inthe00s
The Pop Culture Information Society...

These are the messages that have been posted on inthe00s over the past few years.

Check out the messageboard archive index for a complete list of topic areas.

This archive is periodically refreshed with the latest messages from the current messageboard.




Check for new replies or respond here...

Subject: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: Zelek on 11/09/15 at 7:43 pm

I've heard some people say that the 80s "lasted until 1994" in certain respects, similar to how the late 90s residue lasted until 2004. The neon colors of the early 90s, for example, seemed very 80s-inspired, and 80s shows were being rerun prominently.

Agree or disagree with this?

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/09/15 at 8:38 pm


I've heard some people say that the 80s "lasted until 1994" in certain respects, similar to how the late 90s residue lasted until 2004. The neon colors of the early 90s, for example, seemed very 80s-inspired, and 80s shows were being rerun prominently.

Agree or disagree with this?


True '80s culture: Jaws movie sequels, the TV show Definition, the Breakin' movies, the modern version of American Bandstand, Hot Dog magazine (rival to Dynamite magazine) and everything else introduced before 1978 that disappeared before 1990.

You are confusing what CAME OUT OF THE '80s for "80s culture". The spirit of the year 1990 perished completely in 1999. 1999 did not have sequels to films that came out in the actual '80s years and before, cheesy commercials like the Baby Bottle Pop commercial from 1998 (la6d5FafgTk), or any action figure lines that could pass as the ones first sold from 1979 to 1990.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: bchris02 on 11/09/15 at 9:47 pm

My personal opinion is that the '80s zeitgeist persisted through the Bush '41 era.  There was a significant one-in-a-generation cultural shift in 1992 not much different from what happened in 2008.  The true '90s began at the beginning of 1993 when Bill Clinton was inaugurated.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 11/09/15 at 10:15 pm

I think 1991 was about the time that 90s culture established itself above 80s culture.  By then, house, eurodance, and non-gated drum new-jack swing were dominant music styles, Sonic the Hedgehog had come out on the Sega Genesis, the Super Nintendo was launched, The Simpsons had officially entered its golden era (no longer the early Bartmania-era), the first Nicktoons made their tv premiere, and new rock movements spearheaded by Metallica, RHCP, R.E.M., and Nirvana were picking up steam.

However, 80s influences didn't die completely until about early 1993.  Up until that point, hair metal bands like Def Leppard and FireHouse were still highly successful, shows like Cheers and The Cosby Show were on TV, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles was still pretty relevant (before the third movie), Bush the Elder was still President of the United States, and mainstream hip hop was still mostly just a tame dance genre instead of relentlessly profane gangsta rap.  Things such as pencil top hair and new wave bands held out for about a year longer, though 1993 was still the first 90s year that felt completely separate from the 80s as a whole.


True '80s culture: Jaws movie sequels, the TV show Definition, the Breakin' movies, the modern version of American Bandstand, Hot Dog magazine (rival to Dynamite magazine) and everything else introduced before 1978 that disappeared before 1990.

You are confusing what CAME OUT OF THE '80s for "80s culture". The spirit of the year 1990 perished completely in 1999. 1999 did not have sequels to films that came out in the actual '80s years and before, cheesy commercials like the Baby Bottle Pop commercial from 1998 (la6d5FafgTk), or any action figure lines that could pass as the ones first sold from 1979 to 1990.


The 80s are NOT the 1978's, the 90s are not the Year-1990's, and the 2000s are not the 1999's.  They're all their own, separate years and don't look at an arbitrary year into the future as they go on.  If Ronald Reagan, yuppies, macho action flicks, and MTV aren't true 80s culture, then I don't know what is.  You have GOT to be kidding me if you think the atrocious Jaws 3D and Jaws: The Revenge are more important than stuff like the Indiana Jones and Ghostbusters movies just because they're sequels released in the 1980s that happen to be based on a movie originally released in 1975.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: ocarinafan96 on 11/09/15 at 10:26 pm

Well I'm watching Clarissa Explains It All right now, the epitome of mish mash late 80's/early 90's trends  ;D ;D ;D

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: Jquar on 11/10/15 at 2:56 am

As a rule of thumb I say that most pop cultural things generally start to look pretty old after 5 years or so, so the last of the '80s trends looked pretty dated by the end of 1994. As far as cultural similarities go, there's a ton of things from 1990, a bunch from 1991, a lot from 1992, a fair few from 1993, and maybe a small number of things from 1994. But you're really, really not going to easily mistake too many cultural artifacts from 1995 or later for being from the late 1980s.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/10/15 at 9:04 am


The 80s are NOT the 1978's, the 90s are not the Year-1990's, and the 2000s are not the 1999's.  They're all their own, separate years and don't look at an arbitrary year into the future as they go on.  If Ronald Reagan, yuppies, macho action flicks, and MTV aren't true 80s culture, then I don't know what is.  You have GOT to be kidding me if you think the atrocious Jaws 3D and Jaws: The Revenge are more important than stuff like the Indiana Jones and Ghostbusters movies just because they're sequels released in the 1980s that happen to be based on a movie originally released in 1975.


You were not even born until 1992, how did you become such an expert on the 1980s overnight? So you go by the Gregorian calendars, that does not mean that everyone should. I'm sorry, but every event of the '80s points us in the direction of the year 1990. Without Reganites, Bush 41 would not be in office by the start of 1990. Yuppies were still walking with large cellphones in NYC during the spring of 1990. Predator 2 and Die Hard 2: Die Harder were mucho action flicks right? They are not cult films like their predecessors but they were in theaters in the year 1990. MTV was last known as "music Televison" by all from the start of 1990 until the fall of 1991. Was the Jaws video game by LJN not sold at the antique shop in Back to the Future 2? The final installment of the Jaws movie series was released in 1987. The Ghostbusters and Indiana Jones were not exclusive to the 1980s; I remember seeing The Real Ghostbusters on ABC in the first month of 1992 and The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles in September of that year. Please stop trying to teach an old dog new tricks. :)

Magnum PI and The A-Team were not the only shows on Television in 1983, Little House on the Prairie was just as much a part of that time as the two aforementioned programs. I'm tired of hearing people referring to what came of the '80s as "80s culture".

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: Todd Pettingzoo on 11/10/15 at 9:16 am

'80s hair on everyday people was fairly common up until 1997 or so.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/10/15 at 9:18 am


'80s hair lasted the longest.


If '80s hair lasted the longest than we do you think of it as '80s hair? Why not just call it big hair?

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: Todd Pettingzoo on 11/10/15 at 9:21 am


If '80s hair lasted the longest than we do you think of it as '80s hair? Why not just call it big hair?


Okay big hair was fairly common on everyday average people up until 1997 or so. After that, it's becomes "Where's Waldo?"

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/10/15 at 9:29 am


Okay big hair was fairly common on everyday average people up until 1997 or so. After that, it's becomes "Where's Waldo?"


As I said earlier, the spirit of the year 1990 lived on until 1999. ;)

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/10/15 at 9:34 am


Well I'm watching Clarissa Explains It All right now, the epitome of mish mash late 80's/early 90's trends  ;D ;D ;D


More like HW Bush era and 1st Clinton term trends.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 11/10/15 at 2:27 pm


You were not even born until 1992, how did you become such an expert on the 1980s overnight? So you go by the Gregorian calendars, that does not mean that everyone should. I'm sorry, but every event of the '80s points us in the direction of the year 1990. Without Reganites, Bush 41 would not be in office by the start of 1990. Yuppies were still walking with large cellphones in NYC during the spring of 1990. Predator 2 and Die Hard 2: Die Harder were mucho action flicks right? They are not cult films like their predecessors but they were in theaters in the year 1990. MTV was last known as "music Televison" by all from the start of 1990 until the fall of 1991. Was the Jaws video game by LJN not sold at the antique shop in Back to the Future 2? The final installment of the Jaws movie series was released in 1987. The Ghostbusters and Indiana Jones were not exclusive to the 1980s; I remember seeing The Real Ghostbusters on ABC in the first month of 1992 and The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles in September of that year. Please stop trying to teach an old dog new tricks. :)


I know damn well that all of those sequels, video games, and other spin-off products came out during the years following their original films, and that Reagan's Administration made Bush '41's administration possible, I just don't artificially associate them all strictly with 1990 like you do.  And once again, you're pathetically hiding behind your age as if that makes you a wizard on decade culture.  I can say all of this and more, but in the end, it seems nothing will ever stop your myopic tirade.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/10/15 at 2:41 pm


I know damn well that all of those sequels, video games, and other spin-off products came out during the years following their original films, and that Reagan's Administration made Bush '41's administration possible, I just don't artificially associate them all strictly with 1990 like you do.  And once again, you're pathetically hiding behind your age as if that makes you a wizard on decade culture.  I can say all of this and more, but in the end, it seems nothing will ever stop your myopic tirade.


How old is he, anyway? Didn't he say he was born in '77 on another thread or something?

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 11/10/15 at 2:49 pm


How old is he, anyway? Didn't he say he was born in '77 on another thread or something?


Only 1977?  He acts like he was born in the early 70s or before.  What gives him the special right to define the 80s as the decade of Star Wars, Garfield, and sequels to 70s movies, then?

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/10/15 at 2:58 pm


Only 1977?  He acts like he was born in the early 70s or before.  What gives him the special right to define the 80s as the decade of Star Wars, Garfield, and sequels to 70s movies, then?


I am not sure. I just remember someone making a joke about how he was 13 in 1990 and being a computer whiz with Windows 3.0.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 11/10/15 at 4:29 pm


Only 1977?  He acts like he was born in the early 70s or before.  What gives him the special right to define the 80s as the decade of Star Wars, Garfield, and sequels to 70s movies, then?



I am not sure. I just remember someone making a joke about how he was 13 in 1990 and being a computer whiz with Windows 3.0.


He acts like a know-it-all when he doesn't even remember the 70s and the early 80s very well. That's why the whole 80s began in 1978 doesn't make sense because once again, the 70s were not even over yet. In addition, he has judged others for having different viewpoints than him regarding the decades we talk about. I think I recall reading some of Early90sGuy's posts saying that he despises us (The Millennials/Yers) and that we don't know to handle the truth or be bold and strong.

BTW, since he stated he was born in 1977, Early90sGuy wouldn't even be considered a pure Xer; he's actually part of the X/Y transition.

Here are two threads he was arguing with me and other people (most are our generation) on.

http://www.inthe00s.com/index.php?topic=50492.0

http://www.inthe00s.com/index.php?topic=51252.0

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: 80sfan on 11/10/15 at 4:34 pm

1993, or 1994?

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/10/15 at 4:43 pm


He acts like a know-it-all when he doesn't even remember the 70s and the early 80s very well. That's why the whole 80s began in 1978 doesn't make sense because once again, the 70s were not even over yet. In addition, he has judged others for having different viewpoints than him regarding the decades we talk about. I think I recall reading some of Early90sGuy's posts saying that he despises us (The Millennials/Yers) and that we don't know to handle the truth or be bold and strong.

BTW, since he stated he was born in 1977, Early90sGuy wouldn't even be considered a pure Xer; he's actually part of the X/Y transition.

Here are two threads he was arguing with me and other people (most are our generation) on.

http://www.inthe00s.com/index.php?topic=50492.0

http://www.inthe00s.com/index.php?topic=51252.0


This looks like it'll be a fun read! Why does he say "leave 1990-1993 out of it" in that one thread? I thought he hated everything after December 31st 1992???


1993, or 1994?


I like to make it easier for myself and just say that when Beavis and Butthead premiered on March 8th in 1993, that is when the 80's ended completely. 1994 seems slightly late.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: ocarinafan96 on 11/10/15 at 4:47 pm


More like HW Bush era and 1st Clinton term trends.


Yeah and wasn't HW president for the late 80's/early 90's. That was my point

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: bchris02 on 11/10/15 at 5:12 pm


Yeah and wasn't HW president for the late 80's/early 90's. That was my point


In my opinion, the HW Bush era has more in common with the Reagan era than it does the Clinton era.  His first term was the death throws of the 80s and Clinton's election was the result of the cultural shift that occurred around that time (post-Cold War, more liberal, more focus on domestic policy vs foreign policy).

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 11/10/15 at 5:15 pm


This looks like it'll be a fun read! Why does he say "leave 1990-1993 out of it" in that one thread? I thought he hated everything after December 31st 1992???


Yeah, everything he's stating seems to contradict himself overall. He says 1992 was the last year where pop culture was wonderful and original (to him) and that 1993 was when everything was awful and was full of ripoffs; however, I've seen him slide the first half of 1993 into being the last greatest for pop culture. So, the points Early90sGuy makes is basically biased and he doesn't seem to back it up with research and facts. In addition, I even asked him sometime ago on that if Bush 1 won the 1992 election would he like the mid 90s much better and he replied with a no.

In the end, Early90sGuy's statements are clearly contradictory and he refuses to acknowledge that.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/10/15 at 5:20 pm


Yeah, everything he's stating seems to contradict himself overall. He says 1992 was the last year where pop culture was wonderful and original (to him) and that 1993 was when everything was awful and was full of ripoffs; however, I've seen him slide the first half of 1993 into being the last greatest for pop culture. So, the points Early90sGuy makes is basically biased and he doesn't seem to back it up with research and facts. In addition, I even asked him sometime ago on that if Bush 1 won the 1992 election would he like the mid 90s much better and he replied with a no.

In the end, Early90sGuy's statements are clearly contradictory and he refuses to acknowledge that.


And another thing! He says "1990 is the beginning of the 90's" yet in the thread he states

"1990-1993 was more of an extension to late '88/1989 primarily." He keeps going back and forth between "1993 sucked!" and "1993 ruled!" Too confusing. Even my theories about the early 00's are more consistent then this!

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/10/15 at 5:23 pm


I know damn well that all of those sequels, video games, and other spin-off products came out during the years following their original films, and that Reagan's Administration made Bush '41's administration possible, I just don't artificially associate them all strictly with 1990 like you do. 


You do not do that because you were not alive in 1990.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/10/15 at 5:25 pm


You do not do that because you were not alive in 1990.


Dude, I got a few questions.

1. In another thread you said that 1990-1992 was 1989 split into three years but now you're saying that all those year were just build ups to 1990. What gives?

2. You were born in 1977, right?

3. 1993: Good year or bad year. You keep bouncing back and forth.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/10/15 at 5:27 pm


Only 1977?  He acts like he was born in the early 70s or before.  What gives him the special right to define the 80s as the decade of Star Wars, Garfield, and sequels to 70s movies, then?


Well, I am a child of the 1980s, but I guess that is irrelevant here. ::)

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 11/10/15 at 5:30 pm


And another thing! He says "1990 is the beginning of the 90's" yet in the thread he states

"1990-1993 was more of an extension to late '88/1989 primarily." He keeps going back and forth between "1993 sucked!" and "1993 ruled!" Too confusing. Even my theories about the early 00's are more consistent then this!


Right! And yet, he still doesn't back it up with facts.

Like Infinity stated, he seems to have an obsession with 1990 and it seems like he has mixed feelings with 1993 as well.

Your points about the early 00s are much better than Early90sGuy's statements about the early 90s.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/10/15 at 5:36 pm


Right! And yet, he still doesn't back it up with facts.

Like Infinity stated, he seems to have an obsession with 1990 and it seems like he has mixed feelings with 1993 as well.

Your points about the early 00s are much better than Early90sGuy's statements about the early 90s.


But he also says he wishes he could hope into a time machine and go back to 1991 because, and I quote: "I wish I could hop in Doc's Delorean and go back to 1991 right now! In '91, I stumbled upon Kelly Kapowski after checking out Prostars with my younger cousins. I was lost in her Pearl blue eyes right away! I already thought Paula Abdul was a "hottie" (as we put it back then) before the "Rush Rush" music video premiered on MTV. I came so close to getting a pair of Ewing 33 sneakers at the beginning of the year. I mastered "the split" just before the summer. I'm sure my friends are embarrassed to admit this today, but they actually snuck in the movie theater to see Cool As Ice." Kelly Kapowski was a hottie but Paula Abdul was always kinda funny looking.

Thanks, dude! I try!

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/10/15 at 5:48 pm


Dude, I got a few questions.

1. In another thread you said that 1990-1992 was 1989 split into three years but now you're saying that all those years were just build ups to 1990. What gives?


I should not have put it like that exactly. '89 was the first official year of the HW Bush era. Young men were still getting the Yankees logo carved in the back of their heads at the barbershop in March of 1990 like they were in March of 1989. The only difference between that moment in '89 and the one in 1990 was their familiarity with it. In 1989,getting the Batman logo carved in the back of your head and staying up late to watch The Arsenio Hall Show was new to us. It was the norm in 1990.


