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Subject: Impossible Trivia II (Over)

Written By: Mushroom on 04/02/06 at 7:42 pm

OK, here is another of my Impossible Trivia tests.  This time, I am going to cover even more areas.

Feel free to answer as many as you can, but I ask that you try and not answere huge blocks at once unless you honestly know the answers.  But these are going to be so diverse, I kinda find that hard to imagine.

1.  What world event brought the Human race closest to extincion then anything else.  karen - Lake Toba Supervolcano, Indonesia

2.  What do the following songs all have in common?  Windbreaker05 - Titles are not mentioned in song
     Hair Of The Dog, by Nazareth
     Baba O'Riley, by The Who
     Young Turks, by Rod Stweart
     Space Oddity, by David Bowie
     Virginia Woolf, by Indigo Girls

3.  What are the 3 shortest words in the English language?  scumbie - a, I, O

4.  What makes the town clock in Wellfleet, Massachusetts unique from any other town clock in the world?  Darkbreed - It operates on "Ships Time" (quarter after is 2 bells, half past is 4 bells, quarter til is 6 bells, top of the hour is 8 bells)

5.  What do the words orange, purple, and month have in common?  Windbreaker05 - No rhymes in English

6.  What was the first CD made in the United States?  loki_13 - Born In The USA, by Bruce Springsteen

7.  What was the mask that Michael Myers wore in the original Halloween?  whis

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: Windbreaker05 on 04/02/06 at 8:00 pm

Only ones for which I've any clue...

2. The titles aren't mentioned in the song.
3.  "The English language"
5.  They don't have common English rhymes
13.  Fear of death, sounds like

Cool quiz

Taken out the two guesses as I've just now comprehended the instructions

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: whistledog on 04/02/06 at 8:09 pm

#6 - I'm guessing "Brothers in Arms" by Dire Straits.  I know that album had something to do with the early success of the CD
#7 - William Shatner

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: loki 13 on 04/02/06 at 8:11 pm

#6..Born In The USA..Bruce Springsteen
#8..Charlie Chaplin
#12..Plastic tube at the end of a shoelace

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: Mushroom on 04/02/06 at 8:19 pm


Taken out the two guesses as I've just now comprehended the instructions


I am trying to discourage people from simply giving blind guesses, or looking-up the answers up on-line.  At least early in the contest.  This gives people who really know the chance to show off their trivia knowledge.  :)

An educated guess is one thing, a blind guess is discouraged.

And you got 2 of them, not to bad actually.  :)

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: Darkbreed on 04/02/06 at 8:44 pm

#3. A, an, is?
#20. Thomas Jefferson, 5 cents, and front and back of the $2 bill?

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: scumbie on 04/02/06 at 11:42 pm

3. A, I, O
9. Homer
11. Gum
13.  Fear of rodents.
15 Popular rumor is from 2 characters in "It's a Wonderful Life," but Sesame Street says it's just a coincidence.

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: Mushroom on 04/02/06 at 11:43 pm


#20. Thomas Jefferson, 5 cents, and front and back of the $2 bill?


Nice guess.  This is why I mentioned current US currency.  Even though the $2 bill is barely in circulation, it is so uncommon that it is not in any form of common useage.  Out of over 900 million notes made between 1976 and 2004, less then 500,000 are considered to be "in circulation".

Actually, I am one of the few people that tries to keep this note (and $1 and $0.50 pieces) in circulation.  Whenever I go to the bank, I ask for them on purpose.  The ironic thing is that whenever I do this, the cashiers invariably buy them from the till, and take them home.

I give this an "honorable mention", because it actually ties the person who is depicted on currency in every-day useage.

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: Sister Morphine on 04/02/06 at 11:45 pm

18. A murder?
20.  Abraham Lincoln; $5 bill and the front and back of the penny.

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: Doc Brown on 04/03/06 at 12:09 am

I don't know if you're religious, but would #1 be the Noah's Flood? Either that or the Cuban Missile Crisis.
14. Used Furniture Dealer
17. by population, Mexico City (ab. 25 million)

Your Pal,
Doc

8)

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: Badfinger-fan on 04/03/06 at 2:34 am

19. Come Together  8)

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: maddog on 04/03/06 at 3:52 am

Hey Mushroom, good quiz :).

