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Subject: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: BornIn86 on 10/21/18 at 4:45 pm

What was that like?

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/21/18 at 5:03 pm


What was that like?


it felt natural, it happened around 93 when I noticed it was the 90s.
Power Rangers put TMNT in the bushes, and the whole flower dress doc martins
trend overtook neon. Bill Clinton replaced Bush 1.


The big hair trend continued with teachers well into 1996 tho. I would say 1996 is the year
that felt most core 90s. Everything started looking very worn down and gritty look in fonts and movies.
Think like Beavis & Buttheads livingroom, like all broken and dirty etc,

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: 2001 on 10/21/18 at 5:04 pm


The big hair trend continued with teachers well into 1996 tho. I would say 1996 is the year
that felt most core 90s.


Or into 1997 with my aunt, lol.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/21/18 at 5:05 pm


Or into 1997 with my aunt, lol.


1997 felt more new, it was the year Playstation took over, Spice Girls, BSB etc etc etc.
It felt like mix of mid 90s and late 90s at once.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: BornIn86 on 10/21/18 at 5:28 pm

No offense my contemporaries, but I'm thirsting for the opinions from 40 yr olds and up.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: 90s Bastard on 10/21/18 at 5:33 pm

As a precocious geography learner in preschool, it was the one disadvantage to ending the Cold War.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: annimal on 10/21/18 at 5:35 pm

I noticed at Rollerking I had to start listening to Mc Hammer and Barbie Girl

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: BornIn86 on 10/21/18 at 6:07 pm


I noticed at Rollerking I had to start listening to Mc Hammer and Barbie Girl


There's a lot of pop years between MC Hammer and Barbie Girl, tho.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: annimal on 10/21/18 at 6:13 pm

definatly seemed that soon as the 90's came, that's what Rollerking had to have.  I remeber hearing Ghost Busters all the time earlier,  I dont think it was a good place for pop year songs

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: Voiceofthe70s on 10/21/18 at 7:26 pm

I was just happy to be out of the wretched, shallow 80s at last. Things started getting "earthier" again. The  conservative 80s burst on the scene fully formed and with a bang in 1981 on the nose with the election of Ronald Reagan in November 1980 and the assassination of John Lennon in December 1980. Make no mistake, we have never truly recovered from it. But things seemed to be getting more "meaningful" again in 1990 with the advent of grunge (which I was never big on, but it least it was more meaningful and significant than 80s pap), and the first Gulf War.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/21/18 at 7:31 pm


No offense my contemporaries, but I'm thirsting for the opinions from 40 yr olds and up.


Was in fourth grade in 1997
Was in 5th grade by 1998
and 6th by 1999

My memories of that year are as vivid as any 40 year old

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/21/18 at 7:33 pm


I was just happy to be out of the wretched, shallow 80s at last. Things started getting "earthier" again. The  conservative 80s burst on the scene fully formed and with a bang in 1981 on the nose with the election of Ronald Reagan in November 1980 and the assassination of John Lennon in December 1980. Make no mistake, we have never truly recovered from it. But things seemed to be getting more "meaningful" again in 1990 with the advent of grunge (which I was never big on, but it least it was more meaningful and significant than 80s pap), and the first Gulf War.


Things did indeed get like Gritty earthy, I did enjoy that we got out of that by 1997 tho

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: BornIn86 on 10/21/18 at 8:22 pm


I was just happy to be out of the wretched, shallow 80s at last. Things started getting "earthier" again. The conservative 80s burst on the scene fully formed and with a bang in 1981 on the nose with the election of Ronald Reagan in November 1980 and the assassination of John Lennon in December 1980. Make no mistake, we have never truly recovered from it. But things seemed to be getting more "meaningful" again in 1990 with the advent of grunge (which I was never big on, but it least it was more meaningful and significant than 80s pap), and the first Gulf War.


I look back and the 90s feel so conservative compared to now. I remember how big the religious right was in the 90s. I remember how against Marilyn Manson and gothic culture people were in the 90s.

Apparently, the hatred towards such alternative cultures was worst in the 80s but I'm wondering why things started to change. You have any idea?

I'm super interested in your views of the 80s, Voiceofthe70s, cuz most of the people 40 yrs and up seem to love the 80s. Core millennials like myself seem to be interested in the 80s over other years as well.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: Voiceofthe70s on 10/21/18 at 8:42 pm



I'm super interested in your views of the 80s, Voiceofthe70s, cuz most of the people 40 yrs and up seem to love the 80s. Core millennials like myself seem to be interested in the 80s over other years as well.


Well, I've said it all here before. After the liberal, progressive 60s and 70s I was thrown for a loop when the conservative 80s happened in the blink of an eye in 1981. Everything was suddenly different. It FELT different. It WAS different and all of a sudden everything that was meaningful and spiritual and cool about the 60s and 70s was held in scorn and was replaced with shallowness. Greed was legitimized in the Reagan era. We went from George Harrison's "Living In the Material World" in 1973 ('hope to get out of this place by the Lord Sri Krsna's grace...") to Madonna singing the praises of material pleasures in "Material Girl" in 1985. (Yeah, yeah, I know there are some Madonna fans who say she was just spoofing rather than celebrating the whole thing. I'm not sure she was, but the fact remains the thoughts expressed in that song are what the mainstream was believing in the 80s). And the "young Republicans" of the "Michael P. Keaton" type...even the phrase "young Republicans" would have been an oxymoron in the 70s.

Like I said, we've never recovered from the 80s. Those of us who were there BEFORE the 80s know that well. As to why there are some people who favor the 80s, it beats me. Maybe its for the same reasons the mainstream liked it while it was happening. It was shallow and greedy and the music absolutely sucked, but some people just go for that surface, empty kind of thing. They can dance to it. It doesn't require a whole lot of thought.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: piecesof93 on 10/21/18 at 8:46 pm


Well, I've said it all here before. After the liberal, progressive 60s and 70s I was thrown for a loop when the conservative 80s happened in the blink of an eye in 1981. Everything was suddenly different. It FELT different. It WAS different and all of a sudden everything that was meaningful and spiritual and cool about the 60s and 70s was held in scorn and was replaced with shallowness. Greed was legitimized in the Reagan era. We went from George Harrison's "Living In the Material World" in 1973 ('hope to get out of this place by the Lord Sri Krsna's grace...") to Madonna singing the praises of material pleasures in "Material Girl" in 1985. (Yeah, yeah, I know there are some Madonna fans who say she was just spoofing rather than celebrating the whole thing. I'm not sure she was, but the fact remains the thoughts expressed in that song are what the mainstream was believing in the 80s). And the "young Republicans" of the "Michael P. Keaton" type...even the phrase "young Republicans would have been an oxymoron in the 70s.

Like I said, we've never recovered from the 80s. Those of us who were there BEFORE the 80s know that well. As to why there are some people who favor the 80s, it beats me. Maybe its for the same reasons the mainstream liked it while it was happening. It was shallow and greedy and the music absolutely sucked, but some people just go for that surface, empty kind of thing. They can dance to it. It doesn't require a whole lot of thought.

Stories like this make me believe we will be seeing a more liberal atmosphere in the next 5-10 years. That seems to be the natural order of things?

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/21/18 at 9:14 pm


Stories like this make me believe we will be seeing a more liberal atmosphere in the next 5-10 years. That seems to be the natural order of things?


we shall see

When the 90s was happening I was under the impression this Alternative smashing pumpkins vibe was due to the squeeky clean regan era before it.
Even as a 8 year old I could understand where people were coming from.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: AmericanGirl on 10/21/18 at 10:07 pm

Now for me, the 80's was a really good time, and the 90's was a good time, too.  I was also going through a lot of changes on a personal level, mostly pretty good, and enjoying life, being now a 30-something in the 90's instead of a 20-something in the 80's.  But whereas I mostly liked the pop culture of the 80's I got disenfranchised with 90's pop culture pretty quickly.  One thing I did like in the 90's was the fashion - it was a pretty awesome time to get dressed up.  But whereas I enjoyed 80's music and television, I never got into 90's music, and wasn't a big fan of 90's television fare, either...  :-\\

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 10/21/18 at 10:10 pm


What was that like?


It was a difficult transition at first:

- You had to change the 1989s on your papers to 1990s.

- Most (if not all) of the new items in stores had a copyright date of 1989 on them until August of 1990 or so.

- The SoundScan era began, IIRC.

- We were told not to dress ‘80s anymore by the adults.

- Almost everyone was making a big deal about living in the last decade of the 20th century. It was a new world to us because we were so close to the future (where we are now( :o)). So, Baby Boomers went from talking about planning for the ‘90s in 1989 to imagining what things would be like in the 2000s in 1990.

- Surfing culture took a back seat to skateboarding and biker culture by the end of ‘90.

- Soccer shorts (Umbros) made Volleyball shorts a thing of the past.

- Young African-American males started wearing Carhart denim jackets and baggy Girbaud jeans in the fall of 1990. Sagging started in 1992, I think. Colored Guess and Cross Colours jeans were being sold around that time in most places, too.

- It was okay to be nostalgic for the ‘70s all of the sudden.

- The best new sitcoms of 1990 (i.e. - Wings) were like nothing else on TV at the time.

- New slang words of 1990 = Norvilled, Bushlips, Kewl, Yo-boy, Yo-girl


Long story short, the words “early ‘90s” were uttered only a few times throughout the year 1990. No one knew what the early ‘90s were about in 1990. Boomers were asking how the FOX network (FOX to us now) became the next best thing to MTV. People my age at the time were wondering when new music genres would appear in the ‘90s. MTV was playing nothing but rap, hair metal, house, dance-pop, and some New Jack Swing music back then. Xennials that discovered the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles from late ‘88 to 1989 could not believe that they had classmates who had just became fans in 1990.

Basically, 1990 was like all of the other years of the ‘90s. The wider public wanted to live in the 2000s and not the ‘90s.


Now for me, the 80's was a really good time, and the 90's was a good time, too.  I was also going through a lot of changes on a personal level, mostly pretty good, and enjoying life, being now a 30-something in the 90's instead of a 20-something in the 80's.  But whereas I mostly liked the pop culture of the 80's I got disenfranchised with 90's pop culture pretty quickly.  One thing I did like in the 90's was the fashion - it was a pretty awesome time to get dressed up.  But whereas I enjoyed 80's music and television, I never got into 90's music, and wasn't a big fan of 90's television fare, either...  :-\\



That’s what separates 1990 from 1989 for me. The early ‘90s were interesting times for late Xers and Xennials. Many late Boomers and early Xers stopped listening to mainstream music in ‘87 or so.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/21/18 at 10:26 pm


It was a difficult transition at first:

- You had to change the 1989s on your papers to 1990s.

- Most (if not all) of the new items in stores had a copyright date of 1989 on them until August of 1990 or so.

- The SoundScan era began, IIRC.

- We were told not to dress ‘80s anymore by the adults.

- Almost everyone was making a big deal about living in the last decade of the 20th century. It was a new world to us because we were so close to the future (where we are now( :o)). So, Baby Boomers went from talking about planning for the ‘90s in 1989 to imagining what things would be like in the 2000s in 1990.

- Surfing culture took a back seat to skateboarding and biker culture by the end of ‘90.

- Soccer shorts (Umbros) made Volleyball shorts a thing of the past.

- Young African-American males started wearing Carhart denim jackets and baggy Girbaud jeans in the fall of 1990. Sagging started in 1992, I think. Colored Guess and Cross Colours jeans were being sold around that time in most places, too.

- It was okay to be nostalgic for the ‘70s all of the sudden.

- The best new sitcoms of 1990 (i.e. - Wings) were like nothing else on TV at the time.

- New slang words of 1990 = Norvilled, Bushlips, Kewl, Yo-boy, Yo-girl


Long story short, the words “early ‘90s” were uttered only a few times throughout the year 1990. No one knew what the early ‘90s were about in 1990. Boomers were asking how the FOX network (FOX to us now) became the next best thing to MTV. People my age at the time were wondering when new music genres would appear in the ‘90s. MTV was playing nothing but rap, hair metal, house, dance-pop, and some New Jack Swing music back then. Xennials that discovered the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles from late ‘88 to 1989 could not believe that they had classmates who had just became fans in 1990.

Basically, 1990 was like all of the other years of the ‘90s. The wider public wanted to live in the 2000s and not the ‘90s.



Like I said before wasn't until 93 things were feeling different and we had a good idea this was the 90s
and then in 97 we knew another era started, I am glad the 80sness was fading in the 90s tho, so many damn
reruns of ALF were on then


Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: Tyrannosaurus Rex on 10/21/18 at 10:38 pm



Like I said before wasn't until 93 things were feeling different and we had a good idea this was the 90s
and then in 97 we knew another era started, I am glad the 80sness was fading in the 90s tho, so many damn
reruns of ALF were on then


But it is not as if there were ALF reruns 24/7, right?  ;D ;D

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 10/21/18 at 11:07 pm



Like I said before wasn't until 93 things were feeling different and we had a good idea this was the 90s


Rarely anyone knew what the ‘90s were when we living in them. They were not paying too much attention to what made the ‘90s the ‘90s at the time either. People to this day say that 1993 was an early ‘90s year.  ::)

My colleagues and relatives wanted to be in the  2000s before January 1st of 1990 was even on a television screen.

and then in 97 we knew another era started, I am glad the 80sness was fading in the 90s tho

Unfortunately, we were leaving the first seven months of 1990 (when the ‘90s were really alive) from the fall of 1990 to the end of 1998.

so many damn reruns of ALF were on then

I miss those ALF reruns on FOX.  :\'(
Now, I don’t think ALF is even on TV anymore.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: BornIn86 on 10/22/18 at 12:05 am


Was in fourth grade in 1997
Was in 5th grade by 1998
and 6th by 1999

My memories of that year are as vivid as any 40 year old


And I was in 7th in 99 but there is something different between Us and Gen X/Boomers and I want the latest Gen X and earlier voices to illuminate this thread. No offense, Titor.

