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Subject: The golden age of hip hop - what is it to you?

Written By: Zelek3 on 12/16/18 at 5:22 pm

When it comes to the golden age of hip hop there's usually two ranges cited.

One is 1986-1993, which begins with Run DMC and Beastie Boys getting more mainstream with Raising Hell and License to Ill, ushering in a new era of creativity in hip hop. And ends with the full breakthrough of gangsta rap and G funk via The Chronic and Doggystyle, which older fans consider "not golden age".

The other range is 1988-1997 which begins with the original breakthrough of gangsta rap via NWA's Straight Outta Compton, and ends with the deaths of Tupac and Biggie. This range includes more gangsta rap and is preferred by younger fans it seems. For younger fans, Tupac and Biggie are practically synonymous with "golden age hip hop" but not so much with older fans who think the G-funk, 1993-1997 era, is a separate era from the golden age of 86-93.

What do you think?

Subject: Re: The golden age of hip hop - what is it to you?

Written By: Howard on 12/17/18 at 7:15 am

I would think "The golden age" of Hip-Hop started between 1980-1985, that's just my opinion.

Subject: Re: The golden age of hip hop - what is it to you?

Written By: wsmith4 on 12/17/18 at 10:40 am

Has not yet happened.

Subject: Re: The golden age of hip hop - what is it to you?

Written By: yelimsexa on 12/17/18 at 12:44 pm


I would think "The golden age of Hip-Hop started between 1980-1985, that's just my opinion.


That's just the "old school" era, where it was really just funk/R&B with rapping and not a distinct "hip-hop" style. It was underground and R&B/Electrofunk/soul still dominated the urban scene. 1986 and 1987 are sort of a blend of old school and golden age in style, but increasingly as time has progressed, they're being shoved into the old school category. R&B/funk/soul was still more popular than rap/hip hop in addition. RUN-D.M.C. may have broken through in '86, but that was after spending a few years in underground popularity that's clearly of the old school style. Even The Beastie Boys of that era (around the time of "You Gotta Fight") has rock instrumental that wouldn't be too out of place with the hair metal bands. Finally, most don't associate hip hop at all with the core '80s outside of some breakdancing, of which 1986 and 1987 are still a part of.

Even so, the first half or so of this golden age shared the spotlight with New Jack Swing's popularity, though a noticeable uptick in rap songs hitting the charts in 1988-89, including Tone Loc, J.J. Fad, DZ Dazzy and the Fresh Prince, The Fat Boys, among others, showed that the genre had really started to reach its full maturity at that point.

On the other end of the spectrum, the mid-90s, in addition to G Funk, also had the epic East Coast/West Coast duel with each other, and this was still before southern rap started to infiltrate. Even very early Jay-Z (with the hyphen) sounds very "classic" compared to his "ho bangin" stuff from the Y2K era onwards.

Some may also argue that a similar debate with regards to a silver age seems to arise, with the late '90s/early 2000s (post-Gangsta, pre-Snap) a popular definition, ending with 50 Cent's 2003 breakthrough, though some argue it may go as late as Soulja Boy in 2007 when autotune started to take over, though very few place any "silver age" as lasting that late. Lil' Kim, Nelly, Ja Rule, this era's Jay Z, and early Eminem are the core artists. Of course, those who believe the golden age ends with 1993 include that year through 1997 as part of the silver age as well.

On the other hand, searching "silver age of hip hop" has a YouTube result mentioning the late '80s/early '90s, implying that the TRUE golden age was 1979-1986/87. Others basically consider it the 1990s inclusive, beginning with MC Hammer's breakthrough and ending with the rise of Eminem.

That said, I seem to just go by decades, with '80s=golden, '90s=silver, '00s=bronze, and '10s=modern, with some bellwethers to the coming age near the end of that decade.

Here's a fun link that provides a good opinion on the year's best rapper since 1979, and it can reveal how the genre has evolved.
https://www.complex.com/music/the-best-rapper-alive-every-year-since-1979

Subject: Re: The golden age of hip hop - what is it to you?