#16.....I think that both of these are either hoaxes or mistakes. Piltdown Man was a 19th Century hoax (I seem to recall H.G. Wells being involved ???) where some bones from a variety of sources were put together and supposedly identified as the "missing link". The Brontosaurus doesn't actually exist in the palaeontologoical record either, again it's a collection of bones from different dinosaurs that was incorrectly identified as a unique species.

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: karen on 04/03/06 at 7:13 am

#1 the great plague

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: Mushroom on 04/03/06 at 7:49 am


Hi again Mushroom, I see you've updated 17 to show 'by size'. I still submit Mt.Isa .. if you've got something else, maybe you can check my answer b4 ruling on this .. I seem to remember that answer being in the Guiness book of records.


Actually, this city is bigger.  It's boarder is over 150,000 miles long.


By the way (again), I've just noticed you've marked 'murder' of ravens as being correct. That is not the answer I've read, (in 2) of my sources .. murder is usually applied to crows. Admittedly, crows & ravens look similar, but they have a unique collective noun (as far as I can see). I'll leave it at this stage in case anyone else wants to come up with it.


OK, here is the lowdown on this...

Groups of animals are given a somewhat "unofficial" name.  The names we use (herd, pack, gaggle, etc) are descended from folklore and tradition.  The term for a group of Crows at this time was "Murder", from folklore that groups of crows flying over a person was an evil omen.

During this time, Crows and Ravens were considered variations of the same animal, so were treated the same.  The band "Cradle Of Filth" even has a song called "A Murder Of Ravens in Fugue".

More recently, there are other names that have come up to describe a group of Ravens.  "Conspiracy" is one of those, and I rather like the sound of it.  Yet another reference I have found calls them "an unkindness of Ravens".

I am sure this is also that changes from area to area.  Since these mostly descend from folklore, there are probably different names in different areas.

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: Mushroom on 04/03/06 at 7:56 am


Hey Mushroom, good quiz :).

#16.....I think that both of these are either hoaxes or mistakes. Piltdown Man was a 19th Century hoax (I seem to recall H.G. Wells being involved ???) where some bones from a variety of sources were put together and supposedly identified as the "missing link". The Brontosaurus doesn't actually exist in the palaeontologoical record either, again it's a collection of bones from different dinosaurs that was incorrectly identified as a unique species.


Actually, it was Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.  He did not create it, but he was suckered into it, and wrote several articles on it.

And you are right about good old Brontosaurus.  In real palentology terms, it was the body of an Apatasaurus, with the skill of a Camarasaurus placed on top.

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: Mushroom on 04/03/06 at 8:00 am

OK, here is a little bit more of a definition of #1.

The event I am refering to actually happened.  There is ample evidence of this in both climate records, geological records, and from exploring mitocondrial DNA in humans.  It is estimated that this event brought humans to the brink of extinction, leaving less then 5.000 alive in the entire planet.

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: Mushroom on 04/03/06 at 10:28 am


As for Ravens, my books both said 'Unkindness'. I have a love-hate relationship with trivia .. you can study your socks off till the cows come home ... remember quite some time later verbatim what you've read .. which should be a 'gold star' (though I'd forgotten Unkindness in this case  :().  & still be told you're wrong, 'cause the quiz setter is using a different source to you. So FRUSTRATING!).

So I suppose in one sense I'm kind of glad I didn't remember 'Unkindness' .. being marked wrong would have been very 'unkind'....

::)


I agree, and in looking at it more, I probably should not have asked that one.  While "murder" is the most common name used, there are others that are used, if less frequently.

In fact, looking it up on Wikipedia, I find that it recognizes Murder, Conspiracy, and Unkindness as names for groups of Ravens.  And it lists a 4th as uncertain, "a storytelling of ravens".

For Crows, it lists horde, hover, murder, muster, parcel, and storytelling.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collective_nouns_for_birds

And Ice Age is a good guess, but it is not really an "event".  Ice Ages are long term cooling trends, which take place over tens or hundreds of thousands of years.  In fact, a few climatologists have even theorized that the Ice Ages are more the norm, and the Interglacial periods of warm climate are the exceptions and not the rule.

