01 am


Completely agree with this.  There was a distinct culture in the late '90s and very early '00s.  It started in 1998 and lasted through the around the summer of 2001.  You had Destiny's Child, not Beyonce.  You had N'Sync, not Justin Timberlake.  Nobody knew who Nickelback was.  Computers came with Windows 98 or ME, not XP.  Who Wants To Be A Millionaire was a national sensation and was hosted by Regis Philbin.  Bill Clinton was still President.  It was the golden age of the CD as the dominant form of audio media.  VHS was still the dominant way to watch movies.

To the poster who mentioned GenX culture above, I guess that may be the simplest way to define 1997.  It was the last year dominated by Generation X culture.  In 1998 things shifted to Gen Y.

True dat, because when me and my friends get together we all agree that our kid culture began during the 98-99 school year!! :) DBZ coming to Toonami, Pokemon debuting in the US, Powerpuffigrils, Ed Edd n Eddy debuting on CN, Zoog Disney, Dil debuting on Rugrats, Catdog,The Wild Thornberries,Spongebob, WWF atttiude era .....And sadly it came to and end during the 05-06 school year.  :\'(

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 02/17/15 at 10:10 am


True dat, because when me and my friends get together we all agree that our kid culture began during the 98-99 school year!! :) DBZ coming to Toonami, Pokemon debuting in the US, Powerpuffigrils, Ed Edd n Eddy debuting on CN, Zoog Disney, Dil debuting on Rugrats, Catdog,The Wild Thornberries,Spongebob, WWF atttiude era .....And sadly it came to and end during the 05-06 school year.  :\'( Not the things I mentioned specifically but that style of programming ended

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 02/17/15 at 10:10 pm


True dat, because when me and my friends get together we all agree that our kid culture began during the 98-99 school year!! :) DBZ coming to Toonami, Pokemon debuting in the US, Powerpuffigrils, Ed Edd n Eddy debuting on CN, Zoog Disney, Dil debuting on Rugrats, Catdog,The Wild Thornberries,Spongebob, WWF atttiude era .....And sadly it came to and end during the 05-06 school year.  :\'(


Thank you, I've been saying that 1999 was the year that changed everything. '99 had an identity-changing costume (it was the first true year of the 2000s) and an alter ego (last real year of the 90s because the 90s decade gave birth to most 00's pop culture institutions). I'm not sure why you tacked on 1998 to the year, but then again, I tend to think of the fall to winter of '89 as the head of 1990. All of '89 was truly late 80s, but most 90s shows premiered in the summer to winter of 1989. Coincidence? I think not.

Here's the way I see it:

'02-'05 (early 2000s) - Gives birth to the mid 2000s
'05-'08 (mid/core 2000s) - Conceived the late 2000s
'08-'11 (latter 2000s) - Bent on setting up the early 2010s
'11-'14 (Start of a new decade)

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 02/17/15 at 10:47 pm

From my perspective over the years.  :)
2000-2001(pre 9/11) Very early 2000s
Late 2001-mid 2003 true early 2000s
Late 2003-mid 2006 core 2000s
Late 2006-mid 08 00s culture but more evolved
Late 2008-09 very late 2000s (beginning of the current era)
2010-2011 Very early 10s
Late 2011-mid 2013 early 10s
Late 2013- core 10s

I always have seen that way from MY personal expierence! 8)

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 02/18/15 at 5:33 pm


Thank you, I've been saying that 1999 was the year that changed everything. '99 had an identity-changing costume (it was the first true year of the 2000s) and an alter ego (last real year of the 90s because the 90s decade gave birth to most 00's pop culture institutions). I'm not sure why you tacked on 1998 to the year, but then again, I tend to think of the fall to winter of '89 as the head of 1990. All of '89 was truly late 80s, but most 90s shows premiered in the summer to winter of 1989. Coincidence? I think not.

Here's the way I see it:

'02-'05 (early 2000s) - Gives birth to the mid 2000s
'05-'08 (mid/core 2000s) - Conceived the late 2000s
'08-'11 (latter 2000s) - Bent on setting up the early 2010s
'11-'14 (Start of a new decade)


I included 98 with 99 because of the school year 98-99 season.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 02/18/15 at 8:24 pm


I included 98 with 99 because of the school year 98-99 season.


Thank you for your clarification.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: ArcticFox on 02/26/15 at 10:22 pm

I think 1997 is the Y2K era. In '97, the excitement for the new millennium was well under way. People started naming things in relation to third millennium A.D. Objects and events started being called "(Blank) of the Millennium". People were partying like crazy. There was excitement for the new millennium in 1997. You could even go as far back as 1994, but that's really pushing it. People were partying like it was 1999 before 1999 even existed! In 2001 and 2002, no one was excited for the new millennium anymore. People had gotten it out of their system by 2001. No one was partying like it was 1999 anymore. Look at the much more downbeat music of 2001 and 2002. It's pretty obvious that after 5-6 years of partying, pop culture decided to chill for a little bit. That's why I primarily consider the Y2K era to be 1997-2000. That's where all the excitement was.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Inlandsvägen1986 on 02/27/15 at 1:45 am

No, in 1997, 2000 was still quite far away for a lot of people. It was just another 90s year. 1998 was the first year that people really had concerns about their computers and the y2k crash.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: bchris02 on 02/27/15 at 9:30 am


No, in 1997, 2000 was still quite far away for a lot of people. It was just another 90s year. 1998 was the first year that people really had concerns about their computers and the y2k crash.


Agree.  Few people were talking about the Y2K bug in 1997.  I first started hearing about it in late 1998 but I mostly associate it with 1999 alone.  Nobody was talking about the new millennium in 1997.  I remember that started in 1998 but didn't really ramp up until 1999.  Most things named "of the millennium" I associate with 1999 and 2000.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: ArcticFox on 02/27/15 at 11:07 am

No, in 1997, 2000 was still quite far away for a lot of people. It was just another 90s year. 1998 was the first year that people really had concerns about their computers and the y2k crash.

Agree.  Few people were talking about the Y2K bug in 1997.  I first started hearing about it in late 1998 but I mostly associate it with 1999 alone.  Nobody was talking about the new millennium in 1997.  I remember that started in 1998 but didn't really ramp up until 1999.  Most things named "of the millennium" I associate with 1999 and 2000.

Take note that you guys were children in the late '90s, so three years is a long time at 11-14 years old. Back in 2010 when I was 14, 2013 seemed like an eternity away. Boy, the time went by fast! Now, at 19 years old in 2015, 2018 doesn't seem that far away. Even 2019 isn't too distant in the future! Five years is a long time, so 2020 definitely feels like a long time from now. I got my information from people who were adults in the '90s, people who actually lived them. Didn't 2009 feel like tomorrow to you guys in 2006? Three years isn't that long.

In the Daria season 1 episode "Malled", they named the mall setting "Mall of the Millennium". So there was excitement for the new millennium in 1997. This actually aired on March 31, so maybe even 1996.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Inlandsvägen1986 on 02/27/15 at 1:44 pm


Take note that you guys were children in the late '90s, so three years is a long time at 11-14 years old.


Just look at it like this: Do people seriously talk about 2018 today? And even in 2007, 2010 didn't feel like it was only around the corner, and at this point of time, I was a lot older.
In 1997, it was more than 2 years until Y2K. People seriously talk about the upcoming years if they are about 1-1.5 years away.   

What I also think: 2000 felt much more distant in 1997 psychologically, even for older people, because of the big change of the digits. I also think that the debate about the "excitement" is a bit overrated. People were actually really excited between maybe December 1999 and January 1st, 2000, but after that, everything went back to normal immediately. There was, however, that cultural millennial period (especially music-wise). That lasted from 1998-2002.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 02/27/15 at 2:34 pm


No, in 1997, 2000 was still quite far away for a lot of people. It was just another 90s year. 1998 was the first year that people really had concerns about their computers and the y2k crash.


