inthe00s
The Pop Culture Information Society...

These are the messages that have been posted on inthe00s over the past few years.

Check out the messageboard archive index for a complete list of topic areas.

This archive is periodically refreshed with the latest messages from the current messageboard.

Google
  Web inthe00s.com



Check for new replies or respond here...

Subject: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 02/02/07 at 9:27 pm

I've decided to dedicate a thread to all of the retro icons that have celebrated memories throughout all of our lives. Each week I will feature a new icon, some pictures, facts about the icon. Feel free to discuss it. After the week is over, I will post a new icon to feature.


This week's icon will be: The Planter's Peanut AKA Mr. Peanut

http://img470.imageshack.us/img470/9595/mrpeanutgj9.gif

Amedeo Obici (Ah-may-day-o O-bee-chee), founder of Planters, was born in 1876 in the small town of Oderzo near Venice, Italy. When Obici was old enough to read, his widowed mother would show him his uncle's glowing letters from America. Thus began Obici's dream. At age eleven, reality had him pulling up at Bush Terminal in Brooklyn, New York. An Italian immigrant, 11 years old, not knowing any English, but going on to become prosperous business innovator. His willingness to work showed even at this early age. He started his career as a bellhop and fruitstand vendor in Scranton, Pennsylvania. Later, Obici moved to Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania and opened his own fruit stand and invested in a peanut roaster. Here he linked his life's fortune with the peanut. In a few years, Obici turned peddler, using a horse and wagon, and called himself "The Peanut Specialist". In 1906, Obici went into partnership with Mario Peruzzi. He had developed his own method of blanching whole roasted peanuts, doing away with the troublesome hulls and skins; and so with six employees two large roasters, and crude machinery, Planters was founded. Amedeo Obici realized that prices and first profits were not nearly so important as repeat business. He proved his operation based on quality and brand name were important for continued success. Two years later, the firm was incorporated as Planters Nut and Chocolate Company.  
Mr. Peanut, Planters mascot is such a nut, everybody's just crazy about him! Since his introduction in 1916, to help advertise the sales of the country's first roasted peanut company,  Mr. Peanut has become one of the nation's best-known advertising characters. Based on the original drawing of a 13-year-old boy, Antonio Gentile, who won a $5 prize in a 1916 contest for his "little peanut person." The mascot made its debut in 1918 in The Saturday Evening Post.  According to the company, Mr. Peanut's hat, shoes, cane, and monocle symbolize fresh taste. The gloves do not symbolize anything; Mr. Peanut simply likes them.

Since his conception, Mr. Peanut has appeared in many TV commercials as an animated cartoon character. More recent commercials have shown him computer animated in a real-world setting. His appearances are often accompanied by an elegant accented narrator, and throughout his extensive television life, Mr. Peanut has rarely, if ever, spoken.
Throughout the decades, Mr. Peanut has gained celebrity. During World War II, Mr. Peanut helped promote saving stamps and was a star attraction at the New York World's Fair in the 1960s. His notoriety in the United States stretched from coast to coast, all of which he traveled in the Planters "Nut Mobile." In Hollywood, Mr. Peanut has a star on Hollywood's Melrose Avenue Character Walk and his own fan club, the "Peanut Pals."

Mr. Peanut also has long been associated with Broadway. His first appearance was in 1942, when his billboard appeared in Times Square. In 1997, he made his inaugural appearance in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade and still travels the country in the Planters Nut Mobile.

http://img402.imageshack.us/img402/4257/2037bbg2.jpg

http://img402.imageshack.us/img402/3616/bg04oa7.jpg

http://img402.imageshack.us/img402/6535/plantersvr3.jpg

http://img402.imageshack.us/img402/2799/ad0610syv8.jpg








Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 02/12/07 at 9:25 am

This week's retro icon is Tony the Tiger...famous for the comment, "They're GRRRREAT!!"

TONY THE TIGER

PRODUCT: Kellogg's Sugar Frosted Flakes (later Frosted Flakes)
DATE INTRODUCED: 1951
CREATOR: Leo Burnett Co.



Only one famous feline (sorry, Morris) can rightfully claim he's the cat's meow of commercials: Tony the Tiger.  Adland's premier promotional pussycat was born in 1951, when Burnett was hired to create a campaign for Kellogg's new cereal, Sugar Frosted Flakes. Tony was originally one of four animated critters created to sell the cereal, but he quickly edged out Katy the Kangaroo, Newt the Gnu and Elmo the Elephant to become the sole star of the cereal maker's ad efforts.

Tony's original designer, children's book illustrator Martin Provinsen, first created an orange cat with black stripes and a blue nose who walked on all fours. But like most celebrities, Tony has undergone extensive cosmetic changes over the decades.

The most dramatic alteration occurred early in his career, when Tony's football-shaped head was replaced with a rounder, softer form. That was followed by a series of other minor face-lifts such as an eye color change from green to gold and the addition of "whisker bones" and contours.

When America started heading for the health clubs, Tony also got a slimmer, more muscular physique. He's also risen in stature from a scrawny, cereal-box size pussycat who ambled on all fours to a 6-foot figure with a towering, upright stance.

One thing that remained constant for much of Tony's life was his voice. Thurl Ravenscroft provided the sole voiceover for Tony and his trademark growl: "They're Grrrreat!" In 1952, Tony's son, Tony Jr., was introduced into the campaign. And in the early 1970's, Mama Tony, Tony's wife; and Antoinette, Tony's daughter (born in 1974, the Chinese year of the tiger), also came on board. The expansion of the Tony family broadened his audience appeal.

http://img366.imageshack.us/img366/779/icontonyln9.jpg

http://img366.imageshack.us/img366/1988/tonytigerda6.jpg

http://img366.imageshack.us/img366/5750/box1201gw4.jpg

http://img366.imageshack.us/img366/7347/tonytigerthumbgk4.jpg












Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: Tam on 02/12/07 at 2:39 pm

Mr. Peanut scared me when I was little. I don't even know why or can't remember.

Now, Tony the Tiger on the other hand..... gggrrroooowwwwllllllll! ;D

What an awesome thread idea Erin!

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 02/12/07 at 3:51 pm


Mr. Peanut scared me when I was little. I don't even know why or can't remember.

Now, Tony the Tiger on the other hand..... gggrrroooowwwwllllllll! ;D

What an awesome thread idea Erin!



hey, thanks Tam. BTW....if you ever go to amiwrong to take quizzes....I just posted 6 different retro advertising icons matching quizzes today...they should be up tomorrow. :)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: Ashkicksass on 02/15/07 at 2:57 pm

This is a great thread Erin!  :)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 02/15/07 at 3:02 pm


This is a great thread Erin!   :)



Thanks Ash! :)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: karen on 02/16/07 at 4:18 am

In the UK Tony the Tiger is the icon for Frosties. Same cereal, different name but same catchphrase.


I seem to recall Tony jr was used to promote Ricicles which were sugar frosted rice krispies if I recall correctly

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: lorac61469 on 02/16/07 at 11:20 am

Tony The Tiger!!  LOVE HIM!!!  He's GRRRREAT!!!!
I also love Thurl Ravenscroft's voice.  I wonder what they're going to do now since he passed away.  :(

Did you know he also was the vocalist of the song "You're A Mean One, Mr. Grinch"?

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: gemini on 02/16/07 at 4:37 pm

Great thread idea, Erin.  :)  My husbands name is Tony so whenever we see something with Tony the Tiger on it, we try to pick it up for him, and his favorite cereal is Frosted Flakes. I remember when it was called Sugar Frosted Flakes, but I guess they changed it to try to take the focus off of the fact that it's full of sugar, even though I don't think they took any of the sugar out of it.  :-\\

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 02/19/07 at 10:37 pm


Tony The Tiger!!  LOVE HIM!!!  He's GRRRREAT!!!!
I also love Thurl Ravenscroft's voice.  I wonder what they're going to do now since he passed away.   :(

Did you know he also was the vocalist of the song "You're A Mean One, Mr. Grinch"?



wow...I didn't know that! Thanks for the little tidbit of info! :)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 02/20/07 at 7:04 am

This week's icon is:


Orville Redenbacher.....the famous popcorn guru.

http://img179.imageshack.us/img179/2414/orvilleredenbacherjv8.jpg

http://img65.imageshack.us/img65/9639/orvillepc5.jpg



Orville Redenbacher (July 16, 1907 – September 19, 1995) was an American businessman most often associated with the brand of popcorn that bears his name.

Born in Brazil, Indiana, he attended Purdue University, joining Alpha Gamma Rho fraternity and graduating with a degree in agronomy. He spent most of his life in the agriculture industry, serving as a Vigo County Farm Bureau Extension agent in Terre Haute, Indiana, and at Princeton Farms in Princeton, Indiana.

He earned a small fortune in fertilizer, but in his spare time, he indulged in an obsession he had had since he was a child with developing the perfect popcorn. He bought the George F. Chester and Son dent seed corn plant with partner Charlie Bowman, later named Chester Hybrids, in 1951 near Valparaiso, Indiana, and tried tens of thousands of hybrid strands of popcorn before achieving success. He and Mr. Bowman initially named the breakthrough hybrid RedBow but were advised by an advertising agency to use the name Orville Redenbacher to market the corn. It was good advice which they took to heart, and Orville was suddenly everywhere. For example, Redenbacher can be first seen on national T.V. around 1971 or 1972, long before his signature commercial appearances as himself promoting his gourmet kernels. In an episode of the popular game show, To Tell The Truth, he stumped the panelists including Kitty Carlisle, Bill Cullen, Joe Garagiola, and Peggy Cass, all of whom were shown munching on and enjoying samples of Redenbacher's then-"new" novelty popcorn flavors including "chili," and "bar-b-que."

In 1976 he sold the company to Hunt-Wesson Foods, which was a division of Norton Simon, Inc. In 1983, Esmark purchased Norton Simon; the following year Beatrice Foods acquired Esmark; and in 1990 Beatrice Foods was taken over by agribusiness giant ConAgra. Redenbacher then moved to Coronado, California. He continued to promote his popcorn, appearing in numerous television commercials (including later ones with his grandson Gary Redenbacher), always wearing his trademark bowtie. His wholesome image and folksy name confused many consumers, some even writing the company to ask if Redenbacher was a real person, and not an actor. He responded to this by appearing on various talk shows, professing his identity. After the initial sale to Hunt-Wesson, the City of Valparaiso started their first Popcorn Festival in 1979. Celebrating Redenbacher's development of his popcorn in Valparaiso, the Festival featured Orville and Gary appearing several times as Grand Marshall of the signature event, the Popcorn Parade.

On September 19, 1995, while in the whirlpool tub of his condominium in Coronado, Redenbacher suffered a heart attack and drowned. He was cremated and his ashes were scattered at sea. His brand of popcorn continues to be among the most popular in the United States.

2005 marked the 40th anniversary of Orville Redenbacher's popcorn, still the #1 selling brand in America. To celebrate the man behind the popcorn, ConAgra developed a special website that highlights some of the classic Orville Redenbacher television commercials. One of his most famous and recognizable commercials states, "My gourmet popping corn pops up lighter and fluffier than ordinary popping corn. Eats better, too."

On January 15, 2007 during the Golden Globe Awards, an advertisement featuring a digital re-creation of Redenbacher appeared on TV for the first time. It was the first time a digital representation of a deceased individual appeared that could be made to say and do anything. Gary Redenbacher, responding to questions about how he felt about the advertisement stated that "Grandpa would go for it. He was a cutting-edge guy. This is a way to honor his legacy."

Prior to his death, Redenbacher also hosted the SFM Holiday Network syndicated movie broadcast package along with his grandson.

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: Ashkicksass on 02/20/07 at 10:40 am


On January 15, 2007 during the Golden Globe Awards, an advertisement featuring a digital re-creation of Redenbacher appeared on TV for the first time. It was the first time a digital representation of a deceased individual appeared that could be made to say and do anything. Gary Redenbacher, responding to questions about how he felt about the advertisement stated that "Grandpa would go for it. He was a cutting-edge guy. This is a way to honor his legacy."




As much as I love Orville and his popcorn, that commercial was just CREEPY! 

Great job here, Erin!  :)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 02/20/07 at 10:59 am


As much as I love Orville and his popcorn, that commercial was just CREEPY! 

Great job here, Erin!   :)



I didn't see that commercial...I can imagine it would be though! :o

BTW, thanks Ash! :)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: gemini on 02/23/07 at 7:37 pm


As much as I love Orville and his popcorn, that commercial was just CREEPY! 

Great job here, Erin!   :)

You're right about the commercial, it totally freaked me out when I saw it! But the popcorn is awesome!  :)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: lorac61469 on 02/26/07 at 6:28 pm


As much as I love Orville and his popcorn, that commercial was just CREEPY! 

Great job here, Erin!   :)


I agree, AWFUL commercial.  It gives me the creeps.  Somethings just shouldn't be done with computers.

Popcorn is great, though.

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 03/08/07 at 11:39 am

This Week's Retro Icon is....


Mr. Clean

http://img527.imageshack.us/img527/3913/adtour06tq6.jpg

http://img527.imageshack.us/img527/1851/mrcleancirclesd2.jpg



Mr. Clean is a brand name of household cleaner from Procter & Gamble, first introduced in 1958. Mr. Clean is known as Mr. Proper in mainland Europe, and probably to avoid confusion with Mr. Sheen and Mr. Muscle in the United Kingdom it is known as Flash. Mr. Clean also makes the Melamine foam cleaner under the name-brand of Magic Eraser. In Spain, the name changed from Mr. Proper to Don Limpio (limpiar is the Spanish verb for "to clean"), while in Mexico he is named Maestro Limpio (Master Clean). In Italy he is named Mastro Lindo (Master Clean, as in Mexico).

Its mascot is the character Mr. Clean, a muscular, American, bald man who cleans things very well. According to the company, his image is supposed to be that of a sailor, although most people think he is a genie based on his earring, folded arms, and tendency to magically appear at the appropriate time. Mr. Clean has always smiled on the packaging, except for a brief time in the mid 1960's when he was frowning on the package.

Mr. Clean's theme song has been around since the product's introduction, initially sung as a pop-music style duet between a man and a woman. The Mr. Clean advertising jingle was written by Thomas Scott Cadden. It has been played as recently as 2005, usually in a contemporary musical setting or instrumental version.

Mr. Clean gets rid of dirt and grime
And grease in just a minute
Mr. Clean will clean your whole house
And everything that's in it
Mr. Clean, Mr. Clean, Mr. Clean


Mr. Clean in popular culture

Mr. Clean's bald head and muscular appearance has evoked comparisons to skinheads, although the character doesn't dress in typical skinhead styles, nor does he display other aspects of the skinhead subculture.
Mr. Clean's appearance with his tight muscle shirt, ear piercing, stylishly handsome looks, fastidious habits, and helpful but deferential persona in television commercials, has made Mr. Clean into something of a Chelsea boy-style gay icon.
Mr. Clean has been used as a derisive term in the same manner as goody two shoes or Boy Scout, describing someone who displays conspicuous morally upstanding behavior. The term has been used by Dick Vitale to describe a basketball play that at first glance appeared to be a foul but, in fact, was not.
In the ABC series Lost, Sawyer addresses Locke as Mr. Clean, in a reference to Locke's bald head and strong build.
In Space Quest VI, by clicking on a Mr. Soylent machine, you will hear a jingle similar to that of Mr. Clean.
In Linux kernel the command make mrproper cleans the kernel source directory and returns it to the distribution state. This command is more thorough than make clean.


Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 03/08/07 at 2:11 pm

"Mr. Clean will clean your whole house, Mr. Clean Mr. Clean Mr. Clean!"

The one thing Mr. Clean always makes me think of is an old episode of "Who's the Boss" when Tony dressed up like him :D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: Ashkicksass on 03/08/07 at 3:18 pm

I'm a big fan of all things clean, especially when there's a big strong man attached!  ;)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 03/08/07 at 11:33 pm


I'm a big fan of all things clean, especially when there's a big strong man attached!   ;)



ya, I'm not usually into bald men....but there's just something about that guy! ;D ;)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: gemini on 03/09/07 at 7:17 pm

Another fun icon Erin! I keep looking forward to seeing what you'll post next!  :)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 03/10/07 at 3:52 am


Another fun icon Erin! I keep looking forward to seeing what you'll post next!  :)



awww...thanks Rhonda! :-*

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: gemini on 03/10/07 at 5:33 am



awww...thanks Rhonda! :-*

Well, you know how I love retro stuff! Your new avatar is awesome!  :)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 03/10/07 at 2:25 pm


Well, you know how I love retro stuff! Your new avatar is awesome!  :)



thanks! I found this website with oodles of them. I'll have to find it and post the link. ;)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: CatwomanofV on 03/16/07 at 12:19 pm

Mr. Clean made it fashionable for guys to wear earrings and still be "macho".  :D ;D ;D




Cat

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 03/21/07 at 10:19 am

This week's retro icon is....

McGruff The Crime Dog

http://img124.imageshack.us/img124/7131/mcgruff2di8.jpg

http://img124.imageshack.us/img124/3452/mcgruffdogmk5.jpg


McGruff the Crime Dog is an anthropomorphic cartoon bloodhound created for the National Crime Prevention Council for use by American police in building crime awareness among children. He debuted in July 1980. The character was created by Sherry Nemmers. The motto "Take a Bite out of Crime" was invented by Jack Keil, who also did McGruff's voice for many years. After two years on the air, a nationwide contest was opened to name the character. The most common entry was "Shure-lock Bones". Other entries included "J. Edgar Dog", "Sarg-dog", and "Keystone Kop Dog". The winner, McGruff the Crime Dog, was submitted by a New Orleans police officer. In some of McGruff's advertisements, he appears with his nephew "Scruff McGruff".