2. You were born in 1977, right?

Yes, that is correct.


3. 1993: Good year or bad year. You keep bouncing back and forth.


Horrible year full of lackluster movies, bland TV show debuts, pot culture, cheap looking items in stores, and the first World Trade Center bombing.

Video games like Starfox were the exception and not the rule.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/10/15 at 5:51 pm


Right! And yet, he still doesn't back it up with facts.

Like Infinity stated, he seems to have an obsession with 1990 and it seems like he has mixed feelings with 1993 as well.

Your points about the early 00s are much better than Early90sGuy's statements about the early 90s.


I do back  up my statements with facts, but you turn a blind eye to them everytime.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/10/15 at 5:55 pm


I should not have put it like that exactly. '89 was the first official year of the HW Bush era. Young men were still getting the Yankees logo carved in the back of their heads at the barbershop in March of 1990 like they were in March of 1989. The only difference between that moment in '89 and the one in 1990 was their familiarity with it. In 1989,getting the Batman logo carved in the back of your head and staying up late to watch The Arsenio Hall Show was new to us. It was the norm in 1990.


Yes, that is correct.


Horrible year full of lackluster movies, bland TV show debuts, pot culture, cheap looking items in stores, and the first World Trade Center bombing.

Video games like Starfox were the exception and not the rule.


But would you still say that 1990-1992 have more in common with 1988/1989 than with the 1993-2003 era? That is what you said in the other thread.

Alright, fair enough. I agree with the statement that 1993 was different from 1990-1992 but I disagree that it sucked. In some threads you say "the early 90's are 1990-1993" so why include 1993?

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/10/15 at 5:56 pm


He acts like a know-it-all when he doesn't even remember the 70s and the early 80s very well. That's why the whole 80s began in 1978 doesn't make sense because once again, the 70s were not even over yet. In addition, he has judged others for having different viewpoints than him regarding the decades we talk about. I think I recall reading some of Early90sGuy's posts saying that he despises us (The Millennials/Yers) and that we don't know to handle the truth or be bold and strong.

BTW, since he stated he was born in 1977, Early90sGuy wouldn't even be considered a pure Xer; he's actually part of the X/Y transition.

Here are two threads he was arguing with me and other people (most are our generation) on.

http://www.inthe00s.com/index.php?topic=50492.0

http://www.inthe00s.com/index.php?topic=51252.0


Wow, all of this said by someone who was not even alive in the '70s or '80s to be a better judge. Please enlighten me with more of the hogwash found on Wikipedia.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/10/15 at 6:14 pm


But would you still say that 1990-1992 have more in common with 1988/1989 than with the 1993-2003 era? That is what you said in the other thread.


There really wasn't a 1999-2003 era. '03 was the first post-2002 and pre-2005 year. '93-'99 was a completely different time from 1999 to 2002. As you know, department stores like Caldors, Bradlees and Woolworth were still around for every year of the core '90s and most of the late '90s.

With that said, the early '90s definitely had more in common with '88 and '89 than the Clinton years. More Super Nintendo games were in stores towards the end of 1992, but my peers were all playing Paperboy for the NES then. I did not know anyone with a Super NES in my area. I remember people being ticked in the fall of 1991, shortly after the Super Nintendo was available for purchase in the states, because they just got an NES for the Christmas of 1990.

Alright, fair enough. I agree with the statement that 1993 was different from 1990-1992 but I disagree that it sucked. In some threads you say "the early 90's are 1990-1993" so why include 1993?


The early '90s began in 1990 and came to an end the minute we in January of 1993.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/10/15 at 6:34 pm


This looks like it'll be a fun read! Why does he say "leave 1990-1993 out of it" in that one thread? I thought he hated everything after December 31st 1992???


'90 to '93 were the best years of the 1990s to me. I hate seeing people lump those years in with all of the ones that came after them when they bash the '90s. I'd rather listen to the worst songs of 1991 than hear Aqua's Barbie Girl or MMMBop by Hanson ever again.

I like to make it easier for myself and just say that when Beavis and Butthead premiered on March 8th in 1993, that is when the 80's ended completely. 1994 seems slightly late.


There were still Masters of the Universe clones being made as late as 1994 like Skeleton Warriors. Like I said earlier, the spirit of 1990 was alive and well until 1999.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/10/15 at 6:52 pm


Only 1977?  He acts like he was born in the early 70s or before.  What gives him the special right to define the 80s as the decade of Star Wars, Garfield, and sequels to 70s movies, then?


I was there!

Throughout the course of the Reagan eras, Garfield DID go on to being America's favorite cat! Young men even used to steal Garfield plush dolls from cars to impress their girlfriends with, back in the late '80s. Wasn't Ronald Reagan's missile defense program that was first initiated in March of 1983 named Star Wars? Have you never seen the 1987 American parody film  Spaceballs by Mel Brooks before? Have you seen Back to the Future 2 yet?  In the movie, what holofilm was playing at the Holomax Theater in Hill Valley in October 2015? I'll post the answer to that question below.

Answer: Jaws 19

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/10/15 at 7:02 pm


Yeah, everything he's stating seems to contradict himself overall. He says 1992 was the last year where pop culture was wonderful and original (to him) and that 1993 was when everything was awful and was full of ripoffs; however, I've seen him slide the first half of 1993 into being the last greatest for pop culture. So, the points Early90sGuy makes is basically biased and he doesn't seem to back it up with research and facts. In addition, I even asked him sometime ago on that if Bush 1 won the 1992 election would he like the mid 90s much better and he replied with a no.

In the end, Early90sGuy's statements are clearly contradictory and he refuses to acknowledge that.


Question for you, was the first Reagan term anything like the last one? More importantly, do you think you would be able to answer that?

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/10/15 at 7:03 pm


There really wasn't a 1999-2003 era. '03 was the first post-2002 and pre-2005 year. '93-'99 was a completely different time from 1999 to 2002. As you know, department stores like Caldors, Bradlees and Woolworth were still around for every year of the core '90s and most of the late '90s.

With that said, the early '90s definitely had more in common with '88 and '89 than the Clinton years. More Super Nintendo games were in stores towards the end of 1992, but my peers were all playing Paperboy for the NES then. I did not know anyone with a Super NES in my area. I remember people being ticked in the fall of 1991, shortly after the Super Nintendo was available for purchase in the states, because they just got an NES for the Christmas of 1990.

The early '90s began in 1990 and came to an end the minute we in January of 1993.



'90 to '93 were the best years of the 1990s to me. I hate seeing people lump those years in with all of the ones that came after them when they bash the '90s. I'd rather listen to the worst songs of 1991 than hear Aqua's Barbie Girl or MMMBop by Hanson ever again.

There were still Masters of the Universe clones being made as late as 1994 like Skeleton Warriors. Like I said earlier, the spirit of 1990 was alive and well until 1999.


I agree and disagree. You often talk about 1993 being the year people started walking away from 1990 whereas I see 2003 as the year people started walking away from 1998 except 2003 was more 90's/Y2K than it was 2000's. It was a different time than 1993-1997 but I still consider it a part of the true 90's (true, not core). 1998 had the MP3 player, the Y2K era of Pop Punk (with Homegrown's Act Your Age and MxPx's Slowly Going the Way of the Buffalo plus blink-182 and Lit already started recording the Enema demo's with Travis Barker and A Place in the Sun respectively), Emo/Post-Hardcore (with Keepsake's The Things I Would Say and Jimmy Eat World's EP which had songs re-recorded for Clarity) and Nu Metal (with System of a Down's self titled, Limp Bizkit's Significant Other and Slayer's Diabolus in Musica), the Dreamcast,  Broadband and DVD rising in popularity, the first iMac, etc. Most of this stuff wasn't around until at least 1993/1994 and that's only half of what I mentioned. For the most part, a lot of this stuff didn't appear fully until 1996.

I see the 90's like this:
1987/1988-1992 - 80's holdover era
1993-1997 - the core 90's
1998-2002/2003 - the Y2K era. A mix of the 90's and a "what-if?" 2000's (for all you Marvel comics fans)

You said 1990-1993 are the best years but you also said the minute we went into 1993, the early 90's ended and that 1993 was a bland year so wouldn't that mean that only 1990-1992 were good (in your perspective)?

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: mqg96 on 11/10/15 at 7:03 pm


There really wasn't a 1999-2003 era. '03 was the first post-2002 and pre-2005 year.


Wait, what do you mean by this statement? Like 2003 wasn't related to 1999-2002? I see 2003 as a transitional year by the way.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: mqg96 on 11/10/15 at 7:10 pm


'90 to '93 were the best years of the 1990s to me. I hate seeing people lump those years in with all of the ones that came after them when they bash the '90s. I'd rather listen to the worst songs of 1991 than hear Aqua's Barbie Girl or MMMBop by Hanson ever again.


LMAO!!! Now I can get by this one right here! Do you consider Barbie Girl to be apart of the teen pop surge of the late 90's? It sounds like one of those songs that would appeal to the lowest common denominator at the time it was out.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/10/15 at 7:20 pm


Wait, what do you mean by this statement? Like 2003 wasn't related to 1999-2002? I see 2003 as a transitional year by the way.


Exactly. 2003 is the year that we started moving away from 1998 (I know that sounds cheesy but that's how the early 90's guy describes all this stuff) but it was still very much 90's/Y2K. I don't agree with the 1999-2002 thing either. 1998-2002/2003 makes much more sense as I have pointed out above.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 11/10/15 at 7:25 pm


Question for you, was the first Reagan term anything like the last one? More importantly, do you think you would be able to answer that?
No. They were totally different from each other. The second term was more about the Crack epidemic, Challenger explosion, AIDs epidemic and the Cold War while the first one was about the War on drugs, MADD,  and the attempted assassination of Ronald.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 11/10/15 at 7:30 pm


You do not do that because you were not alive in 1990.

Just cause she wasn't around back then, doesn't meant she can't give her own opinions on the year. We're all here to embrace debate.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 11/10/15 at 7:34 pm


Wow, all of this said by someone who was not even alive in the '70s or '80s to be a better judge. Please enlighten me with more of the hogwash found on Wikipedia.


None of this is on Wikipedia. I made that statement because you do have a problem with most millennials and many of your viewpoints are biased. In addition, you even have an issue with people not seeing 1978 as the start as the 80s because that would be absurd for them especially as the 70's had not ended yet at that time.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 11/10/15 at 7:40 pm


None of this is on Wikipedia. I made that statement because you do have a problem with most millennials and many of your viewpoints are biased. In addition, you even have an issue with people not seeing 1978 as the start as the 80s because that would be absurd for them especially as the 70's had not ended yet at that time.

Yeah, I find it strange that he has a problem with people having their opinions on this subject, like I've said before we're all here to embrace debate. That's why I like to discuss topics on here with other people.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 11/10/15 at 7:53 pm


Yeah, I find it strange that he has a problem with people having their opinions on this subject, like I've said before we're all here to embrace debate. That's why I like to discuss topics on here with other people.
Same here. I like speaking with others about these topics, but yeah he seems to have an issue especially with certain decades. For example, whenever any of us Millennials talk about the early 90s pop culture, he gets offended because we have an inaccurate view of the time period while his is the most correct.  That's the problem because everyone has a different perspective regarding the early 90s; it's definitely not going to be the same as Early90sGuy's.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 11/10/15 at 8:09 pm


I do back  up my statements with facts, but you turn a blind eye to them everytime.


You just call them facts, but all they really amount to are scattered statements about when you personally remember isolated things being popular with certain crowds, and those solitary things somehow being the focal point of all popular culture.  Your logic of all pop culture building up exclusively to one year per decade only makes your statements more confusing, especially when you're talking about sub-eras like 1990-1993 being the early 90s, 1993-1995 being the mid-90s, and 1996-1998 being the late 90s (which are questionable boundaries in themselves).

It sickens me to see you continue to act so biased and arrogant when it should have become obvious to you EONS ago that maybe your perception of reality isn't 100% fact.  I'll at least give you credit for not using vulgar or insulting language, but frankly, I think the vast majority of us are fed up and tired of you jackhammering the same ridiculous points ad nauseum.  If it wasn't for your selfish and condescending attitude, I think most people, including myself, would actually consider your perspectives on decade culture unique and fascinating, even if we didn't totally agree with them.  But with the way you treat us like children who don't know how to read and write, don't expect us to ever buy into whatever you're trying to prove.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/10/15 at 10:27 pm


Exactly. 2003 is the year that we started moving away from 1998 (I know that sounds cheesy but that's how the early 90's guy describes all this stuff) but it was still very much 90's/Y2K. I don't agree with the 1999-2002 thing either. 1998-2002/2003 makes much more sense as I have pointed out above.


I'd argue that we were much further away from 1999 first in 2002. Family Guy was cancelled in that year after three seasons due to low Nielsen ratings. "Let Go", the debut album by Avril Lavigne was released in June of '02. Not to mention, Star Wars Episode 2: Attack of the Clones hit theaters in May of 2002. 2003 just wasn't a significant year in history like 2002 was.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/10/15 at 10:40 pm


I'd argue that we were much further away from 1999 first in 2002. Family Guy was cancelled in that year after three seasons due to low Nielsen ratings. "Let Go", the debut album by Avril Lavigne was released in June of '02. Not to mention, Star Wars Episode 2: Attack of the Clones hit theaters in May of 2002. 2003 just wasn't a significant year in history like 2002 was.


Family Guy wasn't the big pop culture juggernaut back then that it became during it's second incarnation so I don't see how that is too significant. Buffy, a much more significant show for the late 90's/early 00's, finished in 2003. "Let Go" was riding off the success of the already established pop punk bands such as blink-182 and others who got big in 1998/1999. Plus, I can hear some Alanis Morrisette rip offs on that CD (losing grip, anyone?). Also, she fit the whole female singer/songwriter type that was already popular for the time (around 1996/1997-ish). Star Wars Episode II was also riding the success of the Phantom Menace. That movie wouldn't of been possible without Episode I which was released in 1999. 2002 continued the 1998 trends of Nu Metal, Emo and Pop Punk. 2003, on the other hand, had the breakthrough albums of Lil Jon and 50 Cent bringing out the new faces of hip hop to the mainstream that would define the core 00's. Fall Out Boy released Take This To Your Grave and blink-182 released their self titled. Both showed a transition from the 1998-styled happy Pop Punk to the more serious 00's styled eyeliner garbage. While these albums were being released, My Chemical Romance and Green Day were in studio recording their 2004 hit albums that would cement the new style of Emo and Pop Punk and bring us into the 00's so the sound was already developing throughout the year. 2003 is when society started walking away from what was fully established in 1998 but it wasn't until 2004 that we fully embraced these trends. It's not as significant as 2004 but it bridged the gap between the 90's/Y2K era and 00's.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/11/15 at 12:07 am


Family Guy wasn't the big pop culture juggernaut back then that it became during it's second incarnation so I don't see how that is too significant.


The original show did not return after the third season finale in February of '02. '03 was the first post cancellation year. FOX was airing Oliver Beene and various specials in the first two time slots for the show in late '02. It was history by that point.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/11/15 at 12:10 am


Star Wars Episode II was also riding the success of the Phantom Menace. That movie wouldn't of been possible without Episode I which was released in 1999.


I know, people were not exchanging sequel rumors anymore after May 16, 2002 like they were in the fall of 1999.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 11/11/15 at 12:19 am


The original show did not return after the third season finale in February of '02. '03 was the first post cancellation year. FOX was airing Oliver Beene and various specials in the first two time slots for the show in late '02. It was history by that point.


You're acting as if Family Guy was a millennial era fad, when really it didn't enjoy truly high ratings until it became a huge cult hit on DVD, thus prompting FOX to revive it in 2005, at which point its popularity hit its peak.  The famous Surfin' Bird meme originated in a 2008 episode of the show (I Dream of Jesus).


I know, people were not exchanging sequel rumors anymore after May 16, 2002 like they were in the fall of 1999.


I'm pretty sure everybody knew from the get-go that there would be two more films following Phantom Menace, considering it's Episode I, and the original trilogy began with Episode IV.  If anything, people would've been more hyped up for Revenge of the Sith than any of the other films because that was when they were finally going to see Anakin Skywalker officially become Darth Vader and the Empire come into being.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: bchris02 on 11/11/15 at 12:23 am


You're acting as if Family Guy was a millennial era fad, when really it didn't enjoy truly high ratings until it became a huge cult hit on DVD, thus prompting FOX to revive it in 2005, at which point its popularity hit its peak.  The famous Surfin' Bird meme originated in a 2008 episode of the show (I Dream of Jesus).