I know I had concerns about my computer and the Y2K crash.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: af2010 on 02/28/15 at 3:24 am


Just look at it like this: Do people seriously talk about 2018 today? And even in 2007, 2010 didn't feel like it was only around the corner, and at this point of time, I was a lot older.
In 1997, it was more than 2 years until Y2K. People seriously talk about the upcoming years if they are about 1-1.5 years away.   

What I also think: 2000 felt much more distant in 1997 psychologically, even for older people, because of the big change of the digits. I also think that the debate about the "excitement" is a bit overrated. People were actually really excited between maybe December 1999 and January 1st, 2000, but after that, everything went back to normal immediately. There was, however, that cultural millennial period (especially music-wise). That lasted from 1998-2002.


Yeah, Y2K really wasn't that big of a deal. It was similar to the December 21, 2012 thing... it had some hype, but it wasn't some huge cultural phenomenon.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 02/28/15 at 4:46 am


Yeah, Y2K really wasn't that big of a deal. It was similar to the December 21, 2012 thing... it had some hype, but it wasn't some huge cultural phenomenon.
In fact, nothing happened!

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 02/28/15 at 6:43 am


Yeah, Y2K really wasn't that big of a deal. It was similar to the December 21, 2012 thing... it had some hype, but it wasn't some huge cultural phenomenon.


and everybody thought their computers would crash.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Arrowstone on 02/28/15 at 3:05 pm

I was scared about Y2K; my father told me that systems might crash, and that the rivers would flow over xD

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Arrowstone on 02/28/15 at 3:06 pm

The year 1997 though.. I feel like it is right inbetween core 90s and the millennial period.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Inlandsvägen1986 on 02/28/15 at 4:35 pm


The year 1997 though.. I feel like it is right inbetween core 90s and the millennial period.


Not even that. There was that first half of 1998 that didn't feel to far away from the core 90s either. The millennial period started somewhere around October/November 1998 IMO.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 02/28/15 at 5:39 pm


I was scared about Y2K; my father told me that systems might crash, and that the rivers would flow over xD


Was he that scared?

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Arrowstone on 02/28/15 at 6:04 pm


Was he that scared?


I think it was a joke but I didn't know that..

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Arrowstone on 02/28/15 at 6:11 pm


Not even that. There was that first half of 1998 that didn't feel to far away from the core 90s either. The millennial period started somewhere around October/November 1998 IMO.


maybe it is I tend to associate the Spice Girls and Backstreet Boys with the boyband/girlbands of the millennial era. But I was 5; this is all I remember pop cultural from that time apart from collecting dinosaurs.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: ArcticFox on 03/02/15 at 12:02 am


There was, however, that cultural millennial period (especially music-wise). That lasted from 1998-2002.


What do you mean by "Millennial" period? I spent most of my free time during the second half of last year listening to retro music to add to my wish list spanning from '70s to '90s. I have literally listened to every song that was ever popular in the US from 1994 through 2003, and 1998 and 2002 are not similar.

First of all, there was a lot of '70s influences in mainstream music around the late '90s. In the early '00s, there was less of it. Way less of it. "Crazy In Love" by Beyonce is a notable exception to this, and is probably the most '70s inspired sound of 2001-2003 (which I personally see as the same era). Now, 2000 still had a lot of '70s influences, as it was only the first year of the '00s, so '90s ideals were still dominant then.

Second, rock music changed a lot from 1998 to 2002. Here in America, 1998 rock music was still your typical mid '90s fare. It's really hard to tell the differences from 1995-1999 in general, as post grunge wasn't even in yet. It really wasn't around in 2000 either, but there are some notable examples to which I can excuse this. For instance, "Interstate Love Song" by the Stone Temple Pilots sounds like it could be popular in 1998 and even 2000 maybe, but it's actually 1994!

I have two more reasons on the topic of music, but I don't want this to be an essay. What I'm saying is, 1998 and 1999 are still very '90s to me, like quintessential '90s. I can actually imagine 1998 being dated in 2002 due to the leftover mid '90s influences in '98. After all, 1996 was only two years ago in 1998 and six years ago in 2002.

2006 didn't feel old and different in 2008 and 2009, so the same probably goes for a decade prior for each.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: bchris02 on 03/02/15 at 2:05 pm


What do you mean by "Millennial" period? I spent most of my free time during the second half of last year listening to retro music to add to my wish list spanning from '70s to '90s. I have literally listened to every song that was ever popular in the US from 1994 through 2003, and 1998 and 2002 are not similar.

First of all, there was a lot of '70s influences in mainstream music around the late '90s. In the early '00s, there was less of it. Way less of it. "Crazy In Love" by Beyonce is a notable exception to this, and is probably the most '70s inspired sound of 2001-2003 (which I personally see as the same era). Now, 2000 still had a lot of '70s influences, as it was only the first year of the '00s, so '90s ideals were still dominant then.

Second, rock music changed a lot from 1998 to 2002. Here in America, 1998 rock music was still your typical mid '90s fare. It's really hard to tell the differences from 1995-1999 in general, as post grunge wasn't even in yet. It really wasn't around in 2000 either, but there are some notable examples to which I can excuse this. For instance, "Interstate Love Song" by the Stone Temple Pilots sounds like it could be popular in 1998 and even 2000 maybe, but it's actually 1994!

I have two more reasons on the topic of music, but I don't want this to be an essay. What I'm saying is, 1998 and 1999 are still very '90s to me, like quintessential '90s. I can actually imagine 1998 being dated in 2002 due to the leftover mid '90s influences in '98. After all, 1996 was only two years ago in 1998 and six years ago in 2002.

2006 didn't feel old and different in 2008 and 2009, so the same probably goes for a decade prior for each.


Great insight.

Personally I definitely think there was a "millennial" era that marked the transition from '90s to '00s, but I don't think 2002 was a part of it.  That era ended definitively in the summer of 2001. 

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: 90s Guy on 03/15/15 at 5:23 pm

I consider 1997 a transitional year, with the first half or so being a continuation of the mid '90s and the year slowly changing to the preppy late 90s/early 00s.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: ArcticFox on 03/15/15 at 6:01 pm


I consider 1997 a transitional year, with the first half or so being a continuation of the mid '90s and the year slowly changing to the preppy late 90s/early 00s.


I think the late '90s had dressier clothing than the early 2000s. The mid and late '90s actually had people wearing chinos, slacks, polos, vests, button-ups, loafers, dress shoes, heels, sweaters, dresses, and skirts. The early 2000s was all about jeans, sneakers, and crop tops.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: mxcrashxm on 03/17/15 at 5:31 pm

It does seem like 1997 had more of a 90s vibe.

Here are some videos

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GF3-bAcgPLI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4CiZN3-ToKI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=43xL1nNovWk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lsBLXMEjMNQ

And here are some photos

http://waltwhitmanhighschool.com/wwhs/classpics/1997_high.jpg

http://www.mariposa-alumni.org/images/mchs188.jpg

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-7xEEIZolPEg/T4thFvJxHoI/AAAAAAAABCk/Ie6A23bE-rY/s1600/Dix+Teacher1997.jpg

http://www.tampacatholic.org/sites/default/files/TC%20Class%20Pictures/co1997lg.gif

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: 80sfan on 03/17/15 at 6:00 pm

Pretty much by 1993, the 90s was in full gear. Yeah, there were subtle things even up until 1994/1995 that could be deemed '80s' but culturally the 90s was in full gear by '93.

So heck yeah, 1997 was very 90s.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: mxcrashxm on 03/17/15 at 6:16 pm


I think the late '90s had dressier clothing than the early 2000s. The mid and late '90s actually had people wearing chinos, slacks, polos, vests, button-ups, loafers, dress shoes, heels, sweaters, dresses, and skirts. The early 2000s was all about jeans, sneakers, and crop tops.


I now see the contrasts you were explaining.