Written By: wsmith4 on 12/17/18 at 12:44 pm


That's just the "old school" era, where it was really just funk/R&B with rapping and not a distinct "hip-hop" style. It was underground and R&B/Electrofunk/soul still dominated the urban scene. 1986 and 1987 are sort of a blend of old school and golden age in style, but increasingly as time has progressed, they're being shoved into the old school category. R&B/funk/soul was still more popular than rap/hip hop in addition. RUN-D.M.C. may have broken through in '86, but that was after spending a few years in underground popularity that's clearly of the old school style. Even The Beastie Boys of that era (around the time of "You Gotta Fight") has rock instrumental that wouldn't be too out of place with the hair metal bands. Finally, most don't associate hip hop at all with the core '80s outside of some breakdancing, of which 1986 and 1987 are still a part of.

Even so, the first half or so of this golden age shared the spotlight with New Jack Swing's popularity, though a noticeable uptick in rap songs hitting the charts in 1988-89, including Tone Loc, J.J. Fad, DZ Dazzy and the Fresh Prince, The Fat Boys, among others, showed that the genre had really started to reach its full maturity at that point.

On the other end of the spectrum, the mid-90s, in addition to G Funk, also had the epic East Coast/West Coast duel with each other, and this was still before southern rap started to infiltrate. Even very early Jay-Z (with the hyphen) sounds very "classic" compared to his "ho bangin" stuff from the Y2K era onwards.

Some may also argue that a similar debate with regards to a silver age seems to arise, with the late '90s/early 2000s (post-Gangsta, pre-Snap) a popular definition, ending with 50 Cent's 2003 breakthrough, though some argue it may go as late as Soulja Boy in 2007 when autotune started to take over, though very few place any "silver age" as lasting that late. Lil' Kim, Nelly, Ja Rule, this era's Jay Z, and early Eminem are the core artists. Of course, those who believe the golden age ends with 1993 include that year through 1997 as part of the silver age as well.

On the other hand, searching "silver age of hip hop" has a YouTube result mentioning the late '80s/early '90s, implying that the TRUE golden age was 1979-1986/87. Others basically consider it the 1990s inclusive, beginning with MC Hammer's breakthrough and ending with the rise of Eminem.

That said, I seem to just go by decades, with '80s=golden, '90s=silver, '00s=bronze, and '10s=modern, with some bellwethers to the coming age near the end of that decade.


It hasn't happened yet.  Period.

Subject: Re: The golden age of hip hop - what is it to you?

Written By: Howard on 12/17/18 at 2:29 pm


That's just the "old school" era, where it was really just funk/R&B with rapping and not a distinct "hip-hop" style. It was underground and R&B/Electrofunk/soul still dominated the urban scene. 1986 and 1987 are sort of a blend of old school and golden age in style, but increasingly as time has progressed, they're being shoved into the old school category. R&B/funk/soul was still more popular than rap/hip hop in addition. RUN-D.M.C. may have broken through in '86, but that was after spending a few years in underground popularity that's clearly of the old school style. Even The Beastie Boys of that era (around the time of "You Gotta Fight") has rock instrumental that wouldn't be too out of place with the hair metal bands. Finally, most don't associate hip hop at all with the core '80s outside of some breakdancing, of which 1986 and 1987 are still a part of.

Even so, the first half or so of this golden age shared the spotlight with New Jack Swing's popularity, though a noticeable uptick in rap songs hitting the charts in 1988-89, including Tone Loc, J.J. Fad, DZ Dazzy and the Fresh Prince, The Fat Boys, among others, showed that the genre had really started to reach its full maturity at that point.

On the other end of the spectrum, the mid-90s, in addition to G Funk, also had the epic East Coast/West Coast duel with each other, and this was still before southern rap started to infiltrate. Even very early Jay-Z (with the hyphen) sounds very "classic" compared to his "ho bangin" stuff from the Y2K era onwards.

Some may also argue that a similar debate with regards to a silver age seems to arise, with the late '90s/early 2000s (post-Gangsta, pre-Snap) a popular definition, ending with 50 Cent's 2003 breakthrough, though some argue it may go as late as Soulja Boy in 2007 when autotune started to take over, though very few place any "silver age" as lasting that late. Lil' Kim, Nelly, Ja Rule, this era's Jay Z, and early Eminem are the core artists. Of course, those who believe the golden age ends with 1993 include that year through 1997 as part of the silver age as well.