McGruff reaches kids through commercials, songs and booklets from the National Crime Prevention Council, talking about drugs, bullying, safety and the importance of staying in school. Recently, McGruff has appeared in commercials addressing identity theft. The character is often used with his motto "Take a bite out of crime!" He also reaches kids through personal appearances as both puppets (often used in classrooms) and costumes worn by police officers nationwide.

It was announced that when Jack Keil retires, he will be succeeded by Sgt. Steve Parker, a sheriff's deputy from Burlington, Iowa. As of mid-2006, this changeover has not been announced officially; Parker does fill in for Keil on occasion presently.

A McGruff House is a designated house bearing a McGruff logo indicating that it is a safe refuge for children who feel they are in danger. The first McGruff House was opened in Utah in 1982, and there are presently about 700 McGruff House programs throughout the United States. The program is similar to one in the 1970s in which a picture of a red hand was placed in the window of neighborhood houses that provided refuge.

Similarly, there is a program whereby public utility and government work trucks can display a decal identifying the occupant as someone who can be approached if a child feels that they are in danger, or lost, or otherwise distraught.




Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 03/21/07 at 11:43 am

I loved those commercials for McGruff.  "Take A Bite Out of Crime"

I had one of McGruff's Crime Activity Books back in the 80s, but I don't remember what it looked like

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: gemini on 03/21/07 at 4:55 pm

Geez, I was 19 when McGruff had his debut? I thought I was younger when I started seeing that commercial!

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: Ashkicksass on 03/22/07 at 2:16 pm

I loved Mr. McGruff!  I remember seeing the McGruff signs in neighborhood windows as a kid and always felt like someone was looking out for me.  Great job Erin!

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: Dominic L. on 03/24/07 at 10:23 am

Any Smokey the Bear coming soon?

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 03/24/07 at 11:08 pm


Any Smokey the Bear coming soon?



Oooo..Oooo....hmm, maybe I will take requests! :D ;D ;)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 04/05/07 at 7:03 pm

This week's reto icon:


RONALD MCDONALD

http://img134.imageshack.us/img134/9489/originalronaldmcdonaldpf2.jpg

http://img134.imageshack.us/img134/7660/ronald20mcdonaldjq7.jpg


http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A9gnMicKjRVGQSUB7AujzbkF;_ylu=X3oDMTA4NDgyNWN0BHNlYwNwcm9m/SIG=11qncalvm/EXP=1175903882/**http%3A//theimaginaryworld.com/rnn11.jpg

Ronald McDonald is a clown spokesman for McDonald's fast-food restaurant chain. According to the book Fast Food Nation (2001), 96% of school children in the United States can identify Ronald McDonald, making him the United States' most recognized fast food advertising icon. Only Santa Claus was more commonly recognized. Many of the restaurants are decorated with a life-size statue of the clown holding out his hand to greet customers at the entrance for children to shake hands with him. Sometimes the figure is sitting on a bench, allowing children to sit next to him or on his lap. In television commercials, the clown inhabits a fantasy world called McDonaldland, and has adventures with his friends Grimace, Hamburglar, Birdie the Early Bird, and The Fry Kids. The McDonald's Corporation has also characterized Ronald McDonald as being able to speak 31 different languages including Mandarin, Dutch, Tagalog, and Hindi. In recent years, the "childish" McDonaldland has been largely phased out, and Ronald is instead shown interacting with normal kids in their everyday lives.

Putting on the Ronald McDonald clown face is a painstaking process of applied foundation, spirit gum, white base and detail makeup that would sometimes take two hours to apply. Actors are strictly selected by the McDonald's Corporation and Leo Burnett Advertising for their ability to project energy, warmth and compassion that reflected the desired brand image. Ronald's wig is usually kept in a freezer before shoots to keep a uniform red look when applied to the actor's head. Ronald's nose prosthetic is made from a wax paraffin mold, modelled from the actor's own nose. Ronald's oversized clown shoes were at times very painful for the actors to wear as they were injected with a silicone gel to give them weight and a rubberlike appearance. The modern version of Ronald's costume has inflatable balloons in the pants to make them look oversized. The balloons are adjustable to conform to the actor's buttocks.



Many people work full-time making appearances in the Ronald McDonald costume, visiting children in hospitals. There are also Ronald McDonald Houses, where parents can stay overnight when visiting sick children in nearby chronic care facilities. Due to the controversy over fast food, critics have likened McDonald to Joe Camel, the former mascot of Camel cigarettes. Since August 2003, McDonald has been officially recognized as the "Chief Happiness Officer" of the McDonald's Corporation.

Two conflicting versions of Ronald McDonald's origins exist. One claims that the original character and design of Ronald McDonald, including facial design and costume (featuring "french-fry bag pockets" and "food-tray hat"), were created by Terry Teene and George Voorhees. Voorhees, a professional clown, supposedly first portrayed the character for a hired performance at a Los Angeles, California drive-in restaurant McDonald's. When his homosexuality became public, the performer was subsequently legally enjoined from performing as, or exhibiting the likeness of, the character in any form.  The other version of Ronald McDonald's origins involves Willard Scott (a local radio personality who also played Bozo the Clown on WRC-TV in Washington, D.C. from 1959 until 1962), who performed using the moniker "Ronald McDonald, the Hamburger-Happy Clown" in 1963 on three separate television spots. These were the first three television ads featuring the character, whose appearance was substantially similar to George Voorhees' Ronald Mcdonald (spelled with a lower-case "d") as shown in the Valley News and Green Sheet, a San Fernando Valley newspaper of the time.

Scott, who went on to become NBC-TV's "Today" show weatherman, claims to have "created Ronald McDonald" according to the following excerpt from his book Joy of Living:

"At the time, Bozo was the hottest children's show on the air. You could probably have sent Pluto the Dog or Dumbo the Elephant over and it would have been equally as successful. But I was there, and I was Bozo... There was something about the combination of hamburgers and Bozo that was irresistible to kids... That's why when Bozo went off the air a few years later, the local McDonald's people asked me to come up with a new character to take Bozo's place. So, I sat down and created Ronald McDonald."
McDonald's does not mention Voorhees or claim that Willard Scott "created Ronald" in their statement:

"The smile known around the world," Ronald McDonald is second only to Santa Claus in terms of recognition. In his first TV appearance in 1963, the happy clown was portrayed by none other than Willard Scott."
But on March 28, 2000 Henry Gonzalez, McDonald's Northeast Division President, thanked Scott for creating Ronald McDonald, during a taped tribute to Scott on the "Today" show.

Various forms of the name "Ronald McDonald" as well as costume clown face persona, etc. are registered trademarks of McDonald's. McDonald's trains performers to portray Ronald using identical mannerisms and costume, to contribute to the illusion that they are one character.

Willard Scott's costume was in several minor ways different from the Voorhees' Ronald Mcdonald version (but notably, retaining the "fast food tray" hat design) and, as Ronald, Mr. Scott's clown face was substantially the same as that of his personification of Bozo the Clown, a well-known character whose widespread syndication in early television made him the best-known clown character in the United States. Thus, his use of the character may not violate the clown code.

McDonald's marketing designers and stylists changed elements of the Ronald McDonald's character, persona, style, costume and clown face when they adopted the clown as a trademark, possibly in deference to "The Code", the tradition of clowns to scrupulously avoid copying other clowns' appearance or performance style.



Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 04/05/07 at 11:26 pm

I like Ronald McDonald.  I wish they still showed commercials with him, and the whole McDonalds gang.  When I was a kid, I used to go to McDonalds and get what was called a "Treat of the Week", a weekly toy that was given out free to kids

I still have one .. it's a little cardboard wheel thingy with a blank Ronald face and a bunch of other blank faces.  On top are two plastic wheels with eyes and mouths.  You spin the wheels to mix and match the faces ;D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: Tam on 04/06/07 at 12:05 am

Ronald McDonald and Grimace used to scare the crap out of me when I was little!! ;D ;D ;D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 04/06/07 at 12:44 am


Ronald McDonald and Grimace used to scare the crap out of me when I was little!! ;D ;D ;D


http://www.palomar.edu/kksm/onairs/grimace.jpg

;D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: Tam on 04/06/07 at 12:53 am

Thanks Jason!
I am sure to have nightmares for the next week!!! ;D

Seriously, I have no idea why they scared me - look at him. He ispurple and rolly pollie! All innocent and stuff ;D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 04/06/07 at 9:32 am


I like Ronald McDonald.  I wish they still showed commercials with him, and the whole McDonalds gang.  When I was a kid, I used to go to McDonalds and get what was called a "Treat of the Week", a weekly toy that was given out free to kids

I still have one .. it's a little cardboard wheel thingy with a blank Ronald face and a bunch of other blank faces.  On top are two plastic wheels with eyes and mouths.  You spin the wheels to mix and match the faces ;D



I used to LOVE those commercials with the whole McDonald's Gang.  We've had many b-day parties at McDonalds....they used to have this caboose out back of the restaurant, that they would host parties in...it was so cool 8)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: gemini on 04/06/07 at 10:52 am

I remember getting these cheapy little plastic puppets when I was little and we thought that was a big deal. Now, the toys are way cooler!  :) Do they still have the Mcdonaldland characters in any of the commercials?  Mayor McCheese, Grimace, The Hamburgler? I really never paid much attention, but if not, they need to bring them back.

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 04/06/07 at 11:27 am


I remember getting these cheapy little plastic puppets when I was little and we thought that was a big deal. Now, the toys are way cooler!  :) Do they still have the Mcdonaldland characters in any of the commercials?  Mayor McCheese, Grimace, The Hamburgler? I really never paid much attention, but if not, they need to bring them back.



I haven't seen those characters in their commercials in a long time. I LOVED those characters!! Just look at them...I miss seeing all of them!

http://img267.imageshack.us/img267/616/mcdonaldsrn2.jpg

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 04/06/07 at 1:25 pm


I remember getting these cheapy little plastic puppets when I was little and we thought that was a big deal. Now, the toys are way cooler!  :) Do they still have the Mcdonaldland characters in any of the commercials?  Mayor McCheese, Grimace, The Hamburgler? I really never paid much attention, but if not, they need to bring them back.


In the 90s, they were down to just Ronald, Grimmace, Birdy and the Hamburglar.  Slowly, they faded each one out, and nowadays, Ronald is the only one to appear in McDonalds commercials, and it's somewhat of a rare sight to even see him in a commercial

McDonalds sure isn't as great as it used to be.  Those commercials were always fun :)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 04/06/07 at 1:26 pm



I used to LOVE those commercials with the whole McDonald's Gang.  We've had many b-day parties at McDonalds....they used to have this caboose out back of the restaurant, that they would host parties in...it was so cool 8)


I used to love having my B-Day parties at McDonalds.  When I was like 5 or 6, I remember one of my parties, I invited this kid from my class who was somewhat large, and ended up eating 3 Big Mac's ;D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: Tam on 04/06/07 at 1:29 pm


In the 90s, they were down to just Ronald, Grimmace, Birdy and the Hamburglar.  Slowly, they faded each one out, and nowadays, Ronald is the only one to appear in McDonalds commercials, and it's somewhat of a rare sight to even see him in a commercial

McDonalds sure isn't as great as it used to be.  Those commercials were always fun :)

Jason - remember the Sports Memories McDonald's on Bath Rd?
Well, we have one down here that is similar, but not.
It has all of the characters in mylar on the windows, and inside it has all kinds of the old Happy Meal toys, and cardboard happy meal boxes. Has a painting on one wall of car delivery with a female on roller skates, and another painting of a big Cookie I think... I rarely go in there but the place is amazing!

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 04/06/07 at 1:31 pm


I used to love having my B-Day parties at McDonalds.  When I was like 5 or 6, I remember one of my parties, I invited this kid from my class who was somewhat large, and ended up eating 3 Big Mac's ;D



I remember one year, my sister and I had a combined b-day party in the caboose at McDonalds..it was in the middle of January and we had this huge snow blizzard....yet, most of our friends still made it out to the party. There we were...sitting cozily in the little caboose, while outside it was a winter wonderland!! :D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: CatwomanofV on 04/06/07 at 2:44 pm

Ok, ok. I know I have told this story a few times before but I HAVE to repeat it. When I was student teaching, Ronald McDonald came to the school to do a presentation. I was "volunteered" to join in. I did a "Vanna White" type thing (revealing letters) and I was having fun and hamming it up. Ronald made a comment about the way I was doing it and then said, "We should go for coffee sometime". Now, I have been asked out by a bunch of clowns before but this one definately took the cake.




Cat

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 04/06/07 at 9:06 pm


Jason - remember the Sports Memories McDonald's on Bath Rd?
Well, we have one down here that is similar, but not.
It has all of the characters in mylar on the windows, and inside it has all kinds of the old Happy Meal toys, and cardboard happy meal boxes. Has a painting on one wall of car delivery with a female on roller skates, and another painting of a big Cookie I think... I rarely go in there but the place is amazing!


I remember the Sports McDonalds.  I miss that one big time.  It was neat to go in there and see all the sports memorabilia.  It's a "Pizza Pizza" now

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 04/06/07 at 11:28 pm


Ok, ok. I know I have told this story a few times before but I HAVE to repeat it. When I was student teaching, Ronald McDonald came to the school to do a presentation. I was "volunteered" to join in. I did a "Vanna White" type thing (revealing letters) and I was having fun and hamming it up. Ronald made a comment about the way I was doing it and then said, "We should go for coffee sometime". Now, I have been asked out by a bunch of clowns before but this one definately took the cake.




Cat



karma for making me laugh!! :D ;D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 04/06/07 at 11:30 pm


Ok, ok. I know I have told this story a few times before but I HAVE to repeat it. When I was student teaching, Ronald McDonald came to the school to do a presentation. I was "volunteered" to join in. I did a "Vanna White" type thing (revealing letters) and I was having fun and hamming it up. Ronald made a comment about the way I was doing it and then said, "We should go for coffee sometime". Now, I have been asked out by a bunch of clowns before but this one definately took the cake.




Cat


Was Carlos jealous?

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: CatwomanofV on 04/07/07 at 11:43 am


Was Carlos jealous?



We were only dating at the time. When I told him, he did laugh and said, "Who knows, he could be really handsome under all that make-up." Trust me, Carlos had nothing to fear that I would have left him for Ronald McDonald.  :D :D




Cat

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 04/24/07 at 5:17 am

I wanna do the next Retro Icon ...

I don't know much about this one, and info on the net seems hard to come by, but here is Mr. Mini-Wheat


In the USA, Mr. Mini-Wheat had a face on two sides, and they would often argue which was better: The frosted side or the wheat side.  He now has a face on just the one side ...

http://www2.kelloggs.com/uploadedImages/Kellogg/Featured_Content/Mini-Wheats_button.jpg


In Canada, Mr. Mini-Wheat has a face on one side, and in his early days, he would contemplate his Frosted side, and in several commercials in the 80s and 90s, he was seen sitting in a psychiatrist's office discussing the matter.  At the end of the commercials, he would yell "Stupendous!" ...

http://www.kelloggs.ca/french/whoweare/images/char_mw.gif



Here's some of the latest commercials featuring Mr. Mini-Wheat:

Frosted Mini-Wheats - 3 commercials (America)
http://www.mini-wheats.com/advertising.shtml

Vanilla Frosted Mini-Wheats (Canada)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YHWpGb3zYnM

Strawberry Frosted Mini-Wheats (Canada)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EGqlXBx_bBc

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 04/24/07 at 1:42 pm

hey...thanks Jason!! Karma to you for the good idea for this week's retro icon. :)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: Tanya1976 on 04/26/07 at 1:28 pm

Is he really a retro icon? I've only seen him fairly recently.

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 04/26/07 at 1:35 pm


Is he really a retro icon? I've only seen him fairly recently.



no, he's not really an older icon, to the best of my knowledge....unless he's more of a Canadian thing and been around longer there! ;)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 04/26/07 at 4:09 pm


Is he really a retro icon? I've only seen him fairly recently.



no, he's not really an older icon, to the best of my knowledge....unless he's more of a Canadian thing and been around longer there! ;)


It might be more of a Canadian thing, but I can't really find much info on him.  I know he's been around since the 80s, cause I used to watch the ads when I was a kid lol

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 05/17/07 at 12:42 pm

I know I've been slacking a bit, but now I'm back. Anyway, Cat gave me a wonderful idea for the new retro icon of the week...and I had forgotten that Doms requested it awhile back, so thanks to both of them...here it is!! :)


This week's icon:


Smokey Bear

http://img525.imageshack.us/img525/1734/only20youev4.jpg




Smokey Bear and Fire Prevention

"Remember -- Only You...."...Can Prevent Wild Fires!"
Smokey Bear has warned people about the ravages of wild fire for so long that few people remember how this famous bear first captured our nation's attention.