1998-1999 videos and photos

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ylEx8ZSHuuI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yBR4pGrOzss

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rIHNSwPGRXQ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f7IAxDpdGSY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zbNGVAHjZVU

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=22pSYXExSmM

http://waltwhitmanhighschool.com/wwhs/classpics/1998_high.jpg

http://waltwhitmanhighschool.com/wwhs/classpics/1999_high.jpg

http://www.oakparkhistory.com/1998-99/1998-1999-SeniorClassPhoto-22.jpg

http://www.tampacatholic.org/sites/default/files/TC%20Class%20Pictures/co1998lg.gif

http://www.fenton1998.com/clients/83642/2579770_org.jpg

http://www.fmschools.org/webpages/tchaddock/imageGallery/Scan%20120400019.jpg

http://www.wwhsalumni.com/files/1999picture.jpg


2000-2001 videos and photos

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f1_uigr4lrw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dgiIY1TQWL0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t1YfG59mxTI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T8_-EY_5XgU

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0CAq3m3mM0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mOgEi29d94I

http://armwood2001.classquest.com/cqrfiles/sites/13000/13240/Banner.jpg

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-SOg6vhi_cJ8/Ta0tjaIFzOI/AAAAAAAAETY/lzKd7DjEhdc/s1600/classpic2.jpg

http://armwood2001.classquest.com/cqrfiles/sites/13000/13240/PageImages/634170980150343641_9720.JPG

http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e9/clintcrockett/SHS.jpg

http://www.tampacatholic.org/sites/default/files/TC%20Class%20Pictures/co2000lg.gif

http://adventuresinsonicfiction.com/experiment/2000_pic_hires.jpg


Some of the photos I listed have the same schools from different years. Furthermore, it took me about an hour to research everything.
che.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 03/18/15 at 3:23 pm

1997 was another 1987, all the new culture introduced in the mid 90s was going strong as the pop culture of that '99-2002 period was on the horizon. I'd argue that 1997 was a 90s year.

1990 and '91 were eons ago to the people of 1997.
This live recording from the late 90s (1999, I think), only proves how far away we were from the early 90s:

g2ZkTvLdH2o

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: ArcticFox on 03/26/15 at 12:59 am


It does seem like 1997 had more of a 90s vibe.


I now see the contrasts you were explaining. 1998-1999 videos and photos. 2000-2001 videos and photos. Some of the photos I listed have the same schools from different years. Furthermore, it took me about an hour to research everything.

Points for the effort man but high school videos and photos are not the best representation of what was cool in fashion. This is because most teenagers just wear what is comfortable and don't care about how they look. They often times tend to lack self-confidence, have low self-esteem, and are insecure. Therefore, they think they aren't "pretty" or "handsome" enough for stylish clothes.

Even college kids care more about their appearance, and I can definitely say that young adulthood is pretty much the epitome of trendiness for fashion. Yes, you have lots of people who look awful when going to class, but you also have those that look good. And the clothing featured in the store is made with the young woman and man in mind.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: mxcrashxm on 04/01/15 at 10:50 am


Points for the effort man but high school videos and photos are not the best representation of what was cool in fashion. This is because most teenagers just wear what is comfortable and don't care about how they look. They often times tend to lack self-confidence, have low self-esteem, and are insecure. Therefore, they think they aren't "pretty" or "handsome" enough for stylish clothes.

Even college kids care more about their appearance, and I can definitely say that young adulthood is pretty much the epitome of trendiness for fashion. Yes, you have lots of people who look awful when going to class, but you also have those that look good. And the clothing featured in the store is made with the young woman and man in mind.


I see what you're saying and yeah I agree, majority of teens don't have the self confidence which would make them care about their appearance; however, those photos and videos do present what was popular during that time period.

I also agree on the clothing features. Every-time I see a commercial, they always state men and women clothes first then kids and teens.

Here are some 1997 fashion ads.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cO5zCZWiQBc

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6xgcolU4F3I

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 04/01/15 at 1:48 pm

http://i.ytimg.com/vi/iVYFmjrytd0/hqdefault.jpg
Meego

http://i.ytimg.com/vi/lNv78zZFQBQ/hqdefault.jpg
Keenan And Kel

http://img1.ak.crunchyroll.com/i/spire3/bb74357fe4927141bf79cef69a9aa8851396590729_full.jpg
Cartoon Network

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 04/02/15 at 8:20 am


http://i.ytimg.com/vi/iVYFmjrytd0/hqdefault.jpg
Meego

http://i.ytimg.com/vi/lNv78zZFQBQ/hqdefault.jpg
Keenan And Kel

http://img1.ak.crunchyroll.com/i/spire3/bb74357fe4927141bf79cef69a9aa8851396590729_full.jpg
Cartoon Network
I actually remember that Cartoon Network bumper with that kid hanging down from the sign very well from early 1996. I also remember one where he had an empty jar of mayonnaise which caused the cartoon network viewer to lose his mind and rush to buy another full jar. Anyone else here remember that ad?

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 04/02/15 at 9:46 am


http://i.ytimg.com/vi/iVYFmjrytd0/hqdefault.jpg
Meego

http://i.ytimg.com/vi/lNv78zZFQBQ/hqdefault.jpg
Keenan And Kel



8-P

1997: A Year Best Left Forgotten For All Eternity.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 04/02/15 at 1:34 pm


8-P

1997: A Year Best Left Forgotten For All Eternity.


You disliked those shows?

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: mxcrashxm on 04/02/15 at 3:07 pm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HSrl1YUcKII

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v1ASaIFbq6Q

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_N5kcxN7h18

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5wh6W9mGyhE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zOuZqfglwrc

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZxNzq-yKbU

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lNyk6nPh_7U

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 04/02/15 at 3:53 pm


You disliked those shows?


I can't  name one showI liked from the EXTREMELY (stupid) mid 90s and JIGGY late 90s.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: ArcticFox on 04/02/15 at 6:36 pm


I can't  name one showI liked from the EXTREMELY (stupid) mid 90s and JIGGY late 90s.


Seriously? Wow. The fact that you don't like anything from the mid-late '90s says something about your inflexible personality. If you say they were "the best days of my life!  8)" Then that means that you peaked in early high school. You haven't had one fulfilling experience in your life after 1992?

It seems your bitterness toward your young adulthood seems to be rooted in bad decision-making. If you constantly talk about that point in your life and never acknowledge the present then that means that whatever you dislike about yourself is your fault. And as a result you take out your anger on us people who like the mid-late '90s through ridiculous pop culture references and an elitist "my taste in popular culture is better than yours" attitude.

I don't know what is wrong with you, but I do know that you're being a bully and you need to stop it. We can like whatever we want, and not get criticism for it without good reason.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: carriefire on 04/02/15 at 6:56 pm


8-P

1997: A Year Best Left Forgotten For All Eternity.


1990 to 1999.  A DECADE Best Left Forgotten For All Eternity.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 04/02/15 at 8:53 pm


Seriously? Wow. The fact that you don't like anything from the mid-late '90s says something about your inflexible personality. If you say they were "the best days of my life!  8)" Then that means that you peaked in early high school. You haven't had one fulfilling experience in your life after 1992?

It seems your bitterness toward your young adulthood seems to be rooted in bad decision-making. If you constantly talk about that point in your life and never acknowledge the present then that means that whatever you dislike about yourself is your fault. And as a result you take out your anger on us people who like the mid-late '90s through ridiculous pop culture references and an elitist "my taste in popular culture is better than yours" attitude.

I don't know what is wrong with you, but I do know that you're being a bully and you need to stop it. We can like whatever we want, and not get criticism for it without good reason.




http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/155605/90s-nostalgia-millennials-long-for-simpler-times.html
:)

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 04/02/15 at 8:55 pm


1990 to 1999.  A DECADE Best Left Forgotten For All Eternity.


So you loathe Hypercolor, Game Gear and Terminator 2: Judgement Day? ???  :o

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: ArcticFox on 04/02/15 at 10:44 pm


1980 to 1989.  A DECADE Best Left Forgotten For All Eternity.


Fixed it!

http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/155605/90s-nostalgia-millennials-long-for-simpler-times.html
:)


That's childhood culture regarding cartoons and restaurants, NOT music, movies, and fashion (which are aimed at high school and college aged folks). My statement still applies. If people are nostalgic for their childhood, then that really says something about their choices in life. It isn't stuff beyond your control. You choose your path (and your attitude...).