I think everybody knew from the get-go that there would be two more films following Phantom Menace, considering it's Episode I, and the original trilogy began with Episode IV.  If anything, people would've been more hyped up for Revenge of the Sith than any of the other films because that was when they were finally going to see Anakin Skywalker officially become Darth Vader and the Empire come into being.


Yeah I look at Family Guy as more of a late '00s thing, mostly because that is when I watched it.  I remember it being on during the early '00s but I really didn't like it at the time.

Star Wars transcends decades and eras.  It's always popular.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/11/15 at 12:29 am


No. They were totally different from each other. The second term was more about the Crack epidemic, Challenger explosion, AIDS epidemic and the Cold War while the first one was about the War on drugs, MADD,  and the attempted assassination of Ronald.


Exactly. No two presidential terms are alike. There are Republicans in existence who absolutely hated Reagan's second term. One 41 term was magical enough for me.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/11/15 at 12:38 am


You're acting as if Family Guy was a millennial era fad, when really it didn't enjoy truly high ratings until it became a huge cult hit on DVD, thus prompting FOX to revive it in 2005, at which point its popularity hit its peak.  The famous Surfin' Bird meme originated in a 2008 episode of the show (I Dream of Jesus).


I'm well aware of that, thank you, but Family Guy still first aired in 1999.

I'm pretty sure everybody knew from the get-go that there would be two more films following Phantom Menace, considering it's Episode I, and the original trilogy began with Episode IV.  If anything, people would've been more hyped up for Revenge of the Sith than any of the other films because that was when they were finally going to see Anakin Skywalker officially become Darth Vader and the Empire come into being.


The summer of '99 to May 15, 2002 was the stage when wild rumors about the second episode were circulating through America.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 11/11/15 at 12:45 am

Star Wars transcends decades and eras.  It's always popular.

I agree with you totally.  Even if you HAD to confine it to a single era, I'd say its peak was strictly the late 70s and early 80s, during the time the original trilogy came out, a lot like Atari, new wave, and arena rock.  TheEarly90sGuy focuses strictly on the Star Wars ripoffs and spin-off products like the Ewoks and Droids television shows in order to justify Star Wars as the flagship franchise of the entire 80s decade, but these side-creations certainly didn't end after the year 1990.  Even just scratching the surface there were a lot of popular video games produced based on the Star Wars universe like the Super Star Wars trilogy on the SNES and Shadows of the Empire on the Nintendo 64, not to mention the original trilogy was rereleased in theaters in early 1997 as the Special Edition trilogy, completely with fast food toy campaigns (this was actually how I first learned about Star Wars in the first place).


I'm well aware of that, thank you, but Family Guy still first aired in 1999.


I thought your point though was that the show became obsolete after 2002, even though that was actually when it began to pick up in popularity.

The summer of '99 to May 15, 2002 was the stage when wild rumors about the second episode were circulating through America.

Then why don't Episode III rumors matter?  Because they truly took off in 2002 instead of 1999 (even though they clearly still existed back then)?

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/11/15 at 5:19 am


The original show did not return after the third season finale in February of '02. '03 was the first post cancellation year. FOX was airing Oliver Beene and various specials in the first two time slots for the show in late '02. It was history by that point.


Dude, that show wasn't big enough back then. It was seen as another failed comedy. How is that defining the era in anyway? Using shows like Buffy, Johnny Bravo, Rugrats, Friends or Frasier make much more sense because those shows were on long enough and made a huge impact on the culture. The end of those series showed that we were heading into a new era where those characters and situations weren't relevant anymore (or they just felt like ending it at that point was the best decision. You could take it either way, really). If Family Guy ended today or even in 2008-2010 it'd have a huger impact then it ever could in 2002!



I know, people were not exchanging sequel rumors anymore after May 16, 2002 like they were in the fall of 1999.


Dude, as if that's really a huge cultural event. You might as well say "in 1997 people would have conversations about pie sometimes but in 2000 I stopped hearing about pie. It must mean that we've entered the new decade since pie is no longer what I hear about those god damn young kids talking about. Get off my yawn!"

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 11/11/15 at 5:37 am


Dude, that show wasn't big enough back then. It was seen as another failed comedy. How is that defining the era in anyway? Using shows like Buffy, Johnny Bravo, Rugrats, Friends or Frasier make much more sense because those shows were on long enough and made a huge impact on the culture. The end of those series showed that we were heading into a new era where those characters and situations weren't relevant anymore (or they just felt like ending it at that point was the best decision. You could take it either way, really). If Family Guy ended today or even in 2008-2010 it'd have a huger impact then it ever could in 2002!


By 1999, nobody was talking about Leprechaun, beanie babies, or troll dolls anymore.

Dude, as if that's really a huge cultural event. You might as well say "in 1997 people would have conversations about pie sometimes but in 2000 I stopped hearing about pie. It must mean that we've entered the new decade since pie is no longer what I hear about those god damn young kids talking about. Get off my yawn!"

American Pie came out in 1999.  There were several American Pie sequels that led us to 2011. //doesn't consider American Reunion to be in the same caliber as 2, Wedding, Band Camp, Naked Mile, Beta House, or Book of Love because it was released in 2012.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/11/15 at 5:46 am


By 1999, nobody was talking about Leprechaun, beanie babies, or troll dolls anymore.

American Pie came out in 1999.  There were several American Pie sequels that led us to 2011. //doesn't consider American Reunion to be in the same caliber as 2, Wedding, Band Camp, Naked Mile, Beta House, or Book of Love because it was released in 2012.


HAHAHAHA! Holy sh*t, that's too funny.

In 1990, everyone was playing with Furbies, Pogs and Ring Pops but in 1999 nobody was talking about that stuff anymore as they had been replaced with men's trial muscle shirts, puka shell necklaces and mullets.

1999 was the end of 1990 because there were no sequels to 80's movies coming out after then. Never mind Phantom Menace because that is not on the same caliber as the Ewok dolls I bought in 1990. Christmas Vacation 2 and T3 don't count either because they're nothing compared to my Clark Griswald action figure and my Terminator Coffee Mug, both of which came out in 1990.


Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: Mitch Kramer on 11/11/15 at 6:51 am

At least in my experience, the late 80s were almost identical to the early 90s, maybe even the mid 90s.  People around me were still wearing pretty much the same fashions and hair styles in 1994/95 as they were in 1988.  They were still playing some 80s music on the radio, too.

I didn't really notice a clear, obvious change until more like 1997.  This is probably something that is very region-specific.  In my area, the 1991/92 recession didn't end until about 1998/99.  So, perhaps people were saving money by not buying new clothes and cars.  I remember very clearly how, around 1999, I started seeing an explosion of new vehicles -- mostly gas-guzzling trucks and SUVs -- replacing the small compact Japanese cars of the 1980s.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/11/15 at 11:26 am


I thought your point though was that the show became obsolete after 2002, even though that was actually when it began to pick up in popularity.


You're wrong, my point was that the original version of Family Guy was on FOX from January to December of 1999. The same could not be said about the show in 2002. 

Then why don't Episode III rumors matter?  Because they truly took off in 2002 instead of 1999 (even though they clearly still existed back then)?


Where have you heard that Episode III rumors existed in 1999?

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/11/15 at 11:55 am


I agree with you totally.  Even if you HAD to confine it to a single era, I'd say its peak was strictly the late 70s and early 80s, during the time the original trilogy came out, a lot like Atari, new wave, and arena rock.  TheEarly90sGuy focuses strictly on the Star Wars ripoffs and spin-off products like the Ewoks and Droids television shows in order to justify Star Wars as the flagship franchise of the entire 80s decade, but these side-creations certainly didn't end after the year 1990.  Even just scratching the surface there were a lot of popular video games produced based on the Star Wars universe like the Super Star Wars trilogy on the SNES and Shadows of the Empire on the Nintendo 64, not to mention the original trilogy was re-released in theaters in early 1997 as the Special Edition trilogy, completely with fast food toy campaigns (this was actually how I first learned about Star Wars in the first place).


Side-creations like C-3POs cereal were made a few years before the Star Wars action figures of the early '80s were donated to Salvation Army. There was a much larger Star Wars fanbase after 1990 than before that point. Ewoks and Droids were not ever in the same vein as the Super Star Wars and Shadows of the Empire releases for the Super Nintendo and N64. Also, the remastered version of the original trilogy was released when? Two years before The Phantom Menace was in theaters.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/11/15 at 11:58 am


You're wrong, my point was that the original version of Family Guy was on FOX from January to December of 1999. The same could not be said about the show in 2002. 

Where have you heard that Episode III rumors existed in 1999?


Friends, Buffy and Frasier were on the air from January to December in both 1999 and 2002.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/11/15 at 12:03 pm


By 1999, nobody was talking about Leprechaun, beanie babies, or troll dolls anymore.


You're putting words in mouth now. I know you're mocking me, but I never said Leprechaun and beanie babies were completely forgotten by 1999.
Troll dolls actually were a thing of past in 1999, though.

American Pie came out in 1999.  There were several American Pie sequels that led us to 2011. //doesn't consider American Reunion to be in the same caliber as 2, Wedding, Band Camp, Naked Mile, Beta House, or Book of Love because it was released in 2012.



On a side note, American Pie: The Full Reveal was sold in Australia for 11 months in 2010 and all of 2011.  ;)

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/11/15 at 12:04 pm


Friends, Buffy and Frasier were on the air from January to December in both 1999 and 2002.


Those shows did not premiere in 1999, Jordan.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/11/15 at 12:07 pm


Those shows did not premiere in 1999, Jordan.


You're right but they started in 1993 and 1997, respectively, (1993 being first year of the true 90's and 1996/1997 being the years the seeds of the Y2K era were planted) and they were still relevant well into all of 2002, the last pure Y2K/90's year.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/11/15 at 12:29 pm


You're right but they started in 1993 and 1997, respectively, (1993 being first year of the true 90's and 1996/1997 being the years the seeds of the Y2K era were planted) and they were still relevant well into all of 2002, the last pure Y2K/90's year.


The seeds of the Y2K era were planted a lot earlier than 1996. What would be on Nickelodeon at 2pm every weekday in the fall of 2002 if Tiny Toon Adventures never aired in 1990? 

You are correct, Buffy, Frasier and Friends were the shows everyone was talking about last in the very early 2000s.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/11/15 at 12:46 pm


The seeds of the Y2K era were planted a lot earlier than 1996. What would be on Nickelodeon at 2pm every weekday in the fall of 2002 if Tiny Toon Adventures never aired in 1990? 

You are correct, Buffy, Frasier and Friends were the shows everyone was talking about last in the very early 2000s.


I depends the perspective. You do have a good point, though.

Let's look at 1994 for example:

Kurt Cobain dies which leaves Green Day and The Offspring room to bring Pop Punk to the mainstream and start the second wave of Pop Punk. The style they brought was popular well into 2003.

Once those two bands hit, the Grunge style started to die out. No longer was flannel, scruffy faces, long hair and fitted jeans the look to have. Now, it's all about spiky hair, loose T-shirts, backwards fitted baseball caps and baggy dickies or 3/4 shorts. This look was strong until 2003/2004 when tight jeans and eyeliner got popular.

The look of 1994:
http://static.spin.com/files/140131-dookie-2.jpg

The look of 2002:
http://www.shortscore.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/NewFoundGlory_2000.jpg

You could even have an argument for 1995:
- The term "mp3" is coined
- Rabid Neurosis start leaking illegal free mp3's for people to download (yes, people downloaded mp3's pre-Napster)
- Windows 95 is released bringing the internet to greater mainstream heights
- From my experience, kids starting high school in 1995 were the first to abandon the grunge look. When I started High School in 1996, none of the 10th graders did the Cobain look. Only 11th and 12th graders held on to it. 

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: 80sfan on 11/11/15 at 12:52 pm

Family guy may have started in 1999, but it didn't become 'popular' until around 2003. It's more of an 00s thing than a 90s thing.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/11/15 at 1:05 pm


Family guy may have started in 1999, but it didn't become 'popular' until around 2003. It's more of an 00s thing than a 90s thing.


You're the one saying 1999 was a '90s year. I never did.  :)

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: bchris02 on 11/11/15 at 1:29 pm


Family guy may have started in 1999, but it didn't become 'popular' until around 2003. It's more of an 00s thing than a 90s thing.


Yeah Family Guy was somewhat of a flop in its early years.  It's golden era was 2005-2010.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: Howard on 11/11/15 at 3:01 pm


1993, or 1994?


i would say about 1993.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: Howard on 11/11/15 at 3:08 pm


Well, I am a child of the 1980s, but I guess that is irrelevant here. ::)


But your name says early 90's guy.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: Howard on 11/11/15 at 3:14 pm


Family guy may have started in 1999, but it didn't become 'popular' until around 2003. It's more of an 00s thing than a 90s thing.


and it's still going strong.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/11/15 at 6:00 pm


None of this is on Wikipedia. I made that statement because you do have a problem with most millennials and many of your viewpoints are biased. In addition, you even have an issue with people not seeing 1978 as the start as the 80s because that would be absurd for them especially as the 70's had not ended yet at that time.


Clumsy me, the '70s were comprised of the years 1970 to 1979 like everyone else says. And when Jimmy says jump off the bridge, I should do it too. What would this world be without conformity?  8-P

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/11/15 at 6:10 pm


LMAO!!! Now I can get by this one right here! Do you consider Barbie Girl to be apart of the teen pop surge of the late 90's? It sounds like one of those songs that would appeal to the lowest common denominator at the time it was out.


At the time, I did not know what Barbie Girl was or where Aqua was coming from with it. When I saw the music video to it on MTV in 1997 or so, I though it was a parody song, along the lines of Weird Al Yankovic. I was too old back then to be a fair judge of what qualified as teen pop music in the late '90s to be honest with you.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: bchris02 on 11/11/15 at 6:20 pm


At the time, I did not know what Barbie Girl was or where Aqua was coming from with it. When I saw the music video to it on MTV in 1997 or so, I though it was a parody song, along the lines of Weird Al Yankovic. I was too old back then to be a fair judge of what qualified as teen pop music in the late '90s to be honest with you.


Barbie Girl was the '90s version of "What Does The Fox Say" in my opinion.  The song actually isn't that stylistically far from other popular mid-90s eurodance.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 11/11/15 at 8:12 pm


Barbie Girl was the '90s version of "What Does The Fox Say" in my opinion.  The song actually isn't that stylistically far from other popular mid-90s eurodance.


I have to disagree with you there.  Barbie Girl was really the pioneer of the millennial era style of euro dance, as it was FAR more bubblegummy than any of the cushy-beat, male rapper/female singer acts of the mid-90s. Its instrumentation, like other late 90s genres, has more of an emphasis on the treble and isn't dominated by its bass.  Songs like We Like to Party, I'm Blue (Da Ba Dee), and the like would follow in the song's cheesier wake. While there were extremely few notable euro dance hits in 1998 in the United States aside from Lollipop (Candyman) and Turn Back Time, both by Aqua, euro dance continued to thrive in other territories, where the difference was completely evident.  For example, though they were not chart hits in America, songs by early licensed Dance Dance Revolution artists like Bambee (Bumble Bee, Typical Tropical, Cowgirl, and Seventeen) smile.dk (Butterfly, Boys, Mr. Wonderful, Dancing Alone, Petit Love), and Papaya (Hero, Pink Dinosaur, Operator) had the exact same type of trebly, nylon-guitar-driven, raindrop-bass type of production as Barbie Girl and, like that song, are all significantly cheesier and teen poppy than Another Night, Be My Lover, The Rhythm of the Night, and Beautiful Life ever were.  The songs I just mentioned were strictly produced from 1998-2001, after which the original artists retired or went on hiatus (even Aqua followed in the same wake, releasing Cartoon Heroes and Around the World in Europe in 2000 and then going on hiatus soon afterwards), so they fit perfectly alongside non-euro dance teen pop groups from the millennial era like NSYNC and the Spice Girls.