Dressed in a Ranger’s hat and blue jeans, often sporting a shovel, his famous slogan is one of the most recognized advertising phrases in the world, and is protected by federal law.


http://img525.imageshack.us/img525/9102/firstsmokeyposterja5.gif

In 1937 President Roosevelt kicked off a national campaign to reduce the number of fires caused by people. With approximately forty million acres lost to fire each year across the nation, this campaign featured Uncle Sam as a forest ranger. The message spoke to human element of fire, emphasizing people’s responsibility in protecting the forest. The message- “Your Forests – Your Fault – Your Loss” was a powerful message for the public.

http://img525.imageshack.us/img525/7581/unclesamposterzh1.jpg

Following the attack on Pearl Harbor during WWII, the Japanese also attacked an oil field near the Los Padros National Forest in California. With so many men in the military and only a skeleton staff of firefighters remaining, the potential for wild fires struck terror across the country. Americans feared that a fire could destroy our forest resources when wood products were greatly needed for the war effort. As the prevention of wild fires came into focus, the Wartime Advertising Council developed fire prevention posters with slogans such as, "Forest Fires Aid the Enemy," and “Careless Matches Aid the Axis.”

http://img525.imageshack.us/img525/1356/ww2jappostergh0.jpg

In 1944, Walt Disney released the movie “Bambi,” and allowed the Forest Service to use the deer on their campaign posters for one year. This proved effective and showed that a forest animal helped get the message across. The Forest Service decided to continue using an animal and chose a bear for their fire safety mascot.
http://img525.imageshack.us/img525/4701/bambiposterdh6.gif

The Forest Service chose the name to be Smokey Bear, after “Smokey” Joe Martin, who had been the Assistant Chief of the New York City Fire Department. On August 9, 1944, the first poster of Smokey Bear was produced, drawn by Albert Staehle.

The poster depicted a bear pouring a bucket of water on a campfire. The next year Rudy Wedelin became Smokey’s official artist. Smokey Bear soon became popular, so popular that he was given his own zip code because he received such a large amount of fan mail.

His image has been seen in stuffed toys, records, pens, sports items, clothing, and books, and he has become one of the most recognized characters worldwide.


The Story of the Real Bear.

http://img525.imageshack.us/img525/7729/smokeyvetpz8.jpg

In 1950, some careless person started the terrible Capitan Gap wild fire on the Lincoln National Forest in New Mexico. When a strong wind suddenly swept the fire toward a group of courageous firefighters, 24 of them had to run to a rock slide, lay face down, and cover their faces with handkerchiefs to escape the deadly flames. They emptied their canteens over their clothes and swatted their burning clothes. After an hour, the fire moved on. All 24 survived. When the smoke cleared and they caught their breath, they saw a scorched hillside where once a great forest stood. 

Amongst the smoldering ashes was a tiny black bear cub, burnt and afraid, clinging to a tree. The cub was nicknamed “Hotfoot Teddy.” They searched for the cub’s mother, but could not find her. The cub needed veterinary aid for the burns on his paws and hindquarters, so he was flown to Santa Fe to receive professional treatment. While his wounds were healing, he stayed at the home of Ray Bell, the game warden who flew him to Santa Fe. Ray's daughter Judy befriended the little bear and helped nurse him back to health.
The little bear had gained nationwide attention and was soon renamed Smokey after the symbol for fire prevention. Smokey was presented by the New Mexico State Game Warden to the the Chief of the Forest Service to be used to aid the fire prevention program.

Now the question was, “Where will Smokey live?” Little cubs grow up very fast, and Ray Bell’s house was no longer an option as the bear’s home. It was decided that Smokey’s permanent home would be the National Zoo in Washington, D.C. Smokey became the most popular exhibit at the Zoo. Two other bears, both from New Mexico, eventually joined Smokey in Washington. Goldie, a female black bear, was introduced in 1962 as a possible mate for Smokey. However, no cubs were born of the two so Smokey II was introduced to carry on for Smokey in his old age. The original Smokey retired from the public display in 1975, after 25 years of service. He passed away later that year. His adopted son carried on for him until 1990. The character of Smokey lives on, a reminder to people across the world of the dangers of fire.

Smokey was the first individual animal to ever be honored on a postage stamp. This stamp commemorated Smokey's 40th birthday in 1984.

http://img525.imageshack.us/img525/9788/40thannivstampiq6.gif





Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: CatwomanofV on 05/17/07 at 1:06 pm

Thanks Quirk.


I was at the National Zoo sometime in the 70s. I went to see Smokey but he was in his "cave" (he was old at the time) but I did see Smokey Jr. (who was just a cub).  Shortly after that, I heard that Smokey died.  :\'( :\'( So, I missed seeing him.




Cat

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 05/17/07 at 1:30 pm


Thanks Quirk.


I was at the National Zoo sometime in the 70s. I went to see Smokey but he was in his "cave" (he was old at the time) but I did see Smokey Jr. (who was just a cub).  Shortly after that, I heard that Smokey died.  :\'( :\'( So, I missed seeing him.




Cat



aww, that's a shame you didn't get to see him.  I always liked Smokey the Bear...he was along the lines of McGruff the Dog....those kind of safety icons were always neato.  Speaking of safety icons, an idea just popped into my head of another one for next week's icon! ;D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 05/17/07 at 2:04 pm

I used to love seeing those Smokey the Bear commercials on TV! :)
I always wondered what would ever happen if Smokey the Bear and Yogi the Bear ever came face to face? ;D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: CatwomanofV on 05/17/07 at 2:14 pm


I used to love seeing those Smokey the Bear commercials on TV! :)
I always wondered what would ever happen if Smokey the Bear and Yogi the Bear ever came face to face? ;D



Just as long as Yogi doesn't have to start a fire to heat up his picnic basket, I think it will be fine.  :D ;D ;D




Cat

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: KKay on 05/30/07 at 9:41 am

I really want some of this riht now.

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 05/30/07 at 1:21 pm

Kool-Aid Man is awesome!  I used to love the commercials when I was a kid!

There was a Kool-Aid Man game for the Atari 2600.  Never had it, but always wanted to play it lol

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: gemini on 06/04/07 at 6:50 pm


I really want some of this riht now.




Oh Yeah!! Kool aid man!  :D  Kool aid was the only thing I could drink the morning after a long night of drinking lots and lots of beer!  ;D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 06/04/07 at 8:24 pm

Thanks again for another great retro icon idea...Kool Aid Man it is!!! :D ;D


Kool-Aid Man is the mascot for Kool-Aid, a popular drink. The character has appeared in television and print advertising as a fun-loving and avuncular beverage provider, bursting through walls and yelling "Oh yeah!" to share the drink with kids. He is a gigantic anthropomorphic pitcher, filled with Kool-Aid (usually cherry, though other flavors have been used) and marked with a fingerprinted smiley face.

http://img470.imageshack.us/img470/9994/180pxkoolaidmanau0.jpg


HISTORY

The smiling Kool-Aid pitcher first appeared in 1954, a year after Kool-Aid was purchased by General Foods. It was designed by Marvin Potts, an art director at the New York office of the Foote, Cone & Belding advertising agency. He was asked to illustrate the ad slogan "A five-cent package makes 2 quarts". Apparently inspired by his son drawing on a frosty windowpane, he produced three different frosted pitcher designs: one had 5¢ drawn in the frost, one had a heart-and-arrow, and one had the smiling face.

Kool-Aid Man was introduced in 1975 by adding arms and legs to "Pitcher Man." The name Pitcher Man was conceived as a pun on the idea of the corporate "pitch man.'

Already well-known from its company's advertising campaign, Kool-Aid Man starred in a comic book in the 1980s, originally published by Marvel and later Archie Comics. In these comics, he battled long-tongued aliens known as the Thirstees, and later a pyromaniac named Scorch. Also in the 1980s, two video games created by M Networks, and based on the comic books out, were made for the Atari 2600 and Intellivision systems. Both involved Kool-Aid Man having to prevent the Thirstees from stealing all the Kool-Aid from the kids.

http://img238.imageshack.us/img238/8938/koolaidig2.jpg

The voice of the Kool-Aid Man in television commercials — known for the catch phrase "Oh yeah!" — is currently Frank Simms, who sings back-up for singers David Bowie, Madonna, Billy Joel, Carly Simon, Al Green, Chaka Khan, Elvis Costello, and many others. The current character has been modernized, sometimes wearing clothing, or talking with kids in their own slang.

http://img238.imageshack.us/img238/6071/kool2600ww9.jpg

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: AL-B Mk. III on 06/17/07 at 1:12 am

This thread is turning into a "retro icon:"

http://www.inthe00s.com/index.php?topic=9314.435

;) ;) ;)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 06/18/07 at 10:54 pm

This week's retro icon is:

Woodsy Owl
http://img106.imageshack.us/img106/346/woodsy2520owlkv8.jpg

Woodsy Owl is an owl mascot for the United States Forest Service most famous for the motto "Give a hoot — don't pollute!" Woodsy's current motto is "Lend a hand — care for the land!" Woodsy's target audience are children 5 to 8 years old and was designed to be seen as a mentor to children, providing them with information and advice to help them appreciate nature. In 2006 a "New" Woodsy Owl mascot was introduced.

The "Give a Hoot, don't Pollute" slogan was created in 1970 by US Forest ranger Chuck Williams, who was the Forest Service's technical consultant for the "Lassie" TV show which featured a Forest Service ranger and his family. Williams, along with Glenn Kovar, also of the US Forest Service, and Harold Bell of Western Publishing (producer of Smokey Bear and Lassie TV show) then brainstormed the idea for the Woodsy motif.

http://img106.imageshack.us/img106/4962/150pxwoodsyowloriginalul0.jpg

Several songs have been used in conjunction with the Woodsy Owl environmental campaign, including "The Ballad of Woodsy Owl" and "Help Woodsy Spread the Word".

Several other environmentalism, conservation or outdoor themed comics have appeared over the years including Mark Trail and Smokey Bear. Woodsy Owl appeared as a comic by Gold Key Comics from 1973 to 1976.



Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: chiefyamick on 06/19/07 at 9:26 pm

OMG!! LOL I had forgotten all about that one!! Thanks for the flashback!  :)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: KKay on 06/26/07 at 5:31 pm


This week's retro icon is:

Woodsy Owl
http://img106.imageshack.us/img106/346/woodsy2520owlkv8.jpg




I have a great woodsy the owl tshirt that i've had for about 5 years.  i love it.  he's the ma-....owl.

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: Tanya1976 on 06/26/07 at 7:51 pm

haha I remember him.

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 06/27/07 at 2:05 pm

I remember Woodsy.  He was great.  If I remember, the rest of the jingle went "Give a hoot, don't pollute! Never be a dirty bird"

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 06/28/07 at 10:17 pm


I remember Woodsy.  He was great.  If I remember, the rest of the jingle went "Give a hoot, don't pollute! Never be a dirty bird"


Yep...that was totally it! :)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: KKay on 06/30/07 at 2:46 pm

check this out!

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: lorac61469 on 06/30/07 at 6:55 pm


check this out!


Check what out? 

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: KKay on 07/02/07 at 4:55 pm


Check what out? 



Rats. I forgot the link. I posted this days ago. now i'll have to go thru my history and find the page.
devil!

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 07/06/07 at 11:52 pm

This week's retro icon:

Colonel Sanders

http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A9iby55.G49GxoYAfxSjzbkF/SIG=12f4vfr9s/EXP=1183870206/**http%3A//www.thebestlinks.com/images/thumb/4/47/200px-KFC.png

http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A9iby4AgG49GQGMAdDKjzbkF/SIG=122n65pvr/EXP=1183870112/**http%3A//www.agelesslifestyles.com/colonel01.jpg

Harland David Sanders, better known as Colonel Sanders (September 9, 1890 – December 16, 1980) was the founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC).

Early life and career

Sanders was born in Henryville, Indiana. His father died when he was five years old, and since his mother worked, he was required to cook for his family. He dropped out of school in seventh grade. During his teen years, Sanders worked many jobs, including firefighter, steamboat driver, insurance salesman, railroad worker, farmer, and enlisted in the Army as a private in 1907 in Cuba. Also was a member of the Pi Kappa Alpha international fraternity.

At the age of 40, Sanders cooked chicken dishes for people who stopped at his service station in Corbin, Kentucky. Since he didn't have a restaurant, he served customers in his living quarters in the service station. Eventually, his local popularity grew, and Sanders moved to a motel and restaurant that seated 142 people and worked as the chef. Over the next nine years, he perfected his method of cooking chicken that used the same eleven herbs and spices that are used today at KFC. Furthermore, he made use of a pressure cooker that enhanced the flavor and allowed the chicken to be cooked much faster than pan-frying. He was given the honorary title "Kentucky colonel" in 1935 by Governor Ruby Laffoon. Unusually, Sanders chose to call himself "Colonel" and to dress in a stereotypical "southern gentleman" costume as a way of self-promotion. Sanders sold his franchise in 1964, although he remained their corporate spokesman until his death.

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/179/456985156_181d51c3be.jpg?v=0

Death and legacy

Sanders died at age 90, on December 16, 1980, of leukemia. He was buried in his characteristic white suit and black bow tie in Cave Hill Cemetery in Louisville, Kentucky, after lying in state in the rotunda of the Kentucky State Capitol. A later cartoon version of Colonel Sanders (voiced by actor Randy Quaid) has appeared in more recent KFC commercials, and he has an almost-identical impersonator, Thomas Rost, to the considerable consternation of many in the Sanders family.

To this day, the Colonel's secret recipe of 11 herbs and spices remains one of the best-kept trade secrets in business. According to a profile of KFC done by the Food Network television show Unwrapped, portions of the secret spice mix are made at different locations in the United States, and the only copy of the recipe is kept in a vault in corporate headquarters. In 1985, investigative journalist William Poundstone wrote a book, Big Secrets, which analyzed and revealed (among other things) the secret recipe for Kentucky Fried Chicken (lab tests found only traces of salt, black pepper, and MSG, not eleven herbs and spices), and provided readers several methods for duplicating the product.

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 07/07/07 at 1:29 am

Col. Sanders is cool!  Within the last few years, they changed his look to showcase him wearing an apron.  I was shocked the day I noticed this; I thought he looked cool.  He looks more modern now

http://web.mit.edu/cms/bcc/blogpics/colonel_sanders.gif


Wanna see a shocker?  Based on the American menu, Canadian locations of KFC do NOT serve the following ...

- Honey BBQ Sandwich
- Tender Roast Sandwich
- Oven Roasted Twister
- Chicken Pot Pie
- Home Style Biscuits
- Mashed Potatoes
- Mac and Cheese
- Corn on the Cob
- Baked Beans
- Green Beans
- Potato Wedges
- Seasoned Rice
- Mashed Potato Bowl
- Rice Bowl
- Chicken and Biscuit Bowl
- Chocolate Chip Cake
- Smores Granola Bar
- Apple Pie Minis
- Parfaits


Based on the Canadian menu, American locations of KFC do NOT serve ...

- Poutine
- Zesty Bacon Melt Sandwich
- McCain Chocolate Cake
- Brownies
- Apple Turnover

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: Tanya1976 on 07/07/07 at 11:56 am


Col. Sanders is cool!  Within the last few years, they changed his look to showcase him wearing an apron.  I was shocked the day I noticed this; I thought he looked cool.  He looks more modern now

http://web.mit.edu/cms/bcc/blogpics/colonel_sanders.gif


Wanna see a shocker?  Based on the American menu, Canadian locations of KFC do NOT serve the following ...

- Honey BBQ Sandwich
- Tender Roast Sandwich
- Oven Roasted Twister
- Chicken Pot Pie
- Home Style Biscuits
- Mashed Potatoes
- Mac and Cheese
- Corn on the Cob
- Baked Beans
- Green Beans
- Potato Wedges
- Seasoned Rice
- Mashed Potato Bowl
- Rice Bowl
- Chicken and Biscuit Bowl
- Chocolate Chip Cake
- Smores Granola Bar
- Apple Pie Minis
- Parfaits


Based on the Canadian menu, American locations of KFC do NOT serve ...

- Poutine
- Zesty Bacon Melt Sandwich
- McCain Chocolate Cake
- Brownies
- Apple Turnover




I'm not surprised. It's an American institution that appeals to American tastes. So when such companies go into other countries they have to go with the tastes of the culture. In this case, damn what do Canadians like. I've seen Poutine and ew.

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: KKay on 07/07/07 at 12:04 pm

I heard that KFC changed to the initials rather than the old name, Kentucky Fried Chicken.
the did this because there actually is littl 'chicken' in the product.
i personally think that was bunk.


i wish i were a retro icon.


here's a good one:
i love to old guinness ads.
but why th toucan?

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 07/07/07 at 12:43 pm


I heard that KFC changed to the initials rather than the old name, Kentucky Fried Chicken.
the did this because there actually is littl 'chicken' in the product.
i personally think that was bunk.


i wish i were a retro icon.


here's a good one:
i love to old guinness ads.
but why th toucan?



oh, that's a cool ad. Retro icons are cool..I think I'd like to be one also! ;)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: karen on 07/09/07 at 6:36 am



here's a good one:
i love to old guinness ads.
but why th toucan?


I always assumed it was because the colours were the same.  but apparently not.  The original idea was to use a pelican

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 07/19/07 at 3:20 pm

This week's retro icon:


The Campbell's Soup Kids

http://img71.imageshack.us/img71/4037/campbell2ly5.jpg

http://img71.imageshack.us/img71/8912/150823af7.jpg


http://img71.imageshack.us/img71/5893/55campbellskidwo3.jpg
The chubby, cherub-faced twins created by Philadelphia illustrator, Grace Wiederseim Drayton in 1904 for a series of streetcar advertisements have been the Campbell Soup Company mascots for nearly a century. Their images have appeared in print ads, TV commercials and a myriad of promotional products such as postcards, lapel buttons, and dolls etc. In the 1950s Campbell soup twins appeared on commercials produced for such highly rated shows as LASSIE and promoted their wholesomeness in  ads touting the slogan "M'm! M'm! Good! M'm! M'm! Good!, That's what Campbell's soups are, M'm! M'm! Good!" (introduced in the 1930s on the CAMPBELL PLAYHOUSE radio series). In January, 1990 with the record production of some 20 billion cans of Campbell's condensed tomato soup, the company sponsored a new television commercial featuring Campbell Kids singing a rap song about the benefits of their fine soups. This marked the first time since 1958 that the Campbell Soup Twin voices had been heard. In 1998, the company updated their traditional "M'm! M'm! Good!" advertising slogan with "Good for the Body, Good for the Soul." The Campbell twins were also made a bite more slender to reflect the prevailing health conscious culture. For a history of the Campbell company log onto their website at http://www.campbellsoup.com or you can visit the Campbell Museum (opened in 1970) located in Camden, New Jersey that showcases the company's soup tureen collection.

http://img71.imageshack.us/img71/9158/4073gr6.jpg

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 07/19/07 at 4:25 pm

"Mmmm Good! Mmmm Good!  That's why Campbell's Soups are Mmmm Good!"  When I was a kid, my mom used to sing this jingle when she would yawn ;D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: KKay on 07/19/07 at 5:27 pm

reminds me of...