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 04/02/15 at 11:48 pm


That's childhood culture regarding cartoons and restaurants, NOT music, movies, and fashion (which are aimed at high school and college aged folks). My statement still applies. If people are nostalgic for their childhood, then that really says something about their choices in life. It isn't stuff beyond your control. You choose your path (and your attitude...).


Were you not a child in the mid and late 90s?

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 04/02/15 at 11:57 pm


You disliked those shows?


Don't you agree that Perfect Strangers pawns both of those shows?

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 04/03/15 at 7:06 am


I can't  name one showI liked from the EXTREMELY (stupid) mid 90s and JIGGY late 90s.


You can't be serious? You had to like at least something.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 04/03/15 at 7:44 am


You can't be serious? You had to like at least something.


If 1993-1999 were consolidated into one two hour feature and I went to see it,  I'd want my money back immediately.  8-P

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 04/03/15 at 1:15 pm

http://ia.media-imdb.com/images/M/MV5BOTY3NTI0MDM2MV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwOTc0NzQxMTE@._V1_SX640_SY720_.jpg
Austin Powers
http://ia.media-imdb.com/images/M/MV5BMjEzMzA3NzgwNF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwNzQ4MDgyMQ@@._V1_SX640_SY720_.jpg
Liar Liar

http://ia.media-imdb.com/images/M/MV5BMTIwODc4NzcyNF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTYwMTY5OTY5._V1_SX214_AL_.jpg
Flubber

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 04/03/15 at 6:28 pm


Fixed it!

That's childhood culture regarding cartoons and restaurants, NOT music, movies, and fashion (which are aimed at high school and college aged folks). My statement still applies. If people are nostalgic for their childhood, then that really says something about their choices in life. It isn't stuff beyond your control. You choose your path (and your attitude...).


Why do you not like the 80s?

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: 80sfan on 04/04/15 at 12:00 am

Two of my favorite movies came out in 1997, Scream 2 and The Lost World: Jurassic Park.

Although not a favorite 1997's Liar, Liar with Jim Carey is a great movie.

1997 is one of my favorite years of the 90s, probably second after 1998.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 04/04/15 at 1:48 am


Fixed it!


  ;D ;D

Thank you for making my day.

I for one feel like people of this time make too big of a deal out of the 1980s. These are people who don't see the 80s for what they really were.
I hate whenever someone calls something first sold in the early 90s "80s". They're filling the heads of Generation Yers and Zers with lies!!! THE SLAP BRACELETS, WWF WRESTLING BUDDIES and HYPERCOLOR ARE NOT FROM THE ACTUAL "80S DECADE", DAGNAMITT!!!!  >:(

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 04/04/15 at 1:56 am


Why do you not like the 80s?


ArticFox wasn't born in the 60s or 70s. His or Her childhood was mostly in the late 90s. So, he/her will always defend the mid and late 90s in a debate. Being a child of that time, ArticFox probably believes the 70s were better than the 80s in every which way possible. I hate to say it, I would slightly with ArticFox on that one. "The Godfather" (1972) and "The Godfather: Part 2" (1974) own every movie that came out of the 80s. No comment on "The Godfather: Part 3" (1990, filmed in '89/'90) and I'm an 80s and early 90s fan.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 04/04/15 at 3:11 am


ArticFox wasn't born in the 60s or 70s. His or Her childhood was mostly in the late 90s. So, he/her will always defend the mid and late 90s in a debate. Being a child of that time, ArticFox probably believes the 70s were better than the 80s in every which way possible. I hate to say it, I would slightly with ArticFox on that one. "The Godfather" (1972) and "The Godfather: Part 2" (1974) own every movie that came out of the 80s. No comment on "The Godfather: Part 3" (1990, filmed in '89/'90) and I'm an 80s and early 90s fan.

The Godfather 1 and 2 are two of the greatest films ever made, besides Citizen Kane!! :)

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: KatanaChick on 04/04/15 at 6:17 am


Seriously? Wow. The fact that you don't like anything from the mid-late '90s says something about your inflexible personality. If you say they were "the best days of my life!  8)" Then that means that you peaked in early high school. You haven't had one fulfilling experience in your life after 1992?

It seems your bitterness toward your young adulthood seems to be rooted in bad decision-making. If you constantly talk about that point in your life and never acknowledge the present then that means that whatever you dislike about yourself is your fault. And as a result you take out your anger on us people who like the mid-late '90s through ridiculous pop culture references and an elitist "my taste in popular culture is better than yours" attitude.

I don't know what is wrong with you, but I do know that you're being a bully and you need to stop it. We can like whatever we want, and not get criticism for it without good reason.

It's like talking to a wall isn't it?

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 04/04/15 at 8:29 am


It's like talking to a wall isn't it?


>:(

So it's best to keep quiet, right?  ::)

ArticFox thinks I have a strong dislike for the mid and late 90s because of personal issues. The pop culture of those eras seriously stunk! Why is it so hard to believe that someone thinks little of the pop culture and the other shows, movies and video games of the mid and late 90s. The only reason you and ArticFox like it is because you were children at the time.

Let's look at something like the Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers. There you have teenagers who held off thinking about a career to save the world for absolutely NO dinero. Those fictional characters were complete and total idiots. Then again, "only 90s kids" would love such crap as the Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers. That's why no one older than them takes them seriously.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Inlandsvägen1986 on 04/04/15 at 9:31 am


ArticFox thinks I have a strong dislike for the mid and late 90s because of personal issues.


You meant Visor765? ;)

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 04/04/15 at 5:50 pm


You meant Visor765? ;)


    ;D

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 04/05/15 at 1:35 pm

http://ia.media-imdb.com/images/M/MV5BMTU0NDk2ODUzMl5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMTc1NjkyMQ@@._V1_SY317_CR4,0,214,317_AL_.jpg
Jungle 2 Jungle

http://www.crankycritic.com/archive/posters/privateparts.jpg
Private Parts

http://loftcinema.com/files/2014/10/boogie-nights-poster.jpg
Boogie Nights

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 04/05/15 at 7:58 pm


Two of my favorite movies came out in 1997, Scream 2 and The Lost World: Jurassic Park.

"
Scream 2: Leading to the Ghostface masks and Movie Maniacs action figure in 1999.

As for The Lost World: We wouldn't have Warpath: Jurassic Park for the Playstation 1 console in 1999 if not for the success of this one.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 04/05/15 at 8:06 pm


http://loftcinema.com/files/2014/10/boogie-nights-poster.jpg
Boogie Nights


Mark Wahlberg went from doing a freestyle on the TV show "Rap Around" in 1990 to being the lead in The Corruptor and Three Kings in 1999. You can say he really went through some changes from 1990 to 1999. :)

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 04/06/15 at 1:34 pm

http://cdn.miramax.com/media/assets/726_GoodWillHunting_Catalog_Poster-BB_v2_Approved.png
Good Will Hunting
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/a/a2/Batman_%26_robin_poster.jpg
Batman And Robin
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/8/80/Jackie_Brown70%27s.jpg
Jackie Brown

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: yelimsexa on 04/06/15 at 2:35 pm

1997 was solidly a late '90s year, but still fits the mold of the core '90s. I'd say by 1997, the Internet was increasingly beeing seen as a ultility rather than just a cool thing to have given the remarkable growth that was taking place penetrating smaller and smaller parts of society. The 16-bit era was all but history, with just a few sports games holdouts on SNES and Genesis, with PS1 and N64 now the modern video game consoles. I first heard about DVDs in 1997, but didn't use one until 2001. Yes, at least one media source was already talking about the Y2K bug:

https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1309&dat=19970817&id=qpxOAAAAIBAJ&sjid=HBUEAAAAIBAJ&pg=6800,4985612&hl=en

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: bchris02 on 04/07/15 at 12:15 pm


That's childhood culture regarding cartoons and restaurants, NOT music, movies, and fashion (which are aimed at high school and college aged folks). My statement still applies. If people are nostalgic for their childhood, then that really says something about their choices in life. It isn't stuff beyond your control. You choose your path (and your attitude...).