I just want the opinion of people who lived a vivid life thru at least most of the 80s.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/22/18 at 12:07 am


Rarely anyone knew what the ‘90s were when we living in them. They were not paying too much attention to what made the ‘90s the ‘90s at the time either. People to this day say that 1993 was an early ‘90s year.  ::)

My colleagues and relatives wanted to be in the  2000s before January 1st of 1990 was even on a television screen.

Unfortunately, we were leaving the first seven months of 1990 (when the ‘90s were really alive) from the fall of 1990 to the end of 1998.

I miss those ALF reruns on FOX.  :\'(
Now, I don’t think ALF is even on TV anymore.


I actually remember shows name dropping this is the 90s, I think Rosanne did this

Its funny tho I used to NOT like the late 90s and now I like them better than the mid 90s.
I actually think  late 96-99 were superior


Sadly it's not, I remember new episodes of ALF used to come on after TMNT, and
then FOX had it syndicated but it was chopped up so badly, and then that ABC movie
Project ALF, now that was terrible

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: Philip Eno on 10/22/18 at 12:11 am

Nothing really happened, just time progress onwards.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: BornIn86 on 10/22/18 at 12:40 am


Nothing really happened, just time progress onwards.


google search says otherwise.

Google > Philip Eno

Welcome to 2018!

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: Philip Eno on 10/22/18 at 12:42 am


google search says otherwise.

Google > Philip Eno

Welcome to 2018!
You're welcome to it! :)

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: Howard on 10/22/18 at 7:07 am


Rarely anyone knew what the ‘90s were when we living in them. They were not paying too much attention to what made the ‘90s the ‘90s at the time either. People to this day say that 1993 was an early ‘90s year.  ::)

My colleagues and relatives wanted to be in the  2000s before January 1st of 1990 was even on a television screen.

Unfortunately, we were leaving the first seven months of 1990 (when the ‘90s were really alive) from the fall of 1990 to the end of 1998.

I miss those ALF reruns on FOX.  :\'(
Now, I don’t think ALF is even on TV anymore.


I think you might catch it on that classics TV channel.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: Philip Eno on 10/22/18 at 7:10 am


I think you might catch it on that classics TV channel.
Anything on Netflix?

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: Mitch Kramer on 10/22/18 at 7:34 am


No offense my contemporaries, but I'm thirsting for the opinions from 40 yr olds and up.


Age 51 here, so I guess I'll chime in.

Short answer:  The 90s (especially the first half of the 90s) were a lot like the late 80s.

More detailed answer:

Fashion did not change.  The clothing and hairstyles didn't really change much at all until the late 90s.  Radio stations kept on playing a lot of 1980s music.  Grunge never made a big impact in Hawaii, probably because it was perceived as a white boy thing.  Also, the clothing isn't well suited to our climate.

Even the cars were pretty much the same.  I think part of the reason for this is because Hawaii, unlike the rest of the country, never recovered from the early-90s recession.  People kept their old compact cars from the 1980s as long as they could.

When the economy finally did start to recover and gas prices collapsed (around 1999), there was this huge explosion of SUVs, big trucks and full-sized sedans suddenly hitting the road.  This caused a lot of problems, accidents, etc.

The depressed economy helped to keep the physical landscape relatively unchanged as well.  Construction of new buildings and roads accelerated only after the late 90s, and especially the mid 00s.

Politically, both decades were conservative.  In the 80s you had two-term Republican Ronald Reagan coming to power after a one-term Democrat Jimmy Carter.  In the 90s you had two-term Democrat Bill Clinton coming to power after a one-term Republican, George HW Bush.

In 1986, the Senate shifted from Republican to Democratic.  In 1994, the House (and Senate) changed from Democratic to Republican.  Reagan pulled his party to the right.  Bill Clinton pulled his party to the right (on economic issues).  Newt Gingrich pulled his party to the right.

Little progress was made in LGBT rights until the very late 90s and early/mid 00s.  One difference between the 80s and 90s is that LGBT topics were talked about a little bit more openly in the 90s (especially after 1992).  However, the general level of homophobia was about the same in the early 90s as it was in the 80s (i.e., it was pretty bad).

Technology was where some of the biggest changes occurred between the 80s and 90s.  But even here, note the the biggest changes, like in all the other areas I've mentioned, were at the end of the decade.  I had high speed internet access when I entered graduate school in 1988.  The internet was a rather different  place back then.  Almost nobody outside of academia even knew it existed.  I remember trying to give an undergraduate friend my email address and website address in 1993.  He looked at me like I was from Mars.  Most residential internet was dial-up.  Cable modem service was introduced on a widespread scale on Oahu in the late 90s.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: Howard on 10/22/18 at 7:53 am


Anything on Netflix?


I don't think so.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: Philip Eno on 10/22/18 at 8:24 am


I don't think so.
Dodgy copies on YouTube?

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 10/22/18 at 10:39 am


I actually remember shows name dropping this is the 90s, I think Rosanne did this


Script writers pretty much perceived the 90s the way a lot of my peers did at the time. Anything that came out of the ‘80s was “80s” to them in the ‘90s. So, people my age and older thought we were still living in the ‘80s and they wanted to move away from anything ‘80s. Then, we got to 1992 and older Gen Xers started reminiscing about the Reagan early ‘80s (1981-1983) and the mid ‘80s (1984-1986).

Nowadays, there are some people that refer to programs that came out in the late ‘80s as early ‘90s shows:

5voMUGL1fdA

Unfortunately, a small number of people today still cannot tell a day of the early ‘90s apart from one of the late 1980s. They do not even look at their photos from 1990 and say it was from 1989. The picture was taken in “some time in the past”.


Its funny tho I used to NOT like the late 90s and now I like them better than the mid 90s.
I actually think  late 96-99 were superior


I was tired of ‘the moody mid ‘90s’ (the grunge days) when I was living in them. The end caps to the mid ‘90s were better, but, for some reason, the media only chooses to look back to the flannel and Pearl Jam concert shirt days of the 1990s when they’re discussing  the ‘90s. 8-P


Sadly it's not, I remember new episodes of ALF used to come on after TMNT, and
then FOX had it syndicated but it was chopped up so badly, and then that ABC movie
Project ALF, now that was terrible


The ALF comic books by Marvel from the late ‘80s and early ‘90s looked better than Project ALF. In the late ‘80s, I thought ALF was the show and the Tanners were pretty boring. After seeing the commercial for Project ALF in 1996, I realized the show would have never worked without the Tanners. Sure, the show was watered down for children in the late ‘80s and my younger cousin thought the first cartoon was superior to the sitcom, but Project ALF was plain bad. The 1-800 collect commercials were better than Project ALF. What were they thinking?  ???

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: annimal on 10/22/18 at 11:29 am

I remember the show disappearing

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/22/18 at 11:50 am


Age 51 here, so I guess I'll chime in.

Short answer:  The 90s (especially the first half of the 90s) were a lot like the late 80s.

More detailed answer:

Fashion did not change.  The clothing and hairstyles didn't really change much at all until the late 90s.  Radio stations kept on playing a lot of 1980s music.  Grunge never made a big impact in Hawaii, probably because it was perceived as a white boy thing.  Also, the clothing isn't well suited to our climate.

Even the cars were pretty much the same.  I think part of the reason for this is because Hawaii, unlike the rest of the country, never recovered from the early-90s recession.  People kept their old compact cars from the 1980s as long as they could.

When the economy finally did start to recover and gas prices collapsed (around 1999), there was this huge explosion of SUVs, big trucks and full-sized sedans suddenly hitting the road.  This caused a lot of problems, accidents, etc.

The depressed economy helped to keep the physical landscape relatively unchanged as well.  Construction of new buildings and roads accelerated only after the late 90s, and especially the mid 00s.

Politically, both decades were conservative.  In the 80s you had two-term Republican Ronald Reagan coming to power after a one-term Democrat Jimmy Carter.  In the 90s you had two-term Democrat Bill Clinton coming to power after a one-term Republican, George HW Bush.

In 1986, the Senate shifted from Republican to Democratic.  In 1994, the House (and Senate) changed from Democratic to Republican.  Reagan pulled his party to the right.  Bill Clinton pulled his party to the right (on economic issues).  Newt Gingrich pulled his party to the right.

Little progress was made in LGBT rights until the very late 90s and early/mid 00s.  One difference between the 80s and 90s is that LGBT topics were talked about a little bit more openly in the 90s (especially after 1992).  However, the general level of homophobia was about the same in the early 90s as it was in the 80s (i.e., it was pretty bad).

Technology was where some of the biggest changes occurred between the 80s and 90s.  But even here, note the the biggest changes, like in all the other areas I've mentioned, were at the end of the decade.  I had high speed internet access when I entered graduate school in 1988.  The internet was a rather different  place back then.  Almost nobody outside of academia even knew it existed.  I remember trying to give an undergraduate friend my email address and website address in 1993.  He looked at me like I was from Mars.  Most residential internet was dial-up.  Cable modem service was introduced on a widespread scale on Oahu in the late 90s.


A little different than what happened in Jersey, but some similaritys

- Fashion stayed late 80s until around 93/94, Big Hair stayed until late 94 early 95 (mostly due to people who didn't get the memo)
- wasn't very conservative it was actually a backlash here to all the Reganomics, I saw many people trying to act out with fashion/atmosphere
- The Grunge effect hit jersey in like 92/early 93 I pretty much had to grow up with depressed teenagers and a sense of melancholy around me, That
episode of The Simpsons where Homer goes to Lulapooloza was spot on
-  Internet here started to pop off slowly in 96, are computer teacher was trying to put us on to Mario Teaches typing for the mac
- SUVS exploded around 99, it is like everyone HAD to buy a SUV for some reason.
- LBGT there was indeed little progress as you stated, the only thing I can think of is Ellen coming out as gay and people were shocked by it.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/22/18 at 12:00 pm


Script writers pretty much perceived the 90s the way a lot of my peers did at the time. Anything that came out of the ‘80s was “80s” to them in the ‘90s. So, people my age and older thought we were still living in the ‘80s and they wanted to move away from anything ‘80s. Then, we got to 1992 and older Gen Xers started reminiscing about the Reagan early ‘80s (1981-1983) and the mid ‘80s (1984-1986).

Nowadays, there are some people that refer to programs that came out in the late ‘80s as early ‘90s shows:

5voMUGL1fdA

Unfortunately, a small number of people today still cannot tell a day of the early ‘90s apart from one of the late 1980s. They do not even look at their photos from 1990 and say it was from 1989. The picture was taken in “some time in the past”.


I was tired of ‘the moody mid ‘90s’ (the grunge days) when I was living in them. The end caps to the mid ‘90s were better, but, for some reason, the media only chooses to look back to the flannel and Pearl Jam concert shirt days of the 1990s when they’re discussing  the ‘90s. 8-P


The ALF comic books by Marvel from the late ‘80s and early ‘90s looked better than Project ALF. In the late ‘80s, I thought ALF was the show and the Tanners were pretty boring. After seeing the commercial for Project ALF in 1996, I realized the show would have never worked without the Tanners. Sure, the show was watered down for children in the late ‘80s and my younger cousin thought the first cartoon was superior to the sitcom, but Project ALF was plain bad. The 1-800 collect commercials were better than Project ALF. What were they thinking?  ???



The late 90s were such a breath of fresh air, as soon as those pepsi Spice Girls commercials came on I knew it was a new era, we really needed it.

lnuCDXMoZd4


Everything was more up beat and future in the late 90s, Playstation was a huge game changer, compared to the SNES Sega of the early/mid 90s.
I myself like you HATED the moody mid 90s, once 97 hit I knew sh*t was about to pop off

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: violet_shy on 10/22/18 at 12:08 pm

It happened in 1990, when music started to sound different and fashion changed. I remember it well!

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/22/18 at 12:14 pm


It happened in 1990, when music started to sound different and fashion changed. I remember it well!


Fashion atleast in the Jersey section of the world took until 92/ 93 to really make a dent
it was a slow burn

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 10/22/18 at 12:41 pm


A little different than what happened in Jersey, but some similaritys

- Fashion stayed late 80s until around 93/94,


Biker shorts (with the stripe on them), tribal print surfer shirts, and vests with gaudy designs on them were all trendy in the late ‘80s, but that is early ‘90s fashion. They disappeared in 1994 because the yuppie ‘90s (1990-1991) were old. The clothes purchased in the early ‘90s (I.e. - Umbros, colored overalls, and No Fear shirts) pretty much became ‘knock arounds’ when the new designer clothes of the ‘90s (i.e. - Tommy Hilfiger, Phat Farm, and Nautica) were in the wash in ‘94/‘95.
Actual late ‘80s clothes (I.e.- T&C Surf Factory shirts, Coca Cola rugby pullovers, and Hawaiian shirts) were long gone by 1993, but late Xers and Xennials were still wearing denim jackets in the mid ‘90s (like they did in every year of the late ‘80s). That was it though.