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 07/19/07 at 7:57 pm


reminds me of...




awww...the Gerber baby is SO cute!

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 07/27/07 at 1:48 pm

This week's retro icon (special thanks to Cat for the great suggestion of this one ;)):


The Morton Salt Umbrella Girl

The Morton Umbrella Girl has been an enduring icon since she first appeared on our table salt packaging in 1914.
In 1911, Morton’s first advertising campaign for a series of ads in Good Housekeeping created the idea for the girl and her slogan, "When it Rains it Pours."

One of the concepts presented to Morton was an image of a little girl holding an umbrella in one hand to ward off falling rain and a package of salt in the other hand that was tilted back with the spout open and salt running out.

Morton loved the picture that expressed the Morton message — that salt would run even in damp weather. But the copy that went with it, "Even in rainy weather, it flows freely," was too long. Morton felt it needed to be shorter and snappier.

So the advertising agency came up with: "Flows Freely," "Runs Freely," "Pours" and finally, an old proverb, "It never rains, but it pours." The adage was rejected for being too negative. A more positive spin on it resulted in the now famous slogan, "When it Rains it Pours."

The Umbrella Girl remains ageless, but she has continued to changed with the times. Makeovers to modernize her looks began in 1921 and continued in 1933, 1941, 1956 and 1968.


The Umbrella Girl through the Years


1914
The original Morton Salt Umbrella Girl appeared in 1914 with the now familiar slogan 'When It Rains It Pours".
http://img64.imageshack.us/img64/5470/umbgirl1914xv0.jpg

1921
The second Morton Salt Umbrella Girl danced on the scene 1921. The twenties were roaring and the little Morton girl was still pouring.
http://img64.imageshack.us/img64/527/umbgirl1921ac0.jpg

1933
In the post-Depression years from 1933 to 1941, jazz was king. And as it reigned, our little girl kept pouring.
http://img64.imageshack.us/img64/7638/umbgirl1933it2.jpg

1941
The fourth Morton Salt Umbrella Girl was introduced to America in 1941. While our boys were off to war, our little girl was serving at home.
http://img64.imageshack.us/img64/3286/umbgirl1941ve4.jpg


1956
Rock and roll was starting to shake things up in 1956 and our little girl was still filling salt shakers.
http://img64.imageshack.us/img64/1724/umbgirl1956ys2.jpg

1968-Today
Since her most recent makeover in 1968, the current Umbrella Girl has been with us through moon launches, hip-hop and the growth of the Internet.
http://img64.imageshack.us/img64/8377/umbgirl1968ol3.jpg

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: gemini on 07/27/07 at 6:28 pm

Awww, cute! I've always loved that one.  :) 

Hey Erin, I found this neat site of advertising icons, I think you'll like it.
http://www.advertisingiconmuseum.com/  Just click on gallery to see 'em.

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 07/27/07 at 11:53 pm


Awww, cute! I've always loved that one.  :) 

Hey Erin, I found this neat site of advertising icons, I think you'll like it.
http://www.advertisingiconmuseum.com/  Just click on gallery to see 'em.



hehe!! I found that awhile ago..and that's where I get a lot of my ideas for the thread from. Wouldn't it be divine to visit there? :)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 07/28/07 at 1:10 am

This is one I don't know, partly because in Canada, Morton Salt is known as Windsor Salt

http://www.designedgecanada.com/images/windsorsalt.gif

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 07/28/07 at 9:21 am


This is one I don't know, partly because in Canada, Morton Salt is known as Windsor Salt

http://www.designedgecanada.com/images/windsorsalt.gif



well, that's a funky retro design, now...isn't it? :D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: KKay on 07/28/07 at 1:26 pm

has anyone mentioned the lovely coppertone girl?
and the monopoly guy!

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 07/28/07 at 7:33 pm



well, that's a funky retro design, now...isn't it? :D


I still get Windsor Salt just for the awesome box it comes in 8)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: coqueta83 on 07/28/07 at 11:38 pm


This is one I don't know, partly because in Canada, Morton Salt is known as Windsor Salt

http://www.designedgecanada.com/images/windsorsalt.gif


Ooooh, I love that packaging!  :)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 07/28/07 at 11:44 pm

I haven't bought Windsor Salt in a long time, but I notice they changed the packaging for a more modern look ...

http://www.windsorsalt.com/images/food_salt_images/1and2kg.gif

I just love those blue and gold spheres 8)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: CatwomanofV on 07/29/07 at 12:12 pm


Awww, cute! I've always loved that one.  :) 

Hey Erin, I found this neat site of advertising icons, I think you'll like it.
http://www.advertisingiconmuseum.com/  Just click on gallery to see 'em.



That looks like it could be either two of my sisters' rooms. One collects fast food toys (who knows how many she has) and the other collects dolls (again, who knows how many). The one who collects the toys used to have them all in her bedroom (until the toys took over and she had to move out  :D ;D ;D ). One time, my niece brought home her boyfriend for the first and my sister was thinking about asking him, "Do you want to come into my bedroom and see my toys?" My niece looked at her and said, "DON'T YOU DARE!!!!"  :D ;D ;D ;D ;D Yeah, my sister was a good girl and didn't embarrassed her daughter-that time.  :D ;D ;D



Cat

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 07/29/07 at 7:48 pm


I haven't bought Windsor Salt in a long time, but I notice they changed the packaging for a more modern look ...

http://www.windsorsalt.com/images/food_salt_images/1and2kg.gif

I just love those blue and gold spheres 8)



Man, they always have to go and ruin a good thing. ::)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 08/09/07 at 9:08 am

This week's retro icon is:

Alfred E. Neumann

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/8/89/Alfred.jpg



Alfred E. Neuman is the fictional mascot of EC Publications' Mad magazine. The face had drifted through American pictography for decades before being claimed by Mad editor Harvey Kurtzman after he spotted it on the bulletin board in the office of Ballantine Books editor Bernard Shir-Cliff, later a contributor to various magazines created by Kurtzman.

http://img116.imageshack.us/img116/3088/auroramadsd7.jpg


History

Since his debut in Mad, Neuman's likeness, distinguished by jug ears, a missing front tooth, and one eye disquietingly lower than the other, has graced the cover of all but a handful of the magazine's 450+ issues. His face does not translate well to profile, and thus he has almost always been shown in full frontal view or in silhouette.

The first use of this face by Kurtzman came November 1954 on the back cover of Ballantine's The Mad Reader, a paperback collection of reprints from the first two years of Mad. The character's first appearance in the comic book was on the cover of Mad 21 (March 1955), barely visible as part of a mock ad: a rubber mask bearing his likeness with "idiot" written underneath was offered for $1.29. Kurtzman began to introduce other running gags at this time, notably the word Potrzebie.

His third appearance was in the border of the first magazine version of Mad 24 (July 1955) with his now-familiar signature phrase "What, me worry?" written underneath. Initially, the phrase was rendered "What? Me worry?". This border would be used on the cover of every issue up until Mad 30 (December 1956) and thereafter appear on the table of contents page of the reprint series More Trash from Mad from 1958 to 1960 and The Worst from Mad from 1958 to 1961. Neuman also appeared, by name only, in an early Don Martin feature, "Alfred E. Neuman Answers Your Questions." In it, Neuman answered a letter from a suicidal reader by giving "expert advice" on the best technique for tying a hangman's knot.

The character was also briefly known as Mel Haney. In Mad 25, the face and name were brought together as Alfred E. Neuman, but in that same issue, the face appears with the name Mel Haney.

In late 1956, Neuman's identity became fixed, when he appeared on the cover of Mad #30 as a write-in candidate for the Presidency. His features, which had first been rendered in black-and-white by Bill Elder, were fine-tuned and recreated in color by Norman Mingo. It was this image that appeared on the cover of issue 30, and which became the character's defining portrait. Beginning with issue 30, and continuing to the present day, Neuman has appeared on the cover of every issue of Mad and its spinoffs, in one form or another, with the exception of a small handful of issues. One such exception was Mad 233 (September 1982) which replaced Neuman's image with that of Pac-Man.

Mingo painted seven more Neuman covers through 1957 and later became the magazine's signature cover artist throughout the 1960s and 1970s, although Kelly Freas rendered Neuman for Mad from 1958 to 1962. A female version of Alfred, named Moxie Cowznofski and occasionally described in editorial text as Alfred's "girlfriend," appeared briefly during the late 1950s. Alfred and Moxie were sometimes depicted side-by-side, defeating any speculation that Moxie was possibly Alfred in female guise. Her name was inspired by Moxie, a soft drink manufactured in Portland, Maine which was sold nationwide in the '50s and mentioned almost obsessively (usually as the butt of a joke) in early issues of Mad.

Mad routinely combines Neuman with another character for its cover images. Neuman has appeared in a slew of guises, including Santa Claus, Darth Vader, George Washington, King Kong, Baby New Year, Lawrence of Arabia, Batman, Robin, Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, Rosemary's Baby, George S. Patton, the Fiddler on the Roof, Alex from A Clockwork Orange, Barbra Streisand, Mr. T, Indiana Jones, Radar O'Reilly, Bruce Springsteen, Mr. Spock, Pee Wee Herman, Michael Jackson, a California Raisin, Don King, Robin Hood, Abraham Lincoln, Guns N' Roses' Slash, the Man in the Moon, an Oscar statuette, Jabba the Hutt, Wolverine, Gollum, Spongebob Squarepants, Agent Smith from The Matrix,Kurt Cobain Shrek, Dr. Octopus, The Incredibles' Jack-Jack, George W. Bush, Justin Timberlake, Harry Potter, Barry Bonds, the Mona Lisa, and Uncle Sam ("Who Needs You?") among many other familiar faces. Since his unsuccessful run in 1956, he has periodically been re-offered as a candidate for President with the slogan, "You could do worse... and always have!"

Considering Neuman's ubiquity as a cover boy, it is perhaps ironic that the single highest-selling issue of Mad depicted only his feet. The cover image, spoofing the 1973 film The Poseidon Adventure, showed Neuman floating upside-down inside a life preserver.

Along with his face, Mad also includes a short humorous quotation credited to Neuman with every issue's table of contents. Some of these quotations were collected in the book, Mad: The Half-Wit and Wisdom of Alfred E. Neuman (Warner Treasures, 1997), illustrated by Sergio Aragonés.

Neuman is now used exclusively as a mascot and iconic symbol of the magazine, but before this status was codified, he was referenced in several early articles. In one, he gave "advice" to supposed letters; in one of his replies, a suicidal reader was instructed on the best way to tie a knot. Other articles featured the school newspaper of "Neuman High School," and a bulletin from "Alfred E. Neuman University." An article entitled "Alfred E. Neuman's Family Tree" depicted historical versions of Neuman from various eras. Since then, Neuman has appeared only occasionally inside the magazine's articles. A recurring feature titled "Poor Alfred's Almanac" showed his face atop the page, but otherwise the character had no involvement. In an issue in 1968, Alfred's face was assembled, feature by feature, from parts of photographs of well-known politicos, including then-President Lyndon B. Johnson (left ear), Richard Nixon (nose), Oregon Governor Mark Hatfield (eyes), and Ronald Reagan (hair). The gap in his teeth (using the grin of Dwight D. Eisenhower,) came from "The 'Credibility Gap' Created by Practically All Politicians."

Neuman's famous catch phrase is the intellectually uncurious "What, me worry?" This was changed for one issue to "Yes, me worry!" after the Three Mile Island nuclear meltdown in 1979. On the cover of current printings of the paperback The Ides of MAD, as rendered by long-time cover artist Norman Mingo, Alfred is portrayed as a Roman bust with his catch phrase engraved on the base, rendered, of course, into Latin-- Quid, Me Vexari?

Over the decades, Neuman has often appeared in political cartoons as a shorthand for unquestioning stupidity. In recent years, Alfred E. Neuman's features have frequently been merged with those of George W. Bush by editorial cartoonists such as Mike Luckovich and Tom Tomorrow. The image has also appeared on magazine covers, notably The Nation, ) and in numerous Photoshop images and GIF files in which Neuman's face morphs into Bush's. A large Bush/Neuman poster was part of the Washington protests that accompanied Bush's 2001 inauguration. The alleged resemblance between the two has been noted more than once by Hillary Clinton. On July 10, 2005, speaking at the Aspen Institute's Ideas Festival, she said, "I sometimes feel that Alfred E. Neuman is in charge in Washington," referring to Bush's purported "What, me worry?" attitude. Neuman's features have also been compared to others in the public eye, including Prince Charles, Ted Koppel, Oliver North and David Letterman.

Alfred E. Neuman's surname is very frequently misspelled as "Newman."

Alfred E. Neuman's most prominent feature is his gap-toothed grin, which has appeared on nearly every issue of Mad. A notable exception was the November 2001 issue, the first to be produced following the 9-11 terrorist attacks in the United States. The cover showed a close up of Neuman's mouth, but his gap was now filled with a red, white and blue tooth in the pattern of an American flag.

In 1983, Neuman was featured with E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. The cover showed E.T. preparing to board his spaceship, using his famous "healing finger" to touch Alfred E. Neuman's mouth and make a new 32nd tooth appear, giving him a full smile.

Neuman also appeared as himself in a political cartoon, after Newsweek had been criticized for using computer graphics to retouch the teeth of the mother of the McCaughey septuplets. The cartoon had a split-screen comparison, where Alfred E. Neuman was featured on the cover of Mad with his usual gap-toothed grin, then also featured on the cover of Newsweek, but with a perfect smile.

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: Gis on 08/09/07 at 4:01 pm

Has always given me the creeps *SHUDDERS*

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 08/09/07 at 4:05 pm

That guy gave me the creeps too :o

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: Green Lantern on 08/28/07 at 12:14 pm


Has always given me the creeps *SHUDDERS*



That guy gave me the creeps too :o


Gives you the creeps! Wad ya mean!?  >:( ??? .... Mr. 'Mad'  himself ... my inspiration ... the man whose boots I am not fit to lick! My hero! 'Alfred E. Neumann'!

Alfred for President!

Well, I suppose he could be King of England one day. Those ears look suspiciously like Prince Charles'!  :D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 09/03/07 at 10:18 pm

Well now, it's long overdue for a new retro icon...so, without futher ado, the retro icon of this week is:


The Jolly Green Giant

http://img405.imageshack.us/img405/7637/260pxbejggjt9.jpg

The Jolly Green Giant is a symbol of the Green Giant food company of the United States, appearing as a smiling green-skinned giant wearing a tunic, wreath and boots made of leaves. In 1973, JGG teamed up with "Little Green Sprout", the diminutive young green giant. Created by Leo Burnett, the Giant first appeared in advertisements in 1928; the name originally came from a variety of unusually large pea called the "Green Giant" that the company canned and sold.


Portrayal

Len Dresslar, born 1925, provided the voice of the Jolly Green giant in television commercials, saying only "Ho, ho, ho." Dresslar was also a successful as a jazz and popular music singer in Chicago entertainment circles. Despite being over 6ft (1.82m) tall, Dresslar never portrayed the Giant in TV commercials. The figure viewers saw on screen was Keith R. Wegeman, an Olympic ski jumper and father of soap opera actress Katherine Kelly Lang from The Bold and the Beautiful.

The original televised Jolly Green Giant was nothing more than a puppet that, through the use of stop-motion animation, stalked through the "valley" and said little more than "fo fum fi fe" (perhaps a reference to the fable Jack and the Beanstalk). The commercial, which first aired in 1953, was deemed too scary for younger viewers and the puppet was discarded. The next commercial featured several different animated elves (similar to the Keebler elves) working in a "factory" around the valley while Keith Wegeman (shown in far-away shots) stood over the area, chanting the now-famous "ho, ho, ho" phrase.

http://img405.imageshack.us/img405/8436/grgiant1sh4.jpg

Statue

In 1978, the town of Blue Earth, Minnesota paid $43,000 to erect a 55-foot (16.8 m) fiberglass statue of the Jolly Green Giant to commemorate the linking of the east and west sections of Interstate 90. It was permanently erected on July 6, 1979. The statue attracts over 10,000 visitors a year.

Jolly Green Giant in popular culture

~The mascot became so well-known that the name came to be used for other sorts of things that were large and green in color.

~The HH-3E rescue helicopters that the United States Air Force used during the Vietnam War were called Jolly Green Giants, while the larger HH-53 helicopter received the nickname "Super Jolly Green Giant."

~The green superhero monster, The Incredible Hulk, is often described in jest as "The Not-So-Jolly Green Giant."

~There is a large billboard of the Green Giant in Le Sueur, Minnesota, with the Green Giant's companion Little Green Sprout (though trees are in the way).

~In an oft-replayed bit from The Tonight Show, Johnny Carson is dressed as the "Little Green Sprout" and is standing between the lower legs of the Giant. He looks up and says, in his "Art Fern" voice, "Ho-ho-ho, Jolly Green Giant! Show us your Niblets!" whereupon he is showered with gigantic kernels of corn. He then looks up and mouths an obscenity at the Giant while the audience roars.