I don't necessarily agree.  Childhood, being a time of simplicity, little responsibility, and the thrill of every experience being a new experience can be very nostalgic even for those satisfied with the choices they made later in life.  In addition, most people have loved ones that have passed on since they were children and that can invoke nostalgia.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Arrowstone on 04/07/15 at 1:18 pm

"typical 80s" to me is the early 80s (New Wave etc.) Why? Because that's when my parents were 20yo and that's the pop culture (along with the 70s) they were able to give to me. The late 80s don't say me anything pop culturally because I wasn't there and my parents were too old (or busy) to follow it, and it seems to me like a period full of change.
"typical 90s" to me is the mid 90s (flannel and Jurassic Park etc.) Why? because that's the earliest pop cultural period I can remember, being born in '92, and it had a different feel from say 1999.
My childhood (4-12?) was from 1996-2004, the peak being in 2000 I think; 2004 being a changeful year for me personally. That period ties the mid-90s, millennium-period and early 00s, and there is just so much to be nostalgic for.. can't choose..

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 04/07/15 at 1:36 pm

http://askar.ucoz.net/_vi/0/74085379.jpg
Donnie Brasco
http://ia.media-imdb.com/images/M/MV5BMTQ5MTU4MzQ5NF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMjY1OTM2MQ@@._V1_SX640_SY720_.jpg
LA Confidential
http://ia.media-imdb.com/images/M/MV5BMTY5MjYxMTM3OV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMTMzNDcxMQ@@._V1_SY317_CR3,0,214,317_AL_.jpg
Gang Related

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 04/07/15 at 2:22 pm


"typical 80s" to me is the early 80s (New Wave etc.) Why? Because that's when my parents were 20yo and that's the pop culture (along with the 70s) they were able to give to me. The late 80s don't say me anything pop culturally because I wasn't there and my parents were too old (or busy) to follow it, and it seems to me like a period full of change.
"typical 90s" to me is the mid 90s (flannel and Jurassic Park etc.) Why? because that's the earliest pop cultural period I can remember, being born in '92, and it had a different feel from say 1999.
My childhood (4-12?) was from 1996-2004, the peak being in 2000 I think; 2004 being a changeful year for me personally. That period ties the mid-90s, millennium-period and early 00s, and there is just so much to be nostalgic for.. can't choose..


Spot on!!  :) And typical 00s would be mid 2000s obviously

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: 90s Guy on 04/11/15 at 1:36 pm

I remember '97 as feeling like the last 'familiar' year...Like, the last year that'd have sat easily with '95 and '96...I feel '98 is when everything changed.

In my own personal life, '97 was a year of great change and transition. We'd moved into our new home in NJ in January '97 and spent most of the first half of the year working on it, with the bulk of the work being done by August '97. My sister was in a transitional phase, both of them--The older sister, who had moved out of home in April 1996, was experiencing her first full year with the man she'd later marry; my other sister was languishing, single, at my grandmother's house with her kids.

Constant trips to Home Depot, hated that place. I remember early-mid '97 still having that laid back mid '90s vibe, and I don't recall hearing about the Spice Girls or any such until maybe the late summer of '97. I feel like '97 should be divided into two halves--The first half being still mid '90s, the second half being the beginning of the late '90s.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: 90s Guy on 04/12/15 at 11:51 pm

Here's a good way to determine that 97 was indeed a transitional year:
In 1997, both Curse of Monkey Island, and Diablo, were HUGE in PC gaming.
One was the apex and last big moment for one genre of adventure games that had dominated one half of the '90s, the other was the harbinger of a new era that would dominate the rest of the decade and the early '00s.

This was the year Blizzard decided to make their own point and click adventure game--and would cancel it in May of 1998. By then, the late '90s were in full swing and the mood, even in PC games, had changed.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: ArcticFox on 04/13/15 at 1:05 pm

Tomb Raider was a huge hit that year. Tomb Raider II was released at the end of the year.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: ArcticFox on 04/13/15 at 1:35 pm


I feel '98 is when everything changed.


Not really.. I don't even remember that time period, but looking at it seems like there wasn't much change in '98. Iconic '90s Teen shows like "7th Heaven", "Part of Five", and "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" were at their peaks that year.

Staples of '90s fashion like block heels, go-go boots, baggy pants, chinos, short skirts, bleached hair on guys, the Rachel haircut, the flip, feathered hair, spiky hair, and leather coats and pants (both girls and guys!) were pretty much uniforms of '90s fashion by then.

Musically, most of the biggest songs of 1998 were released in 1997. 1998 and 1997 also shared a lot of the same songs (appearing on both Billboard year-end charts). Trackmaster's style production was everywhere that year. The last hit single by The Wallflowers and Oasis occurred in '98. Sheryl Crow's last '90s hit "My Favorite Mistake" was in 1998, and it sounded like it could have easily fit in with her previous album "Sheryl Crow", released in 1996. 112's second album "Room 112" (which was released in 1998) sounds more like their self-titled debut album "112" (which was released in 1996) than it does their third one (which was released in 2001).

Just my two cents.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 04/13/15 at 2:14 pm

This was the year Blizzard decided to make their own point and click adventure game--and would cancel it in May of 1998. By then, the late '90s were in full swing and the mood, even in PC games, had changed.

and Windows 98 was just a year away.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 04/13/15 at 2:53 pm


But during the 1997-1998 school year there was still no Pokemon and music wasn't entirely teen pop. Plus the NBA was still centered around Michael Jordan at that time. If anything the 1998-1999 school year was the first full school year that felt more so millenial than core 90s imo.


Pokemon did air in the 97-98 school year in Japan!! ;)

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 04/13/15 at 2:56 pm


Not really.. I don't even remember that time period, but looking at it seems like there wasn't much change in '98. Iconic '90s Teen shows like "7th Heaven", "Part of Five", and "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" were at their peaks that year.

Staples of '90s fashion like block heels, go-go boots, baggy pants, chinos, short skirts, bleached hair on guys, the Rachel haircut, the flip, feathered hair, spiky hair, and leather coats and pants (both girls and guys!) were pretty much uniforms of '90s fashion by then.

Musically, most of the biggest songs of 1998 were released in 1997. 1998 and 1997 also shared a lot of the same songs (appearing on both Billboard year-end charts). Trackmaster's style production was everywhere that year. The last hit single by The Wallflowers and Oasis occurred in '98. Sheryl Crow's last '90s hit "My Favorite Mistake" was in 1998, and it sounded like it could have easily fit in with her previous album "Sheryl Crow", released in 1996. 112's second album "Room 112" (which was released in 1998) sounds more like their self-titled debut album "
112" (which was released in 1996) than it does their third one (which was released in 2001).

Just my two cents.

I think what he was trying to say was that was when the millennium era hit full swing!!