In my opinion, the last significant euro dance hit of an identifiably mid-90s style in the U.S. was Real McCoy's One More Time (a fitting track name for the final song of a movement), a song which was popular in spring 1997 and wasn't even that huge a hit anyway.  You could argue that Mr. President's Coco Jamboo, marked the end of mid-90s euro dance , but that song originally came out in Europe in 1996 and was already heading in the direction of late 90s euro dance, anyway.  Otherwise, 1997 was when the core 90s euro dance style of 1992 to 1996 diverged into bubbleg euro dance like Aqua, Cartoons, and Vengaboys on the cheesier side, and more serious trance acts like Sash on the other side of the spectrum.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: bchris02 on 11/11/15 at 9:28 pm


I have to disagree with you there.  Barbie Girl was really the pioneer of the millennial era style of euro dance, as it was FAR more bubblegummy than any of the cushy-beat, male rapper/female singer acts of the mid-90s. Its instrumentation, like other late 90s genres, has more of an emphasis on the treble and isn't dominated by its bass.  Songs like We Like to Party, I'm Blue (Da Ba Dee), and the like would follow in the song's cheesier wake. While there were extremely few notable euro dance hits in 1998 in the United States aside from Lollipop (Candyman) and Turn Back Time, both by Aqua, euro dance continued to thrive in other territories, where the difference was completely evident.  For example, though they were not chart hits in America, songs by early licensed Dance Dance Revolution artists like Bambee (Bumble Bee, Typical Tropical, Cowgirl, and Seventeen) smile.dk (Butterfly, Boys, Mr. Wonderful, Dancing Alone, Petit Love), and Papaya (Hero, Pink Dinosaur, Operator) had the exact same type of trebly, nylon-guitar-driven, raindrop-bass type of production as Barbie Girl and, like that song, are all significantly cheesier and teen poppy than Another Night, Be My Lover, The Rhythm of the Night, and Beautiful Life ever were.  The songs I just mentioned were strictly produced from 1998-2001, after which the original artists retired or went on hiatus (even Aqua followed in the same wake, releasing Cartoon Heroes and Around the World in Europe in 2000 and then going on hiatus soon afterwards), so they fit perfectly alongside non-euro dance teen pop groups from the millennial era like NSYNC and the Spice Girls.

In my opinion, the last significant euro dance hit of an identifiably mid-90s style in the U.S. was Real McCoy's One More Time (a fitting track name for the final song of a movement), a song which was popular in spring 1997 and wasn't even that huge a hit anyway.  You could argue that Mr. President's Coco Jamboo, marked the end of mid-90s euro dance , but that song originally came out in Europe in 1996 and was already heading in the direction of late 90s euro dance, anyway.  Otherwise, 1997 was when the core 90s euro dance style of 1992 to 1996 diverged into bubbleg euro dance like Aqua, Cartoons, and Vengaboys on the cheesier side, and more serious trance acts like Sash on the other side of the spectrum.


I understand what you are saying.  Aqua definitely had its stylistic difference compared to mid-90s eurodance, but it had more in common with it than it did the Backstreet Boys or Hanson.  I don't consider Y2K era eurodance like Eiffel 65 and Vengaboys to really even be the same genre.  I think a better analogy would be the transition from mid-90s eurodance to Y2K-era eurodance was similar to the transition from early '10s electropop to mid-10s EDM-influenced teen pop.  In that case, the first part of my post stands.

These are the last songs I remember that were mid-90s style eurodance, all from 1997.  '97 really was a great finale to the euro-dance era.  Amazing how it abruptly died in 1998.

Bi6hjtwk4c0

KiLw45oAuD0

cOrc37wNUqU

l_y8aAf-xY

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/11/15 at 9:54 pm


You just call them facts, but all they really amount to are scattered statements about when you personally remember isolated things being popular with certain crowds, and those solitary things somehow being the focal point of all popular culture.  Your logic of all pop culture building up exclusively to one year per decade only makes your statements more confusing, especially when you're talking about sub-eras like 1990-1993 being the early 90s, 1993-1995 being the mid-90s, and 1996-1998 being the late 90s (which are questionable boundaries in themselves).


Culturally,the years '93 and '96 were like center marks on a ruler. They were not the whole numbers that represent inches like 1990 or 1999 were.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/11/15 at 9:56 pm


These are the last songs I remember that were mid-90s style eurodance, all from 1997.  '97 really was a great finale to the euro-dance era.  Amazing how it abruptly died in 1998.


Same thing with Grunge. It just poofed into thin air right as 1998 came around.


Culturally,the years '93 and '96 were like center marks on a ruler. They were not the whole numbers that represent inches like 1990 or 1999 were.


I still personally think 1998 represented more than 1999 did. Every year from 1999 to 2002 and 50/50 for 2003 had the "spirit" (as you usually call it) of 1998 which is why 1998-2002 are the core Y2K years. 

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/11/15 at 10:26 pm


I still personally think 1998 represented more than 1999 did.


Well, everyone is free to believe what they want. Many of the shows that originally aired in 1998 underwent changes throughout the 2000s like Who Wants To Be A Millionaire. Some viewers of the show in '98 stopped tuning in after Regis left in 2002.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 11/11/15 at 10:26 pm


I understand what you are saying.  Aqua definitely had its stylistic difference compared to mid-90s eurodance, but it had more in common with it than it did the Backstreet Boys or Hanson.  I don't consider Y2K era eurodance like Eiffel 65 and Vengaboys to really even be the same genre.  I think a better analogy would be the transition from mid-90s eurodance to Y2K-era eurodance was similar to the transition from early '10s electropop to mid-10s EDM-influenced teen pop.  In that case, the first part of my post stands.

These are the last songs I remember that were mid-90s style eurodance, all from 1997.  '97 really was a great finale to the euro-dance era.  Amazing how it abruptly died in 1998.


First off, none of the three songs you listed were even originally released in 1997; the latter two were popular in the summer of 1996 in Europe, while Rhythm of Love was originally popular in 1994.  Rhythm of Love, though it was a chart hit in the United States in 1997, was quite insignificant at the time and only reached #53 on the Hot 100 (compared to One More Time's #27 peak).  Ooh Aah...Just a Little Bit was mostly a chart hit the United States during the end of 1996 and very beginning of 1997 (the last stretch of time with a mostly mid-90s feel, in my opinion), after which it fell off the charts.  Coco Jamboo, like I stated before, was more of a transitional song between the core 90s eurodance style and the millennial era bubblegum type of songs (I highly doubt any eurodance hits in the mid-90s would have lyrics like "ya, ya ye, coco jamboo," certainly at least not in the United States).

As for Barbie Girl, I don't mean to overstate the song's genre similarities with late 90s teen pop artists like the Backstreet Boys and Spice Girls, but I can say with confidence that the track marks a drastic shift in the spirit of what made eurodance songs popular, in that it was significantly bubblier, brighter, and more tongue-and-cheek than any major eurodance hits that preceded it.  I really don't understand where you're coming from when you say the track sounds more like La Bouche, Gina G, and Real McCoy-style eurodance than the Vengaboys, The Cartoons, or smile.dk brand of eurodance.  Compare Barbie Girl to these songs:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CmOraUYvUNE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QFFykQIrPCk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MeggMSG7rnQ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B_qwUS8Uqjg

Even if you're not familiar with these songs, since they only charted in other countries, they still represent the general direction that eurodance had taken once the late 90s rolled around.  While I can certainly agree that eurodance was far less popular during the millennial era in the United States than it was during the days of Ace of Base, Real McCoy, and La Bouche, I'd strongly argue that this shift out of the mid-90s era of eurodance had already occurred midway through 1997 and that Barbie Girl is easier to categorize with songs like We Like to Party and Hampsterdance, in that it was one of the exceptions during a time when eurodance almost never found success in American markets, I guess due to its now-ultra-cheesy nature (by that, I mean another step beyond teen pop boybands) not being appealing to the harder, more urban-influenced music industry in that country (the mid-90s stuff at least had serious pop-raps and generally non-bubblegum melodies, which felt more at home to North American audiences).

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: bchris02 on 11/11/15 at 10:32 pm


Well, everyone is free to believe what they want. Many of the shows that originally aired in 1998 underwent changes throughout the 2000s like Who Wants To Be A Millionaire. Some viewers of the show in '98 stopped tuning in after Regis left in 2002.


Who Wants To Be A Millionaire, in the US, started in the summer of 1999, not 1998.  It was a short-lived fad that was extremely popular during the fall of 1999 and spring of 2000 but its popularity dropped off quickly after that.  The show should have been cancelled in 2002 when Regis left.  Today, its one of those shows that its hard to believe is still on the air.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/11/15 at 10:34 pm


Well, everyone is free to believe what they want. Many of the shows that originally aired in 1998 underwent changes throughout the 2000s like Who Wants To Be A Millionaire. Some viewers of the show in '98 stopped tuning in after Regis left in 2002.


A lot of things stayed pretty consistent from 1998 into 2002 and would be until 2003 when things started changing into the true 2000's. Shows like Sex in the City (no, I do not watch it), Becker and Dawson's Creek started in 1998 and lasted well into 2004. People still watched those shows up until the finales. Sabrina the Teenage Witch which started in 1996 and was there for both 1998 and 2002.


Who Wants To Be A Millionaire, in the US, started in the summer of 1999, not 1998.  It was a short-lived fad that was extremely popular during the fall of 1999 and spring of 2000 but its popularity dropped off quickly after that.  The show should have been cancelled in 2002 when Regis left.  Today, its one of those shows that its hard to believe is still on the air.


I feel the same way about Family Guy.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: bchris02 on 11/11/15 at 10:41 pm


First off, none of the three songs you listed were even originally released in 1997; the latter two were popular in the summer of 1996 in Europe, while Rhythm of Love was originally popular in 1994.  Rhythm of Love, though it was a chart hit in the United States in 1997, was quite insignificant at the time and only reached #53 on the Hot 100 (compared to One More Time's #27 peak).  Ooh Aah...Just a Little Bit was mostly a chart hit the United States during the end of 1996 and very beginning of 1997 (the last stretch of time with a mostly mid-90s feel, in my opinion), after which it fell off the charts.  Coco Jamboo, like I stated before, was more of a transitional song between the core 90s eurodance style and the millennial era bubblegum type of songs (I highly doubt any eurodance hits in the mid-90s would have lyrics like "ya, ya ye, coco jamboo," certainly at least not in the United States).

As for Barbie Girl, I don't mean to overstate the song's genre similarities with late 90s teen pop artists like the Backstreet Boys and Spice Girls, but I can say with confidence that the track marks a drastic shift in the spirit of what made eurodance songs popular, in that it was significantly bubblier, brighter, and more tongue-and-cheek than any major eurodance hits that preceded it.  I really don't understand where you're coming from when you say the track sounds more like La Bouche, Gina G, and Real McCoy-style eurodance than the Vengaboys, The Cartoons, or smile.dk brand of eurodance.  Compare Barbie Girl to these songs:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CmOraUYvUNE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QFFykQIrPCk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MeggMSG7rnQ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B_qwUS8Uqjg

Even if you're not familiar with these songs, since they only charted in other countries, they still represent the general direction that eurodance had taken once the late 90s rolled around.  While I can certainly agree that eurodance was far less popular during the millennial era in the United States than it was during the days of Ace of Base, Real McCoy, and La Bouche, I'd strongly argue that this shift out of the mid-90s era of eurodance had already occurred midway through 1997 and that Barbie Girl is easier to categorize with songs like We Like to Party and Hampsterdance, in that it was one of the exceptions during a time when eurodance almost never found success in American markets, I guess due to its now-ultra-cheesy nature (by that, I mean another step beyond teen pop boybands) not being appealing to the harder, more urban-influenced music industry in that country (the mid-90s stuff at least had serious pop-raps and generally non-bubblegum melodies, which felt more at home to North American audiences).


I know those songs from DDR, but I never knew them before that.  I do agree Barbie Girl fits well with those songs.

It seems like throughout the '90s certain trends hit Europe a year or even longer before they caught on in the U.S.  The Backstreet Boys and NSYNC are two examples.  NSYNC was huge in the late '90s in Europe, but in the U.S., the Y2K era was their time.  The Backstreet Boys were big in Europe as early as 1995.

The songs I listed were big in 1997 from the perspective of my small town in Missouri.  I agree that Cocoo Jambo was somewhat transitional, but the female vocal style was far more mid-90s style than it was Y2K era.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/11/15 at 10:57 pm


Who Wants To Be A Millionaire, in the US, started in the summer of 1999, not 1998.  It was a short-lived fad that was extremely popular during the fall of 1999 and spring of 2000 but its popularity dropped off quickly after that.  The show should have been cancelled in 2002 when Regis left.  Today, its one of those shows that its hard to believe is still on the air.


Drats, I mixed up the first year of the British version with the US one. :-[

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/11/15 at 11:03 pm


A lot of things stayed pretty consistent from 1998 into 2002 and would be until 2003 when things started changing into the true 2000's. Shows like Sex in the City (no, I do not watch it), Becker and Dawson's Creek started in 1998 and lasted well into 2004. People still watched those shows up until the finales. Sabrina the Teenage Witch which started in 1996 and was there for both 1998 and 2002.


The true 2000s? What were the 2000s to you? The TV shows that seeped well into the 2010s originally aired in 1999, so I think of that year as the start of the real 2000s.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/11/15 at 11:11 pm


What were the 2000s to you?


The 2000's were a lot of things to me. They were when Emo and Pop Punk went from kids who looked like dorky college students and goofy skater kids (respectively) to Glam Metal rejects. Bands like Jimmy Eat World, The Get Up Kids, Sum 41, New Found Glory and blink-182 are what represented the genre from 2000-2002. From 2004 onward things got much more darker and serious when bands started putting on make-up, tight pants and the style of music went from the fun, extreme tunes of 1998 to this new Myspace-oritented sound. My Chemical Romance, Fall Out Boy and the new lamer Green Day are what represent the true 2000's era of the genre. They were also about the self-indulgent yo yo hip hop like Fiddy Cents and Lil Jon but that style of Hip Hop started emerging in 1997 with Lil Jon's debut album. It just took until 2003 for them to really breakout into the mainstream. The iPod, although released in 2001, had become one of the biggest trends in technology in 2003/2004. Look at Spider-Man 1 and 2, for example. 1 was all about fun action. Just like 2002 was; a great year full of fun. It's like a Teen Flick with good ol' Spidey. It had a god damn Sum 41 rap song, too! The soundtrack is all your Pop Punk and Post-Grunge. It had the classic combo of Default and Greenwheel on one CD, too (I honestly don't like those bands very much but they're better than sh*t like Paramore or whatever)! Those bands weren't relevant past 2003. Even Alien Ant Farm makes an appearance. Spider-Man 2, on the other hand, was much more somber and mature which was fitting for the mood of 2004.

Just look at the moods of these videos (videos in spoiler. Yes, I posted over 100,000 videos in this spoiler):

1998:
kenF3_77774

1998:
AltMeuPkWRs

1999:
ymNFyxvIdaM

1998:
wLwZx1hyGL8

2000:
Qp6Qn8IwPf8

2000:
j0lSpNtjPM8

2002:
WYJj5PP3oRc

2002:
06ES39mVRvs

2002:
3XMPOmuJOUk

2002:
Za54T0KNXxU

2001:
JoC3PUBmhFs

2001:
oKsxPW6i3pM

2001:
xc1Uld0k4W4

2002:
aoZEtBQJN4c

2002:
161NWtHYu0A

Compare those great videos (except for the Papa Roach crap) to this (worse than Papa Roach) crap:

2004:
UCCyoocDxBA

2004:
sc59B7q4OrM

2004:
5yG6iw7AeWE

2005:
Soa3gO7tL-c

2005:
ZQ7oqmikZDQ

2005:
C6MOKXm8x50

2005:
MLTyCu8TTNk

2006:
DWaB4PXCwFU


1998-2002 have a common theme to them. It's all really campy and loud. It's really in your face about everything. Everything is turned up to 11! 2004-2006 also have a common theme. It's very dark and moody like a teenage girl on Myspace in 2005.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: 80sfan on 11/11/15 at 11:29 pm

I go by yearbook pics.

Like the yearbook of 1994, the pics are taken in fall 1993, hair was pretty 90s. Yeah, like 20% of it was still 80s, but overall it was very 90s.
Yearbook of 1993, pics taken in fall 1992, look very 80s.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 11/11/15 at 11:52 pm


I know those songs from DDR, but I never knew them before that.  I do agree Barbie Girl fits well with those songs.

It seems like throughout the '90s certain trends hit Europe a year or even longer before they caught on in the U.S.  The Backstreet Boys and NSYNC are two examples.  NSYNC was huge in the late '90s in Europe, but in the U.S., the Y2K era was their time.  The Backstreet Boys were big in Europe as early as 1995.

The songs I listed were big in 1997 from the perspective of my small town in Missouri.  I agree that Cocoo Jambo was somewhat transitional, but the female vocal style was far more mid-90s style than it was Y2K era.