~In the film Full Metal Jacket Crazy Earl says, "We are jolly green giants, walking the Earth with guns."

~The giant was the subject of several questions on the popular 1970s game show Match Game.

~In the film Demolition Man the "Valley of the Jolly Green Giant" song is heard while in a Taco Bell restaurant.

~The Kingsmen, the Royal Guardsmen, and several other groups recorded songs titled The Jolly Green Giant.

~In the film Ghostbusters 2 After bringing the Statue of Liberty to life, Bill Murray's character says "Keep kickin' Libby. If you make this work, we'll pop for a weekend in Vegas with the Jolly Green Giant!"

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 09/03/07 at 11:17 pm

I alwais liked Little Sprout.  He was a cute lil' fella. 

In the old napster days, there used to be this gal who came into the chat often and her handle was Lil' Sprout and I always used to joke by asking her where the Green Giant was ;D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 09/03/07 at 11:23 pm

The Jolly Green Giant always struck me as a hot sort of character....right up there with Mr. Clean. hubba hubba! :D ;D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: lorac61469 on 09/04/07 at 11:19 am

When I was a kid the Jolly Green Giant was played by a real person...I used to be afraid of him ;D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: coqueta83 on 09/04/07 at 7:59 pm

I used to get the Jolly Green Giant confused with the Incredible Hulk when I was really little.  ;D I actually miss those commercials with the Jolly Green Giant; I haven't seen them in many years!

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 09/17/07 at 8:50 am

The Retro Icon of the Week is:


Aunt Jemima

http://img442.imageshack.us/img442/1627/auntjemimasmlvp0.jpg

Aunt Jemima is a trademark for pancake flour, syrup, and other breakfast foods. The trademark dates to 1893, although Aunt Jemima pancake mix debuted in 1889. The phrase "Aunt Jemima" is sometimes used as a female version of "Uncle Tom" to refer to a black woman who is perceived as obsequiously servile or acting in, or protective of, the interests of whites.

The 1950s television show, Beulah, came under fire for depicting a "mammy"-like black maid and cook who was somewhat reminiscent of Aunt Jemima. Today, "Beulah" and "Aunt Jemima" are regarded as more or less interchangeable as terms of disparagement. The name "Jemima" is biblical in nature and is an anglicized version of the feminine Hebrew name Yamimah, the second of Job's daughters born to at the end of his self-titled book of the Bible.

http://img442.imageshack.us/img442/3217/auntjemimanz3.jpg


History

The direct inspiration for Aunt Jemima originates from a minstrelsy/vaudeville song of the same name. Chris L. Rutt of the Pearl Milling Company saw the song being sung by blackface performers Baker & Farrell wearing an apron and kerchief, and appropriated the character.

Aunt Jemima is depicted as a plump, smiling, bright-eyed, black woman, originally wearing a kerchief over her hair. She was represented as a slave and was the most commonplace representation of the stereotypical "mammy" character.

The character of Aunt Jemima also appeared in vaudeville, played by comedienne-singer Tess Gardella (a white actress, who performed the role in blackface).

The woman whose likeness was painted for the logo was Anna Short Harrington. Nancy Green, born a slave in Montgomery County, Kentucky, was hired by R.T. Davis Milling Company to play the Jemima character from 1890 to her death on September 24, 1923. Green (as Jemima), operated a pancake-cooking display at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, Illinois during 1893, beside the "world's largest flour barrel." Harriette Widmer also portrayed the character on radio. There is also speculation that Ohio woman Rosie Riles (1901–1969) modelled for the first conception of the Aunt Jemima character.

Aunt Jemima was not the only depiction of a black person to be used in early advertising. Black caricatures were often featured prominently as trademarks of several products. Most commonly, such images were used to sell food, cleaning agents, agricultural produce, and products that were black or brown, such as coffee, ink, and chocolate. Examples include Cream of Wheat, featuring a cook named "Rastus," Fairbank's Gold Dust, a powdered laundry detergent, featuring "Goldie" and "Dusty," the "Gold Dust Twins," J & P Coat's Threads, featuring "Topsy" and "Mammy" cookie jars. Objections to the depiction of Aunt Jemima and other black advertising date back to the 1920s. According to Slave in a Box by M.M. Manring, one black professional polled in 1928 responded, "I positively hate this illustration."

The actress Aubrey Andreozzi recently depicted her in a Thursday morning television program, entitled Breakfast at the Firepit. She had chosen to be a "white Jemima," wearing only the apron and bandana, but it worked well.

The Aunt Jemima trademark has been modified several times over the years. She has been made younger and more physically attractive, and her kerchief has been eliminated for a more modern hairstyle and pearls. This new look remains with the products to this day.

http://img250.imageshack.us/img250/7776/iconjemimaqa5.jpg

Quaker Oats bought the brand in 1926. Aunt Jemima frozen foods were licensed out to Aurora Foods in 1996 and in 2004 absorbed into Pinnacle Foods Corporation.

1964: Aunt Jemima receives Key to the City of Albion on January 25, 1964. She visited Albion many times for fundraisers.

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: karen on 09/29/07 at 9:30 am

Out shopping the other day I needed to buy some cooking salt.  I bought Morton's purely because you mentioned it on this thread!

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 09/29/07 at 7:14 pm


Out shopping the other day I needed to buy some cooking salt.  I bought Morton's purely because you mentioned it on this thread!



oh cool! They should give us royalties for the plug that we gave them, eh? ;D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 09/29/07 at 8:08 pm

I love Aunt Jemima.  The only syrup I buy is Aunt Jemima.  No other brand will do

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 09/29/07 at 8:09 pm


I love Aunt Jemima.  The only syrup I buy is Aunt Jemima.  No other brand will do


I wonder....if aunt jemina and mrs. butterworth are related?

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: snozberries on 10/07/07 at 2:52 pm


I wonder....if aunt jemina and mrs. butterworth are related?


nah but they both dated uncle ben

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 10/23/07 at 10:14 am

I've been slacking, I know....but here is this week's retro icon:


This one is an oldie, but goodie....


MARKY MAYPO the Maypo Cereal Boy

http://img527.imageshack.us/img527/3199/hofmaypofs3.jpg

http://img527.imageshack.us/img527/9252/lin12vz0.jpg

In 1956 the Fletcher, Richards, Calkins & Holden Advertising Agency created a successful Maypo ad campaign entitled "Marky Maypo" about the frustrations of a father trying to get his young son Marky (who was dressed in a cowboy costume) to eat a new maple-flavored oatmeal breakfast food called Maypo. After a few tries to get his son to eat Maypo the father said "Tell you what, I'll be an airplane, you be the hangar. Open the doors, here it comes (Whrrrrrrrr!) loaded with delicious (Whrrrrrrr!) maple-flavored (Whrrrrrrr!) Maypo!" Just as the spoon reaches the boy's mouth, he snaps it shut. Frustrated, the father accidentally puts the spoonful of Maypo in his mouth, and immediately his young son cried "I want my MAYPO!" In 1958, the Brian & Houston ad agency made a follow-up commercial where Marky was robbed of his cowboy hat and his favorite cereal by his Uncle Ralphie. In frustration, he wailed "I want my Maypo!" A sequel commercial entitled "Marky's Horse," had the little cowboy jump onto the snoring pot belly of Uncle Ralphie. Marky then rode his uncle's tummy like a bronco until he got some Maypo. The voice of Marky was provided by Mark Hubley, the four-year-old son of John and Faith Hubley, the animators of these now classic B/W commercial spots. Marky Maypo made his debut on New York and New England television stations in September 1956. John Hubley contributed to the "flat" UPA animation style used on such cartoons as "Mister Magoo." In 1951 Hubley worked on the Academy Award animated short Gerald McBoing Boing. The Maypo Company recruited popular sports figures for their INSTANT MAYPO CEREAL. The ad spots featured Gil Hodges who orders Tom Seaver to go in and pitch and he cries "I want my Maypo"; as well as Mickey Mantle , too,. who cries "I want my Maypo!"

http://img527.imageshack.us/img527/7968/hubleymayport2.jpg

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 10/23/07 at 11:51 am

Another one I don't remember.  Is Maypo cereal still made today ?

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 10/23/07 at 4:08 pm


Another one I don't remember.  Is Maypo cereal still made today ?


you know what? I have no idea. I just always remember my dad quoting one of their commercials over and over again, through the years. ;D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 11/09/07 at 8:27 am

This week's retro icon:


The Crash Test Dummies


http://img155.imageshack.us/img155/1849/vinlar6lq8.jpg

Vince and Larry - Otherwise known as "The Crash Test Dummies," Vince and Larry were two hardworking crash test dummies who appeared in a series of public service announcement jointly produced by the Ad Council and the U.S. Department of Transportation's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration beginning in 1985. In the commercials (created by the Leo Burnett Ad Agency), Vince and Larry actively demonstrated what could happen when a person did not wear a seatbelt. Unlike, humans who die or become crippled in real crashes, Vince and Larry dusted themselves off after each crash and lived to joke another day. Vince (who wears grey) is the veteran of the duo while Larry, (who wears blue) is the new comer - eager to prove himself and ready to loose an arm, leg or head for the cause.

http://img155.imageshack.us/img155/6457/vincedummygu5.jpg

The success of the Crash Test Dummies Seat Belt Education campaign motivated a large majority of states to enact laws mandating the use of safety belts. In 1990, the campaign was recognized with a Gold Effie award from the New York chapter of the American Marketing Association. Reportedly, by 1994, seat belt usage had increased from 21% to 73%, saving an estimated 75,000 lives and preventing more than 1.5 million moderate to critical injuries. In 1999, Vince and Larry along with their campaign tagline, "You Could Learn A Lot From a Dummy" were retired when the U.S. Department of Transportation revised the campaign. The new slogan advised "Buckle Up. Always."

TRIVIA NOTE: When the Crash Test Dummies made personal appearances, local actors were hired to wear their costumes. To preserve the integrity of the original TV and radio voices, Vince and Larry never talked in person. They just do skits and interviews using a pre-recorded tape. The popularity of the Crash Dummies inspired the Department of Transportation to sell the merchandising right to a New Jersey Toy Company in 1992 who created spin-off action figures. This decision motivated the CBS, ABC and NBC networks to pull off the air (for a time) the Vince and Larry ad campaign to disassociate the toy's message of "mayhem" from the ad council's original message of safety. In 1993/94, there was also a computer game developed by Software Creations called "The Incredible Crash Dummies." The program featured a storyline about a kidnapped crash dummy designer named Dr. Zub who is kidnapped by the villain Junkman. It's up to the Crash Dummies to save the day and rescue the Zub, But first they must overcome many junkbot obstacles as they drive through the Crash Test Center, Construction Site, and Military Testing Zone.

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: Brigitte on 11/10/07 at 12:51 pm

http://www.crashtestdummies.com/ Inspiration!

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: apollonia1986 on 11/15/07 at 9:52 pm

The Crash Test Dummies scared the crap outta me when I was little.

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 11/15/07 at 10:45 pm

one of them (Larry I believe) was voiced by the late Lorenzo Music, whom is best remembered as the voice of Garfield the Cat or as Carlton the Doorman on "Rhoda".  Or if you were a kid in the 80s like me, you will also remember him as the voice of Tummi on "The Gummi Bears" and as Peter Venkman on "The Real Ghostbusters"

I loved the Crash Test Dummies spoof in the movie "Stay Tuned" ;D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 11/15/07 at 10:54 pm


one of them (Larry I believe) was voiced by the late Lorenzo Music, whom is best remembered as the voice of Garfield the Cat or as Carlton the Doorman on "Rhoda".  Or if you were a kid in the 80s like me, you will also remember him as the voice of Tummi on "The Gummi Bears" and as Peter Venkman on "The Real Ghostbusters"

I loved the Crash Test Dummies spoof in the movie "Stay Tuned" ;D



oh, that's right...I knew that voice sounded familiar.

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: apollonia1986 on 11/23/07 at 6:03 pm

Oh the Gummi Bears. I remember watching them a long time ago. It was a cute show.  ;D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 12/04/07 at 12:57 am

This week's retro icon is:


Yipes the Fruit Stripe Gum Zebra

http://img403.imageshack.us/img403/158/prremiums128gm9.jpg


Fruit Stripe is artificially flavoured fruit chewing gum that is notorious for its strong but fleeting flavor. It is packaged in zebra wrappers and every stick now comes with one or more temporary tattoos. Fruit Stripe is the only gum with painted on stripes.

http://img403.imageshack.us/img403/464/yumzebrafruitygumob1.gif

Fruit Stripe gum was invented by James Parker, and launched in the early-1960s as an extension of the Beech-Nut gum line. Farley's & Sathers Candy Company, Inc. acquired Fruit Stripes in 2003 from Hershey Foods Corporation.

http://img403.imageshack.us/img403/5821/prremiums163xv4.jpg

Fruit Stripe gum wrappers contain tattoos of Yipes inline skating, hang gliding, playing basketball, bicycling, snowboarding, surfing, playing soccer, and playing tennis. In the 1980s or '90s, Yipes was moulded into a plastic Zebra. This zebra was utilized as a promotional tool for Fruit Stripes. The Zebra models currently value at approximately $30-$50 in collector marketplaces.

http://img403.imageshack.us/img403/8729/for56ol3.jpg

In 1996, Fruit Stripe gave 5 cents from the sale of each Jumbo Pack and Variety Multipack to the World Wildlife Fund, totaling up to $100,000, for the preservation of endangered animals and their habitats.


Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: lorac61469 on 12/04/07 at 3:50 pm

I used to love this gum when I was a kid.  I bought some not too long ago, still tastes the same but I don't like it as much as I did.

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: coqueta83 on 12/04/07 at 8:01 pm

I think the last time I had Fruit Stripe gum was in my early junior high days. I don't even see this gum anymore.

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 12/04/07 at 8:10 pm

Man, I haven't thought about Fruit Stripe Gum in years.  It was good stuff.  I haven't seen it around anymore :(

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: Jessica on 12/04/07 at 11:17 pm


Man, I haven't thought about Fruit Stripe Gum in years.  It was good stuff.  I haven't seen it around anymore :(


They sell it at the Meijer over here.

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 12/04/07 at 11:31 pm

Fruit Stripe gum never held it's flavor very long...and it sometimes left a bad taste in your mouth! :D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: CatwomanofV on 12/05/07 at 12:44 pm

I think the Fruit Stripe is a kid thing. Like many have already said, loved it as a kid but as an adult.... probably the sugar factor. I haven't had it in DECADES!



Cat

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: apollonia1986 on 12/06/07 at 4:26 pm

Does anyone remember a gum called Zebra Stripe. It was like Fruit Stripe but it had a little zebra on the package.  :)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 12/24/07 at 3:56 am


Does anyone remember a gum called Zebra Stripe. It was like Fruit Stripe but it had a little zebra on the package.  :)


I do.  It was good gum :)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: snozberries on 12/24/07 at 10:47 am

Have we paid homage to two of my favs yet????


The 7Up Spot
http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m98/valeb1235/fun%20stuff/ththshakeit.gif ?

&


The Domino's Pizza Noid?
  http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k5/Blanceezy/pitfall_lost_expedition_noid.jpg AVOID THE NOID!!!!

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 12/24/07 at 6:58 pm

I loved the Noid.  Ever see the Family Guy episode where Mayor West beats him bloody, then snaps his neck?  I just about died laughing at that ;D

I used to have the game "Yo! Noid" for the NES and I even had a little figurine that I got from Domino's when I was a kid


7-Up Spot was also cool.  I liked him better than Fido Dido.  I remember he had his own NES game as well called 'Cool Spot'.  I never played it though

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: snozberries on 12/24/07 at 6:59 pm


I loved the Noid.  Ever see the Family Guy episode where Mayor West beats him bloody, then snaps his neck?  I just about died laughing at that ;D

I used to have the game "Yo! Noid" for the NES and I even had a little figurine that I got from Domino's when I was a kid


7-Up Spot was also cool.  I liked him better than Fido Dido.  I remember he had his own NES game as well called 'Cool Spot'.  I never played it though


I never played the games but I do have a stuffed Noid and a Stuffed spot at home!

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 01/02/08 at 12:27 pm

This week's retro icon is:

Miss Chiquita Banana

http://img88.imageshack.us/img88/4964/bananachiquita2fo7.jpg

http://img88.imageshack.us/img88/6430/osmiss50bee6.jpg

Female banana character (first drawn by artist Dik Browne) who wore a headdress of fruit and sang the trademark Chiquita Banana song (voice first provided by singer Patti Clayton) that began "Hello Amigo...I'm Chiquita Banana and I've come to say/You eat the banana in a special way/And when it's fleck with brown and has a golden hue/That's when bananas are the best for you...." (Music © 1945 Shawnee Press Inc.) The Chiquita Banana jingle was created in 1944 for the United Fruit Company by a BBDO advertising team headed by Robert Foreman. The song's lyrics, written by Garth Montgomery and music composed by co-worker Ken MacKenzie,  instructed Americans on how to ripen and properly use this golden tropical fruit, for example, putting them in pies, or salads and to never to put the equator grown fruit in the refrigerator. In 1945 and 1946, Puerto Rico-born Elsa Miranda portrayed Miss Chiquita in numerous personal appearances in the movies, in radio commercials. June Valli (popular for her 1954 hit song "Crying in the Chapel) was the singing voice of Chiquita Banana in the TV commercials in the 1950s. In 1987, the image of Miss Chiquita changed from a banana character when artist Oscar Grillo, creator of the Pink Panther, transformed her into a beautiful brown skinned woman with a teasing smile who wore the traditional fruit-filled sombrero, gold loop earrings along with a blue dress adorned with ruffled sleeves and hems edged in yellow. In 1997, Chiquita held a consumer contest to update their lyrics. Joyce Appelquist, a fifth grade teacher from San Mateo, California, won the contest.

http://img88.imageshack.us/img88/5543/oshistccurrbnc6.jpg

Original:
I'm Chiquita Banana, and I've come to say
Bananas have to ripen in a certain way.
And when they are flecked with brown
and have a golden hue,
Bananas taste the best, and are the best for you.
You can put them in a salad. You can put
them in a pie - aye.
Anyway you want to eat them it's
impossible to beat them.
But bananas like the climate of the very,
very tropical equator.
So you should never put bananas in the refrigerator.


