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Subject: Music of 1997: Closer to 1994 or 2000?

Written By: mc98 on 03/17/20 at 11:47 am

This ones hard.

On one hand 1997 was the year when teen pop started to top the charts with acts like Robyn, Spice Girls, Hanson, and Backstreet Boys. Rock started to get more upbeat with acts like Three Eye Blind, Sugar Ray, and Smash Mouth. Hip Hop started to be more flashier and glamorous.

On the other hand, most of the R&B still had its core 90s sound. A lot of pop ballads had its arena sound like How Do I Love and All By Myself. There were downbeat post-grunge songs.

I would pick 2000 but not much since 1997 was still part of the core 90s.

Subject: Re: Music of 1997: Closer to 1994 or 2000?

Written By: oldmusicfan on 03/17/20 at 1:01 pm

2000.

We were just about in the early 2000s in the late 90s.

Subject: Re: Music of 1997: Closer to 1994 or 2000?

Written By: DisneysRetro on 03/17/20 at 4:24 pm

1997 was really unique. The music of that year was definitely apart of the core 90’s although there were some y2k sounds coming in 97. I’d say it’s culturally closer to 1994 rather than 2000.R&B and pop music in 1997 was definitely apart of the core 90’s. Tupac and Biggie’s albums were played all throughout 1996-1997 and singles were released anywhere from late 96- 97. Backstreet boys first album sounds more 90’s than y2k as well. But most teen pop acts were recorded and released in 1995-1996 in Germany such as Robyn, Backstreet boys and Nsync so technically they are products of the mid 90’s. They were released internationally in early 1998 and took over 1998. Backstreet boys only released one hit in 1997 (quit playing games with my heart) which sounds like a typical 90’s pop song and Hanson wasn't really apart of the teen pop craze tbh. Hanson's producers and what not were not creating the same sounds that Max Marin created for artists such as BSB, Nsync, Britney and Christina that took over 1998-2001. Their name was def a pop band symbol that attracted the audience of preteen middle school girls however I would consider them separate  from 98*, Nsync, BSB, etc.

Darlin’ was a song on their 1997 album. This sounds absolutely 90’s.
sHRmBk5wpJU

Subject: Re: Music of 1997: Closer to 1994 or 2000?

Written By: Jaydawg89 on 03/17/20 at 4:50 pm

That's actually quite a hard one in terms of music. I would say 1997 as a whole though felt closer to 2000 than it did to 1994.

1997 and 1998 were very unique years for music and in general, they felt very similar to each other (except for the first few months of 1997). For music it was sort of like a combination of stuff that was popular in the mid 1990s and 1999/2000.

Subject: Re: Music of 1997: Closer to 1994 or 2000?

Written By: Philip Eno on 03/17/20 at 4:54 pm


This ones hard.

On one hand 1997 was the year when teen pop started to top the charts with acts like Robyn, Spice Girls, Hanson, and Backstreet Boys. Rock started to get more upbeat with acts like Three Eye Blind, Sugar Ray, and Smash Mouth. Hip Hop started to be more flashier and glamorous.

On the other hand, most of the R&B still had its core 90s sound. A lot of pop ballads had its arena sound like How Do I Love and All By Myself. There were downbeat post-grunge songs.

I would pick 2000 but not much since 1997 was still part of the core 90s.
At the time when the Spice started having hits in 1996, four of the Spice Girls were over the age of twenty, best not described as teenagers,

Subject: Re: Music of 1997: Closer to 1994 or 2000?

Written By: Early2010sGuy on 03/18/20 at 2:10 am

I know I've been sounding biased about 1997 being part of the Core 90s, but it doesnt mean there werent any Y2K trends during that year.

I'd have to say 2000 for this one, however, but only by a TINY margin. It is 48% 1994, and 52% 2000.