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: karen on 04/03/06 at 10:57 am


Hi again 'Mushroom'

Please have another look at my post (above), which I've edited/added more info to since your response. Still no comment on the author answer. As for the ice age, well if that's not what you want, I suspect you must be talking about a giant meteor that landed somewhere around the Yucatan peninsula of Mexico, believed to have wiped out the dinosaurs, leading to climactic changes etc; etc;




But dinosaurs weren't alive at the same time as humans.

If it wasn't the Great Plague  (Black Death) as I first thought then it might be similar to 70sto80s guys idea in that was it some massive volcano which caused a similar long lasting 'winter' with all the ash in the sky.  I'm sure I could google to find the exact name.

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: Mushroom on 04/03/06 at 12:15 pm


Hi again 'Mushroom'

Please have another look at my post (above), which I've edited/added more info to since your response. Still no comment on the author answer. As for the ice age, well if that's not what you want, I suspect you must be talking about a giant meteor that landed somewhere around the Yucatan peninsula of Mexico, believed to have wiped out the dinosaurs, leading to climactic changes etc; etc;


That event was the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction event, and occured roughly 65 million years ago.  Since the most advanced mammals at the time were rodents, there was no "humans" to be affected.  They evolved roughly 64 million years later.

The humans I am talking about are Homo Sapiens.  And the event happened in the last 100,000 years.

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: Mushroom on 04/03/06 at 12:20 pm


p.s. I've noticed you seem to have skipped over some of my answers, leaving me uncertain whether they're right/wrong/forgotten .. whatever (i.e no comment from you). Anticipating that you have a different answer from Jules Verne for q.9 .. I had a couple of other authors in mind .. one being H.G. Wells, the other, Aldous Huxley. Assuming J.V. is wrong, I now submit HG Wells.


Nope, it is none of these authors.  I will post some hints in a few days for any questions left unanswered.

However, George Orwell loved the book, and the earliest edition is 180 years old this year.  That predates all of the guesses so far quite a few years.

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: FaultyDog on 04/03/06 at 1:57 pm


10.  What makes postage stamps in Israel unique from any other in the world?


I think it would be that they're the only ones in the world that have their nomination value and country name expressed in Hebrew.

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: Darkbreed on 04/03/06 at 2:20 pm

is #4 becuase it gose by ship time?
#17 im not sure but ill take a big guess
i would say the largest city on eart would be Vatican city? i hope i spelled right

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: loki 13 on 04/03/06 at 6:22 pm

I know the answers to #'s 3 and 20 are technically correct, But I have a problem
accepting it.For #3 when was the last time anyone used O in a sentence, 1640?
Maybe on legal documents you may see it but not in every day use so it is not common
to the English language.#20, when I read visible I assumed you could actually see a face.Lincoln
is merely depicted on the back of a penny.Yes, his figure is seated in his his chair but it is so small
it is indistinguishable.We know it's Lincoln because of the Lincoln memorial but to an outsider Lincoln
is not visible.

Finally, could your answer to #1 be The Little Ice Age

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: Mushroom on 04/03/06 at 8:10 pm


For #3 when was the last time anyone used O in a sentence, 1640?
Maybe on legal documents you may see it but not in every day use so it is not common
to the English language


Actually, it is used almost every day.  It is still frequently heard in Ireland, and in some areas of England.  It is also used frequently in giving time (11 O'Clock) and in names (O'Riley).  The use of it as a vocative marker however has fallen out of common use in the United States, other then when useing it in a quote (as in "O, ye of little faith").

In fact, the word "Oh" is simply an Americanization of the Vocative Case "O".

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: loki 13 on 04/03/06 at 8:26 pm


Actually, it is used almost every day.  It is still frequently heard in Ireland, and in some areas of England.  It is also used frequently in giving time (11 O'Clock) and in names (O'Riley).  The use of it as a vocative marker however has fallen out of common use in the United States, other then when useing it in a quote (as in "O, ye of little faith").