1997 Version:
I'm Chiquita Banana, and I've come to say
I offer good nutrition for you every day.
And when you buy Chiquita you will always know,
You've got the best bananas anyone can grow!
Underneath the crescent yellow, you'll find vitamins
And fiber, instant energy to feel good.
Our bananas make a meal good.
It's a gift from Mother Nature and
a natural addition to your table.
A wholesome, healthy, pure banana;
look for Chiquita's label!

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: apollonia1986 on 01/03/08 at 8:04 pm

Omg! Chiquita Bananas! I remember having to sing this in grade school with our little chorus for all the parents. It was so cute!

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: wsmith4 on 01/04/08 at 7:58 am


Fruit Stripe gum never held it's flavor very long...and it sometimes left a bad taste in your mouth! :D


;D I was just saying this to my bf yesterday! That's so funny.  It did taste pretty nasty after a very short time.  But those first 3 seconds were pure bliss LOL

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 01/04/08 at 11:44 am


;D I was just saying this to my bf yesterday! That's so funny.  It did taste pretty nasty after a very short time.  But those first 3 seconds were pure bliss LOL


hahaa...yes, it was all worth the nasty taste that it left in your mouth, for hours on end...for those few seconds of heaven!! ;D :D ;)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 01/20/08 at 11:03 pm

I totally forgot all about Miss Chiquita Banana.  I best remember her in the modern pic on the bottom, though you don't really see her as much as you used to

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: KKay on 01/21/08 at 8:00 am

the ever gentlemanly johnny walker

http://www.airmuseum.ca/040504h3.jpg

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 01/24/08 at 5:03 am

This week's retro icon:


THE MARLBORO MAN

http://img101.imageshack.us/img101/7316/iconmarlboroxz8.jpg

http://img152.imageshack.us/img152/5455/campaignmarlborojb1.jpg

http://img152.imageshack.us/img152/1514/220595644f8c5d754b6un1.jpg

The most powerful -- and in some quarters, most hated -- brand image of the century, the Marlboro Man stands worldwide as the ultimate American cowboy and masculine trademark, helping establish Marlboro as the best-selling cigarette in the world.  Today, even a mention of the Marlboro Man as an effective ad icon brings protests from healthcare workers who see first-hand the devastation wrought by decades of cigarette smoking. More than any other issue, the ethics of tobacco advertising -- both morally and legally -- have divided the advertising industry.

But even those ad professionals who abhor the tobacco industry will, when pressed, agree that the Marlboro Man has had unprecedented success as a global marketing tool for selling Philip Morris Cos.' brand.

In the beginning back in the 1950s, a time when cigarettes were accepted in even the politest society, Burnett created the macho icon as a way to reposition Marlboro from a "mild as May" ladies cigarette to a product with broader appeal. The original newspaper ad from Burnett carried the slogan "delivers the goods on flavor" and it immediately sent sales skyrocketing.

By the time the Marlboro Man went national in 1955, sales were at $5 billion, a 3,241% jump over 1954 and light years ahead of pre-cowboy sales, when the brand's U.S. share stood at less than 1%.

Despite his appeal, the cowboy wasn't the only rough-and-tumble image used to sell the brand's image. Over the next decade, Burnett experimented with other manly types -- ball players, race car drivers and rugged guys with tattoos (often friends of the creative team, sporting fake tattoos). All the pitches worked.

Even with the release in 1957 of the first article in Reader's Digest linking lung cancer to smoking, the real men of the Marlboro ads kept ringing up sales ($20 billion that year), attracting new smokers of both genders. In 1964, the company revived the cowboy but this time he was in mythical Marlboro Country.

This vivid image paid off in 1971 when cigarette ads were banned from TV. The striking print shot of cowboys enjoying a smoke on horseback continued to fuel sales growth. In 1972, Marlboro became the No. 1 tobacco brand in the world.

As the anti-smoking movement has spread, the Marlboro Man has come under particular attack for his role in luring new customers to a cancer-causing habit.

As a commercial icon, he is both reviled and revered. Yet one measure of this icon's clout is that no matter how minimal the imagery gets -- reduced on occasion to little more than a saddle and splash of red -- it still remains instantly evocative of a mythical Marlboro country, of a mythical American cowboy and of the No. 1 brand of cigarettes that gave that cowboy real lung cancer.

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: KKay on 01/24/08 at 1:43 pm

wait.....why did my picture of Johnny Walker have a swastika on it?


???

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 01/24/08 at 6:25 pm


wait.....why did my picture of Johnny Walker have a swastika on it?


???


huh? really? ???

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: Dominic L. on 01/24/08 at 11:19 pm


wait.....why did my picture of Johnny Walker have a swastika on it?


???


You're anti-semitic?

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: snozberries on 01/24/08 at 11:31 pm


wait.....why did my picture of Johnny Walker have a swastika on it?


???



I thought I saw that yesterday but don't see it now...did you change the pic?

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: KKay on 01/25/08 at 10:59 am



I thought I saw that yesterday but don't see it now...did you change the pic?


i didn't....BUT at closer examination, it seems to be painted on the side of a vehicle...perhaps a bomber plane?
that would expalin lots of the stuff on that image.
i'm a knucklehead.



so.  I know he goes way back..can anyone find a good retro shot of
the maytag repair man?

http://www.characterweb.com/images/CaseMaytag.gif

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: snozberries on 01/26/08 at 12:43 pm


i didn't....BUT at closer examination, it seems to be painted on the side of a vehicle...perhaps a bomber plane?
that would expalin lots of the stuff on that image.
i'm a knucklehead.




oh yeah now I see it again...

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: snozberries on 01/26/08 at 12:45 pm






so.  I know he goes way back..can anyone find a good retro shot of
the maytag repair man?

http://www.characterweb.com/images/CaseMaytag.gif


How bout these???

http://i184.photobucket.com/albums/x109/tvscreen/Maytag_repairman2.jpg


http://i180.photobucket.com/albums/x188/eeslide/maytag.jpg


http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f201/chizman226/maytag.jpg


Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 02/27/08 at 12:39 pm

The retro icon of the week:


THE KEEBLER ELVES

http://img166.imageshack.us/img166/1069/keeblergroupjx3.gif
http://img166.imageshack.us/img166/7107/keeblerwd0.gif

The Keebler Elves - Community of elfin creatures living in a hollow tree on a variety of TV spots produced for the United Biscuit Company (No. 2 in the cookies and crackers market). Their chief spokesman is Ernie the Elf, who sported white hair, and a business outfit that included a red hat, white shirt with yellow tie, green jacket, red vest, and yellow pants with red socks. Created in 1968 by the Chicago-based Leo Burnett Co., for the Keebler Company, Ernie and his industrial baker elves espoused the "uncommonly good" products from the Hollow Tree Bakery. Ernie was immortalized in fudge when Keebler created E. L. Fudge, a fudge-coated shortbread cookie in the shape of Ernie the Elf.

Other elves seen include a pudgy Fryer Tuck, who touted the goodness of "Munch 'ems," two teenage elves Zoot and J.J., Zoot's best friend who pushed pizza taste of "Pizzarias," as well as Ma Keebler, Ernie's mother; Elmer Keebler, a baker-in-training; Buckets, who splashes fudge on cookies; Fast Eddie, the cookie and cracker wrapper; Sam, the peanut butter maker; Roger the cookie jeweler, Doc, the doctor and cookie maker; Zack, the fudge shop foreman; Flo the Tree Accountant; Leonardo the artist; and Professor, Edison, Larry, and Art.

TRIVIA NOTE:  Located at One Hollow Tree Lane in Elmhurst, Illinois 60126. the Keebler Company was named after Godfrey Keebler, a baker who opened a shop in Philadelphia in 1853. In 1927 the Keebler bakery joined forces with other bakers to form the United Biscuit Company (later headquartered in West Drayton, Middlesex, England.)

On March 2001, the Kellogg Company from Battle Creek, Michigan acquired Keebler Foods Company for $3.9 billion. The Keebler Company also makes Zesta Crackers, Wheatable, O'Boises, Ripplin' Snack Chips and Town House Crackers.

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 04/02/08 at 8:30 am

This week's retro icon:

Lucky the Leprechaun: Lucky Charms Cereal

http://img187.imageshack.us/img187/384/423218448f26aa24f11nl7.jpg

Lucky Charms is a popular brand of breakfast cereal produced by the General Mills cereal company of Golden Valley, Minnesota. The cereal consists of two main components: small, toasted bits of oats and multi-colored marshmallow bits (or marbits) in various "magical" shapes making up over 25 percent of the cereal's volume. The label features an affable leprechaun mascot, Lucky, animated in commercials.



The cereal was created in 1963 by a team headed up by the manufacturing vice-president of General Mills, John Holahan. The team was to use the available manufacturing capacity from either of General Mills' two principal cereal products — Wheaties or Cheerios — and do something unique to them. Lucky Charms were first invented by mixing Cheerios with bits of Kraft Circus Peanuts.

http://img187.imageshack.us/img187/2117/luckycharmspr1.jpg

An advertising company employed by General Mills suggested marketing the new cereal around the idea of charm bracelets.Thus the charms of Lucky Charms were born. The mascot, Lucky the Leprechaun, was also born in 1963, a cartoon character whose voice was supplied by Arthur Anderson until 1992.

Following launch, the General Mills marketing department found that sales performed dramatically better if the composition of the marbits changed periodically. Various other features of the marbits were also modified to maximize their appeal to the cereal's target young consumers. In focus groups and market research, more brightly colored charms resulted in better sales than dull or pastel colors. Holahan called Lucky Charms a "lesson in creative marketing." Currently, General Mills conducts frequent "concept-ideation" studies on Lucky Charms.

For a brief period of time in 1975, Lucky the Leprechaun was replaced as the cereal's mascot by Waldo the Wizard, who performed better in focus groups and initial market tests than Lucky. Waldo was quickly retired, and Lucky once again reinstated a year later.

In the 1990s the cereal was sold in the United Kingdom, including Northern Ireland, but is no longer retailed in any part of the UK, and neither in the Republic of Ireland. The cereal can be obtained through specialty internet/mail-order companies, or upmarket stores such as Selfridges in the UK at greatly inflated prices however. (Due to the nature of importing items from the US to the UK)

The main selling point for Lucky Charms has always been the marshmallows (or "marbits" as General Mills calls them). The first boxes of Lucky Charms cereal contained marshmallows in the shapes of pink hearts, yellow moons, orange stars, and green clovers. The lineup has changed occasionally over the years, beginning with the introduction of blue diamonds in 1975. Purple horseshoes joined the roster in 1984, followed by red balloons in 1989, rainbows in 1992, pots of gold in 1994, leprechaun hats in 1996, and shooting stars in 1998.


http://img187.imageshack.us/img187/733/1706113025fcdf6315ali5.jpg

Generally as General Mills introduces new shapes, older marshmallows are phased out. The first marbits to be phased out were the yellow moons and blue diamonds, as General Mills introduced their "Pot of Gold" marshmallow. Since they already had a yellow marbit, they changed the yellow moons to blue moons and eliminated the blue diamonds. Sometimes the marbit phase outs are done quietly, other times the changes form the basis for various commercials and other promotional materials. The current assortment (October 2006) thus consists of purple horseshoes; red balloons; blue moons; orange and white shooting stars; yellow and orange pots of gold; pink, yellow, and blue rainbows; two-tone green leprechaun hats; pink hearts (the only shape to survive since the beginning); with the most recent addition being the return of the clovers in 2004. There have also been slight cosmetic changes in the marbits, as when the orange star changed from six points to five in 1995 and when all of the colors were brightened that same year. Other marshmallows have appeared as short-term promotions, such as a whale shape in 1986, shapes based on the Olympic Games in 1996, and marshmallows shaped like various world landmarks in 1999. The marshmallows also grew in size in 2004.

Recent changes to the marshmallows include: the star shape took more of a "shooting star" design, the orange 5 pointed star being added together with a white "trail" (though making the 5th point in the star almost invisible). More recently, in late 2005 another different kind of marshmallow was added, the "Hidden Key". It is a solid yellow marshmallow that resembles the shape of an older designed door (similar to the shape of a tombstone; flat at the bottom, flat sides with a round top). When liquid is added to the cereal, the sugar inside the marshmallow dissolves and the shape of an older key "appears" as if "by magic". The new tagline for this is "Unlock the door with milk!" This "new" marshmallow type has been used in other kinds of hot and cold cereals, but with mixed success (from characters "hidden" inside a bigger marshmallow to letters appearing). Also to note, this new "Hidden Key" marshmallow only appears in the "regular" Lucky Charms; NOT in the Chocolate or Berry Versions. In early June 2006, General Mills introduced a new Lucky Charms marshmallow, Magic Mirror marshmallows.


Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: snozberries on 04/02/08 at 10:26 am


remember when the marshmallows were a solid color?


http://i258.photobucket.com/albums/hh270/stagedolphin/countchocula.jpg

I prefer count chocula.... again I liked it better when the marshmallows were all brown...


I also used to like Frankenberry and BooBerry but now FrankenBerry is too sweet for me and Booberry gives me the runs.    ::)

http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f255/brightneoncliffs/countchoculaandfriends.gif



Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 05/24/08 at 7:19 pm

Lucky Charms and Count Chocula are both awesome!

For some reason, Frankenberry and Boo Berry were never sold in stores aorund here (perhaps they were not sold in Canada).  In the 70s, and 80s, General Mills created a line of the monster cereals, that also included the ling discontinued 'Yummy Mummy' and 'Fruite Brute'. 

Fruit Bruite, which was discontinued in 1982, can be seen in the Quentin Tarantino movies 'Resevoir Dogs' and 'Pulp Fiction'

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 05/25/08 at 7:17 pm

I love those cereals! I just bought Vaughn Frankenberry a few weeks ago..and I ate some too! I always see Count Chocula...but I hardly ever see Boo Berry (only usually around Halloween).

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 06/09/08 at 10:29 pm

Jeepers! It's been forever since I've posted a new retro icon. So...without further ado, here goes.....

This week's retro icon is:

Snap, Crackle, & Pop (Rice Krispies)

http://img262.imageshack.us/img262/8170/historyfe2.jpg

The three elf characters were originally designed by illustrator Vernon Grant and made their debut in 1933. The names of the elves are derived from a Rice Krispies radio ad. The ad said "Listen to the fairy song of health, the merry chorus sung by Kellogg's Rice Krispies as they merrily snap, crackle, and pop in a bowl of milk. If you've never heard food talking, now is your chance." Inspired by this ad, Grant drew three elves and named them Snap, Crackle, and Pop. He brought the characters to Kellogg's, who bought them on the spot. In the United States and Canada, opinion varies concerning Crackle's occupation, but Snap is always portrayed as a baker and Pop as a soldier.

http://img262.imageshack.us/img262/1261/21755607525e7108de94vq5.jpg

Snap is the oldest and the leader of the group. He solves the problems his two brothers create and wears a baker’s hat.

Crackle is the good-hearted, fun middle child. He gets stuck keeping order between his brothers’ personalities and wears a red-and-white-striped stocking cap.

Pop is the mischievous, clumsy younger child. He plays jokes, doesn’t take things seriously and wears a military hat.

http://img262.imageshack.us/img262/5091/ricekrispies1960sng7.jpg

The Elves' large ears and noses have been reduced and softened over the years. With the introduction of television, the Snap! Crackle! Pop! campaign, with animated characters, initially targeted such children's shows as The Howdy Doody Show. The voices of the original elves were provided by the late Daws Butler, Paul Winchell, and Don Messick, and in more recent days by Chris Evans and Keith Chegwin, as well as Chad Doreck, Eddie Deezen and Thom Adcox-Hernandez.





Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 06/09/08 at 10:32 pm

I remember in the 80s and 90s, animated ads for Rice Krispies were massive.  They almost gave the Keebler Elves a run for their money.  You don't hardly see Snap, Crackle and Pop! too often anymore :\'(

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 06/09/08 at 10:34 pm


I remember in the 80s and 90s, animated ads for Rice Krispies were massive.  They almost gave the Keebler Elves a run for their money.  You don't hardly see Snap, Crackle and Pop! too often anymore :\'(



I know..that's very true. Oh, if you go here (http://www.ricekrispies.com/The_Tale.aspx), you can see what the front of the cereal box looked like from the year 1932 to 2008. Pretty impressive! :)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: Gis on 06/27/08 at 10:13 am


the ever gentlemanly johnny walker

http://www.airmuseum.ca/040504h3.jpg
It's off the side of a Lancaster bomber. I recognised it because i have seen the plane in the flesh so to speak!  ;D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: 2kidsami on 08/11/08 at 1:34 pm

Does anyone remember this icon from my childhood?  I could not miss this show....http://images-19.jpegimages-17.jpegimages-18.jpeg

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 08/11/08 at 11:15 pm


Does anyone remember this icon from my childhood?  I could not miss this show....http://images-19.jpegimages-17.jpegimages-18.jpeg



the image didn't show up.