Yeah, it's definitely interesting the way musical trends often have such different boundaries in Europe and Oceania than in the United States.  For one thing, the whole boyband/teen pop craze was around throughout the entirety of the 90s, beginning in 1988 with acts like New Kids on the Block, and then continuing in the early and mid-90s with Take That, Eternal, Boyzone, East 17, and eventually the Backstreet Boys and *NSYNC, ultimately bridging the movement all the way to the beginning of the 2000s with acts like Atomic Kitten, A*Teens, and Samantha Mumba.  On the other hand, gangsta rap, which was fairly insignificant by 1997 in the United States, was still quite successful in Europe that year, with songs by Coolio, Warren G, and even Snoop Doggy Dogg (whose Doggfather album produced no hit singles in the United States but found success elsewhere) performing just as well as Puffy's glam rap, if not even better.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/13/15 at 12:01 am


i would say about 1993.


The Extreme Ghostbusters TV show was on the air in 1997.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: bchris02 on 11/16/15 at 4:06 pm


The Extreme Ghostbusters TV show was on the air in 1997.


Yet I don't remember hardly anybody talk about it and it only lasted one season, which to me indicates that it was a flop.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 11/16/15 at 6:28 pm


Yet I don't remember hardly anybody talk about it and it only lasted one season, which to me indicates that it was a flop.


Yeah, it's similar to Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles:  The Next Mutation, a live-action show in the franchise that aired for a single season during the 1997-1998 school year and got less than stellar reviews.  Once again, the Early90sGuy is just desperately trying to justify an unambiguously 80s franchise as a 90s one simply based on the first film coming out in 1984 and not the 70s, even though most of the significant spin-off products, as well as the only sequel came out while the 80s were still going on.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: MarkMc1990 on 11/16/15 at 6:32 pm

To me, "1990" conjurs images of...acid wash jeans, the last days of glam metal, mall culture, Roxette, Poison, New Kids on the Block, Vanilla Ice, cheesy old school hip hop, TMNT, Little Mermaid mania, pre-Web, pre-grunge, and end of the Cold War era. Some of this lasted in to 1991-2 or so but it was mostly gone by 1994. Also in this year you had sequels to '70s and '80s franchises like Rocky V, Back to the Future Part III, The Godfather Part III, and Child's Play 2.

Of course it would be remiss to imply 1990 itself didn't give rise to many icons that helped define the rest of the decade like Mariah Carey, Home Alone, Vanilla Ice, The Fresh Prince of Bel Air, Beverly Hills 90210, etc.

1991 seems like a very transitional year and maybe just a wee bit more modern than 1990. In this year alone the world wide web makes its debut, the Soviet flag is permanently lowered from the Kremlin, and grunge gains momentum in the mainstream. Sonic the Hedgehog, Beauty and the Beast, SNES in North America, Nicktoons, etc. are all about to be a quarter century old, but it doesn't feel that way.

In the spring of 1992, The Cosby Show, Who's the Boss, The Golden Girls, Johnny Carson, and Cheers were still on the air but would all be ending that season (Cheers would eek out one more season). Honorable mention to Dallas which ended the year before after 14 seasons.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: bchris02 on 11/16/15 at 6:44 pm


To me, "1990" conjurs images of...acid wash jeans, the last days of glam metal, mall culture, Roxette, Poison, New Kids on the Block, Vanilla Ice, cheesy old school hip hop, TMNT, Little Mermaid mania, pre-Web, pre-grunge, and end of the Cold War era. Some of this lasted in to 1991-2 or so but it was mostly gone by 1994.


In essence, the 1980s.  Everything you describe here is the 1980s to me, with the exception of hip-hop.

Most malls I remember from the 1990 era still had their darker, '80s look with lots of colorful neon signage and the dark brown brick flooring.  During the '90s many of them remodeled to make the concourses brighter as we know them today, which completely changed the feel of the mall.

This was my mall during that era, that my parents used to take me to.

u6xFA5uE-XE

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/16/15 at 7:05 pm


To me, "1990" conjurs images of...acid wash jeans, the last days of glam metal, mall culture, Roxette, Poison, New Kids on the Block, Vanilla Ice, cheesy old school hip hop, TMNT, Little Mermaid mania, pre-Web, pre-grunge, and end of the Cold War era. Some of this lasted in to 1991-2 or so but it was mostly gone by 1994. Also in this year you had sequels to '70s and '80s franchises like Rocky V, Back to the Future Part III, The Godfather Part III, and Child's Play 2.


I wouldn't necessarily call 1990 pre-Grunge...

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: MarkMc1990 on 11/16/15 at 7:11 pm


In essence, the 1980s.  Everything you describe here is the 1980s to me, with the exception of hip-hop.


The late 1980s anyway. I don't imagine many of the things I mentioned were around in ~1984, but surely much of it was in '88 and definitely '89.


I wouldn't necessarily call 1990 pre-Grunge...


No doubt it was around but was it mainstream yet? I'm hardly the authority, and maybe I'm just buying into the idea that it broke through with the release of Nirvana's Nevermind in September of 1991.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/16/15 at 7:24 pm


The late 1980s anyway. I don't imagine many of the things I mentioned were around in ~1984, but surely much of it was in '88 and definitely '89.

No doubt it was around but was it mainstream yet? I'm hardly the authority, and maybe I'm just buying into the idea that it broke through with the release of Nirvana's Nevermind in September of 1991.


Well, it was getting there. It broke through in 1991 but in 1989 Soundgarden released Louder Than Love on the major label A&M and it peaked at 108 on the Billboard 200 charts in 1990. It wasn't as big as it got post-Nevermind but it had somewhat of a mainstream presence. 

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 11/16/15 at 7:51 pm


Well, it was getting there. It broke through in 1991 but in 1989 Soundgarden released Louder Than Love on the major label A&M and it peaked at 108 on the Billboard 200 charts in 1990. It wasn't as big as it got post-Nevermind but it had somewhat of a mainstream presence.


I don't see how #108 is mainstream in the least.  The first grunge album to garner real mainstream attention was Alice in Chain's Facelift, which came out in 1990 but didn't catch on until the summer of 1991, when the Man in the Box video (and, eventually, the Sea of Sorrow video) helped the album earn a Gold Certification before Nevermind even peaked on the Billboard 200, as well as earn Alice in Chains an American Music Awards nomination for Best New Artist alongside Nirvana (both lost to FireHouse).  They were also nominated at the Grammys for Best Hard Rock Performance for Man in the Box.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/16/15 at 7:57 pm


I don't see how #108 is mainstream in the least.  The first grunge album to garner real mainstream attention was Alice in Chain's Facelift, which came out in 1990 but didn't catch on until the summer of 1991, when the Man in the Box video (and, eventually, the Sea of Sorrow video) helped the album earn a Gold Certification before Nevermind even peaked on the Billboard 200, as well as earn Alice in Chains an American Music Awards nomination for Best New Artist alongside Nirvana (both lost to FireHouse).  They were also nominated at the Grammys for Best Hard Rock Performance for Man in the Box.


Anything on the Billboard Charts still has a mainstream presence. I don't see how getting into the Billboard 200 is underground. And it was on a Major, too. The point was that 1990 wasn't exactly pre-Grunge and that it was emerging into the mainstream around that time. Soundgarden's album charted in 1990 while it took Alice in Chains until 1991 to chart.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 11/16/15 at 8:27 pm


Anything on the Billboard Charts still has a mainstream presence. I don't see how getting into the Billboard 200 is underground. And it was on a Major, too. The point was that 1990 wasn't exactly pre-Grunge and that it was emerging into the mainstream around that time. Soundgarden's album charted in 1990 while it took Alice in Chains until 1991 to chart.


Facelift did significantly better, though, and was the first grunge album to earn prestigious award nominations and regular promotion through MTV.  Regardless of Soundgarden's Louder Than Love charting on the Billboard 200, #108 is frankly abysmal for a major label record.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: musicguy93 on 11/16/15 at 11:06 pm


True '80s culture: Jaws movie sequels, the TV show Definition, the Breakin' movies, the modern version of American Bandstand, Hot Dog magazine (rival to Dynamite magazine) and everything else introduced before 1978 that disappeared before 1990.

You are confusing what CAME OUT OF THE '80s for "80s culture". The spirit of the year 1990 perished completely in 1999. 1999 did not have sequels to films that came out in the actual '80s years and before, cheesy commercials like the Baby Bottle Pop commercial from 1998 (la6d5FafgTk), or any action figure lines that could pass as the ones first sold from 1979 to 1990.


No offense dude, but your post is a little bit trippy. But hey, I guess we all have different perspectives.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: musicguy93 on 11/16/15 at 11:17 pm


Well I'm watching Clarissa Explains It All right now, the epitome of mish mash late 80's/early 90's trends  ;D ;D ;D


My thoughts exactly. In fact, the Nostalgia Critic (back when he was funny) mentions this in his Nickcoms video. In regards to the fashion he says, "the 80s were trying to die, and the 90s were trying to define themselves, in that they had no original way of defining themselves". It's a pretty funny video, if you haven't see it already.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bVfyOMqUZks

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/16/15 at 11:49 pm


Facelift did significantly better, though, and was the first grunge album to earn prestigious award nominations and regular promotion through MTV.  Regardless of Soundgarden's Louder Than Love charting on the Billboard 200, #108 is frankly abysmal for a major label record.


No doubt about it, but you do you see my point? Even in 1990 Grunge started creeping into the mainstream even if it didn't do as well as it did in 1991.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/17/15 at 12:15 am


No offense dude, but your post is a little bit trippy. But hey, I guess we all have different perspectives.


Most things he says are really trippy. He is a pretty funny dude, though.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/17/15 at 9:56 am


No offense dude, but your post is a little bit trippy. But hey, I guess we all have different perspectives.


It's not trippy to anyone who was there. The pop culture of the first Reagan term was spawned from 1978 to 1981. All of the years of the actual '80s took after the year 1978. Many programs for the '90s were first introduced in 1978. Look at Grange Hill for example. The multiple camera episodes of the series began its run on February 8th of 1978 and went off the air in April of 1998.

I imagine my posts would look off to the casual observer who sees Transformers as an "80s thing" because the TV show and toyline began in 1984. That would be like saying Seinfeld was a part of " '80s culture" because the pilot aired in 1989. Anyone who lived the '90s knows Transformers items were in stores from 1990 to 1999.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/17/15 at 10:14 am


Most things he says are really trippy.


I know what I'm talking about, though. My words only appear trippy to everyone else on here because of their subjective views.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/17/15 at 10:16 am


I know what I'm talking about, though. My words only appear trippy to everyone else on here because of their subjective views.


I was there in 1990 and it's still trippy to me. You clearly know enough about this to write huge essays about it, dude. Isn't your view a subjective view, too?


I imagine my posts would look off to the casual observer who sees Transformers as an "80s thing" because the TV show and toyline began in 1984. That would be like saying Seinfeld was a part of " '80s culture" because the pilot aired in 1989. Anyone who lived the '90s knows Transformers items were in stores from 1990 to 1999.


But Transformers never left stores! They were still in stores after 1999.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 11/17/15 at 10:19 am


I was there in 1990 and it's still trippy to me. You clearly know enough about this to write huge essays about it, dude. Isn't your view a subjective view, too?


It's the truth.  You weren't alive in 1978, so you don't have a full perspective of the 80s.

Ghostbusters and Terminator came out in 1984, but it was in 1990 that stores were flooded with Slimer plushies and I'll Be Back t-shirts.  Molly Ringwald movies were also for the 90s; the VHS for Sixteen Candles came out in 1992.

But Transformers never left stores! They were still in stores after 1999.

The Transformers came out in 1984, but it was in 1990 that this commercial aired, thus heralding in the 90s:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=551a_2lLGuU

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/17/15 at 10:24 am


It's the truth.  Ghostbusters and Terminator came out in 1984, but it was in 1990 that stores were flooded with Slimer plushies and I'll Be Back t-shirts.  Molly Ringwald movies were also for the 90s; the VHS for Sixteen Candles came out in 1992.


Well, apparently Transformers were also meant for 1990 and then they left the stores in 1999. I don't get it, I have never been in a Toys R Us without transformers toys. I guess this also means Betsy's Wedding is the peak of Molly Ringwalds career since that movie came out in 1990.


The Transformers came out in 1984, but it was in 1990 that this commercial aired, thus heralding in the 90s:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=551a_2lLGuU


I guess Transformers were the end all to be all of the 1990's.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 11/17/15 at 10:26 am


Well, apparently Transformers were also meant for 1990 and then they left the stores in 1999. I don't get it, I have never been in a Toys R Us without transformers toys. I guess this also means Betsy's Wedding is the peak of Molly Ringwalds career since that movie came out in 1990.


Kids everywhere opened presents with Transformers toys inside during Christmas 1998.  By New Years Day, 1999, however, their Optimus Prime action figures were stashed in their attics while they rushed out to buy Pokémon cards instead.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/17/15 at 10:27 am


I was there in 1990 and it's still trippy to me. You clearly know enough about this to write huge essays about it, dude. Isn't your view a subjective view, too?


1990 was trippy to most folks at the time. My uncle thought we were still living in the '80s back then. Everything came full circle in January of 1990.

Personally, I do not think of my perspective as an invalid one because I have used facts to support my claims many times. The first run of the TV show Dallas was on from April 2nd of 1978 to May 3th of 1991, right?

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/17/15 at 10:28 am


But Transformers never left stores! They were still in stores after 1999.


I know, but the '90s were the first full decade of Transformers in stores.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/17/15 at 10:33 am


It's the truth.  You weren't alive in 1978, so you don't have a full perspective of the 80s.

Ghostbusters and Terminator came out in 1984, but it was in 1990 that stores were flooded with Slimer plushies and I'll Be Back t-shirts.  Molly Ringwald movies were also for the 90s; the VHS for Sixteen Candles came out in 1992.


Actually, The Terminator PC game and Dark Horse comics were in stores in 1990. The Universal Studios stores was, in fact, flooded with Slimer plushes all through the early '90s.

Molly Ringwald last starred in a movie with Ally Sheedy in 1990. The name to that film was Betsy's Wedding, look it up.

The Transformers came out in 1984, but it was in 1990 that this commercial aired, thus heralding in the 90s:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=551a_2lLGuU


1990 was the last full year of new Transformers figures in stores.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/17/15 at 10:35 am


Kids everywhere opened presents with Transformers toys inside during Christmas 1998.  By New Years Day, 1999, however, their Optimus Prime action figures were stashed in their attics while they rushed out to buy Pokémon cards instead.


The Beast Wars set was not a phenomenon like Pokemon, but the figures did leave store shelves.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 11/17/15 at 10:36 am

Personally, I do not think of my perspective as an invalid one because I have used facts to support my claims many times. The first run of the TV show Dallas was on from April 2nd of 1978 to May 3th of 1991, right?


That's true, but it also just as easily undermines your logic.  First off, the show still being on throughout all of 1990 means 1990 had a conspicuous 80s influence (if not many more).  Actually wait, forget it, the 90s had already started by 1990, so it still counts.

1990 was the last full year of new Transformers figures in stores.

What the hell?  I thought you just called The Transformers a 90s franchise?  Were kids playing with the exact same 1990 set of toys for nine full years or something?  And you call ludicrous statements like this "facts."

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/17/15 at 10:37 am


Kids everywhere opened presents with Transformers toys during Christmas 1998.  By New Years Day, 1999, however, their Optimus Prime action figures were stashed in their attics while they rushed out to buy Pokémon cards instead.


I always thought kids opened up Playstations and Nintendo 64's during this time but I guess Transformers were the main thing or something. Why do people say Kurt Cobain was the figurehead of Generation X? Clearly, Optimus Prime was.


1990 was trippy to most folks at the time. My uncle thought we were still living in the '80s back then. Everything came full circle in January of 1990.

Personally, I do not think of my perspective as an invalid one because I have used facts to support my claims many times. The first run of the TV show Dallas was on from April 2nd of 1978 to May 3th of 1991, right?


My grandpa says that music got sh*tty once the year 1980 came around and that we've been stuck in 1980 ever since. I wish, dude, I wish.

Wasn't saying it was invalid, I was just saying that it's also subjective. Using that logic, I could say that 1993 is the beginning of the 90s and that everything full circle in 2004 because of Frasier and Friends.


I know, but the '90s were the first full decade of Transformers in stores.


And the 2000's were the second full decade of the Transformers in store.


Molly Ringwald last starred in a movie with Ally Sheedy in 1990. The name to that film was Betsy's Wedding, look it up.


Also, I already named Betsy's Wedding in another post. That movie sucks, dude. It's only good if you wanna stare at Ally and Molly but that's a stupid reason to watch a movie. That the kinda dumb sh*t I did when I was 16 but even then I knew that movie was awful. 