In fact, the word "Oh" is simply an Americanization of the Vocative Case "O".



OK, I'll accept you're explaination, having never left the U.S. I wouldn't know how
English is spoken elsewhere, However, I was always under the assumption that o'clock
was a contraction for "of the clock" and the "O" in names, as O'Riley, simply means
"the son of"

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: Doc Brown on 04/04/06 at 12:20 am

For #1 again, How about the Influenza pandemic of 1918?
and #17, the largest U.S. city by area is Jacksonville, Florida. Could it be the biggest on Earth?

Your Pal,
Doc

8)

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: Mushroom on 04/04/06 at 11:53 am


For #1 again, How about the Influenza pandemic of 1918?


Good guess, but that one only killed 40-100 million people between 1918-1921.  While it was devistating, it came nowhere near to driving humans to extinction.


and #17, the largest U.S. city by area is Jacksonville, Florida. Could it be the biggest on Earth?


Another good guess, but also incorrect.  It is another US city though.

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: Trimac20 on 04/04/06 at 12:25 pm

I'll field no. 17...I've heard it is Brisbane, Queensland, Australia (I of all people should get that one) if one counts the statistical metropolitan area.

Am I right?

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: FaultyDog on 04/04/06 at 12:46 pm

In reply to your #10 question, I posted:


I think it would be that they're the only ones in the world that have their nomination value and country name expressed in Hebrew.


But if that's not right, please tell me what other country uses Hebrew..? ???

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: Mushroom on 04/04/06 at 1:26 pm


In reply to your #10 question, I posted:

But if that's not right, please tell me what other country uses Hebrew..? ???


Yes, but that is not what I am looking for.  No more then I would expect any country other then Japan to use Japanese, or to use the Yen.

It is something special about the stamps themselves.  And it has nothing to do with the demoniation, nor what language it uses.  And all of the Stamps in Israel share this trait.

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: Mushroom on 04/04/06 at 1:35 pm


Continuing with the saga of the largest city, knowing that you reckon it's one in the USA, I've done a bit of research. This link ( http://geography.about.com/od/specificplacesofinterest/a/sitkaarea.htm )  informs what it reckons that city is, & I suspect that's the answer you're 'paying' However, if you look at the area for that city, it's only about 20% of Mt. Isa, which as I've said earlier ... and here's my quote:


OK, here is a bit more information.  For city size, most resources look at the area of the city, or the area it encompasses.  This city actually is not connected to the majority of it's area.  The reason it is so large is because of the wording of the State's Constitution.  And yes, it is a city in a US State.

The city itself is just over 270 square kilometers.  But because of the way the state constitution is worded, a lot more land is attached to the city.

You will find that most references consider a city to be a contiguous location.  This city is not contiguous in the area it covers.

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: Sister Morphine on 04/04/06 at 1:55 pm

Why are people getting so defensive in this quiz?  It's an online quiz; not the SAT's.

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: Darkbreed on 04/04/06 at 3:02 pm

would # 1 be the black death?

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: loki 13 on 04/04/06 at 3:58 pm

I know you don't want wild guesses but I have been reading your hints
about the largest city.I will only guess at it once and choose the obvious

#17...New York City?

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: scumbie on 04/04/06 at 4:56 pm

"Actually, this city is bigger.  It's boarder is over 150,000 miles long."

OK, hold on a minute.  The circumference of planet Earth is something like 25,000 miles.  You're saying there's a city with a border 6 times bigger?  I really, really doubt that.  Or did you intentionally misspell "border" and this is some sort of trick question?

Also, for the question about the writer predicting the moons of Mars, you must be referring to Gulliver's Travels, by Jonathon Swift.  I misread the question earlier.

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: Mushroom on 04/04/06 at 6:03 pm


"Actually, this city is bigger.  It's boarder is over 150,000 miles long."

OK, hold on a minute.  The circumference of planet Earth is something like 25,000 miles.  You're saying there's a city with a border 6 times bigger?  I really, really doubt that.  Or did you intentionally misspell "border" and this is some sort of trick question?