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: 2kidsami on 08/12/08 at 2:42 pm

Dang I can not get the images to go.  But it was the Captain (and not the Captain I am now so fond of) but the Captain of Kangaroo variety.  With Moose and the ping pongs - man I loved that guy. 

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 08/12/08 at 9:25 pm

I know it's been awhile since I've made a retro icon (I totally deserved that smite ;)).

Here goes...

This week's retro icon:

Sailor Jack--Cracker Jacks

http://i55.photobucket.com/albums/g131/katpc99/180px-Crackerjack2.jpg


Cracker Jack is a US brand of snack consisting of caramel-coated popcorn and peanuts. It is also well known for being packaged with a "Toy Surprise Inside" of nominal value. This attained pop-culture status with the term "came in a Cracker Jack box" referring to an object of limited value.

The product's name is often misstated in a plural form, as in "Buy me some peanuts and Cracker Jacks..." from the song "Take Me Out to the Ball Game," even though it is in the singular in the proper version of the song.

http://img185.imageshack.us/img185/1474/crackerjacksjh4.jpg
http://img185.imageshack.us/img185/1474/crackerjacksjh4.7276506334.jpg

HISTORY

1893: Frederick William Rueckheim (known to friends and family as "Fritz") and his brother Louis mass produce Cracker Jack and sell it at the first Chicago World's Fair in 1893. At the time, it was a mixture of popcorn, molasses, and peanuts and was called "Candied Popcorn and Peanuts".

1896: Rueckheim devises a way to keep the popcorn kernels separate. As each batch was mixed in a cement-mixer-like drum, a small quantity of oil was added -- a closely-guarded trade secret. Before this change, the mixture had been difficult to handle as it stuck together in chunks.

1912: Prizes included in Cracker Jack boxes for the first time. In recent years, the toy and trinket prizes have been replaced with paper prizes displaying riddles and jokes.

1918: Mascots Sailor Jack and his dog, Bingo, are introduced (though they were not registered as trademark logos until 1919.

1964: The Cracker Jack Company is purchased by Borden after a bidding war between Borden and Frito-Lay.

1997: Borden sells the brand to Frito-Lay.



Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 08/12/08 at 10:03 pm

As a kid, I always loved a gool ol' Box of Cracker Jack complete with cool toy inside.  You used to be able to get cool decoder rings.  Nowadays, Cracker Jack comes in a bag, and the surprise inside is a chinsy lick on tatoo

Realistically, you buy Cracker Jack for the sweet buttery caramel taste of the popcorn, but screw that.  I want my f*cking decoder ring ;D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 08/12/08 at 10:15 pm


As a kid, I always loved a gool ol' Box of Cracker Jack complete with cool toy inside.  You used to be able to get cool decoder rings.  Nowadays, Cracker Jack comes in a bag, and the surprise inside is a chinsy lick on tatoo

Realistically, you buy Cracker Jack for the sweet buttery caramel taste of the popcorn, but screw that.  I want my f*cking decoder ring ;D



I know what you mean. The prizes were always something to look forward to when we were younger...now, it's pure crap.

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: Reynolds1863 on 08/20/08 at 4:10 pm


As a kid, I always loved a gool ol' Box of Cracker Jack complete with cool toy inside.  You used to be able to get cool decoder rings.  Nowadays, Cracker Jack comes in a bag, and the surprise inside is a chinsy lick on tatoo

Realistically, you buy Cracker Jack for the sweet buttery caramel taste of the popcorn, but screw that.  I want my f*cking decoder ring ;D


I never got a decoder ring. :\'(

I think they've also changed the recipe.  It doesn't taste the same.

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: snozberries on 08/20/08 at 10:25 pm


I never got a decoder ring. :\'(

I think they've also changed the recipe.  It doesn't taste the same.



You're right about the taste.

Also I always got the crappy tatoo

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 08/20/08 at 11:40 pm



You're right about the taste.

Also I always got the crappy tatoo


It's more than just tattos.  You can get all sorts of prizes inside Cracker Jack ...

http://img513.imageshack.us/img513/5240/crackerjackzu6.png

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: bookmistress4ever on 08/21/08 at 12:19 am


It's more than just tattos.  You can get all sorts of prizes inside Cracker Jack ...

http://img513.imageshack.us/img513/5240/crackerjackzu6.png


Sorry dude, I'm not licking Howard's face and sticking him to my arm.  No way no how-hard)  ;) ;D

That was very very funny though Jason

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: snozberries on 08/21/08 at 12:38 am


Sorry dude, I'm not licking Howard's face and sticking him to my arm.  No way no how-hard)  ;) ;D

That was very very funny though Jason



you're on a roll tonight!!!

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 08/21/08 at 10:50 am


It's more than just tattos.  You can get all sorts of prizes inside Cracker Jack ...

http://img513.imageshack.us/img513/5240/crackerjackzu6.png



mmhahahaah!!! That's flippin'great! Hey wait, why didn't I ever get that kind of prize? ??? :D ;D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: snozberries on 08/21/08 at 11:30 am



mmhahahaah!!! That's flippin'great! Hey wait, why didn't I ever get that kind of prize? ??? :D ;D


wow you have a pretty loose description on what you refer to as a prize...

just kidding howard.

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: Reynolds1863 on 08/21/08 at 3:11 pm


It's more than just tattos.  You can get all sorts of prizes inside Cracker Jack ...

http://img513.imageshack.us/img513/5240/crackerjackzu6.png


It's all downhill from here folks. :D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 08/21/08 at 7:47 pm


It's all downhill from here folks. :D



haha..I wonder what that person was thinking when they discovered that Howhard was the prize? ;D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 08/21/08 at 7:52 pm



haha..I wonder what that person was thinking when they discovered that Howhard was the prize? ;D


They probably questioned if that sticky coating over the popcorn was caramel or not ;D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 08/21/08 at 7:53 pm


They probably questioned if that sticky coating over the popcorn was caramel or not ;D



Ugh. Baby batter coated popcorn. No thanks. 8-P

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 08/21/08 at 7:55 pm

I think I might have just ruined Cracker Jack for everyone ;D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 08/21/08 at 7:55 pm


I think I might have just ruined Cracker Jack for everyone ;D


just think of the name itself....cracker JACKS. ;D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 08/21/08 at 8:00 pm


just think of the name itself....cracker JACKS. ;D


Crack Her Jacks.  Sounds like something women on street corners charge big $$ for ;D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 08/21/08 at 8:17 pm


Crack Her Jacks.  Sounds like something women on street corners charge big $$ for ;D


;D ;D ;D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: snozberries on 08/21/08 at 9:55 pm



They probably questioned if that sticky coating over the popcorn was caramel or not ;D


http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c3/pagingdr/Forum/smileys/vomit-smiley-9529.gif


I think I might have just ruined Cracker Jack for everyone ;D



yes, yes you did!




Ugh. Baby batter coated popcorn. No thanks. 8-P




Baby Batter... that's a new one for me... I like it about as much as I like the term Spunk...

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 08/21/08 at 10:36 pm

Suddenly a topic about a box of Cracker Jack turned into a discussion about Howard and sex.  Man, can I totally twist a conversation into knots or what? :D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 08/21/08 at 10:40 pm


Suddenly a topic about a box of Cracker Jack turned into a discussion about Howard and sex.  Man, can I totally twist a conversation into knots or what? :D



ya...I was about to say that this is the most traffic this thread has EVER had! :D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: Reynolds1863 on 08/22/08 at 3:51 pm



haha..I wonder what that person was thinking when they discovered that Howhard was the prize? ;D


Probably, what the hell did I do to deserve this?

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: Reynolds1863 on 08/22/08 at 3:52 pm


They probably questioned if that sticky coating over the popcorn was caramel or not ;D


That's disgusting. 8-P

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: gibbo on 08/22/08 at 5:15 pm


That's disgusting. 8-P


That's what the popcorn eater said.......

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: CatwomanofV on 08/26/08 at 5:48 pm


It's more than just tattos.  You can get all sorts of prizes inside Cracker Jack ...

http://img513.imageshack.us/img513/5240/crackerjackzu6.png



That is WAY too funny. Karma for making me laugh so hard (or is that "How hard?" lol)



Cat

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: 2kidsami on 08/27/08 at 6:54 pm

this whole conversation is giving me the willies http://www.inthe00s.com/smile/04/eek7.gif http://www.inthe00s.com/smile/04/eek2.gif http://www.inthe00s.com/smile/04/eek.gif I never liked Cracker Jacks to begin with - now I don't think my children will ever get to experience it.  EWWWWWWWWWWWWW

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: greenjello74 on 08/28/08 at 8:52 am


It's more than just tattos.  You can get all sorts of prizes inside Cracker Jack ...

http://img513.imageshack.us/img513/5240/crackerjackzu6.png



Thats too funny, at least he got in a box!!!!!!

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: 2kidsami on 09/23/08 at 8:11 pm

What no more retro Icons????  I will have to think of some,,,,  ??? ??? ??? ???

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 09/23/08 at 9:11 pm

I have one ...

THE GREAT A&W ROOT BEAR

He was first introduced in 1974 as the mascot for A&W Restaurants in Canada, and was later adopted for the American franchise of A&W as well. 

In Canada, he was well-seen in long running ad-campaigns for A&W Restaurants.  Each commercial featured an instrumental tuba song that was so recognizable Canada-wide that it was released as a single titled "Ba-Dum, Ba-Dum" and credited to the artist Major Ursus

The Great Root Bear's role has greatly decreased in today's times.  Despite his appearance on A&W Root Beer cases in Canada and images in A&W restaurants, he has largely been replaced by "The Burger Family" as the mascot of A&W Restaurants in Canada.  He plays a much larger role in America, even though his appearance there is quite sparse as well
 
You can always tell the difference between the American Root Bear (pictured on the right) and the Canadian one (seen on the left) as the logo for each franchise is different. 

http://www.townchronicles.com/images/dancing_20bear.gif http://www.geocastle.com/terrace/clients_terrace/a_w/Bear2.gif



A&W Commercial in Canada with Tuba jingle at the end
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zBEiLw-V7zw

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: 2kidsami on 09/25/08 at 5:40 pm


I have one ...

THE GREAT A&W ROOT BEAR

He was first introduced in 1974 as the mascot for A&W Restaurants in Canada, and was later adopted for the American franchise of A&W as well. 

In Canada, he was well-seen in long running ad-campaigns for A&W Restaurants.  Each commercial featured an instrumental tuba song that was so recognizable Canada-wide that it was released as a single titled "Ba-Dum, Ba-Dum" and credited to the artist Major Ursus

The Great Root Bear's role has greatly decreased in today's times.  Despite his appearance on A&W Root Beer cases in Canada and images in A&W restaurants, he has largely been replaced by "The Burger Family" as the mascot of A&W Restaurants in Canada.  He plays a much larger role in America, even though his appearance there is quite sparse as well
 
You can always tell the difference between the American Root Bear (pictured on the right) and the Canadian one (seen on the left) as the logo for each franchise is different. 

http://www.townchronicles.com/images/dancing_20bear.gif http://www.geocastle.com/terrace/clients_terrace/a_w/Bear2.gif



A&W Commercial in Canada with Tuba jingle at the end
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zBEiLw-V7zw



Is it just me or does the A&W Bear look A LOT like (a retro icon of my childhood - My father was an avid beer drinker and bar collectibles) the Hamm's Bear in a sweatshirt???????

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: 2kidsami on 09/25/08 at 5:43 pm


Is it just me or does the A&W Bear look A LOT like (a retro icon of my childhood - My father was an avid beer drinker and bar collectibles) the Hamm's Bear in a sweatshirt???????

I forgot the pictures - doh!!!!

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 02/25/09 at 8:36 am

I thought this would be a good time to revive this thread, it's been long enough. :D

The featured retro icon is:

TOUCAN SAM

http://i223.photobucket.com/albums/dd146/jlab1/toucansammypopsandpuddin.gif

Toucan Sam is the avian mascot of Froot Loops cereal. The character is a blue cartoon toucan with a striped beak. Although his beak originally had two pink stripes, during the 1970s it became a tradition that each stripe on his beak represented one of the flavors of the pieces in the cereal: (red = cherry, yellow = lemon, orange = orange). The additions of new colors have made this color scheme no longer accurate. There are now seven colors of this cereal. The first new color was green, which was introduced in 1991. After that came purple in 1994, then blue in 1997. The newest color, gold, was introduced in 2006.
The colors perhaps represent different flavors present in the cereal, but each color has the same flavor.

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b32/spiffywonderboy/10182007/Fruit-Loops-Posters.gif

http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g313/barniesgirl/Cereal/12957.jpg

Biologically speaking, Toucan Sam appears to be a Keel-billed Toucan. Keel-billed Toucans are well-known for their colorful beaks and propensity for fruit in their diets, two features which are very consistent with the character.

In commercials featuring Toucan Sam, he exhibits the ability to smell out Froot Loops from great distances. He invariably locates a concealed bowl or box of the cereal while intoning, "follow my nose! It always knows!" Sometimes followed by "the flavor of fruit! wherever it grows!" http://i266.photobucket.com/albums/ii244/fruitloops4u/fruitloops.gif


http://i250.photobucket.com/albums/gg248/A_M_Y_827/48_fruit_loops.jpg



History

The cartoon character Toucan Sam was created by Manuel R. Vega and originally voiced by Mel Blanc, using an ordinary American accent. Blanc's original commercials were noted for their use of Pig Latin (referring to the cereal as OOT-fray OOPS-lay). The ad agency later decided to switch to the English accent more commonly associated with the character. They then employed Paul Frees to do what is, in effect, an imitation of Ronald Colman. In the most recent cartoon advertisements for Froot Loops, Toucan Sam's voice is now performed by Canadian voice actor Maurice LaMarche after Paul Frees death.


Since 1994, Toucan Sam has been joined onscreen by Puey, Susey, and Louis. The nephews are voiced by two notable voice over artists: Frank Welker and Jim Cummings. In recent commercials, Toucan Sam's nephews have joined him in opposition to many practical Froot Loop-loving enemies through a series of integrated commercials (each of them as well appropriately advertise the cereal itself). In recent recordings Mike Leboff will be voicing yet another one of Sams foes.

The first of these enemies were Dr. Peacock, a peacock modeled after a stereotypical mad scientist who stole Toucan Sam's color with a giant laser called a color ray, thus rendering him black and white. Toucan Sam and his nephews find Dr. Peacock's lair and use the color ray to return his colors, and add Rainbow Loops to the cereal as voted by kids everywhere.

Another enemy, an alien called the Nasty Alien Froot Monster, lands on Earth in search of the ultimate fruit taste of Froot Loops. He captures Toucan Sam, but thanks to online voting, Toucan Sam's nephews gave the Froot Monster what he wanted, allowing Toucan Sam to escape. The Froot Monster, however, wanted more and stole Toucan Sam's cereal box. When Toucan Sam and his nephews found him, the Froot Monster devoured the entire box, and turned from bad to good by changing from green to yellow and creating Alien Berry Froot Loops, which he shared with everyone.

Then after, the smell of Froot Loops travels through the mirror to the land of Froot Scents, where the Froot Queen owns all fruity aromas. When she smells the Froot Loops, she declares it the best fruit scent and orders her guards (humans with fruit for heads) to capture the Froot Loops. The guards successfully stole the Froot Loops and broke the mirror in the process. Toucan Sam and his nephews fix the mirror, and Toucan Sam follows them inside, commenting on the land's wonderful and strange fruit, and takes back the Froot Loops from the Froot Queen. The Froot Queen orders her guards to capture Toucan Sam, but the confusion allows Toucan Sam to take some of the land's fruit, where kids decided through online voting that the new loop should be Cherry-Cherry. Toucan Sam then escaped and added the Cherry-Cherry to the cereal. He even gave the new Froot Loops to the Froot Queen, whom after taking a bite, turned into a pretty good queen and rewarded her guards with Cherry-Cherry loops.

A current series of commercials for Froot Loops follow the adventures of Toucan Sam and his nephews finding a treasure map and following it to a treasure that once belonged to a toucan pirate, Blackbeak (the name is a pun on Blackbeard). In each exploit, they reach a new destination that holds a new variety of Froot Loops, the most recent being "Golden Bars" (in reality, just 3 Yellow Froot Loops stuck in a line). Blackbeak looks very similar to Toucan Sam. Toucan Sam's age is not known. Currently, the Toucan Sam campaign is produced at Pepper Films (www.pepperfilms.net) by director, Jean Perramon.



Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: snozberries on 02/25/09 at 12:03 pm



Woo Hoo! The Retro Icon is back....and what a cool pick!  LUV YA TUCAN!


hmmm suddenly I'm craving some cereal

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: whistledog on 02/28/09 at 1:08 am

The last time I saw a Froot Loops commercial, Toucan Sam had his little nephews with him LOL

I have a plush Toucan Sam toy, as well as a Tony the Tiger LOL

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: 2kidsami on 03/04/09 at 6:33 pm

I still think they should make a perfume that smells like fruit loops. 

I could always Identify the Sassafras tree in college because if you broke a twig of (or scratched it) it would smell like fruit loops (amoung other distinguishing factors, but the smell test was my favorite ;D). 

I love Fruit Loops, I actually prefer fruity pebbles, but fruit loops will definitely work for me.  My favorite time is opening a new box, rip open the bag and take a huge wiff.  DELICIOUS, FRUITY, WONDERFUL, SMELLLS

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: snozberries on 03/04/09 at 11:45 pm


I still think they should make a perfume that smells like fruit loops. 

I could always Identify the Sassafras tree in college because if you broke a twig of (or scratched it) it would smell like fruit loops (amoung other distinguishing factors, but the smell test was my favorite ;D). 