On the Hip Hop side of things, it's clear that it changed completely. In 1994, Gangsta Rap and G-funk were very popular, and there was the rivalry between East Coast and West Coast Rappers. The rivalry basically started dying off in Late 1996 following Tupac's death, until Shiny-suit rap became dominant in 1997. Puff Daddy became the new king of Hip Hop, and new acts like Mase, Missy Elliott, Eminem, and Will Smith (Not really new but still counts as shiny-suit with his Men In Black song), all of which you didnt hear in 1994. In 2000, similar beats from 1997 continued with Dr. Dre, Eminem, Nas, and Ja Rule, so for rap, it is 30% 1994, 70% 2000.

On R&B, this ones fairly easy to answer. Contemporary Adult Ballads were still dominating the charts in 1997-1998, and classic 90s R&B songs like No Diggity, Pony, Honey, Too Close, and many more were also popular during this time. However, Pop-R&B was slowly coming up with Max Martin and Timbaland with Aaliyah, Robyn, Usher, Total, and Destiny's Child, but still not as big as the Contemporary Adult Ballads dominating that time. 75% 1994, 25% 2000.

Now let's get into the fun part, pop. In 1994, pop was basically morphed into other genres like R&B (Not Y2K Pop-R&B of course), Rock (Grunge or VERY Early post-grunge), or Eurodance. 1996-1997 is when Teen Pop exploded. Spice Girls, Robyn, Hanson, Backstreet Boys, and NSync were in full swing during 1997. However, it is not perfectly Y2K, aside from Robyn and a bit of Backstreet Boys. Songs like Wannabe or Spice Up Your Life probably would not pass in 2000, and Hanson is basically just Post-Grunge with Teen Pop elements thought they sound nowhere near Y2K acts like Christina Aguilera or Britney Spears. NSync during this time was New Jack Swing based, I Want You Back, Tearin' Up My Heart, those won't pass in 2000, even Backstreet Boys' We've Got It Goin' On is released in 1995, again, New Jack Swing. Listen to I Want You Back, and compare it to Bye Bye Bye, a night and day difference. However, Quit Playing Games With My Heart and As Long As You Love me sound very Y2K, along with Robyn's songs. At the same time however, you still had this soft R&B/Rock/Eurodance feel to a lot of songs in 1997 with En Vogue, Meredith Brooks, Jewel, Natalie Imbruglia, Hanson, etc. Pop music wise, gray area (50/50).

Rock music wise, this one is a bit tough. Grunge was at its peak around 1994, but when Kurt Cobain died, Post-Grunge music slowly crept in until 1995 when it went mainstream with Alanis Morisette. That all peaked in 1997 in fact, you had dominating songs like Semi-Charmed Life by Third Eye Blind, B!+ch by Meredith Brooks, Torn By Natalie Imbruglia, If It Makes You Happy by Sherul Crow, Tubthumping, and much much more. While they might take a pass in 2000 as well, one thing is Nu-metal. 1997 had a few Nu-metal songs but not much. It wasnt until Late 1998 when Nu-Metal truly took off with Limp Bizkit, Green Day, etc. Rock music, 55% 1994, 45% 2000.

Lastly, we have electronics. Eurodance is what springs to mind here. In 1994, Classic Eurodance was still ongoing with Haddaway, Real McCoy, Scatman John, etc. Late 1996-Early 1997 was when Classic Eurodance was dying in exchange for a more Bubblegum sound with Aqua and No Mercy, which further got amplified in Late 1998-1999 with Eiffel 65 and Vengaboys, but at the same time, Trance music was becoming popular with Alice DJ and Darude, something you'd barely hear in 1997. This ones easy. Round it to 2000. 30% 1994, 70% 2000.

Subject: Re: Music of 1997: Closer to 1994 or 2000?

Written By: DisneysRetro on 03/18/20 at 4:49 am


I know I've been sounding biased about 1997 being part of the Core 90s, but it doesnt mean there werent any Y2K trends during that year.

I'd have to say 2000 for this one, however, but only by a TINY margin. It is 48% 1994, and 52% 2000.