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 05/06/15 at 2:39 pm

May 6th 1997 – The Bank of England is given independence from political control, the most significant change in the bank's 300-year history.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 05/08/15 at 1:08 am

May 8th 1997 – A China Southern Airlines Flight 3456 crashes on approach into Bao'an International Airport, killing 35 people.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 05/10/15 at 12:34 pm

May 10th 1997 – A 7.3 Mw earthquake strikes Iran's Khorasan Province, killing 1,567, injuring over 2,300, leaving 50,000 homeless, and damaging or destroying over 15,000 homes.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 05/10/15 at 12:34 pm

1997 – The Maeslantkering, a storm surge barrier in the Netherlands that is one of the world's largest moving structures, is opened by Queen Beatrix.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Katluver on 05/10/15 at 1:02 pm

I would say '97 was the first year of the "Millennium Period" (1997-2000) because that was when I started noticing "futuristic" fashion (ie. vinyl clothing), boy bands, princess artists/groups (ie. Spice Girls), less of that '90s cynicism, hopefulness of the future, and whimsical songs such as these:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=LQj--Kjn0z8
www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZyhrYis509A

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 05/10/15 at 1:17 pm


I would say '97 was the first year of the "Millennium Period" (1997-2000) because that was when I started noticing "futuristic" fashion (ie. vinyl clothing), boy bands, princess artists/groups (ie. Spice Girls), less of that '90s cynicism, hopefulness of the future, and whimsical songs such as these:
LQj--Kjn0z8
ZyhrYis509A
Links not working, take out the 'www.youtube.com/watch?v='

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 05/10/15 at 2:20 pm

https://sp.yimg.com/ib/th?id=JN.5dwtloW5IrwcPMyg%2f8PdaA&pid=15.1&P=0
Jungle 2 Jungle

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 05/14/15 at 3:14 pm

May 14th 1997 - Mark Morrison was jailed for three months after threatening a police officer with an electric stun gun, he was also ordered to pay £350 costs.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 05/16/15 at 6:14 am

May 16th 1997 – Mobutu Sese Seko, the President of Zaire, flees the country.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 05/17/15 at 9:10 am

1997 – Troops of Laurent Kabila march into Kinshasa. Zaire is officially renamed Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 05/19/15 at 4:21 am

May 19th 1997 – The Sierra Gorda biosphere, the most ecologically diverse region in Mexico, is established as a result of grassroots efforts.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 05/22/15 at 8:46 am

May 22nd 1997 – Kelly Flinn, the US Air Force's first female bomber pilot certified for combat, accepts a general discharge in order to avoid a court-martial.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 05/22/15 at 1:13 pm

http://cdn.cultofmac.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/final_fantasy_vii_sephiroth_cloud_strife_barret_tifa_desktop_1920x1200_hd-wallpaper-823489.jpg

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 05/22/15 at 1:14 pm

http://romhustler.net/img/screenshots/psx_full/title/50f72d3d46554.jpg

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 05/22/15 at 1:53 pm

http://gamerssphere.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/JBGE_box.jpg

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 05/22/15 at 9:32 pm

http://thedisneyblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/disney-recess.jpg
These guys made my morning!! 8)

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Fearsword on 05/26/15 at 8:10 pm

May 27, 1997-Central Texas tornado outbreak begins

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: mxcrashxm on 05/27/15 at 2:44 pm

http://img4.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20090608175139/nickelodeon/images/c/c7/The_Angry_Beavers_%3D_002.png

http://carbonclothing.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/cow-and-chicken-official-shirts.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/7e/Mario_Kart_64box.png

http://vignette1.wikia.nocookie.net/kirby/images/a/ad/Kirby's_Dream_Land_3_Title_Screen.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20091107031607&path-prefix=en

http://ia.media-imdb.com/images/M/MV5BMTI5NTI3OTAyOV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMTg3ODkxMQ@@._V1_SX640_SY720_.jpg

http://ia.media-imdb.com/images/M/MV5BMTM1MTk2ODQxNV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwOTY5MDg0NA@@._V1_SX640_SY720_.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/75/The_Notorious_B.I.G._-_Hypnotize.jpg]

http://media4.popsugar-assets.com/files/2012/06/23/2/192/1922283/bf070f0ac1124f7a_aqua-babrbie-girl.xxxlarge/i/Barbie-Girl-Aqua.jpg

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 05/28/15 at 2:48 pm


I would say '97 was the first year of the "Millennium Period" (1997-2000) because that was when I started noticing "futuristic" fashion (ie. vinyl clothing), boy bands, princess artists/groups (ie. Spice Girls), less of that '90s cynicism, hopefulness of the future, and whimsical songs such as these:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=LQj--Kjn0z8
www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZyhrYis509A


We were definitely getting closer to 1999 in 1997. '97 was still very much a '90s year.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 06/06/15 at 3:04 am

June 6th 1997 – Prom Mom incident: While attending her senior prom in Lacey Township, New Jersey, Melissa Drexler gives birth in a bathroom stall, leaves the baby to die in a trash can and then returns to the prom.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 06/06/15 at 7:03 am


June 6th 1997 – Prom Mom incident: While attending her senior prom in Lacey Township, New Jersey, Melissa Drexler gives birth in a bathroom stall, leaves the baby to die in a trash can and then returns to the prom.


Disgusting! >:(

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: #Infinity on 06/07/15 at 6:00 pm

Honestly, I think 1997 is much more easily lumped with 1998-2001 than with the early and mid-90s.  Pop culture changed a LOT around late 1996 to early 1997, due to the deaths of 2Pac and Biggie, the rise of Bad Boy Records and materialistic hip hop in general, the release of several definitive fifth generation video games (and the transition from 2D to 3D in general), the teen pop explosion, the advent of the Internet, and the beginning of Clinton's second term in office.  I think the early and mid-1990s were much more rebellious and introspective, whereas 1997 to 2001 was rather carefree and optimistic.  The only thing that truly separates 1997 from 1998, in my opinion, is the nu-metal craze that began on August 18, 1998 with the releases of Devil Without a Cause and Follow the Leader.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 06/10/15 at 5:14 am

June 10th 1997 – Before fleeing his northern stronghold, Khmer Rouge leader Pol Pot orders the killing of his defense chief Son Sen and 11 of Sen's family members.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 06/12/15 at 7:59 pm


Honestly, I think 1997 is much more easily lumped with 1998-2001 than with the early and mid-90s.  Pop culture changed a LOT around late 1996 to early 1997, due to the deaths of 2Pac and Biggie, the rise of Bad Boy Records and materialistic hip hop in general, the release of several definitive fifth generation video games (and the transition from 2D to 3D in general), the teen pop explosion, the advent of the Internet, and the beginning of Clinton's second term in office.  I think the early and mid-1990s were much more rebellious and introspective, whereas 1997 to 2001 was rather carefree and optimistic.  The only thing that truly separates 1997 from 1998, in my opinion, is the nu-metal craze that began on August 18, 1998 with the releases of Devil Without a Cause and Follow the Leader.
You really think that 1997 was closer pop culturally to 2001 than to 1996? I think that 1997 was closer pop culturally to 1996 than it was even to 1999.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: ArcticFox on 06/13/15 at 12:26 am


You really think that 1997 was closer pop culturally to 2001 than to 1996? I think that 1997 was closer pop culturally to 1996 than it was even to 1999.


My most flexible philosophy: Regarding popular culture, if a year is four years away or less from a certain calendar year, then it is still relevant and contemporary, regardless of how different they may be. If it is five years or more, then it has to be different, regardless of how similar they may be.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: bchris02 on 06/13/15 at 8:07 pm


You really think that 1997 was closer pop culturally to 2001 than to 1996? I think that 1997 was closer pop culturally to 1996 than it was even to 1999.


I agree with this. Millennial culture started emerging in the 1997-98 school year so you maybe could make a case that the fall of '97 was in that era but it didn't kick into full gear until 1998.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: tv on 06/13/15 at 8:49 pm


June 6th 1997 – Prom Mom incident: While attending her senior prom in Lacey Township, New Jersey, Melissa Drexler gives birth in a bathroom stall, leaves the baby to die in a trash can and then returns to the prom.
I remember hearing about that at the time I think.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: tv on 06/13/15 at 8:55 pm


Does anybody here believe that 1997 for the most part was culturally closer to 1995 than to 1999?
1999 if had to pick one because teen-pop was around in 1997 but in 1995 there was no teen-pop. Grunge Bands were still popular in the 1995-1996 school year like Alice In Chains, Soundgarden, and Stone Temple Pilots but those bands were on their last legs popularity wise. Stone Temple Pilots did have a hit with "Sour Girl" in 1999 though.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: tv on 06/13/15 at 9:00 pm


I agree with this. Millennial culture started emerging in the 1997-98 school year so you maybe could make a case that the fall of '97 was in that era but it didn't kick into full gear until 1998.
Yeah I remember 2 of my classmates not liking Puffy or Mase in our Senior Year of High School. They liked the "Gangsta-Rap era" of 1992-1996 but they didn't like Puffy or Mase though in 1997-1998.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: tv on 06/13/15 at 9:11 pm


Honestly, I think 1997 is much more easily lumped with 1998-2001 than with the early and mid-90s.  Pop culture changed a LOT around late 1996 to early 1997, due to the deaths of 2Pac and Biggie, the rise of Bad Boy Records and materialistic hip hop in general, the release of several definitive fifth generation video games (and the transition from 2D to 3D in general), the teen pop explosion, the advent of the Internet, and the beginning of Clinton's second term in office.  I think the early and mid-1990s were much more rebellious and introspective, whereas 1997 to 2001 was rather carefree and optimistic.  The only thing that truly separates 1997 from 1998, in my opinion, is the nu-metal craze that began on August 18, 1998 with the releases of Devil Without a Cause and Follow the Leader.
The rap-metal craze has roots in 1995-1996 with Korn, The Deftones, and even with" Rage Against The Machine" but it exploded in 1999 though I think with Limp Bizkit and Korn's popularity going through the roof. Limp Bizkit had just debut in 1997 with their first album.