On the other hand, searching "silver age of hip hop" has a YouTube result mentioning the late '80s/early '90s, implying that the TRUE golden age was 1979-1986/87. Others basically consider it the 1990s inclusive, beginning with MC Hammer's breakthrough and ending with the rise of Eminem.

That said, I seem to just go by decades, with '80s=golden, '90s=silver, '00s=bronze, and '10s=modern, with some bellwethers to the coming age near the end of that decade.

Here's a fun link that provides a good opinion on the year's best rapper since 1979, and it can reveal how the genre has evolved.
https://www.complex.com/music/the-best-rapper-alive-every-year-since-1979


I'm referring to music groups such as The Sugarhill Gang and The Fat Boys. 

Subject: Re: The golden age of hip hop - what is it to you?

Written By: Zelek3 on 12/21/18 at 5:10 am


That's just the "old school" era, where it was really just funk/R&B with rapping and not a distinct "hip-hop" style. It was underground and R&B/Electrofunk/soul still dominated the urban scene. 1986 and 1987 are sort of a blend of old school and golden age in style, but increasingly as time has progressed, they're being shoved into the old school category. R&B/funk/soul was still more popular than rap/hip hop in addition. RUN-D.M.C. may have broken through in '86, but that was after spending a few years in underground popularity that's clearly of the old school style. Even The Beastie Boys of that era (around the time of "You Gotta Fight") has rock instrumental that wouldn't be too out of place with the hair metal bands. Finally, most don't associate hip hop at all with the core '80s outside of some breakdancing, of which 1986 and 1987 are still a part of.

Even so, the first half or so of this golden age shared the spotlight with New Jack Swing's popularity, though a noticeable uptick in rap songs hitting the charts in 1988-89, including Tone Loc, J.J. Fad, DZ Dazzy and the Fresh Prince, The Fat Boys, among others, showed that the genre had really started to reach its full maturity at that point.

On the other end of the spectrum, the mid-90s, in addition to G Funk, also had the epic East Coast/West Coast duel with each other, and this was still before southern rap started to infiltrate. Even very early Jay-Z (with the hyphen) sounds very "classic" compared to his "ho bangin" stuff from the Y2K era onwards.

Some may also argue that a similar debate with regards to a silver age seems to arise, with the late '90s/early 2000s (post-Gangsta, pre-Snap) a popular definition, ending with 50 Cent's 2003 breakthrough, though some argue it may go as late as Soulja Boy in 2007 when autotune started to take over, though very few place any "silver age" as lasting that late. Lil' Kim, Nelly, Ja Rule, this era's Jay Z, and early Eminem are the core artists. Of course, those who believe the golden age ends with 1993 include that year through 1997 as part of the silver age as well.

On the other hand, searching "silver age of hip hop" has a YouTube result mentioning the late '80s/early '90s, implying that the TRUE golden age was 1979-1986/87. Others basically consider it the 1990s inclusive, beginning with MC Hammer's breakthrough and ending with the rise of Eminem.

That said, I seem to just go by decades, with '80s=golden, '90s=silver, '00s=bronze, and '10s=modern, with some bellwethers to the coming age near the end of that decade.

Here's a fun link that provides a good opinion on the year's best rapper since 1979, and it can reveal how the genre has evolved.
https://www.complex.com/music/the-best-rapper-alive-every-year-since-1979

My benchmark for the end of the silver age is 2006, when Nas released Hip Hop Is Dead. I do consider 50 Cent a silver age artist.

Subject: Re: The golden age of hip hop - what is it to you?

Written By: Philip Eno on 12/21/18 at 7:25 am

The golden age is the beginning and went downhill since then.

Subject: Re: The golden age of hip hop - what is it to you?

Written By: Emman on 12/24/18 at 7:49 pm


It hasn't happened yet.  Period.


I get the feeling you're not a yuge fan of rap/hip-hop.

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