On the Hip Hop side of things, it's clear that it changed completely. In 1994, Gangsta Rap and G-funk were very popular, and there was the rivalry between East Coast and West Coast Rappers. The rivalry basically started dying off in Late 1996 following Tupac's death, until Shiny-suit rap became dominant in 1997. Puff Daddy became the new king of Hip Hop, and new acts like Mase, Missy Elliott, Eminem, and Will Smith (Not really new but still counts as shiny-suit with his Men In Black song), all of which you didnt hear in 1994. In 2000, similar beats from 1997 continued with Dr. Dre, Eminem, Nas, and Ja Rule, so for rap, it is 30% 1994, 70% 2000.

On R&B, this ones fairly easy to answer. Contemporary Adult Ballads were still dominating the charts in 1997-1998, and classic 90s R&B songs like No Diggity, Pony, Honey, Too Close, and many more were also popular during this time. However, Pop-R&B was slowly coming up with Max Martin and Timbaland with Aaliyah, Robyn, Usher, Total, and Destiny's Child, but still not as big as the Contemporary Adult Ballads dominating that time. 75% 1994, 25% 2000.

Now let's get into the fun part, pop. In 1994, pop was basically morphed into other genres like R&B (Not Y2K Pop-R&B of course), Rock (Grunge or VERY Early post-grunge), or Eurodance. 1996-1997 is when Teen Pop exploded. Spice Girls, Robyn, Hanson, Backstreet Boys, and NSync were in full swing during 1997. However, it is not perfectly Y2K, aside from Robyn and a bit of Backstreet Boys. Songs like Wannabe or Spice Up Your Life probably would not pass in 2000, and Hanson is basically just Post-Grunge with Teen Pop elements thought they sound nowhere near Y2K acts like Christina Aguilera or Britney Spears. NSync during this time was New Jack Swing based, I Want You Back, Tearin' Up My Heart, those won't pass in 2000, even Backstreet Boys' We've Got It Goin' On is released in 1995, again, New Jack Swing. Listen to I Want You Back, and compare it to Bye Bye Bye, a night and day difference. However, Quit Playing Games With My Heart and As Long As You Love me sound very Y2K, along with Robyn's songs. At the same time however, you still had this soft R&B/Rock/Eurodance feel to a lot of songs in 1997 with En Vogue, Meredith Brooks, Jewel, Natalie Imbruglia, Hanson, etc. Pop music wise, gray area (50/50).

Rock music wise, this one is a bit tough. Grunge was at its peak around 1994, but when Kurt Cobain died, Post-Grunge music slowly crept in until 1995 when it went mainstream with Alanis Morisette. That all peaked in 1997 in fact, you had dominating songs like Semi-Charmed Life by Third Eye Blind, B!+ch by Meredith Brooks, Torn By Natalie Imbruglia, If It Makes You Happy by Sherul Crow, Tubthumping, and much much more. While they might take a pass in 2000 as well, one thing is Nu-metal. 1997 had a few Nu-metal songs but not much. It wasnt until Late 1998 when Nu-Metal truly took off with Limp Bizkit, Green Day, etc. Rock music, 55% 1994, 45% 2000.

Lastly, we have electronics. Eurodance is what springs to mind here. In 1994, Classic Eurodance was still ongoing with Haddaway, Real McCoy, Scatman John, etc. Late 1996-Early 1997 was when Classic Eurodance was dying in exchange for a more Bubblegum sound with Aqua and No Mercy, which further got amplified in Late 1998-1999 with Eiffel 65 and Vengaboys, but at the same time, Trance music was becoming popular with Alice DJ and Darude, something you'd barely hear in 1997. This ones easy. Round it to 2000. 30% 1994, 70% 2000.