It happened in 1990, when music started to sound different and fashion changed. I remember it well!


VH1 went from playing mainly music that Boomers would enjoy in the spring of ‘90 to adult contemporary singles that both early and late Xers were listening to by the end of 1990.

The Who Framed Roger Rabbit shirts, backwards suspenders look, and Vision Skate Wear shirts that didn’t have only Vision on them were all “out” before the spring of 1990. Instead, Batman shirts, Don’t Worry Be Happy shirts, Hard Rock Cafe tees, NY Yankees tops, California souvenir shirts, and International News clothes were all “in” during that time until Bart Simpson shirts, Bo Knows Nike tees, Duck Head clothes, 8 Ball Jackets, anything with Dick Tracy on it, and Guess Jeans striped shirts arrived.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: wsmith4 on 10/22/18 at 12:55 pm

It's really hard to say how it felt because I was growing up as well, so my perception of things was changing a lot. To me, there's a very clear divide between the 80's and 90's, and it happened December 31, 1989.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/22/18 at 12:59 pm


Biker shorts (with the stripe on them), tribal print surfer shirts, and vests with gaudy designs on them were all trendy in the late ‘80s, but that is early ‘90s fashion. They disappeared in 1994 because the yuppie ‘90s (1990-1991) were old. The clothes purchased in the early ‘90s (I.e. - Umbros, colored overalls, and No Fear shirts) pretty much became ‘knock arounds’ when the new designer clothes of the ‘90s (i.e. - Tommy Hilfiger, Phat Farm, and Nautica) were in the wash in ‘94/‘95.
Actual late ‘80s clothes (I.e.- T&C Surf Factory shirts, Coca Cola rugby pullovers, and Hawaiian shirts) were long gone by 1993, but late Xers and Xennials were still wearing denim jackets in the mid ‘90s (like they did in every year of the late ‘80s). That was it though.

VH1 went from playing mainly music that Boomers would enjoy in the spring of ‘90 to adult contemporary singles that both early and late Xers were listening to by the end of 1990.



The Who Framed Roger Rabbit shirts, backwards suspenders look, and Vision Skate Wear shirts that didn’t have only Vision on them were all “out” before the spring of 1990. Instead, Batman shirts, Don’t Worry Be Happy shirts, Hard Rock Cafe tees, NY Yankees tops, California souvenir shirts, and International News clothes were all “in” during that time until Bart Simpson shirts, Bo Knows Nike tees, Duck Head clothes, 8 Ball Jackets, anything with Dick Tracy on it, and Guess Jeans striped shirts arrived.


still saw overalls up to 95, it kind of faded in the east coast around 95 ish, I remember seeing that Batman logo everywhere in 92 around Batman Returns.
Batman Forever I thought was the better movie tho lol

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: Howard on 10/22/18 at 1:01 pm


Dodgy copies on YouTube?


most likely on YouTube.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 10/22/18 at 1:26 pm


It's really hard to say how it felt because I was growing up as well, so my perception of things was changing a lot. To me, there's a very clear divide between the 80's and 90's, and it happened December 31, 1989.


‘80s shows that started in past time periods like the new American Bandstand, Ryan’s Hope, Soul Train, ABC Afternoon Special, Saturday Night Live and Hee Haw were cancelled or retooled for a new audience by the time our 1990 calendars went up. For example, the show ABC Afternoon Special in the 70s and very early ‘80s (Carter ‘80s) became ABC Afternoon Specials somewhere in the Reagan ‘80s.

Not to mention, everyone stopped dressing like it was 1977 before January 1st of 1990, also. The clothes you see the characters wearing in Stranger Things and Wet Hot American Summer officially became a thing of the past in 1990.

Some of my friends did not know it at the time, but concert shirts, cartoon shirts, movie shirts, denim jackets, mom jeans, striped tops with ringers, designer t-shirts was ‘90s fashion.  :)

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: wsmith4 on 10/22/18 at 1:34 pm

Did Ren & Stimpy start in 1988 or 1989?

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: Tyrannosaurus Rex on 10/22/18 at 2:18 pm


Did Ren & Stimpy start in 1988 or 1989?


I'm pretty sure that it started in '91.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 10/22/18 at 2:54 pm


Did Ren & Stimpy start in 1988 or 1989?


It was pitched to Nickelodeon in 1989, I believe. Nickelodeon, at that time, was known for Double Dare, You Can’t Do that on Television, and Inspector Gadget, so it was introduced late in the summer of 1991 with Doug and Rugrats. Ren & Stimpy was extremely popular in 1992 and the merchandise was almost everywhere in 1993. Ren and Stimpy reruns were to the mid ‘90s what the original Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles cartoon was to the early ‘90s. There were new episodes of Ren and Stimpy on MTV like there were SatAM Teenage Ninja Turtles episodes on CBS, but everyone I knew preferred the ones from the previous era.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: wsmith4 on 10/22/18 at 3:01 pm


It was pitched to Nickelodeon in 1989, I believe. Nickelodeon, at that time, was known for Double Dare, You Can’t Do that on Television, and Inspector Gadget, so it was introduced late in the summer of 1991 with Doug and Rugrats. Ren & Stimpy was extremely popular in 1992 and the merchandise was almost everywhere in 1993. Ren and Stimpy reruns were to the mid ‘90s what the original Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles cartoon was to the early ‘90s. There were new episodes of Ren and Stimpy on MTV like there were SatAM Teenage Ninja Turtles episodes on CBS, but everyone I knew preferred the ones from the previous era.


God, I miss those days of Nickelodeon.  Did Inspector Gadget start out as a Nick show?

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 10/22/18 at 3:07 pm


Did Inspector Gadget start out as a Nick show?


No. Inspector Gadget started as a syndicated show. It was not on Nickelodeon until 1987.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 10/22/18 at 11:07 pm


I remember seeing that Batman logo everywhere in 92 around Batman Returns.
Batman Forever I thought was the better movie tho lol


The Batman shirts from ‘89 were worn from the spring of ‘89 to sometime in late ‘92 by Xennials and Xers of all ages. The Batman Returns shirts were mainly purchased by Boomers for Xennials in the summer of ‘92.

Batman Forever struck me as odd at the time. I didn’t feel that Jim Carey and Tommy Lee Jones were on the level of Jack Nicholson and Danny Devito in ‘95. I don’t even remember the shirts sold for Batman Forever besides the logo one. At least with Batman Returns, the shirts had Batman, Penguin, Catwoman, the sequel logo, or all three of them on it.

We were in the middle of the ‘90s in 1995, so I did not care about marketing in the mid ‘90s being as great as it was in the last year of the 80s into the early 1990s. Everything was about moving ahead to the future in the ‘90s. By 1995, the first Batman was declared the best Batman movie anyway by people my age. You could not be alive in the summer of ‘89 and not see Batman or want to see Batman. It was THE movie of 1989. Batman Returns suffered from being a post-Edward Scissorhands Burton film, but it is a high-class sequel to pop culture fans who appreciate the art of Tim Burton. The problem I had with it was that I was already introduced to Keaton’s Batman by 1992. The costume for Keaton’s Batman was not fresh and futuristic looking to me in ‘92 like it was in 1989. I will say this. The merchandising for Batman Returns was heaps better than that for the ‘89 Batman film. Unfortunately, comic book fans were collecting all things X-Men when Batman Returns memorabilia hit stores. I’ve seen people wearing Catwoman shirts from ‘92 in 2009. The artwork on the merchandise for Batman Returns was definitely a step up from the ‘89 stuff.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: Howard on 10/23/18 at 7:20 am


No. Inspector Gadget started as a syndicated show. It was not on Nickelodeon until 1987.


Before that I think it was on Channel 5 here in New York.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: Philip Eno on 10/23/18 at 7:24 am


No. Inspector Gadget started as a syndicated show. It was not on Nickelodeon until 1987.
Inspector Gadget is a media franchise that began in 1983 with the DIC Entertainment animated television series, Inspector Gadget. Since the original series, there have been many spin-offs based on the show, including additional animated series, video games and films.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: annimal on 10/23/18 at 11:06 am

I could have possibly seen a spin off on Nickelodeon

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/23/18 at 1:11 pm


The Batman shirts from ‘89 were worn from the spring of ‘89 to sometime in late ‘92 by Xennials and Xers of all ages. The Batman Returns shirts were mainly purchased by Boomers for Xennials in the summer of ‘92.

Batman Forever struck me as odd at the time. I didn’t feel that Jim Carey and Tommy Lee Jones were on the level of Jack Nicholson and Danny Devito in ‘95. I don’t even remember the shirts sold for Batman Forever besides the logo one. At least with Batman Returns, the shirts had Batman, Penguin, Catwoman, the sequel logo, or all three of them on it.

We were in the middle of the ‘90s in 1995, so I did not care about marketing in the mid ‘90s being as great as it was in the last year of the 80s into the early 1990s. Everything was about moving ahead to the future in the ‘90s. By 1995, the first Batman was declared the best Batman movie anyway by people my age. You could not be alive in the summer of ‘89 and not see Batman or want to see Batman. It was THE movie of 1989. Batman Returns suffered from being a post-Edward Scissorhands Burton film, but it is a high-class sequel to pop culture fans who appreciate the art of Tim Burton. The problem I had with it was that I was already introduced to Keaton’s Batman by 1992. The costume for Keaton’s Batman was not fresh and futuristic looking to me in ‘92 like it was in 1989. I will say this. The merchandising for Batman Returns was heaps better than that for the ‘89 Batman film. Unfortunately, comic book fans were collecting all things X-Men when Batman Returns memorabilia hit stores. I’ve seen people wearing Catwoman shirts from ‘92 in 2009. The artwork on the merchandise for Batman Returns was definitely a step up from the ‘89 stuff.


Forever had more hype, it was always on in commercials etc, I just liked it because it was like neo tokyo

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: c_keenan2001@hotmail.com on 10/24/18 at 10:03 pm


No offense my contemporaries, but I'm thirsting for the opinions from 40 yr olds and up.


I don't think it was any different than the 70s turning into the 80s. 

In the first half of 1990, I was still 13 and for the second half of 1990, I was 14.  I was starting my junior year in high school, absolutely horrendous BTW, because I got teased a lot because I liked NKOTB.

Grade 10 I was still a little bit shy from the year before.

Grade 11 I had more friends than I knew what do with.

Grade 12 I wanted to go to school and my teacher said "YOU CAN'T DO THAT! YOU'RE GOING TO GET A JOB!"  By then I was so tired of people telling me what I should and shouldn't be able to do.  ::)

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: yelimsexa on 10/25/18 at 8:20 am


‘80s shows that started in past time periods like the new American Bandstand, Ryan’s Hope, Soul Train, ABC Afternoon Special, Saturday Night Live and Hee Haw were cancelled or retooled for a new audience by the time our 1990 calendars went up. For example, the show ABC Afternoon Special in the 70s and very early ‘80s (Carter ‘80s) became ABC Afternoon Specials somewhere in the Reagan ‘80s.

Not to mention, everyone stopped dressing like it was 1977 before January 1st of 1990, also. The clothes you see the characters wearing in Stranger Things and Wet Hot American Summer officially became a thing of the past in 1990.

Some of my friends did not know it at the time, but concert shirts, cartoon shirts, movie shirts, denim jackets, mom jeans, striped tops with ringers, designer t-shirts was ‘90s fashion.  :)


Actually, Soul Train's retools around this time were in 1987 and 1993, so the late '80s-early '90s era of the show goes together, with a new synth theme of the classic 1973-75 theme. And for the '87 retool, while somewhat different, the show wasn't too different from the previous generations, just a gradual evolution, even as far back as 1971 when it shifted from being a local Chicago show to a nationally syndicated one with a much higher budget. The '93 retool was a lot more abrupt with the hip-hop theme and departure of Don Cornelius as host IMO. Saturday Night Live introduced new logos in 1988 and 1995, but cast changes were gradual through that period, with 1986 having the last major cast change.

To me as it kid, it was the transition from the "8 bit" to the "16-bit" era. This "Genesis" was the first hint of the change, by the time I first played it and the SNES by the end of '91 at a friend's house, I knew that a new era had really formed. I was young (in preschool when the official transition happened), but I didn't fully understand the significance, and that even includes the most recent '00s-'10s transition, although looking back, I could see how it evolved, with the recession more or less as a "death knell to the '00s", with the recovery being the emerging '10s atmosphere, with things like Osama Bin Laden's death and social media being mainstream 24/7. Personally, I sort of see this as the transition of being a "little kid" to a "bigger kid", as a seven-year old can start to reach more things than a four-year old could, and could start to expand to PG-rated culture as opposed to simply G-rated things.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: ZeldaFan20 on 10/25/18 at 9:27 am


I look back and the 90s feel so conservative compared to now. I remember how big the religious right was in the 90s. I remember how against Marilyn Manson and gothic culture people were in the 90s.

Apparently, the hatred towards such alternative cultures was worst in the 80s but I'm wondering why things started to change. You have any idea?

I'm super interested in your views of the 80s, Voiceofthe70s, cuz most of the people 40 yrs and up seem to love the 80s. Core millennials like myself seem to be interested in the 80s over other years as well.