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/17/15 at 10:39 am


Well, apparently Transformers were also meant for 1990 and then they left the stores in 1999. I don't get it, I have never been in a Toys R Us without transformers toys. I guess this also means Betsy's Wedding is the peak of Molly Ringwalds career since that movie came out in 1990.


Now it you who is being funny. I never said that Molly Ringwald was at her peak shortly after Betsy's Wedding came out. It is the last ever film she did with Ally Sheedy.

I guess Transformers were the end all to be all of the 1990's.


You're misconstruing my meaning.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/17/15 at 10:44 am


Now it you who is being funny. I never said that Molly Ringwald was at her peak shortly after Betsy's Wedding came out. It is the last ever film she did with Ally Sheedy.

You're misconstruing my meaning.


I sure hope so. At least one person finds my jokes funny. Girls always told me I wasn't funny when I was in High School. Anyway, like I said, that movie is crap. If Molly and Ally did a movie today, would that mean that the 80's never left?

And you do put an awful lot of importance on the Transformers.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 11/17/15 at 10:45 am


Now it you who is being funny. I never said that Molly Ringwald was at her peak shortly after Betsy's Wedding came out. It is the last ever film she did with Ally Sheedy.


Which puts her firmly in the 80s category, despite her breakout being in 1984.  Unless Betsy's Wedding VHS's were flying off Blockbuster shelves like hotcakes for nine straight years from 1990 to 1998.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/17/15 at 10:45 am


That's true, but it also just as easily undermines your logic.  First off, the show still being on throughout all of 1990 means 1990 had a conspicuous 80s influence (if not many more).  Actually wait, forget it, the 90s had already started by 1990, so it still counts.


You don't even know what the '80s are to say that 1990 had a "conspicuous '80s influence".

What the hell?  I thought you just called The Transformers a 90s franchise?

The Transformers went through many stages in the 1990s.

G1 Transformers: 1990, 1991

G2 Transformers: 1993-1995

Beast Wars: Transformers: 1996-1999

Machine Wars: 1997

Were kids playing with the exact same 1990 set of toys for nine full years or something?  And you call ludicrous statements like this "facts."

You're taking my words out of context.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/17/15 at 10:46 am


I sure hope so. At least one person finds my jokes funny. Girls always told me I wasn't funny when I was in High School. Anyway, like I said, that movie is crap. If Molly and Ally did a movie today, would that mean that the 80's never left?

And you do put an awful lot of importance on the Transformers.


The movie being crap does not change its release date.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/17/15 at 10:50 am


You don't even know what the '80s are to say that 1990 had a "conspicuous '80s influence".

The Transformers went through many stages in the 1990s.

G1 Transformers: 1990, 1991

G2 Transformers: 1993-1995

Beast Wars: Transformers: 1996-1999

Machine Wars: 1997

You're taking my words out of context.


Transformers:

Robots in Disguise (2000–2002)

The Unicron Trilogy (Armada, Energon and Cybertron) (2001–2006)

Transformers: Animated (2007–2010)

So, the 80's must of lasted through the 2000's, too.


The movie being crap does not change its release date.


It should! That movie was horrible! Why would anyone wanna bring up that horsesh*t!? Why?!

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/17/15 at 10:51 am


I always thought kids opened up Playstations and Nintendo 64's during this time but I guess Transformers were the main thing or something. Why do people say Kurt Cobain was the figurehead of Generation X? Clearly, Optimus Prime was.


???

I never said Transformers were the central toys of the 1990s.

My grandpa says that music got sh*tty once the year 1980 came around and that we've been stuck in 1980 ever since. I wish, dude, I wish.

I did not agree with my uncle at the time he said that, nor do I now.

Using that logic, I could say that 1993 is the beginning of the 90s and that everything full circle in 2004 because of Frasier and Friends.

I disagree, dude.

And the 2000's were the second full decade of the Transformers in store.

Pointless information.

Also, I already named Betsy's Wedding in another post. That movie sucks, dude. It's only good if you wanna stare at Ally and Molly but that's a stupid reason to watch a movie. That the kinda dumb sh*t I did when I was 16 but even then I knew that movie was awful.


Nothing stands out about it, but it was the last film with Molly and Ally in it.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 11/17/15 at 10:52 am


The movie being crap does not change its release date.


So basically, Molly Ringwald's resume looks like this:

1982 - Tempest - Miranda Dimitrius
1983 - Spacehunter: Adventures in the Forbidden Zone - Niki
1983 - Packin' It In - Melissa Webber
1984 - Sixteen Candles - Samantha Baker
1985 - Surviving: A Family in Crisis - Lonnie
1985 - The Breakfast Club - Claire Standish
1986 - Pretty in Pink - Andie Walsh
1987 - P.K. and the Kid - P.K. Bayette
1987 - King Lear - Cordelia
1987 - The Pick-up Artist - Randy Jensen
1988 - For Keeps - Darcy Elliot Bobrucz
1988 - Fresh Horses - Jewel

1990 - Strike It Rich - Cary
1990 - Betsy's Wedding - Betsy Hopper

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/17/15 at 10:53 am


Transformers:

Robots in Disguise (2000–2002)

The Unicron Trilogy (Armada, Energon and Cybertron) (2001–2006)

Transformers: Animated (2007–2010)

So, the 80's must of lasted through the 2000's, too.


I do not see any ties to G1 Transformers in there, only revamps.

It should! That movie was horrible! Why would anyone wanna bring up that horsesh*t!? Why?!


It should to you, but the release date remains.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/17/15 at 10:56 am


So basically, Molly Ringwald's resume looks like this:

1982 - Tempest - Miranda Dimitrius
1983 - Spacehunter: Adventures in the Forbidden Zone - Niki
1983 - Packin' It In - Melissa Webber
1984 - Sixteen Candles - Samantha Baker
1985 - Surviving: A Family in Crisis - Lonnie
1985 - The Breakfast Club - Claire Standish
1986 - Pretty in Pink - Andie Walsh
1987 - P.K. and the Kid - P.K. Bayette
1987 - King Lear - Cordelia
1987 - The Pick-up Artist - Randy Jensen
1988 - For Keeps - Darcy Elliot Bobrucz
1988 - Fresh Horses - Jewel

1990 - Strike It Rich - Cary
1990 - Betsy's Wedding - Betsy Hopper



I'm in stitches right now. How long did it take for you to think of that?

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 11/17/15 at 10:58 am


???

I never said Transformers were the central toys of the 1990s.


That's not the point.  His use of rhetoric was only to make fun of your embarrassingly stubborn misguidedness.  The point is you call The Transformers a 90s fad only, with the 80s and 2000s being completely insignificant, even though in reality, those were the two decades that produced the most significant culture in the franchise.

I did not agree with my uncle at the time he said that, nor do I now.

Frankly, you sound like a crazy uncle yourself, just postpone the downfall of popular culture to 1993 and there you go.

I disagree, dude.

Got any more "facts" to prove why your 1990-1998 definition is superior to a 1993-2004 definition?

Pointless information.

The Transformers is a multi-decade franchise, which churned out its most popular work in the mid-80s and late 2000s.

Nothing stands out about it, but it was the last film with Molly and Ally in it.


A contradiction within the same sentence.  Lovely.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/17/15 at 10:58 am


???

I never said Transformers were the central toys of the 1990s.


But you are acting like it is.


I did not agree with my uncle at the time he said that, nor do I now.


Neither do I. My grandpa's crazy.


I disagree, dude.


Well, ok, you are entitled to your opinion, dude.


Pointless information.


No it isn't. It shows how the spirit of 1978 lasted throughout the 00's.


Nothing stands out about it, but it was the last film with Molly and Ally in it.


The only thing that stands out about it is the smell.


I do not see any ties to G1 Transformers in there, only revamps.


They had revamps in the 90's too unless Beast Wars is the true G1.


It should to you, but the release date remains.


If I didn't know any better and we were using movies like that, I'd say "1990 must of been the worst turd of a year because of all the crap that came out" especially that movie.


So basically, Molly Ringwald's resume looks like this:

1982 - Tempest - Miranda Dimitrius
1983 - Spacehunter: Adventures in the Forbidden Zone - Niki
1983 - Packin' It In - Melissa Webber
1984 - Sixteen Candles - Samantha Baker
1985 - Surviving: A Family in Crisis - Lonnie
1985 - The Breakfast Club - Claire Standish
1986 - Pretty in Pink - Andie Walsh
1987 - P.K. and the Kid - P.K. Bayette
1987 - King Lear - Cordelia
1987 - The Pick-up Artist - Randy Jensen
1988 - For Keeps - Darcy Elliot Bobrucz
1988 - Fresh Horses - Jewel

1990 - Strike It Rich - Cary
1990 - Betsy's Wedding - Betsy Hopper



Thanks. You made me spit out my drink.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/17/15 at 10:58 am


Which puts her firmly in the 80s category, despite her breakout being in 1984.  Unless Betsy's Wedding VHS's were flying off Blockbuster shelves like hotcakes for nine straight years from 1990 to 1998.


She made her worst mistake turning down the female lead roles in Pretty Woman and Ghost.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 11/17/15 at 11:01 am


I do not see any ties to G1 Transformers in there, only revamps.


G1 Transformers ended in 1987, though.

It should to you, but the release date remains.


You're forgetting that Molly Ringwald starred in a theatre production in 5th grade that premiered before 1978.  I know it wasn't on the same level as Sixteen Candles, not to mention I don't even know specifically what play she starred in, but the release date remains the same.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/17/15 at 11:06 am


G1 Transformers ended in 1987, though.


http://img.ifcdn.com/images/a7b823ceb20fb1ccfd69add512504976b61bdd269dd1451a081e8b19eccb3dbd_1.jpg

The G1 Transformers toyline ran from 1984 to 1991.

You're forgetting that Molly Ringwald starred in a theatre production in 5th grade that premiered before 1978.  I know it wasn't on the same level as Sixteen Candles, not to mention I don't even know specifically what play she starred in, but the release date remains the same.


In 1978, Molly Ringwald played Kate in the West Coast production of Annie.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 11/17/15 at 11:08 am


http://img.ifcdn.com/images/a7b823ceb20fb1ccfd69add512504976b61bdd269dd1451a081e8b19eccb3dbd_1.jpg

The G1 Transformers toyline ran from 1984 to 1991.


Number of 80s years with G1 Transformers toylines coming out:  6.
Number of 90s years with G1 Transformers toylines:  2.

Actually, never mind, G1 Transformers was more relevant than Power Rangers as the 90s went on, so the second total is actually 9.

In 1978, Molly Ringwald played Kate in the West Coast production of Annie.


Oh, YEAH!!!  Move over, Olivia Newton-John and Diana Ross, there's a NEW queen of entertainment!  8)

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/17/15 at 11:12 am


That's not the point.  His use of rhetoric was only to make fun of your embarrassingly stubborn misguidedness.  The point is you call The Transformers a 90s fad only, with the 80s and 2000s being completely insignificant, even though in reality, those were the two decades that produced the most significant culture in the franchise.


Most significant culture or not, the '90s were still the first full decade of Transformers toys being in stores.

Frankly, you sound like a crazy uncle yourself, just postpone the downfall of popular culture to 1993 and there you go.

You know what, I should just post like a page on Wikipedia. "The 1980s (pronounced "nineteen-eighties", commonly abbreviated as the "Eighties") was a decade of the Gregorian calendar that began on January 1, 1980 and ended on December 31, 1989." Is that better for you?

Got any more "facts" to prove why your 1990-1998 definition is superior to a 1993-2004 definition?

Why bother.  ::)

The Transformers is a multi-decade franchise, which churned out its most popular work in the mid-80s and late 2000s.

You have a point, but the '90s were still the first decade when Transformers  were in toy stores from beginning to end.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/17/15 at 11:13 am

YahNhXSD1Zs

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/17/15 at 11:14 am


Oh, YEAH!!!  Move over, Olivia Newton-John and Diana Ross, there's a NEW queen of entertainment!  8)


You hate when you're wrong, don't you?

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/17/15 at 11:17 am


But you are acting like it is.


I am?

No it isn't. It shows how the spirit of 1978 lasted throughout the 00's.

No it doesn't, there was an '80s revival in swing during the 2000s.


They had revamps in the 90's too unless Beast Wars is the true G1.

No, Beast Wars came out long after G2.



Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/17/15 at 11:18 am


Why bother.  ::)


My argument of the true 90's starting from 1993 and ending in 2003/2004 makes much more sense.


I am?

No it doesn't, there was an '80s revival in swing during the 2000s.


No, Beast Wars came out long after G2.






Yeah.

80's revival = spirit of 1978.

Then... What.... Huh!? I thought you said G1 lasted throughout the 90's!?

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 11/17/15 at 11:19 am

You know what, I should just post like a page on Wikipedia. "The 1980s (pronounced "nineteen-eighties", commonly abbreviated as the "Eighties") was a decade of the Gregorian calendar that began on January 1, 1980 and ended on December 31, 1989." Is that better for you?

Good job.  You just referenced an article that explicitly implies that 1978 was not an 80s year by definition.

Why bother.  ::)

Um, because I thought your whole point in wasting our times, besides to amuse us, was to scientifically prove that the 80s began in 1978?

You have a point, but the '90s were still the first decade when Transformers  were in toy stores from beginning to end.

Most people, including Jordan and I, consider decades to be defined by the best, most significant, and popular culture during its peak, not the first full decade that a franchise existed.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/17/15 at 11:52 am


Good job.  You just referenced an article that explicitly implies that 1978 was not an 80s year by definition.


Good job, you cannot detect sarcasm.

Um, because I thought your whole point in wasting our times, besides to amuse us, was to scientifically prove that the 80s began in 1978?

Most people, including Jordan and I, consider decades to be defined by the best, most significant, and popular culture during its peak, not the first full decade that a franchise existed.


We have different perspectives on start and end dates of decades, obviously. No one can change the way people think, so it was I who wasted my own time on here. I was happy to know I put some tools out there, regardless. I mean you are now aware that there are people out there who see 1978 was the first full year of the '80s, rather you agreed with them or not.




Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 11/17/15 at 12:07 pm


Good job, you cannot detect sarcasm.


It's outlining the only factually accurate date boundaries for the 1980s.  My opinion of 1991 being the true beginning of the 90s isn't factually accurate either, but the point is regardless of your sarcasm, you keep writing as though 1978 is the factual beginning of the 80s.

We have different perspectives on start and end dates of decades, obviously. No one can change the way people think, so it was I who wasted my own time on here. I was happy to know I put some tools out there, regardless. I mean you are now aware that there are people out there who see 1978 was the first full year of the '80s, rather you agreed with them or not.


This is what it all comes down to.  I already figured there were probably some people who considered 1978 the beginning of 80s culture, but they were still the stark minority compared to those who mark the starting point as some point between 1980 and 1983.  I just don't flaunt my own opinion like it's absolute fact.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/17/15 at 12:15 pm


My argument of the true 90's starting from 1993 and ending in 2003/2004 makes much more sense.


I have to disagree, but people are different so what can you do?

Yeah.

80's revival = spirit of 1978.

Then... What.... Huh!? I thought you said G1 lasted throughout the 90's!?


I forgot to put the quotation marks before and after " '80s culture". People in 2001 were confusing what came out of the '80s for " '80s culture" too, back then.

Jordan, the G1 toyline did last until 1991.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/17/15 at 12:20 pm


I have to disagree, but people are different so what can you do?


That's a fair point.


I forgot to put the quotation marks before and after " '80s culture". People in 2001 were confusing what came out of the '80s for " '80s culture" too, back then.


Aren't they still doing that today?


Jordan, the G1 toyline did last until 1991.


The G1 toyline was reissued in 2000.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/17/15 at 12:42 pm


It's outlining the only factually accurate date boundaries for the 1980s.  My opinion of 1991 being the true beginning of the 90s isn't factually accurate either, but the point is regardless of your sarcasm, you keep writing as though 1978 is the factual beginning of the 80s.


Did Dallas not start in 1978?  8)

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: MarkMc1990 on 11/17/15 at 1:01 pm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KP8NpPcVgBA

Interesting dichotomy in this video. It came out in February 1993. The song itself sounds like it could have come out in 1988 alongside Brenda K Star's "I Still Believe". However the lead singer's hideous floral dress reeks of the '90s!

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: Howard on 11/17/15 at 2:30 pm


Did Dallas not start in 1978?  8)


Yes, Dallas started in 1978.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 11/17/15 at 2:33 pm


Did Dallas not start in 1978?  8)

Yup, I see what you're saying, the earliest 80s influences started in 1978.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/17/15 at 11:13 pm


Aren't they still doing that today?