I agree with a lot of this accept the Nsync and BSB part. Nsync didn’t release there first international single until 1998. In the US they were unheard of in 1997 and were only known in Germany in 1996 due to record label/production. Backstreet boys was managed  through the same company and only released one single in May of 1997. The rest of their classic hits like “We’ve got it going on”, “All I have to give”, “As long as you love me”, etc were all released in 1998. They were not in full swing in 1997 at all...Robyn was a product of 1995-1996 as well. Her music was released in Germany in 1995-1996 and released internationally in 1997 although her 1997 hits strike me as more 90’s than not.

As for Timbaland, Missy and Aaliyah, well that sound of r&b started in August of 1996 when that crew released Ginuwine’s “Pony” and soon after Aaliyah’s “If your girl only knew” which was a single on her one in a million album (1996-1997). It progressed from there. Hip hop In 1997 was still core 90’s in my opinion. You had Lil Kim’s “Crush on you” which came out summer of 1997. “Ladies night remix” which came out in 1997 and featured almost all the female rappers/ r&b singers of the 90’s in that music video including SWV, Blaque, missy, da brat, queen latifah, left eye, etc. You had gangsta rap like Wu tang clan and Bone thugz n harmony, etc. 1997 was the year female neo soul became a thing when Erykah Badu came on the scenes, however it was already prevalent in 1995 with D’Angelo.

As for ballads, they were still core 90’s like you said. Mariah Carey’s My All went number one in late 97 early 98 and that sounds transitional while her Butterfly single sounds like the work she did in 1995 on her Daydream album.

All in all 1997 was definitely apart of the core 90’s.

Subject: Re: Music of 1997: Closer to 1994 or 2000?

Written By: Early2010sGuy on 03/18/20 at 11:47 am


I agree with a lot of this accept the Nsync and BSB part. Nsync didn’t release there first international single until 1998. In the US they were unheard of in 1997 and were only known in Germany in 1996 due to record label/production. Backstreet boys was managed  through the same company and only released one single in May of 1997. The rest of their classic hits like “We’ve got it going on”, “All I have to give”, “As long as you love me”, etc were all released in 1998. They were not in full swing in 1997 at all...Robyn was a product of 1995-1996 as well. Her music was released in Germany in 1995-1996 and released internationally in 1997 although her 1997 hits strike me as more 90’s than not.

As for Timbaland, Missy and Aaliyah, well that sound of r&b started in August of 1996 when that crew released Ginuwine’s “Pony” and soon after Aaliyah’s “If your girl only knew” which was a single on her one in a million album (1996-1997). It progressed from there. Hip hop In 1997 was still core 90’s in my opinion. You had Lil Kim’s “Crush on you” which came out summer of 1997. “Ladies night remix” which came out in 1997 and featured almost all the female rappers/ r&b singers of the 90’s in that music video including SWV, Blaque, missy, da brat, queen latifah, left eye, etc. You had gangsta rap like Wu tang clan and Bone thugz n harmony, etc. 1997 was the year female neo soul became a thing when Erykah Badu came on the scenes, however it was already prevalent in 1995 with D’Angelo.

As for ballads, they were still core 90’s like you said. Mariah Carey’s My All went number one in late 97 early 98 and that sounds transitional while her Butterfly single sounds like the work she did in 1995 on her Daydream album.

All in all 1997 was definitely apart of the core 90’s.

But NSync and Backstreet Boys were already popular in the US in Late 1997 with Quit Playing Games and Tearin' Up My Heart. NSync was only popular in Germany, yes, but Backstreet Boys and Spice Girls already exploded in Europe and Asia in Late 1996. There is also no way Robyn sounds Mid 90s, shes ahead of her time with Do You Know and Show Me Love, they both sound practically identical to Mandy Moore's 1999 song Candy, and Britney Spears' Baby One More Time, all of which are produced by Max Martin. Hip Hop in 1997 is different from 1993-1996, G-funk and Gangsta Rap were all gone by 1997 aside from a few remnants by Tupac. But half of 1997 still sounds very core 90s so yeah... I still think 1997 is part of the core 90s because of the ballads, classic 90s R&B, a bit of Euordance, and Post-Grunge once again, but Teen Pop already exploded since 1996 starting in Europe, and Grunge was completely dead by Late 1996. 1997 is like Late 1996 on steroids, 1998 is when the Core 90s vibe starts fading midway...