I agree. Despite the amount of progress we made in the 1990s (homosexuality becoming slowly accepted, black pride with the popularity of Living Color & Martin, the rise of the Internet, etc.), people forget how conservative the 1990s actually were. Not trying to sound like a stereotypical whining Millennial, but the amount of 'gay jokes' in many popular TV shows in the 1990s like Seinfeld, Friends, & Frasier (ironically, since the main characters themselves were gay), among others, would certainly not fly in the 2010s. Heck, the presidency of Bill Clinton was a product of the 'Reagan Era' of the 1980s & 1990s. This was because he ran and governed as a 'New Democrat', differentiating himself from the Democratic Party of FDR or even Carter/Mondale, and more as a Left-Wing Moderate (so essentially, the modern day DNC). If you really think about it, the Presidencies of Reagan, Bush Senior, & Clinton all sort of coincide with each politically, despite the misc. differences regarding social issues. NAFTA was started under Reagan, negotiated under Bush, & ratified under Clinton. Theres other examples I could think of, but nonetheless, the 1990s being this Liberal antithesis to the 1980s is largely a myth.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: piecesof93 on 10/25/18 at 10:56 am


I look back and the 90s feel so conservative compared to now.

So do the 2000s, although it may not have felt like it as we were living it when comparing it to previous decades. As society  progresses you realize how dated things used to be.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 10/25/18 at 3:48 pm


I was starting my junior year in high school, absolutely horrendous BTW, because I got teased a lot because I liked NKOTB.


Do you remember the “New Kids Suck” shirts and decal stickers? There was also the debate about The Beatles being the better boy band over the New Kids on the Block. 1990 was a big year for the New Kids on the Block and their fans.

There were a lot of boy bands with hits towards the end of the mid 90s into the early 2000s, but I don’t there was a larger merchandising extravaganza for any other boy band in the 90s  than the one for the New Kids on the Block. They came onto the scene at the right time (in the 80s) and became extremely popular after Batmania of ‘89. In 1990, you would have to have been living under a rock if you didn’t know who the New Kids were. The Backstreet Boys versus N’SYNC feud was a big deal in the Y2K era, but neither one of them managed to be on the cover of just about every magazine at the time. The New Kids were on Cracked magazine in 1990 (around the time their last big single was on the radio) and Mad Magazine in early 1991 (when their merchandise was in just about every store), whereas the Backstreet Boys and N’SYNC were only on the covers of mainly teen magazines. Not to mention, the name change. The New Kids on the Block changed their stage name to the much cooler NKOTB in the same year, 1991, that MC Hammer dropped the “MC” from his name.

Come to think of it, they are another reason why I like the last year of the late 80s and every year of the early 90s. Those times were so easy to remember:

1989: Batmania, Hulkmania

1990: Mariomania, Batmania 2.0, New Kids mania, Turtlemania, Roseanne-mania, “Twin Peaks” mania, Bartmania

1991: Urkelmania, Hammermania, Waldomania, Macaulaymania, Super Soaker mania, Videomania (Gameboy was the must have item of the Christmas season that year), and Jordan-mania

1992: Ren and Stimpy mania, 90210-mania, and Wayne’s World mania

I’m sorry you had to see the repeated use of the word “mania”, but there were that many of them back then. Those were good times.  :)

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 10/25/18 at 7:27 pm


Forever had more hype, it was always on in commercials etc, I just liked it because it was like neo tokyo


Forever was the first Schumacher Batman film, so there was a lot of anticipation for it at the time like you said. I don’t remember seeing the characters or merchandise in any commercials outside of the McDonald’s ones and Kenner toy commercials. I may have to search YouTube for them.

Of course, by that point in the 90s, I had just about lost touch with pop culture. The mid 90s were the time of crime dramas (Law and Order), ugly cartoons (Rugrats), Barney, modern age sitcoms (Home Improvement),  bad comic book crossovers (Black September), grunge-mania, hardcore rap, mainstream 70s nostalgia, early internet, hemp culture, and Cowboys Starter jackets. I love the early 90s (1990-1992) because they are easier to remember and still a part of the analog age. The mid 90s were the boring 90s to me. Not even the final episodes of my favorite shows from the early 90s (I.e. - The Wonder Years) could save the mid 90s.

Gotham in Batman Forver does closely resemble the city in Neo Tokyo. Unfortunately, Two-Face never appeared in the 1966 tv show, so the Boomers and Silent generation had no one to compare Tommy Lee Jones to. To me, the film was a large departure from what I had seen in the last two films. I could overlook that Michael Keaton was not going to be in every Batman film of the 90s , but not having two villains that both appeared in the ‘66 Batman tv show ended the appeal for me. I did not like the addition of Bane in the fourth film, either. Everyone has different tastes. I’m sure there were a lot of Millennials that enjoyed those movies and still do. It’s just not for me.


Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/25/18 at 8:15 pm


Forever was the first Schumacher Batman film, so there was a lot of anticipation for it at the time like you said. I don’t remember seeing the characters or merchandise in any commercials outside of the McDonald’s ones and Kenner toy commercials. I may have to search YouTube for them.

Of course, by that point in the 90s, I had just about lost touch with pop culture. The mid 90s were the time of crime dramas (Law and Order), ugly cartoons (Rugrats), Barney, modern age sitcoms (Home Improvement),  bad comic book crossovers (Black September), grunge-mania, hardcore rap, mainstream 70s nostalgia, early internet, hemp culture, and Cowboys Starter jackets. I love the early 90s (1990-1992) because they are easier to remember and still a part of the analog age. The mid 90s were the boring 90s to me. Not even the final episodes of my favorite shows from the early 90s (I.e. - The Wonder Years) could save the mid 90s.

Gotham in Batman Forver does closely resemble the city in Neo Tokyo. Unfortunately, Two-Face never appeared in the 1966 tv show, so the Boomers and Silent generation had no one to compare Tommy Lee Jones to. To me, the film was a large departure from what I had seen in the last two films. I could overlook that Michael Keaton was not going to be in every Batman film of the 90s , but not having two villains that both appeared in the ‘66 Batman tv show ended the appeal for me. I did not like the addition of Bane in the fourth film, either. Everyone has different tastes. I’m sure there were a lot of Millennials that enjoyed those movies and still do. It’s just not for me.


Yeah Forever was more MTV generation/Gen y if that makes sense, they wanted something lighter in contrast to the darker returns.
Seals kiss from a rose was everywhere at the time promoting that movie, I am putting myself in your shoes for a min because maybe
I can see how the mid 90s could be boring was it boring in the same way mid 2010s were boring ? I found the early 90s very 80s. Like
everything was zany but I did feel that things were like very drab and worn down,  In Jersey everything looked sheeshty lol  It got a little better
in the mid 90s but everything had this Beavis in Butthead living room aesthetic to it.  This scene from the simpsons best describes late 1993- 1996 lol


cELOaM-wRUY


Everyone had this hopeless vibe to them

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 10/26/18 at 12:00 am


Yeah Forever was more MTV generation/Gen y if that makes sense, they wanted something lighter in contrast to the darker returns.


Forever was a better time capsule than the 80s movie and the other 90s films, in my opinion. There was Val Kilmer (The Doors) as Batman, Jim Carey (In Living Color) as the Riddler, Chris ‘O Donnell (The Scent of a Woman) as Robin, Tommy Lee Jones (The Fugitive) as Two Face, and Nicole Kidman (Days of Thunder) as Doctor Chase Meridan.

Another issue I had with Forever was that there was not really anything to remember it by. The ‘89 Batman had the batmobile, Batman Returns had Catwoman, and Batman and Robin was a so bad it’s good film. Female pop culture fans actually purchased catsuits after seeing Batman Returns in 1992. The moment was similar to when black lace cocktail dresses became popular in 1990. Women in 1990 thought Julia Roberts looked good in her black lace cocktail dress in Pretty Woman, so the cocktail dresses were big sellers before the year was over. I don’t know of anyone who rushed to stores to pick up anything associated with either Schumacher films. To be fair, the ‘89 Batman movie is the most talked about one out of them all and it always will be. Batman fans tolerate Returns a bit better than the Schumacher films, but it’s not hard for many of them to see how the movies got progressively worse starting with Batman Returns onward. In the 80s, every new sci-fi epic at the theater was compared to Star Wars: A New Hope. Things were no different for the 90s. The ‘89 Batman movie was the ultimate superhero picture to put up against every superhero film coming out in the 90s.

I think Batman Forever suffered from having too many villains. The series was leading up to Harvey Dent becoming Two Face, but the transformation should have happened in the last Batman film of the 90s. That ruined it for a lot of people. Jim Carey’s name on the poster alone would have attracted lots of different pop culture fans (especially the ones that went to see all of his movies from the year before). There was no need for two antagonists.


Seals kiss from a rose was everywhere at the time promoting that movie

It was played more on the radio than “Face to Face” by Siouxie and the Banshees in the summer of 1992. I did not even know about “Face to Face” in ‘92. The new acts of the early 90s (I.e. - Pearl Jam, Kris Kross, and Mariah Carey) were getting all of the screen time on MTV at that point.


I am putting myself in your shoes for a min because maybe
I can see how the mid 90s could be boring was it boring in the same way mid 2010s were boring ?


The mid 90s had more to offer than the mid 2010s, but I think it is unfair to compare the two of them. We’re just in the second time period of the new millennium. In the mid 90s, we had almost a whole century behind us. Overall, I would much rather live in the mid 10s than go back to the mid 90s.

The pros of the Mid 90s:

- The economy was better

-Items from the early 90s were still in stores and most of them were marked down.

-Reruns of my favorite early 90s shows were on TV.


The cons of the mid 90s:

- Barneymania (His voice was the stuff of nightmares)

- 1993 World Trade Center Bombing

- NAFTA

- The OJ Simpson trial

- Oklahoma City Bombing

- Too many knock-off video game and cartoon characters (I.e. - Two Stupid Dogs, Earthworm Jim, and Pinky and the Brain in Animaniacs to name a few)

- Hackey sack and hemp were a big deal.

- The 1993 Geo Metro Convertible

- The Grunge music scene/ Gangsta Rap

- All of my new favorite shows from the early 90s (I.e. - The Simpsons and Jim Henson’s Dinosaurs) jumped the shark in this era.

- Cheap looking goods (I.e. - All of the merchandise for the first Jurassic Park film)

- The Real World marathons on MTV/Road Rules

I can go on about what I dislike about the mid 90s, but it would take days.  :-\\

I found the early 90s very 80s. Like
everything was zany but I did feel that things were like very drab and worn down,  In Jersey everything looked sheeshty lol


The 80s were like the clothes worn in the show Silver Spoons, strait-laced. The early 90s were a confusing time for a lot of people, but almost everything was laid back and cool. There were some things that were drab and worn down, but they were barely noticeable in the neon color shirt and happy pants era.

It got a little better
in the mid 90s but everything had this Beavis in Butthead living room aesthetic to it.  This scene from the simpsons best describes late 1993- 1996 lol


cELOaM-wRUY


Everyone had this hopeless vibe to them


In the mid 90s, people began to build on all of the drab and worn down stuff from the early 90s (the new culture of the time). That was a large part of my problem with the mid 90s.

The 90s started to feel the way I imagine the late 60s did and I preferred the music, clothes, and TV shows from the mid 60s to the late 60s.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 10/26/18 at 9:03 pm


I found the early 90s very 80s.


Was the Y2K era (1999-2001) very 90s to you?

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: c_keenan2001@hotmail.com on 10/26/18 at 9:20 pm


Do you remember the “New Kids Suck” shirts and decal stickers? There was also the debate about The Beatles being the better boy band over the New Kids on the Block. 1990 was a big year for the New Kids on the Block and their fans.

There were a lot of boy bands with hits towards the end mid-90smid 90s into the early 2000s, but I don’t there was a larger merchandising extravaganza for any other boy band in the 90s  than the one for the New Kids on the Block. They came onto the scene at the right time (in the 80s) and became extremely popular after Batmania of ‘89. In 1990, you would have to have been living under a rock if you didn’t know who the New Kids were. The Backstreet Boys versus N’SYNC feud was a big deal in the Y2K era, but neither one of them managed to be on the cover of just about every magazine at the time. The New Kids were on Cracked magazine in 1990 (around the time their last big single was on the radio) and Mad Magazine in early 1991 (when their merchandise was in just about every store), whereas the Backstreet Boys and N’SYNC were only on the covers of mainly teen magazines. Not to mention, the name change. The New Kids on the Block changed their stage name to the much cooler NKOTB in the same year, 1991, that MC Hammer dropped the “MC” from his name.

Come to think of it, they are another reason why I like the last year of the late 80s and every year of the early 90s. Those times were so easy to remember:

1989: Batmania, Hulkmania

1990: Mariomania, Batmania 2.0, New Kids mania, Turtlemania, Roseanne-mania, “Twin Peaks” mania, Bartmania

1991: Urkelmania, Hammermania, Waldomania, Macaulaymania, Super Soaker mania, Videomania (Gameboy must-haves have item of the Christmas season that year), and Jordan-mania

1992: Ren and Stimpy mania, 90210-mania, and Wayne’s World mania

I’m sorry you had to see the repeated use of the word “mania”, but there were that many of them back then. Those were good times.  :)


Yes, I did.  I hated anything to do with anybody hating New Kids.  I still see a flood of jealous boyfriends and husbands who used to be jealous teenaged boys.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/26/18 at 10:17 pm


Was the Y2K era (1999-2001) very 90s to you?