Good point about Clinton starting his second term in January of 1997 and music changing that year too.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 06/13/15 at 9:42 pm


My most flexible philosophy: Regarding popular culture, if a year is four years away or less from a certain calendar year, then it is still relevant and contemporary, regardless of how different they may be. If it is five years or more, then it has to be different, regardless of how similar they may be.
I guess you have a point there about a particular year having some similarities with years that either precede or follow it by 4 years.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 06/13/15 at 9:56 pm


1999 if had to pick one because teen-pop was around in 1997 but in 1995 there was no teen-pop. Grunge Bands were still popular in the 1995-1996 school year like Alice In Chains, Soundgarden, and Stone Temple Pilots but those bands were on their last legs popularity wise. Stone Temple Pilots did have a hit with "Sour Girl" in 1999 though.
There may have been an early emergence of teen pop in 1997 but you have to remember that in 1997 grunge was still very much prevalent up until the summer of that year and many things that were popular in 1999 that one would associate with the millenial era wasn't even out yet in 1997, and another thing to note is that DVDs were not available on the market for much of 1997  until late that year, whereas in 1999 DVDs were already gaining popularity in the market place. These are some of the reasons why I believe 1997 for the mid part is cultural closer to 1995 than to 1999 and really tie 1999 more into the same cultural era as 2001 rather than 1997. Yes, teen pop may have started to emerge by 1997 it wasn't ubiquitous like it was in 1999 they still had more club hits than teen pop in 1997.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Gdowe1991 on 06/13/15 at 10:26 pm


I agree with this. Millennial culture started emerging in the 1997-98 school year so you maybe could make a case that the fall of '97 was in that era but it didn't kick into full gear until 1998.
Well I wouldn't say that the 1997-1998 school year started the millenial era as yet from what I remember.That school year may not have been part of the absolute core 90s era but I don't think it was part of the millenial era either, as during that time the backstreet boys were only just starting to get big and we still didn't have Britney Spears or Christina Aguilera on the music scene as yet. I would have to say that the earliest point to say that millenial culture started the earliest by the summer of 1998 and even that is a bit of a stretch to say the millenial era started as alot of things that defined the millenial era were still not around. It was pretty clear by late 1998 that millenial culture was spread around. When I think of CORE millenial culture, I often think of 1999 and the very early 2000s up until around the first half or summer of 2001.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: SpyroKev on 06/13/15 at 11:04 pm

I was 6 and turned 7 closed to the end of 97. I would say it wasn't exactly the core 90s. It was more pretty modern. Blockbuster was rather at its prime. It was our source for video games at the time. We rented Donkey Kong and I was blown away by the graphics. The Sega Genesis was still relevant, while the SNES was less relevant. The music I remember hearing then was Usher - Nice & Slow, Jon B - They Don't Know, Brian McKnight - Anytime, Usher - U Make Wanna, Next - Too Close, Biggie Smalls - Big Poppa, Aaliyah - One In A Million and Backstreet Boys - Rock Your Body, which still sound modern. 1997 just belonged to the Late 90s.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: bchris02 on 06/14/15 at 9:29 pm


Well I wouldn't say that the 1997-1998 school year started the millenial era as yet from what I remember.That school year may not have been part of the absolute core 90s era but I don't think it was part of the millenial era either, as during that time the backstreet boys were only just starting to get big and we still didn't have Britney Spears or Christina Aguilera on the music scene as yet. I would have to say that the earliest point to say that millenial culture started the earliest by the summer of 1998 and even that is a bit of a stretch to say the millenial era started as alot of things that defined the millenial era were still not around. It was pretty clear by late 1998 that millenial culture was spread around. When I think of CORE millenial culture, I often think of 1999 and the very early 2000s up until around the first half or summer of 2001.


...Baby One More Time came out in the fall of 1998.  That year also saw hits by Destiny's Child, Blink 182, and Limp Bizkit.  N'Sync and the Backstreet Boys were rising in popularity.  Maybe it really kicked into gear in the 1998-99 school year but there were definite signs of it in the 1997-98 school year.  The 1996-97 school year however is definitely core 90s.  You still had strong Grunge influence, euro-dance, and pop ballads in 1997 especially the first half.  In the fall of 1997 you had Hanson, the Spice Girls, and "No Diggity" by Blackstreet which were the first signs of the millennial era in music.  That is why I say the 1997-98 school year started the millennial era.  Like the transition from the '00s to '10s however, it didn't happen overnight.  However, the '90s sound and especially eurodance vanished pretty quick and clean towards the end of 1997.  It was basically the opposite of what happened with post grunge and ringtone rap, both having died very slow deaths in the late '00s and early '10s.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: ArcticFox on 06/14/15 at 10:43 pm


In the fall of 1997 you had Hanson, the Spice Girls, and "No Diggity" by Blackstreet which were the first signs of the millennial era in music.


Actually "No Diggity" was a 1996-1997 school year song: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/No_Diggity

It was popular in both '96 and '97, becoming the 36th most successful song of the 1990s.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Howard on 06/15/15 at 1:46 pm

http://ia.media-imdb.com/images/M/MV5BMTk0NjY0Mzg5MF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwNzM1OTM2MQ@@._V1_SX640_SY720_.jpg
Good Will Hunting
http://ia.media-imdb.com/images/M/MV5BNjYwMTI0NzUzOV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwNjk3NjQxMTE@._V1_SX640_SY720_.jpg
Donnie Brasco

http://www.selenaforever.com/Selena_The_Movie/images/Selena_The_Movie.jpg
Selena

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: J. Rob on 06/15/15 at 9:54 pm

The first half of 97 was definitely felt "90s" to me......that really start to change around July or August.....I remember hearing songs like Sugar Ray - Fly, Usher - You Make Me Wanna, Missy Elliott - The Rain, and just really being thrown off by them. This was also around the time TV shows started to get that hi-def look that we see today. I thought it looked terrible at the time. LOL

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: bchris02 on 06/15/15 at 11:33 pm


The first half of 97 was definitely felt "90s" to me......that really start to change around July or August.....I remember hearing songs like Sugar Ray - Fly, Usher - You Make Me Wanna, Missy Elliott - The Rain, and just really being thrown off by them. This was also around the time TV shows started to get that hi-def look that we see today. I thought it looked terrible at the time. LOL


I wouldn't say 1997 is when TV went high-def.  HDTV didn't really explode in popularity until the middle to late 2000s.  What did happen around 1997 is digital video emerged to replace the tape-based video of the past.  DVD had come out and was beginning to replace VHS, something Laserdisc never was able to do.  Some cable companies were starting to roll out digital cable service, which at the time was a huge improvement over analog in number of channels and picture quality.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: 90s Guy on 06/16/15 at 7:00 pm

What sort of fashions were there in '97?

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: bchris02 on 06/16/15 at 11:39 pm


What sort of fashions were there in '97?