Subject: Re: Music of 1997: Closer to 1994 or 2000?

Written By: DisneysRetro on 03/18/20 at 3:16 pm


But NSync and Backstreet Boys were already popular in the US in Late 1997 with Quit Playing Games and Tearin' Up My Heart. NSync was only popular in Germany, yes, but Backstreet Boys and Spice Girls already exploded in Europe and Asia in Late 1996. There is also no way Robyn sounds Mid 90s, shes ahead of her time with Do You Know and Show Me Love, they both sound practically identical to Mandy Moore's 1999 song Candy, and Britney Spears' Baby One More Time, all of which are produced by Max Martin. Hip Hop in 1997 is different from 1993-1996, G-funk and Gangsta Rap were all gone by 1997 aside from a few remnants by Tupac. But half of 1997 still sounds very core 90s so yeah... I still think 1997 is part of the core 90s because of the ballads, classic 90s R&B, a bit of Euordance, and Post-Grunge once again, but Teen Pop already exploded since 1996 starting in Europe, and Grunge was completely dead by Late 1996. 1997 is like Late 1996 on steroids, 1998 is when the Core 90s vibe starts fading midway...


Where are you getting your info from ?. Tearin up my heart was released internationally in June of 1998 (UK and US) and as I said earlier BSB’s “Quit playin games with my heart” was the only single released internationally in June of 1997, “As long as you love me” was released in oct 1997 and hit the charts in early 1998. The rest of their album’s singles were released in 1998. You can’t take music released in late 1997 and apply it to the entire year as 99.9 percent of the time the song hits the charts in the following year. Robyn’s music was released and recorded in the mid 90’s however internationally released in 1997. Yes it is a Max Martin production and definitely sounds similar to candy and one more time, however you are taking two songs released in 1997 and applying them to the entire year. Max Martin produced most of those artist’s work in the mid 90’s in europe. Robyn’s work was recorded and produced in 1995. They are not “ahead of their time” just delayed on international release due to the record label and happened to do well in the late 90’s.  Due to Max martin’s sound gaining much popularity in the late 90’s (despite being produced in 1995-1996) he progressed and evolved into the early 2000’s.

Gangsta rap and G-Funk  was definitely still alive in 1997 are you kidding ? To say that they were gone in 1997 is a bold statement.  Tupac’s “to live and die in LA” Biggie’s “Hypnotize” Lil Kim’s “Crush on you feat junior mafia”, “Sound is vibration” by the Atmosphere, “Triumph” By wu-tang clan, “Look into my eyez” bone thugz n harmony, Warren G’s entire “Take a look over your shoulder” album was released in 1997 and sounds adjacent to his 1993 work, “nobody does it better” Nate dogg (1998) etc. You are pointing out puff daddy’s explosion after the death of Biggie and applying it to the entire year of 1997 as well. Hip Hop was not all about Mase and Puffy in 1997. Did you live through 1997 ? If so it seems you don’t remember the year for what it was. There was a ton of hits that defined that year.

Subject: Re: Music of 1997: Closer to 1994 or 2000?

Written By: DisneysRetro on 03/19/20 at 1:53 am


Do You Know and Show Me Love, they both sound practically identical to Mandy Moore's 1999 song Candy, and Britney Spears' Baby One More Time.


Took me a while to find it but if you’re interested here is both the 1995 and 1997 video release of Robyn’s Do You Know. Released in Sweden/Germany in 1995 and internationally in 1997/1998. If you look up Nsync you will also see there mid 90’s releases and then their recent 1998 releases of the same song as well.

1997/1998:
h9PUGrKJBx4

1995:
z4n6ymEMQmk

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