Nope everything felt y2k as soon as late 97 hit (even tho it had mid 90s/late 90s elements)


2001 felt 89%  early 2000s and it felt that way a week before 9/11

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: charasmaticleague1997@gma on 10/26/18 at 10:31 pm

To me it seems like this

90-91:early 90s
92:mid 90s transition year
93-95:mid 90s
96:late 90s transition year
97-2001:late 90s+y2k era

I think the two era pretty much was the whole late 90s and while I think it mostly was stopped by 911 it still lingred to about fall if 2002.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/26/18 at 10:33 pm


To me it seems like this

90-91:early 90s
92:mid 90s transition year
93-95:mid 90s
96:late 90s transition year
97-2001:late 90s+y2k era

I think the two era pretty much was the whole late 90s and while I think it mostly was stopped by 911 it still lingred to about fall if 2002.


my first week of 8th grade in Fall 2001 felt early 2000s did not feel any trace of y2k and this was a week before 9/11

Fall of 2002 did not feel y2k at all, at least on the east coast in Jersey

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: charasmaticleague1997@gma on 10/26/18 at 10:41 pm

I was in the 6th grade in 2001! :)

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/26/18 at 11:06 pm


I was in the 6th grade in 2001! :)

so u got pretty similar experiences to me then

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 10/26/18 at 11:39 pm


To me it seems like this

90-91:early 90s
92:mid 90s transition year
93-95:mid 90s
96:late 90s transition year
97-2001:late 90s+y2k era

I think the two era pretty much was the whole late 90s and while I think it mostly was stopped by 911 it still lingred to about fall if 2002.


It was like this for me:

1990-1992: The early 90s

Somewhere in the last week in December of ‘92 to January 19th of 1993: Mid ‘90s transition

1993-1995: The mid 90s

In between the last week in December of 1995 to January 9th of 1996: Late ‘90s transition

1996-1998: The Late 90s

After December 25th of 1998 to January 15th of 1999: Y2K era transition

1999-2001: The Y2K era

December 29th of 2001 to January 8th of 2002: Bush early 2000s transition

2002-2004: The Bush early 2000s


Fall of 2002 did not feel y2k at all, at least on the east coast in Jersey


The Y2K era was over before then.

In the fall of 2002:

- Buffy the Vampire Slayer was on UPN.

- JNCO jeans were closets everywhere all over the country.

- Pokèmon Johto League Champions toys replaced the original Pokèmon collectibles from Hasbro in stores.

- N’SYNC was on a temporary hiatus.

- The new Adam Sandler movies were duds.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/26/18 at 11:46 pm


It was like this for me:

1990-1992: The early 90s

Somewhere in the last week in December of ‘92 to January 19th of 1993: Mid ‘90s transition

1993-1995: The mid 90s

In between the last week in December of 1995 to January 9th of 1996: Late ‘90s transition

1996-1998: The Late 90s

After December 25th of 1998 to January 15th of 1999: Y2K era transition

1999-2001: The Y2K era

December 29th of 2001 to January 8th of 2002: Bush early 2000s transition

2002-2004: The Bush early 2000s




late 96 for me felt like a shift with Sabrina, Tomb Raider, N64 arriving, and the debut of BSB (altho it was on Nutty Professor movie and no one even knew who BSB was until 97 lol) Then you had tupacs death. The first half of 96 is not late numerically or culturally

That Y2k transtion was already happening in early 97 with the change from n64 to ps1s popularity, end of 16 bit, Robyn (first time we would hear the Britney Nsync type sound) Spice Girls, 98 degrees, all this happened in 97.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: charasmaticleague1997@gma on 10/26/18 at 11:58 pm


so u got pretty similar experiences to me then
yup!!

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 10/27/18 at 1:10 am




late 96 for me felt like a shift with Sabrina, Tomb Raider, N64 arriving, and the debut of BSB (altho it was on Nutty Professor movie and no one even knew who BSB was until 97 lol) Then you had tupacs death. The first half of 96 is not late numerically or culturally


3rd Rock from the Sun premiered in the first half of 96. It was like nothing else on TV at the time.

That Y2k transtion was already happening in early 97 with the change from n64 to ps1s popularity, end of 16 bit, Robyn (first time we would hear the Britney Nsync type sound) Spice Girls, 98 degrees, all this happened in 97.


The beginning of the Y2K era is best remembered for South Park going downhill, Britney Spears having two hits, the second Austin Powers film, and Pokèmania. South Park, “...Baby One More Time“, and the 4Kids version of Pokèmon all first appeared after early ‘97. The 1996 to 1997 school year sticks out to most pop culture fans when discussing those times, but we were not out of the 90s yet. As bad as it was, the Seinfeld two-part finale is still brought up when pop culture fans do a review for 1998. I don’t know of anyone that calls Seinfeld a ‘90s and 2000s show. It’s a show that started in the 80s and ended in the 90s. 1998 was a 90s year to most people. I credit it as the last year of the 90s, but I almost see it as a Y2K era year. It’s close enough.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/27/18 at 10:54 am


3rd Rock from the Sun premiered in the first half of 96. It was like nothing else on TV at the time.

The beginning of the Y2K era is best remembered for South Park going downhill, Britney Spears having two hits, the second Austin Powers film, and Pokèmania. South Park, “...Baby One More Time“, and the 4Kids version of Pokèmon all first appeared after early ‘97. The 1996 to 1997 school year sticks out to most pop culture fans when discussing those times, but we were not out of the 90s yet. As bad as it was, the Seinfeld two-part finale is still brought up when pop culture fans do a review for 1998. I don’t know of anyone that calls Seinfeld a ‘90s and 2000s show. It’s a show that started in the 80s and ended in the 90s. 1998 was a 90s year to most people. I credit it as the last year of the 90s, but I almost see it as a Y2K era year. It’s close enough.



1997 was still y2k it was the first full year of the new systems and by 97 the britney spears nsync time of sound had already been out, WWF attitude started in 97 as well as the new scratch logo. Being in school at the time in 97 it felt like a new era.


I am talking more about the 1997-1998 year

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: Tyrannosaurus Rex on 10/27/18 at 10:35 pm


It was like this for me:

1990-1992: The early 90s

Somewhere in the last week in December of ‘92 to January 19th of 1993: Mid ‘90s transition

1993-1995: The mid 90s

In between the last week in December of 1995 to January 9th of 1996: Late ‘90s transition

1996-1998: The Late 90s

After December 25th of 1998 to January 15th of 1999: Y2K era transition

1999-2001: The Y2K era

December 29th of 2001 to January 8th of 2002: Bush early 2000s transition

2002-2004: The Bush early 2000s

The Y2K era was over before then.

In the fall of 2002:

- Buffy the Vampire Slayer was on UPN.

- JNCO jeans were closets everywhere all over the country.

- Pokèmon Johto League Champions toys replaced the original Pokèmon collectibles from Hasbro in stores.

- N’SYNC was on a temporary hiatus.

- The new Adam Sandler movies were duds.


No offense, but I don't get it.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: Longaotian00 on 10/27/18 at 11:05 pm


No offense, but I don't get it.


Seems to have an obsession with late December/early January lol

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 10/27/18 at 11:57 pm



1997 was still y2k it was the first full year of the new systems and by 97 the britney spears nsync time of sound had already been out, WWF attitude started in 97 as well as the new scratch logo. Being in school at the time in 97 it felt like a new era.


I am talking more about the 1997-1998 year


That’s like saying that 1988 and ‘89 were early 90s years.

1988 was the first full year of more late Xers and Xennials owning the Nintendo Entertainment System. By 1988, the world knew about the teen-pop offerings of Tiffany and Debbie Gibson. The first episode of WWF The Main Event aired on NBC in February of ‘88, also.

The 1988-1989 school year was similar to the 1997-1988 year in that we were getting much closer to the eras that came after the ones those years were a part of.

I know a few pop culture fans that label things that came out of the 1988-1989 school year as 90s (the cassingle to Bobby Brown’s “On Our Own”) and miscellaneous items from the 1985-1986 year as late 80s (the vinyl record for “Crush on You” by The Jets), but it’s not many people that do that. I guess it all depends on your age and experience in that period. :-\\

The 1997-1998 school year seems to be your favorite period currently. The words “year 2000 date problem” were being uttered a lot in 1997. It became “Y2K” in ‘98. We made the biggest fuss about it in 1999, making 1999 the first year of the Y2K era to me.


No offense, but I don't get it.


I’ll use the early 90s as an example of what I’m talking about.

From 1990 to 1992, Americans were living in the Bush 90s and preparing for the mid 90s. On November 3rd of 1992, US voters elected Bill Clinton to be president over the incumbent George HW Bush. We still had one last month of Bush being in office, but everything started to change within that last week of December to January 19th of ‘93. The media went from talking about the 1992 debates in December of ‘92 to focusing exclusively on the Clinton family in the earliest weeks of January in 1993. It was a strange time. Bush the elder was still in office during those days, but Boomers and Xers were talking only about the Clintons nonstop. Movies released in the early 90s to mid 90s transition like the first Leprechaun movie and Alive are often referred to as “early 90s movies”, but that time did not quite feel like a part of the early 90s. For that reason, I group those dates together and classify them as a transition era.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/28/18 at 12:47 am


That’s like saying that 1988 and ‘89 were early 90s years.

1988 was the first full year of more late Xers and Xennials owning the Nintendo Entertainment System. By 1988, the world knew about the teen-pop offerings of Tiffany and Debbie Gibson. The first episode of WWF The Main Event aired on NBC in February of ‘88, also.

The 1988-1989 school year was similar to the 1997-1988 year in that we were getting much closer to the eras that came after the ones those years were a part of.

I know a few pop culture fans that label things that came out of the 1988-1989 school year as 90s (the cassingle to Bobby Brown’s “On Our Own”) and miscellaneous items from the 1985-1986 year as late 80s (the vinyl record for “Crush on You” by The Jets), but it’s not many people that do that. I guess it all depends on your age and experience in that period. :-\\

The 1997-1998 school year seems to be your favorite period currently. The words “year 2000 date problem” were being uttered a lot in 1997. It became “Y2K” in ‘98. We made the biggest fuss about it in 1999, making 1999 the first year of the Y2K era to me.

I’ll use the early 90s as an example of what I’m talking about.

From 1990 to 1992, Americans were living in the Bush 90s and preparing for the mid 90s. On November 3rd of 1992, US voters elected Bill Clinton to be president over the incumbent George HW Bush. We still had one last month of Bush being in office, but everything started to change within that last week of December to January 19th of ‘93. The media went from talking about the 1992 debates in December of ‘92 to focusing exclusively on the Clinton family in the earliest weeks of January in 1993. It was a strange time. Bush the elder was still in office during those days, but Boomers and Xers were talking only about the Clintons nonstop. Movies released in the early 90s to mid 90s transition like the first Leprechaun movie and Alive are often referred to as “early 90s movies”, but that time did not quite feel like a part of the early 90s. For that reason, I group those dates together and classify them as a transition era.


I don't know the y2k era feeling was felt as early as September 1997, even Beavis & Butthead ended  ( a Gen X show), but yeah for the 90s
97-98 school year was my favorite. It was kind of a it's almost here school year. Had a few mid 90s elements on their last leg. I remember SNES
games were still at blockbuster in 97 but discounted to only 99 cents. Family Matters & Step by Step moved to CBS and their last seasons looked
very Y2K. TGIF was having an identity crisis and latched onto the horror witch genre.

Everything felt so new then, at LAST my culture had arrived, I was so sick of Grunge I hated it!

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 10/28/18 at 1:27 pm


I don't know the y2k era feeling was felt as early as September 1997, even Beavis & Butthead ended  ( a Gen X show), but yeah for the 90s
97-98 school year was my favorite.


Beavis and Butthead might have gone off of the air in November of ‘97, but there were other mid to late 90s shows on Television at that time for late Xers to enjoy (I.e. - Party of Five).

I see where you are coming from. The ‘97-‘98 school year was similar in some ways to the ‘98-‘99 year, ‘99-‘00 year, and ‘00-‘01 academic year. The ‘97-‘98 school year was still the ‘88-‘89 year out of all of them. The winter to mid summer seasons of 1998 gave us the greatest Ben Stiller comedy movie (There’s Something About Mary), WB’s most memorable teen drama (Dawson’s Creek), the single everyone knows Will Smith for (Getting Jiggy With It) and the first Pokèmon games for Gameboy were unveiled at the Electronic Entertainment Expo.

The ‘97-‘98 year was a pseudo-Y2K school year. It is the last school year that was wholly late 90s though. ‘98-‘99 was half late 90s and half Y2K era. ‘99-‘00 and ‘00-‘01 were completely Y2K school years.

It was kind of a it's almost here school year. Had a few mid 90s elements on their last leg. I remember SNES
games were still at blockbuster in 97 but discounted to only 99 cents. Family Matters & Step by Step moved to CBS and their last seasons looked
very Y2K. TGIF was having an identity crisis and latched onto the horror witch genre.


Family Matters was a pop culture phenomenon in ‘90-‘91 school year. Then, the writers brought in the Urkelbot and people my age started looking at the show differently. That was weird to us at the time.  The only people that were watching every episode of Family Matters on TGIF from late ‘91 to ‘97 were Millennials that missed the ‘89 to ‘91 seasons. They watched Saved by the Bell The New Class for the same reason. Millennials were too young to see every unedited episode of the original Saved by the Bell on Saturday mornings in the very late 80s and early 90s.