I love Fruit Loops, I actually prefer fruity pebbles, but fruit loops will definitely work for me.  My favorite time is opening a new box, rip open the bag and take a huge wiff.  DELICIOUS, FRUITY, WONDERFUL, SMELLLS


I always get the lemon scent at the car wash because it reminds me of fruit loops....or is it trix? same dif.

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: Reynolds1863 on 03/04/09 at 11:49 pm


I always get the lemon scent at the car wash because it reminds me of fruit loops....or is it trix? same dif.




The Trix scents were more distinct individually.

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: bookmistress4ever on 07/21/09 at 12:18 am

In honor of the 40th anniversary of the Moon Landing, I thought I'd look up advertising with moon stuff.

Here are a couple:

http://www.plan59.com/images/JPGs/arma59moon01.jpg
From 1959:
STEPS IN THE RACE TO OUTER SPACE. This 30-foot high Unicycle is designed for preliminary exploration of the Moon, once a base camp has been established. It's entirely constructed of inflated, rubberized fabric, with the exception of strengthening members, hatches and a few other items. Electricity for the motors comes from solar batteries mounted in the "parasol." The cleated, rotating wheel upon which the Unicycle travels is made of inflated tubes. A spare wheel, carried around the body, acts as a bumper in traversing narrow defiles. Living quarters make up a middle deck.



http://www.cartoonstock.com/lowres/mvo0061l.jpg



Hip-hop astronauts dance on an alien moon... until their space buggy gets jacked and their ship gets stolen, in this Bridgestone ad from the Superbowl. I have to admit a weakness for dancing space-dudes.
http://io9.com/5144099/the-moon-is-no-place-to-lose-your-tires

http://www.sutherlandsurvey.com/Images/Columns07_Images/VW%20Moon%20Lander%20vsmall.jpg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=htFyOaQxt54  Hummer H2 moon commercial

http://www.artlex.com/ArtLex/d/images/differ_armstrong.JPG Apple computers - Think Different campaign

http://www.thirdwayblog.com/images/400/Miller%20Girl%20in%20the%20Moon.jpg Miller High Life beer ad

http://adland.tv/n1rv4n4g8/2006/augjpgs/basketballmoonadland.jpg Adidas shoes
http://adland.tv/n1rv4n4g8/2006/augjpgs/nikemoonadland.jpg Nike shoes

http://www.robertopiecollection.com/Application/Images/Newpics/14OCC03-sm.jpg J edmonson Confectionary

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/206/515174302_57bd6d786e.jpg?v=0

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 07/21/09 at 3:12 pm

that's awesome Patty! :)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: 2kidsami on 07/24/09 at 11:04 am


In honor of the 40th anniversary of the Moon Landing, I thought I'd look up advertising with moon stuff.

Here are a couple:

http://www.plan59.com/images/JPGs/arma59moon01.jpg
From 1959:
STEPS IN THE RACE TO OUTER SPACE. This 30-foot high Unicycle is designed for preliminary exploration of the Moon, once a base camp has been established. It's entirely constructed of inflated, rubberized fabric, with the exception of strengthening members, hatches and a few other items. Electricity for the motors comes from solar batteries mounted in the "parasol." The cleated, rotating wheel upon which the Unicycle travels is made of inflated tubes. A spare wheel, carried around the body, acts as a bumper in traversing narrow defiles. Living quarters make up a middle deck.



http://www.cartoonstock.com/lowres/mvo0061l.jpg



Hip-hop astronauts dance on an alien moon... until their space buggy gets jacked and their ship gets stolen, in this Bridgestone ad from the Superbowl. I have to admit a weakness for dancing space-dudes.
http://io9.com/5144099/the-moon-is-no-place-to-lose-your-tires

http://www.sutherlandsurvey.com/Images/Columns07_Images/VW%20Moon%20Lander%20vsmall.jpg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=htFyOaQxt54  Hummer H2 moon commercial

http://www.artlex.com/ArtLex/d/images/differ_armstrong.JPG Apple computers - Think Different campaign

http://www.thirdwayblog.com/images/400/Miller%20Girl%20in%20the%20Moon.jpg Miller High Life beer ad

http://adland.tv/n1rv4n4g8/2006/augjpgs/basketballmoonadland.jpg Adidas shoes
http://adland.tv/n1rv4n4g8/2006/augjpgs/nikemoonadland.jpg Nike shoes

http://www.robertopiecollection.com/Application/Images/Newpics/14OCC03-sm.jpg J edmonson Confectionary

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/206/515174302_57bd6d786e.jpg?v=0


Michael Jordan did an Adidas commercial/advertisement ???

:o


Cool Stuff Patty 8)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: snozberries on 07/24/09 at 12:41 pm


Michael Jordan did an Adidas commercial/advertisement ???

:o


Cool Stuff Patty 8)


Jordan never played for the T-Wolves!  :P

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: 2kidsami on 07/24/09 at 1:08 pm


Jordan never played for the T-Wolves!  :P
Never noticed uniform - thanks...


I was confused  ::)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: snozberries on 07/24/09 at 1:44 pm


Never noticed uniform - thanks...


I was confused  ::)


you saying all basketball players look alike?  ???

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: 2kidsami on 07/24/09 at 2:17 pm


you saying all basketball players look alike?  ???
No silly, I just did not look at it well enough to even notice the uniform... I glanced and posted :P 

:D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: snozberries on 07/24/09 at 2:23 pm


No silly, I just did not look at it well enough to even notice the uniform... I glanced and posted :P 

:D


sure....  ;)

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 04/23/12 at 10:28 am

Hey guys! Wow, it's been a long time. So, here's a new retro icon for ya!


MICKEY MOUSE


http://www.starstore.com/acatalog/Mickey_Mouise-retro.jpg

Mickey Mouse is a cartoon character created in 1928 by Walt Disney and Ub Iwerks at The Walt Disney Studio. Mickey is an anthropomorphic black mouse and typically wears red shorts, large yellow shoes, and white gloves. He is one of the most recognizable cartoon characters in the world and is the mascot of The Walt Disney Company, the world's largest media conglomerate in terms of annual revenue.
Mickey debuted in November 1928 in the animated cartoon Steamboat Willie after initially appearing in a test screening earlier that year. He went on to appear in over 130 films including The Band Concert (1935), Brave Little Tailor (1938), and Fantasia (1940). Mickey appeared primarily in short films, but also in a few feature-length films. Nine of Mickey's cartoons were nominated for the Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film, one of which, Lend a Paw, won the award in 1942. In 1978, Mickey became the first cartoon character to have a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_NYR92N7qBB0/TJ61cCcU_pI/AAAAAAAACiw/WUcGPk-aiX0/s1600/dlrp_mickey_minnie_retro_013105.gif


Beginning 1930, Mickey has also been featured extensively as a comic strip character. His self-titled newspaper strip, drawn primarily by Floyd Gottfredson, ran for 45 years. Mickey has also appeared in comic books and in television series such as The Mickey Mouse Club (1955–1996) and others. He also appears in other media such as video games as well as merchandising, and is a meetable character at the Disney parks.
Mickey typically appears alongside his girlfriend Minnie Mouse, his pet dog Pluto, his friends Horace Horsecollar, Donald Duck, and Goofy, and his nemesis Pete among others (see Mickey Mouse universe).
http://images.sodahead.com/slideshows/000002989/vintage-mickey-28807492490_xlarge.jpeg

Originally characterized as a mischievous antihero, Mickey's increasing popularity led to his being rebranded as an everyman, usually seen as an ever cheerful, yet shy role model. In 2009, Disney announced that they will begin to rebrand the character again by putting less emphasis on his pleasant, cheerful side and reintroducing the more mischievous and adventurous sides of his personality, starting with the video game Epic Mickey.

http://www.polyvore.com/cgi/img-set/BQcDAAAAAwoDanBnAAAABC5vdXQKFkxOcmNlQUgwM2hHVUhHVVNyemJXTncAAAACaWQKAXgAAAAEc2l6ZQ.jpg

"I only hope that we never lose sight of one thing – that it was all started by a mouse."
—Walt Disney, Disneyland; October 27, 1954
Mickey Mouse was created as a replacement for Oswald the Lucky Rabbit, an earlier cartoon character created by the Disney studio for Charles Mintz of Universal Studios. In the spring of 1928, with the series going strong, Disney asked Mintz for an increase in the budget. But Mintz instead demanded that Walt take a 20 percent budget cut, and as leverage, he reminded Disney that Universal owned the character, and revealed that he had already signed most of Disney's current employees to his new contract. Mintz owned Oswald and thought he had Disney over a barrel. Angrily, Disney refused the deal and returned to produce the final Oswald cartoons he contractually owed Mintz. Disney was dismayed at the betrayal by his staff, but determined to restart from scratch. The new Disney Studio initially consisted of animator Ub Iwerks and a loyal apprentice artist, Les Clark, who together with Wilfred Jackson were among the few who remained loyal to Walt. One lesson Disney learned from the experience was to thereafter always make sure that he owned all rights to the characters produced by his company.
In the spring of 1928, Disney asked Ub Iwerks to start drawing up new character ideas. Iwerks tried sketches of various animals, such as dogs and cats, but none of these appealed to Disney. A female cow and male horse were also rejected. They would later turn up as Clarabelle Cow and Horace Horsecollar. (A male frog, also rejected, would later show up in Iwerks' own Flip the Frog series.) Walt Disney got the inspiration for Mickey Mouse from his old pet mouse he used to have on his farm. In 1925, Hugh Harman drew some sketches of mice around a photograph of Walt Disney. These inspired Ub Iwerks to create a new mouse character for Disney. "Mortimer Mouse" had been Disney's original name for the character before his wife, Lillian, convinced him to change it, and ultimately Mickey Mouse came to be. Actor Mickey Rooney has claimed that, during his Mickey McGuire days, he met cartoonist Walt Disney at the Warner Brothers studio, and that Disney was inspired to name Mickey Mouse after him.

https://encrypted-tbn1.google.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQtRtIWmnZMjGOGh5zmxIE6sE9tcAVw-Z8ECh14_vq2NpmC72aPyw


In the 1950s, Mickey became more known for his appearances on television, particularly with the Mickey Mouse Club. Many of his theatrical cartoon shorts were rereleased on television series such as Ink & Paint Club, various forms of the Walt Disney anthology television series, and on home video. Mickey returned to theatrical animation in 1983 with Mickey's Christmas Carol, an adaptation of Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol in which Mickey played Bob Cratchit. This was followed up in 1990 with The Prince and the Pauper.
Throughout the decades, Mickey Mouse competed with Warner Bros.' Bugs Bunny for animated popularity. But in 1988, in a historic moment in motion picture history, the two rivals finally shared screen time in the Robert Zemeckis Disney/Amblin film Who Framed Roger Rabbit. Disney and Warner signed an agreement stating that each character had exactly the same amount of screen time, right down to the frame.
Similar to his animated inclusion into a live-action film on Roger Rabbit, Mickey made a featured cameo appearance in the 1990 television special The Muppets at Walt Disney World where he met Kermit the Frog. The two are established in the story as having been old friends. The Muppets have otherwise spoofed and referenced Mickey over a dozen times since the 1970s. Eventually, The Muppets were purchased by the Walt Disney Company in 2004.
Mickey appeared on several animated logos for Walt Disney Home Entertainment, starting with the "Neon Mickey" logo and then to the "Sorcerer Mickey" logos used for regular and Classics release titles.
His most recent theatrical cartoon short was 1995's short Runaway Brain, while in 1999–2004, he appeared in made-for-video features, like Mickey's Once Upon a Christmas; Mickey, Donald, Goofy: The Three Musketeers; and the computer-animated Mickey's Twice Upon a Christmas.
Many television programs have centered around Mickey, such as the recent ABC shows Mickey Mouse Works (1999—2000), Disney's House of Mouse (2001—2003) and Disney Channel's Mickey Mouse Clubhouse (2006–present). Prior to all these, Mickey was also featured as an unseen character in the Bonkers episode "You Oughta Be In Toons".
Mickey has recently been announced to star in two films. One is being based on the Magic Kingdom theme park at the Walt Disney World Resort, while the other is a film idea pitched by Walt Disney Animation Studios veteran Burny Mattinson centering around Mickey, Donald and Goofy.

http://www.vintagepostcards.org/auctions/orlando-fl-florida-walt-disney-world-disneyana-mickey-mouse-firefighter-firefighting.jpg

As the official Walt Disney mascot, Mickey has played a central role in the Disney parks since the opening of Disneyland in 1955. As with other characters, Mickey is often portrayed by a non-speaking costumed actor. In this form he has participated in ceremonies and countless parades. A popular activity with guests is getting to meet and pose for photographs with the mouse. As of the presidency of George W. Bush, Mickey has met every U.S. President since Harry Truman, with the exception of Lyndon B. Johnson. Mickey also features in several specific attractions at the Disney parks. Mickey's Toontown (Disneyland, Tokyo Disneyland, Magic Kingdom as "Mickey's Toontown Fair") is a themed land which is a recreation of Mickey's neighborhood. Buildings are built in a cartoon style and guests can visit Mickey or Minnie's houses, Donald Duck's boat, or Goofy's garage. This is a common place to meet the characters.
Mickey's PhilharMagic (Magic Kingdom, Tokyo Disneyland, Hong Kong Disneyland) is a 4D film which features Mickey in the familiar role of symphony conductor. At Main Street Cinema several of Mickey's short films are shown on a rotating basis; the sixth film is always Steamboat Willie. Mickey plays a central role in Fantasmic! (Disneyland Resort, Disney's Hollywood Studios) a live nighttime show which famously features Mickey in his role as the Sorcerer's Apprentice. Mickey was also a central character in the now defunct Mickey Mouse Revue (Magic Kingdom, Tokyo Disneyland) which was an indoor show featuring animatronic characters. Mickey's face currently graces the Mickey's Fun Wheel at Disney California Adventure Park
In addition to Mickey's overt presence in the parks, numerous images of him are also subtly included in sometimes unexpected places. This phenomenon is known as "Hidden Mickey", involving hidden images in Disney films, theme parks and merchandise.

https://encrypted-tbn2.google.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTFcAJ9dwZKHXVHj9vgd4B3V6xvTyGmR7eRYfKasowkZxLAPOpKoQ

Like many popular characters, Mickey has starred in many video games, including Mickey Mousecapade on the Nintendo Entertainment System, Mickey Mania: The Timeless Adventures of Mickey Mouse, Mickey's Ultimate Challenge, and Disney's Magical Quest on the Super Nintendo Entertainment System, Castle of Illusion Starring Mickey Mouse on the Mega Drive/Genesis, Mickey Mouse: Magic Wands! on the Game Boy, and many others. In the 2000s, the Disney's Magical Quest series were ported to the Game Boy Advance, while Mickey made his sixth generation era debut in Disney's Magical Mirror Starring Mickey Mouse, a Nintendo GameCube title aimed at younger audiences. Mickey plays a major role in the Kingdom Hearts series, as the king of Disney Castle and aide to the protagonist, Sora. King Mickey wields the Keyblade, a weapon in the form of a key that has the power to open any lock and combat darkness. Epic Mickey, featuring a darker version of the Disney universe, was released in 2010 for the Wii. The game is part of an effort by The Walt Disney Company to re-brand the Mickey Mouse character by moving away from his current squeaky clean image and reintroducing the mischievous side of his personality.

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: Ashkicksass on 04/23/12 at 11:10 am

Oh Mickey you're so fine, you're so fine you blow my mind!  :D

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: quirky_cat_girl on 04/23/12 at 11:19 am


Oh Mickey you're so fine, you're so fine you blow my mind!  :D


http://dummidumbwit.files.wordpress.com/2010/02/2795141.jpg

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: Foo Bar on 04/25/12 at 1:10 am

http://www.wired.com/images_blogs/gamelife/2012/04/larry1joke.jpg

Leisure Suit Larry is 25.  And the original designer wants to reboot it, independently of the major game publishing houses.  We'll come back to that point, but first...

...going back another ten years, Leisure Suit Larry is a descendant of one of the first adventure games for the Apple ]Softporn Adventure.

Now with a name like that, I'd be remiss if I didn't contrast the provocative box art:

http://www.filfre.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/SoftpornAdventure.jpg

Yes, in that hot tub is Roberta Williams, developer of King's Quest, who could sling code as much as her husband Ken Williams, who's serving champagne.

...with the reality of what computing was like back in the day:

http://www.filfre.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/softporn1.png

Reviewer's comment: "As you can see above, the actual sex is pretty much left to the imagination; staying period specific, Softporn is very much Porky’s rather than Debbie Does Dallas"


Hey guys! Wow, it's been a long time. So, here's a new retro icon for ya!


Since Quirk came back to mention the Mouse, I'll bring us all the way from 80s retrocomputing back to The Mouse:

"No doubt about it: There were two people that had a heavy influence on Sierra: Bill Gates and Walt Disney. These two companies were our role models. I read every book written on both companies. I did everything to try to understand how they thought, and how they did business."

  - Ken Williams of On-Line Systems, aka Sierra On-Line, as interviewed in 2006.

As of this writing (Apr 24), the effort to Make Leisure Suit Larry Come Again is at $493,495 of $500,000 goal, and 10,970 people have signed on as backers.

Subject: Re: Retro icon of the week

Written By: Foo Bar on 04/28/12 at 2:34 am


As of this writing (Apr 24), the effort to Make Leisure Suit Larry Come Again is at $493,495 of $500,000 goal, and 10,970 people have signed on as backers.


Update: 12,187 backers, $534,655 raised. 

Leisure Suit Larry will come again.

Check for new replies or respond here...