Affirmative, they sure are.

The G1 toyline was reissued in 2000.


Right, the Commemorative Series one with the small smokestacks hit the states in 2002.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/17/15 at 11:14 pm


Yup, I see what you're saying, the earliest 80s influences started in 1978.


Dallas had jumped the shark by the time our 1990 calendars went up, but this show was on for all of 1990 into 1991. It did help to make up the atmosphere of 1990 and the winter to spring seasons of 1991, so 1978 had to be the first year of the 80s.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 11/17/15 at 11:26 pm


Exactly, thank you.


The earliest 80s influences became fairly noticeable in 1978, but that doesn't mean 80s culture was dominant yet.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/17/15 at 11:33 pm


The earliest 80s influences became fairly noticeable in 1978, but that doesn't mean 80s culture was dominant yet.


What is " '80s culture" to you?

These come to mind for me:

http://thumbs4.ebaystatic.com/d/l225/m/mvDNXbs6Ke2TFhqgyA4liVQ.jpg

http://vignette4.wikia.nocookie.net/logopedia/images/e/e7/Eveningmag1979_a.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20120710102005

http://www.liketotally80s.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/breakdancer-costume-450px.jpg

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/17/15 at 11:42 pm


Right, the Commemorative Series one with the small smokestacks hit the states in 2002.


Wouldn't this just mean that the spirit of 1990 lived on in 2002?

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 11/17/15 at 11:53 pm


What is " '80s culture" to you?


+ Ronald Reagan
+ MTV
+ Adult Michael Jackson
+ Madonna
+ Yuppies
+ Hair bands
+ New wave
+ Family ties
+ Brat Pack teen flicks
+ AIDS Epidemic
+ Drum machines and synthesizers
+ Gated drums
+ Hi-NRG
+ The Far Side
+ Don Bluth animated features
+ Horror-comedies (i.e. Ghostbusters, A Nightmare on Elm Street, Beetlejuice, Killer Klowns from Outer Space)
+ Macho action flicks (Lethal Weapon, Die Hard, The Terminator, Rambo, etc.)
+ Old school hip hop (Grandmaster Flash, Run-DMC, Licensed to Ill-era Beastie Boys, etc.)
+ The Cosby Show
+ Cheers
+ Phil Collins
+ Bruce Springsteen
+ Prince
+ The Transformers
+ Conservative-leaning libertarian politics (more of an emphasis on fiscal conservatism than social conservatism, as social expression progressed far more than it regressed this decade)
+ Final stretch of the Cold War (beginning with the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan on the dawn of the 80s, ending with the fall of the Berlin Wall)
+ Cassette tapes
+ Rise of cable television
+ Home computers become huge for the first time
+ Expansion of big business
+ Indiana Jones
+ Eddie Murphy comedies
+ Permed-up hair
+ Neon clothing
+ Post-disco (especially Michael Jackson and Kool & the Gang)
+ Big band influences in pop/rock (i.e., Huey Lewis & the News)
+ Wham! and Faith-era George Michael
+ Atari 2600
+ Pac-Man
+ Nintendo Entertainment System

There are probably several more things, but that's a basic overview.  I'm guessing you consider the vast majority of what I listed culture "for the 90s," even though they peaked in popularity before 1990.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 11/18/15 at 12:01 am


Dallas had jumped the shark by the time our 1990 calendars went up, but this show was on for all of 1990 into 1991. It did help to make up the atmosphere of 1990 and the winter to spring seasons of 1991, so 1978 had to be the first year of the 80s.

Everybody says after the ''death'' of Bobby story line ended, the show jumped the shark!

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/18/15 at 12:09 am


Wouldn't this just mean that the spirit of 1990 lived on in 2002?


No, those figures are filed under the 2002 Commemorative Series.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/18/15 at 1:05 am


+ Ronald Reagan
+ MTV
+ Adult Michael Jackson
+ Madonna
+ Yuppies
+ Hair bands
+ New wave
+ Family ties
+ Brat Pack teen flicks
+ AIDS Epidemic
+ Drum machines and synthesizers
+ Gated drums
+ Hi-NRG
+ The Far Side
+ Don Bluth animated features
+ Horror-comedies (i.e. Ghostbusters, A Nightmare on Elm Street, Beetlejuice, Killer Klowns from Outer Space)
+ Macho action flicks (Lethal Weapon, Die Hard, The Terminator, Rambo, etc.)
+ Old school hip hop (Grandmaster Flash, Run-DMC, Licensed to Ill-era Beastie Boys, etc.)
+ The Cosby Show
+ Cheers
+ Phil Collins
+ Bruce Springsteen
+ Prince
+ The Transformers
+ Conservative-leaning libertarian politics (more of an emphasis on fiscal conservatism than social conservatism, as social expression progressed far more than it regressed this decade)
+ Final stretch of the Cold War (beginning with the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan on the dawn of the 80s, ending with the fall of the Berlin Wall)
+ Cassette tapes
+ Rise of cable television
+ Home computers become huge for the first time
+ Expansion of big business
+ Indiana Jones
+ Eddie Murphy comedies
+ Permed-up hair
+ Neon clothing
+ Post-disco (especially Michael Jackson and Kool & the Gang)
+ Big band influences in pop/rock (i.e., Huey Lewis & the News)
+ Wham! and Faith-era George Michael
+ Atari 2600
+ Pac-Man
+ Nintendo Entertainment System

There are probably several more things, but that's a basic overview.  I'm guessing you consider the vast majority of what I listed culture "for the 90s," even though they peaked in popularity before 1990.


So The Cosby Show did not seep into the early '90s whatsoever? The Cosby Show was still going strong in the 1989 to 1990 TV season.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/18/15 at 2:19 am


So The Cosby Show did not seep into the early '90s whatsoever? The Cosby Show was still going strong in the 1989 to 1990 TV season.


Out of that whole list, all you got out of it was the Cosby Show!?


No, those figures are filed under the 2002 Commemorative Series.


Still G1, though.

Bryan Adams should of named his song "Summer of 90" instead.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 11/18/15 at 5:03 am


Out of that whole list, all you got out of it was the Cosby Show!?


People everywhere were wearing sweater vests in the 90s.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/18/15 at 7:04 am


Out of that whole list, all you got out of it was the Cosby Show!?


No. I decided not to say anymore after that.

Still G1, though.

Bryan Adams should of named his song "Summer of 90" instead.


You're a hoot.

It is not G1 at all. Those were reissues of the originals and not the first editions.

The Commemorative Series was made after more people started using dial-up Internet in 1999.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/18/15 at 7:07 am


People everywhere were wearing sweater vests in the 90s.


More like people everywhere were wearing sweaters with ugly gaudy designs in the winters of 1990, 1991, and 1992.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 11/18/15 at 9:35 am

This is the 80s based on popular consensus:

https://typicaltracy.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/80s-collage.jpg

http://weather.bloginky.com/files/2013/05/80s-collage.jpg

http://uncomical.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/deviant-art-80s-collage.jpg

https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8358/8314353234_2857b33c03_b.jpg

http://orig02.deviantart.net/9608/f/2012/340/c/c/totally_80s_collage_by_krazyemomom-d5n8ae2.jpg

https://estefrioscastel.files.wordpress.com/2013/02/ilovethe80s.jpg

http://library.austintexas.gov/sites/default/files/1980scollage.jpg

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/18/15 at 10:39 am


No. I decided not to say anymore after that.

You're a hoot.

It is not G1 at all. Those were reissues of the originals and not the first editions.

The Commemorative Series was made after more people started using dial-up Internet in 1999.


Fair enough.

Thanks!

How could the spirit of 1990 live on in 1991-1998 if there was no G1 figures on the shelf's? If the G1 figures were put back on shelf's in 2000, wouldn't that mean the spirit was rekindled?

More people started using Dial-Up in 1995/1996. I got my first computer in 1996 and so did most people I know. Hell, even broadband was available in 1996 and 1997. 

What's the internet have to do with this anyway??


More like people everywhere were wearing sweaters with ugly gaudy designs in the winters of 1990, 1991, and 1992.


If the spirit of 90 existed in 1991-1998 wouldn't that mean that people were wearing sweaters from the winter of 1990 to the winter of 1998 and then in winter of 1999 we wore skinny jeans and black eyeliner because it wasn't the 90's anymore?

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: Howard on 11/18/15 at 2:48 pm


What is " '80s culture" to you?

These come to mind for me:

http://thumbs4.ebaystatic.com/d/l225/m/mvDNXbs6Ke2TFhqgyA4liVQ.jpg

http://vignette4.wikia.nocookie.net/logopedia/images/e/e7/Eveningmag1979_a.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20120710102005

http://www.liketotally80s.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/breakdancer-costume-450px.jpg


break dancing is definitely 80's culture.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/28/15 at 11:26 pm


Fair enough.

Thanks!

How could the spirit of 1990 live on in 1991-1998 if there was no G1 figures on the shelf's? If the G1 figures were put back on shelf's in 2000, wouldn't that mean the spirit was rekindled?


The G2 and Machine Wars lines were made up of Generation 1 figures sold in European markets.

The original versions of the G1 Transformers have not been re-released in the States thus far. The 2002 Commemorative Series figures (exclusives to Toys "R" Us) were the same molds as the first ones with slight modifications made to them. Personally, I do not think the spirit of 1990 will ever be rekindled.

What's the internet have to do with this anyway??

'99 was the year of Internet mania and its mania within a mania, the Internet stock craze.


If the spirit of 90 existed in 1991-1998 wouldn't that mean that people were wearing sweaters from the winter of 1990 to the winter of 1998 and then in winter of 1999 we wore skinny jeans and black eyeliner because it wasn't the 90's anymore?


Not exactly, but something like that....

http://images.canberratimes.com.au/2015/06/04/6587175/Article%20Lead%20-%20wide996788919ghgnhdimage.related.articleLeadwide.729x410.ghgn93.png1433392125299.jpg-620x349.jpg


http://ak-hdl.buzzfed.com/static/2014-02/enhanced/webdr03/10/16/original-16198-1392067893-4.jpg

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/28/15 at 11:37 pm


The G2 and Machine Wars lines were made up of Generation 1 figures sold in European markets.

The original versions of the G1 Transformers have not been re-released in the States thus far. The 2002 Commemorative Series figures (exclusives to Toys "R" Us) were the same molds as the first ones with slight modifications made to them. Personally, I do not think the spirit of 1990 will ever be rekindled.


Key word being slight. Still G1, dude. The revamped G1!


'99 was the year of Internet mania and its mania within a mania, the Internet stock craze.


Do you have to put mania after everything? And that whole thing started in 1997.


Not exactly, but something like that....

http://images.canberratimes.com.au/2015/06/04/6587175/Article%20Lead%20-%20wide996788919ghgnhdimage.related.articleLeadwide.729x410.ghgn93.png1433392125299.jpg-620x349.jpg


http://ak-hdl.buzzfed.com/static/2014-02/enhanced/webdr03/10/16/original-16198-1392067893-4.jpg


That was still the Emo look in 2000-2002. It wasn't until 2003/2004 that the look changed into what it's known for now. Hell, I'd even see people wear sweaters like George is during Christmas time in 2000-2002 as well.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 11/29/15 at 12:22 pm


Key word being slight. Still G1, dude. The revamped G1!

Well, "revamped G1" is still filed under the 2002 Commemorative Series. It is not apart of the original toyline of '84 to '91.

Do you have to put mania after everything? And that whole thing started in 1997.

I'm not the only one who witnessed this, though:

http://www.prentiss-smith.com/internet-mania-january-1999/

http://money.cnn.com/1999/12/02/markets/marketwrap/

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/internet-mania/


Hell, I'd even see people wear sweaters like George is during Christmas time in 2000-2002 as well.


In the '90s, we wore sweaters like that in the spring, autumn, and fall seasons.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 11/29/15 at 12:28 pm

But then what does 1992-1998 have to do with this then, anyway if there were to Transformers on the shelves of toy stores everywhere!

Dot-Com bubble started in 1997.

We also did in 2000, 2001 and 2002.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: TheEarly90sGuy on 12/02/15 at 12:28 pm


But then what does 1992-1998 have to do with this then, anyway if there were to Transformers on the shelves of toy stores everywhere!


1992: Action Masters figures are on clearance at many department stores
1993 - 1995: G2 Transformers hit
1996: G2 figures are still on shelves
1997: Kay Bee Toys exclusive "Machine Wars" line
1998: "Machine Wars" figures are still on the shelves

Dot-Com bubble started in 1997.

You are very correct. The Dot-Com bubble lasted from 1997 to 2000.

We also did in 2000, 2001 and 2002.


Do you have photographic evidence of this?

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: JordanK1982 on 12/02/15 at 1:24 pm


1992: Action Masters figures are on clearance at many department stores
1993 - 1995: G2 Transformers hit
1996: G2 figures are still on shelves
1997: Kay Bee Toys exclusive "Machine Wars" line
1998: "Machine Wars" figures are still on the shelves

You are very correct. The Dot-Com bubble lasted from 1997 to 2000.

Do you have photographic evidence of this?


2000-2002: G1 figures are reissued bringing the Transformers back on the shelves of Toys R Us stores everywhere.

Yes.

Yeah, dude. Of course I do. For starters, that picture you sent is from a Seventeen magazine from 2002 which my sister owns. That was the Emo look from 1996-2003. The glasses, shaggy hair, sweater or sweater vests etc., etc., etc.

Weezer in 2002:
https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/31/59996297_2adc3893c5.jpg

Model in 2002 showing off the "current Emo look"
http://the.honoluluadvertiser.com/dailypix/2002/Jan/08/il01a.jpg

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: Jquar on 12/04/15 at 3:26 am

Musically, there were a few hits from as late as the spring of 1995 that still give off a genuine touch of an '80s vibe.

In the House of Stone and Light

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JpbgUVPP3DU&ab_channel=QuestionAuthority2

I Live My Life For You

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aY2sBDPgOXU&ab_channel=FirehouseVEVO

No More "I Love Yous"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NSkboTTTmpg&ab_channel=AnnieLennoxVEVO

Secret Garden

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9zkmE07X7-E&ab_channel=UnoEntreMil

All of these songs were sizable pop radio hits between February and May of 1995. Looking back, this was probably the absolute end point (in the 1990s at least) where that late 80s musical production style was somewhat viable commercially.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 12/04/15 at 5:40 am


Musically, there were a few hits from as late as the spring of 1995 that still give off a genuine touch of an '80s vibe.

In the House of Stone and Light

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JpbgUVPP3DU&ab_channel=QuestionAuthority2

I Live My Life For You

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aY2sBDPgOXU&ab_channel=FirehouseVEVO

No More "I Love Yous"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NSkboTTTmpg&ab_channel=AnnieLennoxVEVO

Secret Garden

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9zkmE07X7-E&ab_channel=UnoEntreMil

All of these songs were sizable pop radio hits between February and May of 1995. Looking back, this was probably the absolute end point (in the 1990s at least) where that late 80s musical production style was somewhat viable commercially.


I agree with you there.  The ironic thing is that early 1995 had more of an 80s influence to its sound than did 1994, which had a couple of songs by Erasure but pretty much nothing else.  Towards the end of 1995, this made a respectable impact on the Mainstream Top 40 Chart, not to mention excellent standings in the British Isles:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7ew_jIxLa8

To stretch the boundaries even further, these songs were also popular around early 1997:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aYTSkPi6v8w

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=idE1lsqG2Vc

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IhZKh0sXT1s

The aforementioned Secret Garden re-charted the Billboard Hot 100 at the same time with significantly improved standings, thanks to its use in Jerry McGuire.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: aja675 on 12/04/15 at 7:21 am


I agree with you there.  The ironic thing is that early 1995 had more of an 80s influence to its sound than did 1994, which had a couple of songs by Erasure but pretty much nothing else.  Towards the end of 1995, this made a respectable impact on the Mainstream Top 40 Chart, not to mention excellent standings in the British Isles:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7ew_jIxLa8

To stretch the boundaries even further, these songs were also popular around early 1997:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aYTSkPi6v8w

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=idE1lsqG2Vc

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IhZKh0sXT1s

The aforementioned Secret Garden re-charted the Billboard Hot 100 at the same time with significantly improved standings, thanks to its use in Jerry McGuire.
In a similar vein, this song from 2006 still has a late '90s melody despite the '00s beat.
V9cauvGO8ME

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: violet_shy on 12/04/15 at 4:28 pm

Until 1990. Because I remember everything changed around 1991. I disagree it lasted until 1994, '94 was completely different.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: Jquar on 12/05/15 at 1:36 am


I agree with you there.  The ironic thing is that early 1995 had more of an 80s influence to its sound than did 1994, which had a couple of songs by Erasure but pretty much nothing else.  Towards the end of 1995, this made a respectable impact on the Mainstream Top 40 Chart, not to mention excellent standings in the British Isles:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7ew_jIxLa8

To stretch the boundaries even further, these songs were also popular around early 1997:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aYTSkPi6v8w

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=idE1lsqG2Vc

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IhZKh0sXT1s

The aforementioned Secret Garden re-charted the Billboard Hot 100 at the same time with significantly improved standings, thanks to its use in Jerry McGuire.