To be fair, Boomers were making just about every sitcom and anti-sitcom (Married with Children) that started in the 80s and ended in the 90s into a live-action cartoon because they were nostalgic for their younger days when brand new episodes of Looney Tunes were on the air. Mel Blanc (voice actor for Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck and Porky Pig) died in the summer of 1989. So, from that point forward, you knew the adults (Boomers) were going to make different tributes to Mel Blanc and Warner Brothers all throughout the 90s.

The beginning of the end for TGIF was when Perfect Strangers and Full House were cut from their lineup in ‘91. Family Matters was still there, but it got worse when their production company was switched to Warner Brothers Television in mid ‘93. Going Places, Dinosaurs, Baby Talk, and Camp Wilder were not family shows like Just the Ten of Us was. I felt the schedule for TGIF was worse when they added Boy Meets World in late ‘93. That was more of a modern-age sitcom (like Home Improvement) than any show on TGIF that came before it. With the addition of that show, TGIF lost everything that made it great in the beginning to many late Xers and Xennials. It transformed into a block that only Millennials could enjoy from there onward.

I knew about Family Matters moving to CBS in late ‘97, but I never watched it on there. Step by Step (the 90s version of The Brady Bunch) was fun to look at sometimes, but it should have ended when Sasha Mitchell left. It was never on the level of Perfect Strangers, Family Matters, or Full House, but I always thought it premiered at the right time. There were a lot of shows with big families on TV in 1991. The Tokelsons immediately came to my mind when I typed that last sentence.

As for the TGIF shows of the ‘97-‘98 school year, I have to agree with you. TGIF was really suffering from an identity crisis that year with shows like You Wish and Teen Angel. The B-grade series, Sabrina the Teenage Witch, made its debut in the academic year before it. So it makes sense that that shows like it almost took over TGIF.

Everything felt so new then, at LAST my culture had arrived, I was so sick of Grunge I hated it!


Unfortunately, I have a feeling that the 1990s “decade” (1991-1999 to most people) will always be remembered for grunge, post-grunge, neo-soul R&B, and hardcore rap music. That’s “the 90s” that people my age and older want to see whenever the 90s are brought up. So, everything from the yuppie 90s (start of 1990 to July of ‘91) and the fall of ‘97 to the end of 1998 does not get a fair shake. My peers call the yuppie 90s “the late 80s” and you grouped the ‘97 to ‘98 school year with the Y2K era (1999-2001), so the fall of 1991 to July of 1997 can only be thought of as core 90s to the general public. Those were the months and full years of Pearl Jam, Nirvana (in its Grohlvana stage), Boys II Men, and Tupac. The 90s, overall, were a transition from the Bush 41 days (when the 90s were THE 90s) to the start of the second term Clinton days (a very diluted form of the 90s, but more like the Y2K era when you look back in hindsight).

At the end of the day, 80s fans in this century(Gen Xers, some Xennials, and Millennials that missed out on them) who hate the 90s will look for the grunge and hardcore rap artists in every 199x year and point them out as the only musicians of the 90s to the generations that come after them. People that like both the 80s and 90s will listen to and play everything that came out of those ages for future generations. Then, you have a variety of 90s fans that will show the oncoming generations who and what they liked from the 90s.

I prefer the period of house, acid house, adult contemporary, country, pop-rap, regular rap, power ballads, hair metal, heavy metal, pop, some grunge, New Jack Swing, and some neo-soul music to the music that came out of the rest of the 90s. I have to admit that the late 90s into the Y2K era were the break we all needed from the modest mid 90s. There was some post-grunge music on the radio by Creed and Nickelback in those years, but thankfully, there wasn’t another anti-fashion movement to go along with it. Grunge lovers in those years dressed the same way they did from late ‘92 into the mid 90s. Grungies stole almost everything from Metalheads in the 80s and early 90s. Grungies were more clean-shaven than Metalheads, but many of them did not looked well-groomed or groomed at all for that matter.

I was glad when ‘97 rolled around, too. 
The Tommy Hilfiger, Nautica, and FUBU clothes were a huge improvement over the earth tone clothing (we can thank the cast of Twin Peaks for that), store bought flannel shirts, and thrift store leather jackets before it. The start and end tips of the 90s were the lightest days of the 90s. Sure, they had their problems (I.e. - Savings and Loans crisis, the asbestos scare, Gulf War, LA Riots, Dot-com bubble, and Heaven's Gate Cult mass suicide), but all times have problems. At least, there were artists like Paula Abdul, Janet Jackson, Spice Girls, and Backstreet Boys on the radio to help us get through them.  :)

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/28/18 at 1:35 pm


Beavis and Butthead might have gone off of the air in November of ‘97, but there were other mid to late 90s shows on Television at that time for late Xers to enjoy (I.e. - Party of Five).

I see where you are coming from. The ‘97-‘98 school year was similar in some ways to the ‘98-‘99 year, ‘99-‘00 year, and ‘00-‘01 academic year. The ‘97-‘98 school year was still the ‘88-‘89 year out of all of them. The winter to mid summer seasons of 1998 gave us the greatest Ben Stiller comedy movie (There’s Something About Mary), WB’s most memorable teen drama (Dawson’s Creek), the single everyone knows Will Smith for (Getting Jiggy With It) and the first Pokèmon games for Gameboy were unveiled at the Electronic Entertainment Expo.

The ‘97-‘98 year was a pseudo-Y2K school year. It is the last school year that was wholly late 90s though. ‘98-‘99 was half late 90s and half Y2K era. ‘99-‘00 and ‘00-‘01 were completely Y2K school years.


Family Matters was a pop culture phenomenon in ‘90-‘91 school year. Then, the writers brought in the Urkelbot and people my age started looking at the show differently. That was weird to us at the time.  The only people that were watching every episode of Family Matters on TGIF from late ‘91 to ‘97 were Millennials that missed the ‘89 to ‘91 seasons. They watched Saved by the Bell The New Class for the same reason. Millennials were too young to see every unedited episode of the original Saved by the Bell on Saturday mornings in the very late 80s and early 90s.

To be fair, Boomers were making just about every sitcom and anti-sitcom (Married with Children) that started in the 80s and ended in the 90s into a live-action cartoon because they were nostalgic for their younger days when brand new episodes of Looney Tunes were on the air. Mel Blanc (voice actor for Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck and Porky Pig) died in the summer of 1989. So, from that point forward, you knew the adults (Boomers) were going to make different tributes to Mel Blanc and Warner Brothers all throughout the 90s.

The beginning of the end for TGIF was when Perfect Strangers and Full House were cut from their lineup in ‘91. Family Matters was still there, but it got worse when their production company was switched to Warner Brothers Television in mid ‘93. Going Places, Dinosaurs, Baby Talk, and Camp Wilder were not family shows like Just the Ten of Us was. I felt the schedule for TGIF was worse when they added Boy Meets World in late ‘93. That was more of a modern-age sitcom (like Home Improvement) than any show on TGIF that came before it. With the addition of that show, TGIF lost everything that made it great in the beginning to many late Xers and Xennials. It transformed into a block that only Millennials could enjoy from there onward.

I knew about Family Matters moving to CBS in late ‘97, but I never watched it on there. Step by Step (the 90s version of The Brady Bunch) was fun to look at sometimes, but it should have ended when Sasha Mitchell left. It was never on the level of Perfect Strangers, Family Matters, or Full House, but I always thought it premiered at the right time. There were a lot of shows with big families on TV in 1991. The Tokelsons immediately came to my mind when I typed that last sentence.

As for the TGIF shows of the ‘97-‘98 school year, I have to agree with you. TGIF was really suffering from an identity crisis that year with shows like You Wish and Teen Angel. The B-grade series, Sabrina the Teenage Witch, made its debut in the academic year before it. So it makes sense that that shows like it almost took over TGIF.

Unfortunately, I have a feeling that the 1990s “decade” (1991-1999 to most people) will always be remembered for grunge, post-grunge, neo-soul R&B, and hardcore rap music. That’s “the 90s” that people my age and older want to see whenever the 90s are brought up. So, everything from the yuppie 90s (start of 1990 to July of ‘91) and the fall of ‘97 to the end of 1998 does not get a fair shake. My peers call the yuppie 90s “the late 80s” and you grouped the ‘97 to ‘98 school year with the Y2K era (1999-2001), so the fall of 1991 to July of 1997 can only be thought of as core 90s to the general public. Those were the months and full years of Pearl Jam, Nirvana (in its Grohlvana stage), Boys II Men, and Tupac. The 90s, overall, were a transition from the Bush 41 days (when the 90s were THE 90s) to the start of the second term Clinton days (a very diluted form of the 90s, but more like the Y2K era when you look back in hindsight).

At the end of the day, 80s fans in this century(Gen Xers, some Xennials, and Millennials that missed out on them) who hate the 90s will look for the grunge and hardcore rap artists in every 199x year and point them out as the only musicians of the 90s to the generations that come after them. People that like both the 80s and 90s will listen to and play everything that came out of those ages for future generations. Then, you have a variety of 90s fans that will show the oncoming generations who and what they liked from the 90s.

I prefer the period of house, acid house, adult contemporary, country, pop-rap, regular rap, power ballads, hair metal, heavy metal, pop, some grunge, New Jack Swing, and some neo-soul music to the music that came out of the rest of the 90s. I have to admit that the late 90s into the Y2K era were the break we all needed from the modest mid 90s. There was some post-grunge music on the radio by Creed and Nickelback in those years, but thankfully, there wasn’t another anti-fashion movement to go along with it. Grunge lovers in those years dressed the same way they did from late ‘92 into the mid 90s. Grungies stole almost everything from Metalheads in the 80s and early 90s. Grungies were more clean-shaven than Metalheads, but many of them did not looked well-groomed or groomed at all for that matter.

I was glad when ‘97 rolled around, too. 
The Tommy Hilfiger, Nautica, and FUBU clothes were a huge improvement over the earth tone clothing (we can thank the cast of Twin Peaks for that), store bought flannel shirts, and thrift store leather jackets before it. The start and end tips of the 90s were the lightest days of the 90s. Sure, they had their problems (I.e. - Savings and Loans crisis, the asbestos scare, Gulf War, LA Riots, Dot-com bubble, and Heaven's Gate Cult mass suicide), but all times have problems. At least, there were artists like Paula Abdul, Janet Jackson, Spice Girls, and Backstreet Boys on the radio to help us get through them.  :)



I have to differ with you on TGIF's prime, I know you are biased towards the early 90s but TGIF's prime was 95-96 when the line up was.

Family Matters
Boy Meets World
Hanging with MR Cooper
Step by Step


Most teenagers werent watching this lineup and it was kids hence why it was changed to appeal to them

Its the period that got the most ratings, TGIF was getting crappy when they filled their 2 remaining slots to Teen Angel and You wish, both magic
themed shows, at this point ratings got so bad ABC was desperate for a Full House return so they brought back the Olsen Twins for Two of a Kind
to recapture the magic, it last only one season and ratings were getting worse. In the 99-2000 season WB created its own TGIF lineup and took
Sabrina away from ABC, then Boy meets world decided to end it's run due to being no more lineup and that was it.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 10/28/18 at 3:02 pm



I have to differ with you on TGIF's prime, I know you are biased towards the early 90s but TGIF's prime was 95-96 when the line up was.

Family Matters
Boy Meets World
Hanging with MR Cooper
Step by Step


Most teenagers werent watching this lineup and it was kids hence why it was changed to appeal to them



-Family Matters is the only A-grade TV show on that lineup. The episodes that Gen Joners, Boomers, Xers, Xennials, and Yers like to talk about are the ones from the second season. The third and fourth seasons were not so bad, but as I said in an earlier post, the introduction of Urkelbot (one large Robocop joke) scared most people away.

-Boy Meets World was the second Savage program on ABC in the 90s. The Wonder Years (another A-grade show) was cancelled by then because Fred Savage was accused of sexual harassment (a big issue in the mid 90s) by the costume designer of the show. ABC was trying to win over the 1988 shows’ audience with Boy Meets World, but Ben Savage did not have the looks or charm that Fred Savage had from 1988 to 1991. For that reason alone, ABC only got Millennials and Xennials that were still watching Family Matters to catch the first seasons of Boy Meet World. It was a C-grade show. There were two VH1 “I Love the 90s” specials and not one of them mentioned Boy Meets World because it was the less successful second attempt . Boy Meets World never belonged on TGIF one way or another. However,  Boy Meets World probably would have worked if Michael Jacobs and April Kelly created it in 1989. Still, it would have gone best in the time slot for Growing Pains on Wednesday night in the 1990-1991 school year. Boomers, Gen Xers, and Xennials all would not have missed Boy Meets World if it came on after The Wonder Years and before Doogie Bowser MD. Instead, it wound up being a show that mainly gen Yers watched. To this day, the only individuals praising Boy Meets World are Millennials that were too young to watch The Wonder Years during its original run.

-The first season of Hangin’ with Mr. Cooper was the best out of all of them. It nuked the fridge when Dawnn Lewis left and Raven Simone was added to the shows’ cast. I suggest you look at the pilot to Hangin’ with Mr. Cooper from the fall of ‘92 to see what I’m talking about.