In '97 I wore JNCOs and XXXL t-shirts.  I wore that until 1999 when I switched to more of a preppy look.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: tv on 06/22/15 at 12:31 am


...Baby One More Time came out in the fall of 1998.  That year also saw hits by Destiny's Child, Blink 182, and Limp Bizkit.  N'Sync and the Backstreet Boys were rising in popularity.  Maybe it really kicked into gear in the 1998-99 school year but there were definite signs of it in the 1997-98 school year.  The 1996-97 school year however is definitely core 90s.  You still had strong Grunge influence, euro-dance, and pop ballads in 1997 especially the first half.  In the fall of 1997 you had Hanson, the Spice Girls, and "No Diggity" by Blackstreet which were the first signs of the millennial era in music.  That is why I say the 1997-98 school year started the millennial era.  Like the transition from the '00s to '10s however, it didn't happen overnight.  However, the '90s sound and especially eurodance vanished pretty quick and clean towards the end of 1997.  It was basically the opposite of what happened with post grunge and ringtone rap, both having died very slow deaths in the late '00s and early '10s.
Yeah I just read that sentence and remembered that song "Ohh Ah....Just A Little Bit" by "Gina G" I think that was one of the last 1990's Euro-Dance hits in the US. That song might have been a hit in early 1997 because Wikipedia said it was released in late 1996 as a single. I always thought that song was a hit in the US in late 1997.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 06/22/15 at 9:06 am


Yeah I just read that sentence and remembered that song "Ohh Ah....Just A Little Bit" by "Gina G" I think that was one of the last 1990's Euro-Dance hits in the US. That song might have been a hit in early 1997 because Wikipedia said it was released in late 1996 as a single. I always thought that song was a hit in the US in late 1997.
"Ohh Ah....Just A Little Bit" first released in the UK in March 1996 as it was the UK Eurovision Song Contest entry for that year.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: bchris02 on 06/22/15 at 5:05 pm


Yeah I just read that sentence and remembered that song "Ohh Ah....Just A Little Bit" by "Gina G" I think that was one of the last 1990's Euro-Dance hits in the US. That song might have been a hit in early 1997 because Wikipedia said it was released in late 1996 as a single. I always thought that song was a hit in the US in late 1997.


I remember hearing it in late 1996 into early 1997.  Because it was popular in the US well into 1997, I consider it to be a relevant hit that year.  In addition, the following songs are among the last of the euro-dance hits and were also popular in 1997.  That year was kind of a last hurrah for the genre.

Le Click - Call Me
Mr. President - Coco Jambo
Aqua - Barbie Girl

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 06/26/15 at 9:45 am

June 26th 1997 – The U.S. Supreme Court rules that the Communications Decency Act violates the First Amendment to the United States Constitution.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 06/30/15 at 4:56 am

June 30th 1997 – The United Kingdom transfers sovereignty over Hong Kong to the People's Republic of China.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Inlandsvägen1986 on 06/30/15 at 9:10 am


The first half of 97 was definitely felt "90s" to me


When it was the 90s, it actually felt 90s until December 31st, 1999, because we weren't used to the 00s at this point of time. Our perception changed once we got deeper into the 00s and 10s.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/04/15 at 3:15 am

July 4th 1997 – NASA's Pathfinder space probe lands on the surface of Mars.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: bchris02 on 07/05/15 at 3:24 pm


When it was the 90s, it actually felt 90s until December 31st, 1999, because we weren't used to the 00s at this point of time. Our perception changed once we got deeper into the 00s and 10s.


Correct.  I still consider 1998 through late 2001 to be its own era.  It wasn't purely 90s and wasn't purely 00s.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 07/05/15 at 6:47 pm


Correct.  I still consider 1998 through late 2001 to be its own era.  It wasn't purely 90s and wasn't purely 00s.

yes the millennium period!!!

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: ArcticFox on 07/06/15 at 7:37 pm


I would say '97 was the first year of the "Millennium Period" (1997-2000) because that was when I started noticing "futuristic" fashion (ie. vinyl clothing), boy bands, princess artists/groups (ie. Spice Girls), less of that '90s cynicism, hopefulness of the future, and whimsical songs such as these:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LQj--Kjn0z8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZyhrYis509A


My mom said shiny clothing kicked off in the mid '90s. Where did you live? How old were you? What were people wearing before you noticed futuristic fashion?

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/07/15 at 2:13 am

July 7th 1997 – The Turkish Armed Forces withdraw from northern Iraq after assisting the Kurdistan Democratic Party in the Iraqi Kurdish Civil War.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/10/15 at 2:13 am

July 10th 1997 – In London scientists report the findings of the DNA analysis of a Neanderthal skeleton which supports the "out of Africa theory" of human evolution placing an "African Eve" at 100,000 to 200,000 years ago.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/10/15 at 2:14 am

July 10th 1997 – Miguel Ángel Blanco, a member of Partido Popular (Spain), is kidnapped in the Basque city of Ermua by ETA members, sparking widespread protests.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/15/15 at 8:22 am

July 15th 1997 – In Miami, Florida, serial killer Andrew Cunanan guns down Gianni Versace outside his home.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/19/15 at 5:08 am

July 19th 1997 – The Provisional Irish Republican Army permanently resumed its ceasefire to end its 25-year campaign against British rule in Northern Ireland.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/23/15 at 3:31 am

July 23rd 1997 – Digital Equipment Corporation files antitrust charges against chipmaker Intel.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/23/15 at 3:31 am

1999 – Mohammed VI becomes King of Morocco.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/30/15 at 3:13 pm

July 30th 1997 - A judge in Los Angeles ruled that Michael Jackson and members of his family were not liable for losses incurred by the producers of the failed 1994 Jackson Family Honors TV special. The show was delayed for several weeks because Jackson was ill and could not perform solo as expected.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 08/03/15 at 4:26 am

August 3rd 1997 – Oued El-Had and Mezouara massacre in Algeria; a total of 116 villagers killed, 40 in Oued El-Had and 76 in Mezouara.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 08/07/15 at 9:28 am

August 7th 1997 - Garth Brooks played to the largest crowd ever in New York's Central Park. An estimated 1 million people attended the live concert with an additional 14.6 million viewing live on HBO.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 08/31/15 at 12:52 pm

August 31st 1997 – Diana, Princess of Wales, her companion Dodi Fayed and driver Henri Paul die in a car crash in Paris.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 09/01/15 at 5:58 am

September 1st 1997 - Steve Jobs returns to Apple Computer, Inc at Macworld in Boston.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 09/03/15 at 5:32 am

September 3rd 1997 – Vietnam Airlines Flight 815 (Tupolev Tu-134) crashes on approach into Phnom Penh airport, killing 64.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 09/06/15 at 3:52 am

September 6th 1997 – The Funeral of Diana, Princess of Wales takes place in London. Well over a million people lined the streets and 2.5 billion watched around the world on television.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 09/07/15 at 11:46 am

September 7th 1997 - Fleetwood Mac went to No.1 on the US album chart with 'The Dance'. The album went on sell over 5 million copies in the US alone.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 09/14/15 at 2:28 pm

September 14th 1997 -Over 2000 fans watched Pete Townshend unveil a English Heritage Blue Plaque at 23 Brook Street, Mayfair London, to mark where Jimi Hendrix had lived in 1968-69. Hendrix was the first pop star to be awarded with the plaque.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 09/18/15 at 7:34 am

September 18th 1997 – Al-Qaeda carried out a terrorist attack in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Philip Eno on 09/18/15 at 7:35 am

September 18th 1997 – United States media magnate Ted Turner donates US$1 billion to the United Nations.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Baltimoreian on 01/23/16 at 6:42 pm


I can't  name one showI liked from the EXTREMELY (stupid) mid 90s and JIGGY late 90s.


Wow. That's depressing. I don't like this decade in general, but at least I could name a few show that I liked from the early-mid 2010s. God, if you barely watched TV back then, then your adolescent years must've been really boring as crap.

Subject: Re: 1997 cultural debate

Written By: Baltimoreian on 01/24/16 at 2:18 pm


Were you not a child in the mid and late 90s?


I don't think that was his point. His point was that the whole article you linked was about childhood culture in the 90s. He might be a mid-late 90s kid, but that doesn't excuse your stereotypes on people's ages.

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