Yeah, a lot of '80s artists made comebacks in the mid 1990s and did at least respectably.

As for 1997, I agree and this is another one that gets me, it feels rather dated for 1997 but I remember it being a genuine radio hit at the time and it was the 2nd (or arguably even 3rd) big comeback for the Bee Gees.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HBwqiq1PN0E&ab_channel=beegees

1994 had a few similar gasps of '80s talent scoring hits. The Pretenders hit it big with I'll Stand By You, Prince and Richard Marx had their last really big hit songs, and Steve Perry even had a modest hit that year.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 12/05/15 at 3:05 am

1994 had a few similar gasps of '80s talent scoring hits. The Pretenders hit it big with I'll Stand By You, Prince and Richard Marx had their last really big hit songs, and Steve Perry even had a modest hit that year.


Well, aside from Steve Perry, the acts you listed had pretty much abandoned their respective 80s styles by 1994.  I'll Stand By You is a typical adult ballad, without the booming production of more prototypical 80s ballads like Alone or I Want to Know What Love Is.  It blends together with the Celiné Dion, Mariah Carey, and Vanessa Williams-style pop ballads that were prominent in the 90s.  Prince was a truly unorthodox musician throughout the 80s, but by 1994, he was caving into to all of the dominant urban genres of the 90s, from new-jack swing, to g-funk, to contemporary r&b.  A lot like fellow 80s male singer/songwriter heartthrob Bryan Adams, Richard Marx became predominantly known for his soft love ballads during the 90s, as opposed to the loud pop-rock that first made him popular in the 80s, although The Way She Loves Me has a vague 80s feel to it (key word vague).  Most artists who were successful during the 80s and who were still popular in 1994 had already changed their musical style to keep up with current trends.

The brief 80s resurgences in 1995 and early 1997 could simply be due to important musical movements declining at the time.  The hair metal-killing grunge peaked in popularity during 1994 but then began to lose chart significance in 1995.  Early 1997 was when grunge died off completely, as well as about the time most mid-90s rock movements like britpop and first wave pop punk and post-grunge began to lose momentum.  It's these little voids, I think, that allowed old school bands to briefly reclaim their time in the spotlight while staying true to their roots.  The rock industry was a bit unclear about its identity both respective times, so it opened the window for air stations to experiment with different bands, including old ones.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: Jquar on 12/12/15 at 3:45 am


Well, aside from Steve Perry, the acts you listed had pretty much abandoned their respective 80s styles by 1994.  I'll Stand By You is a typical adult ballad, without the booming production of more prototypical 80s ballads like Alone or I Want to Know What Love Is.  It blends together with the Celiné Dion, Mariah Carey, and Vanessa Williams-style pop ballads that were prominent in the 90s.  Prince was a truly unorthodox musician throughout the 80s, but by 1994, he was caving into to all of the dominant urban genres of the 90s, from new-jack swing, to g-funk, to contemporary r&b.  A lot like fellow 80s male singer/songwriter heartthrob Bryan Adams, Richard Marx became predominantly known for his soft love ballads during the 90s, as opposed to the loud pop-rock that first made him popular in the 80s, although The Way She Loves Me has a vague 80s feel to it (key word vague).  Most artists who were successful during the 80s and who were still popular in 1994 had already changed their musical style to keep up with current trends.

The brief 80s resurgences in 1995 and early 1997 could simply be due to important musical movements declining at the time.  The hair metal-killing grunge peaked in popularity during 1994 but then began to lose chart significance in 1995.  Early 1997 was when grunge died off completely, as well as about the time most mid-90s rock movements like britpop and first wave pop punk and post-grunge began to lose momentum.  It's these little voids, I think, that allowed old school bands to briefly reclaim their time in the spotlight while staying true to their roots.  The rock industry was a bit unclear about its identity both respective times, so it opened the window for air stations to experiment with different bands, including old ones.


I think I'll Stand By You fits well enough with their 1980s output. Their style was never of the booming AOR variety like Heart or Foreigner, they were far truer to the jangle pop structure that carried over well into the 1990s anyways. That song stands out more because it was a last gasp of success for an "80s" group at a point when not a whole lot of "older" groups were having much success.

Ditto for The Most Beautiful Girl in the World. 1990s Prince was generally really subdued and milquetoast compared to his earlier stuff, and that song is no exception as it can easily be classified as Adult Contemporay. Its production still sounded pretty typical of that genre's sound in the late 80s.

I agree that Marx had gone to a more acoustic and soft rock sound with his 1994 work, which was a departure from his previous hits but of course still a long ways off from the dominant commercial rock sound of the time.

I don't think there were genuine 80s resurgences in music in 1994-95 or 1997. Simply more a continued intermixing of genres and artists with some of the hits from that time occasionally hearkening more back to the previous decade than others. The 1980s were still far too recent to be considered "retro cool" in the mid 1990s.

It should be noted that a hefty percentage of the Adult Contemporary stuff from the mid 1990s (as late as 96-97 perhaps) could still have generally passed for being from the late 1980s. The genre's production standards didn't evolve a whole lot in that time.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: yelimsexa on 12/12/15 at 8:12 am

The difference is in the late 1980s, adult contemporary had heavy usage of gated drums and primitive, DX7-sounding synths. The gated drums were the first to disappear (around the end of 1991), followed by those synths by the end of 1993 (Whitney Houston's "Run to You" was among the last). If anything it was a return to the '70s soft rock sound (with a fresh coat of technology) around then. Celine Dion instead of Melissa Manchester, Seal's Kiss From A Rose and Elton John's Can You Feel the Love Tonight, etc. That's why a lot of '90s AC doesn't test well with radio formats unfortunately. After My Heart Will Go On, this sound started to fade out. Either way you look at it, the '80s in terms of defining music were 100% gone by the end of 1991 (and even a lot of innovative sounds that came out in the late '80s underground such as Techno, Industrial, and early Grunge are seen as '90s). Any hair metal groups as described had updated their sound by then and certainly weren't '80s.

For other arts, it is somewhat different. Television was still quite '80s (except for FOX in which the '90s came in right with the new decade) until the end of the 1991-92 season with the end of the Cosby Show, Growing Pains, Who's The Boss, MacGyver, Night Court, Dear John (rather obscure but very '80s), the Golden Girls, the final season of Sesame Street with the original theme song, The Real Ghostbusters, The Super Mario Bros. cartoons, along with long runners Knots Landing and Cheers around then knowing that just a season was remaining. 1990 movies are basically the '80s by default since most were produced and/or written in 1989 (even a few from 1988), but generally speaking when 1990 hit, all scripts/ideas made during that year (not necessarily released) are quite '90s in tone, but then again Look Who's Talking and The Little Mermaid (1989) are sometimes seen as '90s movies due to the former's sequels and the later launching the Disney Renaissance. Video Games are similar to music given that the release of the SNES and Sonic the Hedgehog were around the time of Alice in Chains and Nirvana's breakthroughs but with embryotic signs emerging in 1989 (early Sega Genesis and Game Boy), yet there were NES games being released as late as 1994, though like Prince incorporating the popularity of a '90s franchise or trend. Most franchises that began in 1989 and lasted through at least 1992 are viewed as '90s things. I view the summer of 1991 as when '90s culture had outpaced '80s culture for good in terms of what's mainstream, but around the spring of 1989 when '90s culture in terms of creative, innovative ideas surpassed ideas created "for the '90s". 

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 12/12/15 at 7:27 pm


The difference is in the late 1980s, adult contemporary had heavy usage of gated drums and primitive, DX7-sounding synths. The gated drums were the first to disappear (around the end of 1991), followed by those synths by the end of 1993 (Whitney Houston's "Run to You" was among the last). If anything it was a return to the '70s soft rock sound (with a fresh coat of technology) around then. Celine Dion instead of Melissa Manchester, Seal's Kiss From A Rose and Elton John's Can You Feel the Love Tonight, etc. That's why a lot of '90s AC doesn't test well with radio formats unfortunately. After My Heart Will Go On, this sound started to fade out. Either way you look at it, the '80s in terms of defining music were 100% gone by the end of 1991 (and even a lot of innovative sounds that came out in the late '80s underground such as Techno, Industrial, and early Grunge are seen as '90s). Any hair metal groups as described had updated their sound by then and certainly weren't '80s.


Actually, hair metal continued on as a mainstream force for about a year after the grunge explosion of 1991/1992.  Def Leppard released two top 20 singles in 1992 from their multi-platinum album Adrenalize, FireHouse came out with When I Look into Your Eyes, and Guns N' Roses had the gigantic November Rain dominating the radio and MTV in 1992.  Even a lot of other pop rock from 1992 had strong 80s influences, like How Do You Talk to an Angel, Everything About You, Human Touch, and all of the hit singles from Bryan Adams' Waking Up the Neighbors.  The 80s tone in rock didn't officially disappear until about early 1993, when Bon Jovi and Aerosmith came out with new material that completely broke with their 80s successes.  Otherwise, I agree with what you said.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: violet_shy on 12/13/15 at 3:33 pm

Musically, I would say until 1991. But actually it lasted until 1990, I remember it well.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: aja675 on 12/14/15 at 8:34 am


I think I'll Stand By You fits well enough with their 1980s output. Their style was never of the booming AOR variety like Heart or Foreigner, they were far truer to the jangle pop structure that carried over well into the 1990s anyways. That song stands out more because it was a last gasp of success for an "80s" group at a point when not a whole lot of "older" groups were having much success.

Ditto for The Most Beautiful Girl in the World. 1990s Prince was generally really subdued and milquetoast compared to his earlier stuff, and that song is no exception as it can easily be classified as Adult Contemporay. Its production still sounded pretty typical of that genre's sound in the late 80s.

I agree that Marx had gone to a more acoustic and soft rock sound with his 1994 work, which was a departure from his previous hits but of course still a long ways off from the dominant commercial rock sound of the time.

I don't think there were genuine 80s resurgences in music in 1994-95 or 1997. Simply more a continued intermixing of genres and artists with some of the hits from that time occasionally hearkening more back to the previous decade than others. The 1980s were still far too recent to be considered "retro cool" in the mid 1990s.

It should be noted that a hefty percentage of the Adult Contemporary stuff from the mid 1990s (as late as 96-97 perhaps) could still have generally passed for being from the late 1980s. The genre's production standards didn't evolve a whole lot in that time.
Which mid '90s Adult Contemporary songs could pass as being from the late '80s?

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: ArcticFox on 12/20/15 at 2:25 am


Which mid '90s Adult Contemporary songs could pass as being from the late '80s?


Toni Braxton's "Un-Break My Heart" and Selena's "Dreaming of You" don't sound that different from Richard Marx's "Wherever You Go". Mid '90s ballads really don't sound that different from that of the very late 1980's.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: #Infinity on 12/20/15 at 3:28 am


Toni Braxton's "Un-Break My Heart" and Selena's "Dreaming of You" don't sound that different from Richard Marx's "Wherever You Go". Mid '90s ballads really don't sound that different from that of the very late 1980's.


Despite being one of the biggest songs of 1989, Richard Marx's Right Here Waiting isn't truly representative of late 80s music, not even adult contemporary.  Around the same time that track came out, the radio was dominated by power ballads by the likes of Michael Bolton, as well as hair bands such as Warrant and Bad English.  Additionally, most contemporary r&b ballads retained that gated drum/electric piano style that typified the era, such as Natalie Cole's Miss You Like Crazy, Surface's Shower Me with Your Love, and eventually Mariah Carey's Love Takes Time.

As for Un-Break My Heart and Dreaming of You, even those songs contain elements that are quite exclusive to their time.  The Selena song is backed by a smooth bass track, triangles, and laid-back, non-gated percussion, all of which were standard during the mid-90s.  It's far too silky to have been made during the late 80s/Bush '41 era.  Toni Braxton's Un-Break My Heart may use an acoustic guitar like Right Here Waiting, but the true similarities end there.  If you listen to the production more closely, you'll here a very muffled, synthesized downbeat, as well as echoed snaps and a synth pad, all of which are very late 90s elements that aren't present in Right Here Waiting.  Even the melodic progression is distinctly 90s, employing a balance of subtle minor key changes and a structure that really bubbles up as it reaches the chorus.  Mariah Carey's My All, which was a #1 hit in 1998, bears a much closer resemblance to Un-Break My Heart, as it features the same blend of acoustic guitars, gently synthesized backdrops, and an ascending pop progression as that song.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: aja675 on 12/20/15 at 7:01 am

j-gcDKTwZvA

Despite the piano, I feel like this 1995 song has an '80s vibe to it because of the high pitched vocals and slightly gated drums.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: Jquar on 01/22/16 at 3:40 am


Which mid '90s Adult Contemporary songs could pass as being from the late '80s?


Most of them, honestly.

Here's a huge AC hit from 1994. Sounds like pretty standard adult pop radio stuff from the time

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MggrZMe86i0

Or take this Celine Dion, Meat-Loafian rock opera from 1996 that still has a prototypical power ballad arrangement


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pDxoj-tDDIU


Like I say, the genre didn't "evolve" a whole lot and to a layperson I don't feel there were huge differences between a lot of the pop in that timespan.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: Jquar on 01/22/16 at 3:51 am

Foreigner was another big AOR band that had a random last gasp of radio success in the mid 1990s with this single that almost cracked the top 40 at the end of 1994. Not much evolution in style here, but it certainly wasn't nearly as popular as it would have been a few years previous.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OngMpfcXmJs

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: aja675 on 01/22/16 at 4:14 am


Most of them, honestly.

Here's a huge AC hit from 1994. Sounds like pretty standard adult pop radio stuff from the time

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MggrZMe86i0

Or take this Celine Dion, Meat-Loafian rock opera from 1996 that still has a prototypical power ballad arrangement


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pDxoj-tDDIU


Like I say, the genre didn't "evolve" a whole lot and to a layperson I don't feel there were huge differences between a lot of the pop in that timespan.
Would you agree with me about the song I posted?

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: Baltimoreian on 01/22/16 at 10:24 pm

Around 1992-93.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: Jquar on 01/23/16 at 2:47 am


Would you agree with me about the song I posted?


The video looks very typical of its era but the song's sound itself definitely wouldn't have been too out of place in 1989/90, it does have some gated drum mixed in and a pretty generic soft rock guitar solo towards the end.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: aja675 on 01/23/16 at 7:17 am

AC was indeed the last genre to sound '90s.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: tv on 01/24/16 at 11:58 pm


Musically, there were a few hits from as late as the spring of 1995 that still give off a genuine touch of an '80s vibe.

In the House of Stone and Light

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JpbgUVPP3DU&ab_channel=QuestionAuthority2

I Live My Life For You

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aY2sBDPgOXU&ab_channel=FirehouseVEVO

No More "I Love Yous"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NSkboTTTmpg&ab_channel=AnnieLennoxVEVO

Secret Garden

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9zkmE07X7-E&ab_channel=UnoEntreMil

All of these songs were sizable pop radio hits between February and May of 1995. Looking back, this was probably the absolute end point (in the 1990s at least) where that late 80s musical production style was somewhat viable commercially.
Yeah I think the 1994-1995 school year was the last school year that songs like that would be popular.

Subject: Re: How long did 80s culture last into the 90s?

Written By: tv on 01/25/16 at 12:18 am


Foreigner was another big AOR band that had a random last gasp of radio success in the mid 1990s with this single that almost cracked the top 40 at the end of 1994. Not much evolution in style here, but it certainly wasn't nearly as popular as it would have been a few years previous.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OngMpfcXmJs
I remember this song. It could have been a bigger hit from 88-90/91 and it sounds kinda dated for 1994. It does sound maybe current or revelant till maybe late 1991/early 1992 when Nirvana came out. Their hair looks 80's still but their fashion does look current for 1994 in the video I think.

I have always been a fan of Foreigner's music from my late Pre-School Years. Just like their sound.

Check for new replies or respond here...