- Sasha Mitchell was no longer on Step by Step in the 1995 to 1996 year. I’m sorry to tell you this, but Step by Step is fondly remembered for the scenes with Cody in them and the episode where Urkel appears with his jet pack. The writers and casting directors of Step by Step brought in Bronson Pinchot as Jean-Luc in a desperate attempt to get win back the late Xers and Xennials that were watching the show since its beginning, but they apparently moved on to other programs like The X-Files and Dateline NBC.

All in all, looking at it on paper, the lineup for the 1995-1996 year seems better than any of them on TV today, but it doesn’t top the first ever TGIF lineup. The first lineup will down in history as the greatest one until my generation and the XYers (Xennials) die off. Then, Millennials will most likely have debates over mid 90s TGIF being better than late 90s TGIF. Some Millennials will measure the sitcom blocks up against those of the very late 80s and early 90s. Information on all TGIF lineups will be around for the rest of this century into the next one.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/28/18 at 3:25 pm


-Family Matters is the only A-grade TV show on that lineup. The episodes that Gen Joners, Boomers, Xers, Xennials, and Yers like to talk about are the ones from the second season. The third and fourth seasons were not so bad, but as I said in an earlier post, the introduction of Urkelbot (one large Robocop joke) scared most people away.

-Boy Meets World was the second Savage program on ABC in the 90s. The Wonder Years (another A-grade show) was cancelled by then because Fred Savage was accused of sexual harassment (a big issue in the mid 90s) by the costume designer of the show. ABC was trying to win over the 1988 shows’ audience with Boy Meets World, but Ben Savage did not have the looks or charm that Fred Savage had from 1988 to 1991. For that reason alone, ABC only got Millennials and Xennials that were still watching Family Matters to catch the first seasons of Boy Meet World. It was a C-grade show. There were two VH1 “I Love the 90s” specials and not one of them mentioned Boy Meets World because it was the less successful second attempt . Boy Meets World never belonged on TGIF one way or another. However,  Boy Meets World probably would have worked if Michael Jacobs and April Kelly created it in 1989. Still, it would have gone best in the time slot for Growing Pains on Wednesday night in the 1990-1991 school year. Boomers, Gen Xers, and Xennials all would not have missed Boy Meets World if it came on after The Wonder Years and before Doogie Bowser MD. Instead, it wound up being a show that mainly gen Yers watched. To this day, the only individuals praising Boy Meets World are Millennials that were too young to watch The Wonder Years during its original run.

-The first season of Hangin’ with Mr. Cooper was the best out of all of them. It nuked the fridge when Dawnn Lewis left and Raven Simone was added to the shows’ cast. I suggest you look at the pilot to Hangin’ with Mr. Cooper from the fall of ‘92 to see what I’m talking about.

- Sasha Mitchell was no longer on Step by Step in the 1995 to 1996 year. I’m sorry to tell you this, but Step by Step is fondly remembered for the scenes with Cody in them and the episode where Urkel appears with his jet pack. The writers and casting directors of Step by Step brought in Bronson Pinchot as Jean-Luc in a desperate attempt to get win back the late Xers and Xennials that were watching the show since its beginning, but they apparently moved on to other programs like The X-Files and Dateline NBC.

All in all, looking at it on paper, the lineup for the 1995-1996 year seems better than any of them on TV today, but it doesn’t top the first ever TGIF lineup. The first lineup will down in history as the greatest one until my generation and the XYers (Xennials) die off. Then, Millennials will most likely have debates over mid 90s TGIF being better than late 90s TGIF. Some Millennials will measure the sitcom blocks up against those of the very late 80s and early 90s. Information on all TGIF lineups will be around for the rest of this century into the next one.


Actually Family Matters didn't reach is apex until Stefan showed up.


Boy meets world was way more popular than the wonder years.

https://uproxx.com/tv/tgif-rankings-abc-90s/


This proves that mid 90s TGIF was better than early 90s, I watched some of The Wonder years and never liked it in the early 90s

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: charasmaticleague1997@gma on 10/28/18 at 3:27 pm


Actually Family Matters didn't reach is apex until Stefan showed up.


Boy meets world was way more popular than the wonder years.

https://uproxx.com/tv/tgif-rankings-abc-90s/


This proves that mid 90s TGIF was better than early 90s, I watched some of The Wonder years and never liked it in the early 90s
mid 90s tgif lineup was the best imo

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 10/28/18 at 4:37 pm


Actually Family Matters didn't reach is apex until Stefan showed up.


That doesn’t show at all in TV ratings for the ‘93-‘94 TV season.

Not to mention, there are shirts and board game boxes with “Do the Urkel” on them from 1991.

Family Matters was rising in the end of the first season, reached its peak with the second season, and went down when Urkelbot was invented in the third season. It got worse and worse like all ‘90s Miller-Boyett tv shows with long runs after the introduction of Urkelbot. 

Please explain to me how Family Matters was at its best in the fifth season when Judy Winslow was missing. Carl even said he had two children in one late ‘93 episode, IIRC. That was ridiculous to anyone who had been taping the show when it was fresh (second season).

Family Matters was an excellent Bush 90s family sitcom, but it should have been scrapped after the fourth season.


Boy meets world was way more popular than the wonder years.

How can you say that when the Jets jacket from The Wonder Years was in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History in Washington in 2014?  ???

There were caps, books, and soundtracks for The Wonder Years in the very late 80s and yuppie ‘90s (1990-1991).

Pinups of Fred Savage seemed to be in every Teen Bop type magazine from ‘89 to ‘90.

What are you basing this on? The fact that Boy Meets World was on for seven seasons? Millennials loved it, but Ben Savage never appeared on a TV Guide or TV Week that I’m aware of. There was not a time in the mid 90s to Y2K era that Ben Savage was the host on SNL. I know that as a fact. Boy Meets World isn’t pop culture to anyone, but Millennials who want to believe its an A-grade show. I’m sorry.


https://uproxx.com/tv/tgif-rankings-abc-90s/


This proves that mid 90s TGIF was better than early 90s


Not really. That proved that Josh Sorokach was born sometime in the 80s.

I watched some of The Wonder years and never liked it in the early 90s


At what time did you watch it in the early 90s?  ???

The episodes from 1989-1990 TV season are classics. Ben Savage is even dressed as Cupid in the 1990 episode “The St. Valentine’s Day Massacre”. That’s how most people my age and older know him. My apologizes if this offends you, but The Wonder Years knocks Boy Meets World out of the park. It had something for everyone. I can’t say the same about Boy Meets World. My sources told me in the past that Boy Meets World went from being a sitcom to dramedy before the 90s were over. Frankly, I never gave it a good look when it was on because I knew that Ben Savage was Xennial and I could not relate much to him. I must say the show was a product of the 90s. I will give it that and stop there.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/28/18 at 5:10 pm


That doesn’t show at all in TV ratings for the ‘93-‘94 TV season.

Not to mention, there are shirts and board game boxes with “Do the Urkel” on them from 1991.

Family Matters was rising in the end of the first season, reached its peak with the second season, and went down when Urkelbot was invented in the third season. It got worse and worse like all ‘90s Miller-Boyett tv shows with long runs after the introduction of Urkelbot. 

Please explain to me how Family Matters was at its best in the fifth season when Judy Winslow was missing. Carl even said he had two children in one late ‘93 episode, IIRC. That was ridiculous to anyone who had been taping the show when it was fresh (second season).

Family Matters was an excellent Bush 90s family sitcom, but it should have been scrapped after the fourth season.



How can you say that when the Jets jacket from The Wonder Years was in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History in Washington in 2014?  ???

There were caps, books, and soundtracks for The Wonder Years in the very late 80s and yuppie ‘90s (1990-1991).

Pinups of Fred Savage seemed to be in every Teen Bop type magazine from ‘89 to ‘90.

What are you basing this on? The fact that Boy Meets World was on for seven seasons? Millennials loved it, but Ben Savage never appeared on a TV Guide or TV Week that I’m aware of. There was not a time in the mid 90s to Y2K era that Ben Savage was the host on SNL. I know that as a fact. Boy Meets World isn’t pop culture to anyone, but Millennials who want to believe its an A-grade show. I’m sorry.


Not really. That proved that Josh Sorokach was born sometime in the 80s.

At what time did you watch it in the early 90s?  ???

The episodes from 1989-1990 TV season are classics. Ben Savage is even dressed as Cupid in the 1990 episode “The St. Valentine’s Day Massacre”. That’s how most people my age and older know him. My apologizes if this offends you, but The Wonder Years knocks Boy Meets World out of the park. It had something for everyone. I can’t say the same about Boy Meets World. My sources told me in the past that Boy Meets World went from being a sitcom to dramedy before the 90s were over. Frankly, I never gave it a good look when it was on because I knew that Ben Savage was Xennial and I could not relate much to him. I must say the show was a product of the 90s. I will give it that and stop there.





https://movieshenanigans.com/2010/03/24/tv-show-brawl-series-boy-meets-world-vs-the-wonder-years/
https://www.tigerdroppings.com/rant/movie-tv/boy-meets-world-or-the-wonder-years--what-ya-think/42943427/




Almost anything online you search about BMW vs Wonder years ends up in BMW winning, BMW was just the better show.
BMW had bigger impact in the world than wonder years, BMW impact was so big it had to be rebooted into Girl Meets world.


BMW was not pop culture?

https://www.today.com/popculture/boy-meets-world-controversy-was-fence-actually-backyard-t128870

https://www.complex.com/pop-culture/2014/10/10-things-about-boy-meets-world/

cg9CqQTSqOQ

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: charasmaticleague1997@gma on 10/28/18 at 5:25 pm


That doesn’t show at all in TV ratings for the ‘93-‘94 TV season.

Not to mention, there are shirts and board game boxes with “Do the Urkel” on them from 1991.

Family Matters was rising in the end of the first season, reached its peak with the second season, and went down when Urkelbot was invented in the third season. It got worse and worse like all ‘90s Miller-Boyett tv shows with long runs after the introduction of Urkelbot. 

Please explain to me how Family Matters was at its best in the fifth season when Judy Winslow was missing. Carl even said he had two children in one late ‘93 episode, IIRC. That was ridiculous to anyone who had been taping the show when it was fresh (second season).

Family Matters was an excellent Bush 90s family sitcom, but it should have been scrapped after the fourth season.



How can you say that when the Jets jacket from The Wonder Years was in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History in Washington in 2014?  ???

There were caps, books, and soundtracks for The Wonder Years in the very late 80s and yuppie ‘90s (1990-1991).

Pinups of Fred Savage seemed to be in every Teen Bop type magazine from ‘89 to ‘90.

What are you basing this on? The fact that Boy Meets World was on for seven seasons? Millennials loved it, but Ben Savage never appeared on a TV Guide or TV Week that I’m aware of. There was not a time in the mid 90s to Y2K era that Ben Savage was the host on SNL. I know that as a fact. Boy Meets World isn’t pop culture to anyone, but Millennials who want to believe its an A-grade show. I’m sorry.


Not really. That proved that Josh Sorokach was born sometime in the 80s.

At what time did you watch it in the early 90s?  ???

The episodes from 1989-1990 TV season are classics. Ben Savage is even dressed as Cupid in the 1990 episode “The St. Valentine’s Day Massacre”. That’s how most people my age and older know him. My apologizes if this offends you, but The Wonder Years knocks Boy Meets World out of the park. It had something for everyone. I can’t say the same about Boy Meets World. My sources told me in the past that Boy Meets World went from being a sitcom to dramedy before the 90s were over. Frankly, I never gave it a good look when it was on because I knew that Ben Savage was Xennial and I could not relate much to him. I must say the show was a product of the 90s. I will give it that and stop there.
All I know is that boy meets world is a relatable show to me and I loved it and family matters while I liked it ,but it still was not as  relatable and as interesting as boy meets world in the long run.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 10/28/18 at 6:05 pm





https://movieshenanigans.com/2010/03/24/tv-show-brawl-series-boy-meets-world-vs-the-wonder-years/
https://www.tigerdroppings.com/rant/movie-tv/boy-meets-world-or-the-wonder-years--what-ya-think/42943427/




Almost anything online you search about BMW vs Wonder years ends up in BMW winning, BMW was just the better show.
BMW had bigger impact in the world than wonder years, BMW impact was so big it had to be rebooted into Girl Meets world.


Those articles were typed by XYers and Yers. They were too young to know who Fred Savage was when he appeared in Super Bowl commercials, SNL, and different awards shows.

The Wonder Years was a far more iconic show than Boy Meets World. As I mentioned in my last post, there were soundtracks with songs that people of all ages enjoy from the late 60s into the 70s. Women in the early 90s started wearing their hair straight because of America’s love for Winnie Cooper in 1990.

Let’s compare the years that BMW and TWY came out in:

1988: Best known for the premieres of Roseanne, The Wonder Years, and the syndicated Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles cartoon.

1993: Best known for the premieres of Beavis and Butthead, Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers, Walker Texas Ranger, The X-Files, NYPD Blue, Animaniacs, and Dr. Quinn Medicine Woman

Boy Meets World was not on most people’s radar when it made its debut in 1993. It was the show that was on because no one but Millennials was in the living room. It will always be remembered as that show that on TV after Family Matters. That’s it.

Girl Meets World would not have been on the Disney Channel in the mid to late 10s if Millennials did not make a big fuss about being “90s kids” who wanted a BMW reunion.

BMW was not pop culture?

https://www.today.com/popculture/boy-meets-world-controversy-was-fence-actually-backyard-t128870

https://www.complex.com/pop-culture/2014/10/10-things-about-boy-meets-world/

cg9CqQTSqOQ


No, BMW was never pop culture to anyone born in the 70s and before. It was not a top 30 show at any point during its run. Don’t believe me? Look it up. It’s a C-grade show.

Millennials seemed to really gravitate towards C-grade and D-grade TV shows a lot in the 90s and 2000s. I think this is because Millennials aren’t channel surfers. That’s why they can tell you every show that was on Fox Kids lineup in the 1993-1994 TV season, whereas late Xers and Xennials will only mention Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers and that’s it. Culturally, Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers is the only show that entire Saturday and weekday block is known for.


All I know is that boy meets world is a relatable show to me and I loved it and family matters while I liked it ,but it still was not as  relatable and as interesting as boy meets world in the long run.


Family Matters was not as interesting as Boy Meets World?!  ???

You’re kidding, right?

Jaleel White is a child star that everyone knows! Gen Zers have seen a wax model of him in the Scion iM commercial and he will be brought up a lot in the 2020s.

Ben Savage is only famous for his appearance in The Wonder Years.

BMW was never on the level of The Wonder Years or Family Matters. Millennials and some Xennials choose to group it with the two, but no one else has heard of BMW.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/28/18 at 6:51 pm


Those articles were typed by XYers and Yers. They were too young to know who Fred Savage was when he appeared in Super Bowl commercials, SNL, and different awards shows.

The Wonder Years was a far more iconic show than Boy Meets World. As I mentioned in my last post, there were soundtracks with songs that people of all ages enjoy from the late 60s into the 70s. Women in the early 90s started wearing their hair straight because of America’s love for Winnie Cooper in 1990.

Let’s compare the years that BMW and TWY came out in:

1988: Best known for the premieres of Roseanne, The Wonder Years, and the syndicated Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles cartoon.

1993: Best known for the premieres of Beavis and Butthead, Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers, Walker Texas Ranger, The X-Files, NYPD Blue, Animaniacs, and Dr. Quinn Medicine Woman

Boy Meets World was not on most people’s radar when it made its debut in 1993. It was the show that was on because no one but Millennials will in the living room. It will always be remembered as that show that on TV after Family Matters. That’s it.

Girl Meets World would not have been on the Disney Channel in the mid to late 10s if Millennials did not make a big fuss about being “90s kids” who wanted a BMW reunion.

No, BMW was never pop culture to anyone born in the 70s and before. It was not a top 30 show at any point during its run. Don’t believe me? Look it up. It’s a C-grade show.

Millennials seemed to really gravitate towards C-grade and D-grade TV shows a lot in the 90s and 2000s. I think this is because Millennials aren’t channel surfers. That’s why they can tell you every show that was on Fox Kids lineup in the 1993-1994 TV season, whereas late Xers and Xennials will only mention Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers and that’s it. Culturally, Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers is the only show that entire Saturday and weekday block is known for.

Family Matters was not as interesting as Boy Meets World?!  ???

You’re kidding, right?

Jaleel White is a child star that everyone knows! Gen Zers have seen a wax model of him in the Scion iM commercial and he will be brought up a lot in the 2020s.

Ben Savage is only famous for his appearance in The Wonder Years.

BMW was never on the level of The Wonder Years or Family Matters. Millennials and some Xennials choose to group it with the two, but no one else has heard of BMW.



If it was as Iconic as BMW it would have been rebooted like the rest of the shows, and it hasnt.
You seem to be ignoring BMW as an iconic show, that SYFY clip I shared the host says BMW is an iconic show.



Everyone knows who Corey Matthews is. I am going to run a poll to prove what show is more popular lol

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 10/28/18 at 7:16 pm



If it was as Iconic as BMW it would have been rebooted like the rest of the shows, and it hasnt.
You seem to be ignoring BMW as an iconic show, that SYFY clip I shared the host says BMW is an iconic show.


The Wonder Years did not need to be rebooted, it ended on a very strong note. It took me awhile to warm up to the finale to The Wonder Years, but now I see it as one of the most realistic endings in television history.

BMW is not an iconic show to anyone other than the Xennials and Millennials who grew up with it.

BMW did have William Daniels as Mr. Feeny. He is a Dr. Mark Craig (St. Elsewhere) and the voice of KITT in Knight Rider to all of America. When he passes away, those will be the roles he is remembered for.

A reboot does not mean a show is successful. There were petitions by Xennials and Millennials, some of which never saw any value in The Wonder Years, to bring back Boy Meets World. Those same Millennials wear Rocko’s Modern Life shirts nowadays. Rocko’s Modern Life, like Boy Meets World, would not have been on the air if Ren and Stimpy and The Wonder Years failed.

Everyone knows who Corey Matthews is. I am going to run a poll to prove what show is more popular lol


The show could not have been that important to you because you misspelled the name of the main character.

I’m going to let you get the last word in, but I will say this- Time Life is not re-releasing any DVDs for the 30th anniversary of Boy Meets World in 2023.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/28/18 at 7:24 pm


The Wonder Years did not need to be rebooted, it ended on a very strong note. It took me awhile to warm up to the finale to The Wonder Years, but now I see it as one of the most realistic endings in television history.

BMW is not an iconic show to anyone other than the Xennials and Millennials who grew up with it.

BMW did have William Daniels as Mr. Feeny. He is a Dr. Mark Craig (St. Elsewhere) and the voice of KITT in Knight Rider to all of America. When he passes away, those will be the roles he is remembered for.

A reboot does not mean a show is successful. There were petitions by Xennials and Millennials, some of which never saw any value in The Wonder Years, to bring back Boy Meets World. Those same Millennials wear Rocko’s Modern Life shirts nowadays. Rocko’s Modern Life, like Boy Meets World, would not have been on the air if Ren and Stimpy and The Wonder Years failed.

The show could not have been that important to you because you misspelled the name of the main character.

I’m going to let you get the last word in, but I will say this- Time Life is not re-releasing any DVDs for the 30th anniversary of Boy Meets World in 2023.


Boy meets world made me learn life lessons literally before experiencing them, if you watch that video I  posted you will see how the people told the cast
that the show changed their lives and helped them grow up, the reason why BMW is so beloved the show raised them ,the show has universal appeal
that can effect someone born in 87 or 2007, it effects generations something Wonder years can't do.



I made a poll on what show is more iconic, We will get the REAL answer in a few days

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: wsmith4 on 10/29/18 at 8:50 am

It's sort of like "world cup" meets "boy meets world" world in a cup.  Can you imagine if those two hadn't existed?

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 10/29/18 at 10:47 am


It's sort of like "world cup" meets "boy meets world" world in a cup.  Can you imagine if those two hadn't existed?


Boy Meets World already doesn’t exist to a good chunk of people over the age of 40. It’s mostly Millennials, “90s Kids”, that won’t be quiet about BMW. This is why I have to see the 90s revival die out in the late 2020s. Millennials are going to sink their own battleship by excessively talking about C-grade and D-grade TV shows and movies that no one else on the face of the planet earth knows anything about. The stories and actual pop culture references that Xennials put in their 2020s TV programs and movies will be the best thing offered for people of all ages that once lived in the 90s. There is a huge disconnect between the youngest Millennials and everyone else when it comes to discussing what pop culture is and they don’t seem to get that.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/29/18 at 1:24 pm


Boy Meets World already doesn’t exist to a good chunk of people over the age of 40. It’s mostly Millennials, “90s Kids”, that won’t be quiet about BMW. This is why I have to see the 90s revival die out in the late 2020s. Millennials are going to sink their own battleship by excessively talking about C-grade and D-grade TV shows and movies that no one else on the face of the planet earth knows anything about. The stories and actual pop culture references that Xennials put in their 2020s TV programs and movies will be the best thing offered for people of all ages that once lived in the 90s. There is a huge disconnect between the youngest Millennials and everyone else when it comes to discussing what pop culture is and they don’t seem to get that.



I can say the same about Gen X,  BMW is a legendary show that effected peoples lives, Wonder years not so much.
Does not matter if Wonder Years was popping for that one year or 2,  BMW had a bigger legacy than wonder years,


You may think BMW is D-Grade but the fact that the show is still talked about and has panels shows this show is a legacy in itself.
I don't see any wonder years panels, I never see Wonder Years get talked about ever.



BMW was huge in the 90s and got actually bigger when it went to Disney Channel in Syndication in 2001

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: wsmith4 on 10/29/18 at 2:08 pm

When BMW started in 89, I thought that was the end of the 80's but the 90's extended well into the 80's.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 10/29/18 at 2:23 pm



I can say the same about Gen X,  BMW is a legendary show that effected peoples lives, Wonder years not so much.
Does not matter if Wonder Years was popping for that one year or 2,  BMW had a bigger legacy than wonder years,


You may think BMW is D-Grade but the fact that the show is still talked about and has panels shows this show is a legacy in itself.
I don't see any wonder years panels, I never see Wonder Years get talked about ever.



BMW was huge in the 90s and got actually bigger when it went to Disney Channel in Syndication in 2001


Ah, now you’re trolling me.

I take it you have not been to any shows at Gallery 1988.Here is an art piece for the “We Made Them Do It” show at Gallery 1988:

https://www.behance.net/gallery/9601187/The-Wonder-Years

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/29/18 at 2:33 pm


Ah, now you’re trolling me.

I take it you have not been to any shows at Gallery 1988.Here is an art piece for the “We Made Them Do It” show at Gallery 1988:

https://www.behance.net/gallery/9601187/The-Wonder-Years


You are forgetting I was alive for wonder years hype as well.
BMW was the better show and more memorable.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 10/29/18 at 4:04 pm


BMW was the better show and more memorable.


Where the hype for Boy Meets World in the mid 90s then?

In your eyes, it might have been an unappreciated gem, but I’m not sure if you should say it was more memorable than The Wonder Years.  :(

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/29/18 at 6:48 pm


Where the hype for Boy Meets World in the mid 90s then?

In your eyes, it might have been an unappreciated gem, but I’m not sure if you should say it was more memorable than The Wonder Years.  :(


it got more popular in 98/99

and more popular when it moved to Disney Channel for syndication

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 10/30/18 at 7:12 am


it got more popular in 98/99

and more popular when it moved to Disney Channel for syndication


Let’s go over this again:

Pop culture that Millennials loved in the mid to late 90s: Barney and Friends, Jurassic Park, Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers, Free Willy, Animaniacs, Babe, Toy Story, The Nanny, South Park, Teletubbies, and Pokèmon

Alternative culture that Millennials loved in the mid to late 90s: Lamb Chop’s Play Along, Bill Nye the Science Guy, Rocko’s Modern Life, Boy Meets World, All That, The Secret World of Alex Mack, Freakazoid, and Blue’s Clues

Do you see the difference now?

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: charasmaticleague1997@gma on 10/30/18 at 9:49 am


Boy meets world made me learn life lessons literally before experiencing them, if you watch that video I  posted you will see how the people told the cast
that the show changed their lives and helped them grow up, the reason why BMW is so beloved the show raised them ,the show has universal appeal
that can effect someone born in 87 or 2007, it effects generations something Wonder years can't do.



I made a poll on what show is more iconic, We will get the REAL answer in a few days
yeah what John titor said BMW was awesome and it had good characters and taught life lessons. Now while I do like wonder years and family matters to me they can't compare to the stories,lessons,and episodes of Boy Meets World.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/30/18 at 2:51 pm


Let’s go over this again:

Pop culture that Millennials loved in the mid to late 90s: Barney and Friends, Jurassic Park, Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers, Free Willy, Animaniacs, Babe, Toy Story, The Nanny, South Park, Teletubbies, and Pokèmon

Alternative culture that Millennials loved in the mid to late 90s: Lamb Chop’s Play Along, Bill Nye the Science Guy, Rocko’s Modern Life, Boy Meets World, All That, The Secret World of Alex Mack, Freakazoid, and Blue’s Clues

Do you see the difference now?



Beavis & ButtHead, Simpsons, Family Guy come on now

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: John Titor on 10/30/18 at 2:52 pm


yeah what John titor said BMW was awesome and it had good characters and taught life lessons. Now while I do like wonder years and family matters to me they can't compare to the stories,lessons,and episodes of Boy Meets World.


Exactly, if someone didn't grow up with BMW  (the show aged with its audience ) they won't get the effect
the show had on us.


If Wonder years was that revealed it would still be talked about today (which it isn't)
While BMW is talked about everyday by someone lol

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 10/30/18 at 3:06 pm



Beavis & ButtHead, Simpsons, Family Guy come on now


The Millennials I’ve heard from would much rather watch Daria than Beavis and Butthead. I could definitely see Millennials enjoying Deep Space Homer from the fifth season, but that’s not alternative culture. Family Guy is the 2000s show. Not a 90s and 2000s TV show like The Simpsons, but a 2000s and 2010s TV show. Family Guy should not have been in your post. The Simpsons are currently on FOX, but the people that were with it since its inception stopped watching the show in 2005.

Subject: Re: Those old enough to remember the 80s transforming into the 90s

Written By: 80sfan on 10/30/18 at 3:08 pm

There are some subtle 80's vibes all the way until 1996/1997. It's the same as any decade. You could feel some 70's vibes, some of it small, all the way until 1985.  :o

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