Also, for the question about the writer predicting the moons of Mars, you must be referring to Gulliver's Travels, by Jonathon Swift.  I misread the question earlier.


Sorry, I made a bonehead conversion error when going from Metric to Miles.  The correct length of the boder 1,500 miles.

And yes, it was Johnathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels.  The description was in Part III, A VOYAGE TO LAPUTA, BALNIBARBI, LUGGNAGG, GLUBBDUBDRIB, AND JAPAN.  Here is what he wrote about the moons:

They have likewise discovered two lesser Stars, or Satellites, which revolve about Mars; whereof the innermost is distant from the Center of the primary Planet exactly three of his Diameters, and the outermost five; the former revolves in the space of ten Hours, and the latter in Twenty-one and an Half; so that the Squares of their periodical Times, are very near in the same Proportion with the Cubes of their Distance from the Center of Mars; which evidently shews them to be governed by the same Law of Gravitation, that influences the other heavenly Bodies.

Quite amazing, considering Jonathan Swift was not an astronomer.  The discoverers he credits the discovery to lived on the floating island of Laputa.

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: scumbie on 04/04/06 at 6:57 pm


Sorry, I made a bonehead conversion error when going from Metric to Miles.  The correct length of the boder 1,500 miles.




OK.  A U.S. city that big has to be in Alaska.  I'll guess Juneau.

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: scumbie on 04/04/06 at 7:04 pm


Yes, but that is not what I am looking for.  No more then I would expect any country other then Japan to use Japanese, or to use the Yen.

It is something special about the stamps themselves.  And it has nothing to do with the demoniation, nor what language it uses.  And all of the Stamps in Israel share this trait.


Are they round?

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: lorac614 on 04/04/06 at 10:57 pm

#10...is the glue Kosher?

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: lorac614 on 04/05/06 at 10:35 am

#1

OK, if we're talking about an actual illness then how about the White Plague...

Now we could also say that our Creation or Evolution (depending on your beliefs) has brought us closest to extinction, because if humans never appeared on the planet then we would never have to even worry about becoming extinct!  How's that for an answer??  LOL!!

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: karen on 04/05/06 at 10:38 am




1.  What world event brought the Human race closest to extincion then anything else.



Toba supervolcano in Indonesia

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II

Written By: Mushroom on 04/05/06 at 2:35 pm


Toba supervolcano in Indonesia


Exactly right!  This is the largest known Supervolcano eruption in the last 2 million years.  The eruption is believed to have lasted for over 2 weeks, and devistated the planet.  WHile this eruption occured in Indonesia, it covered India (over 4,000 miles away) in a blanket of ash between 6 inches and 3 feet thick.

This eruption also lowered average global temperatures from 3-5 degrees centigrade.  This cooling is believed to have lasted for 3-5 years.  The Ice Age rebounded, and some of the mass extinctions of Super Fauna is believed to be related to this event as well.

Human populations were estimated to be around half a million at the time of the eruption.  Within 10 years, it fell to somewhere between 5,000-10,000 people.  A lot of genotypes that have been found in fossils were wiped out.

Part of the discovery between the link was found when observing the mutations in mitocondrial DNA.  There are regular mutatuions in this Mitocondria, and it is passed from the maternal side.  They realized in the 1980's that there was not enough diversity, and were perplexed as to why.  Looking back, they realized that around 73,000 years ago, there was something that devistated the human population on a global scale.

After things settled down, a second wave of human migration started.  Eventually humans returned to Asia and beyond.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toba_catastrophe_theory

If anybody gets the chance, watch a show the History Channel occasionally broadcasts about Supervolcanos.  While it is centered around the volcano in Yellowstone, it also gives a lot of background into the Bruno-Jarbridge and Lako Toba Supervolcanos.

And this is something that can affect us all.  The Yellowstone Caldera is a Supervolcano that erupts on an average of once ever 600,000 years.  The most recent eruption was 640,000 years ago.

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II (Over)

Written By: Mushroom on 04/07/06 at 9:56 am

I have had fun with this quiz, thanks everybody for participating.

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II (Over)

Written By: Windbreaker05 on 04/08/06 at 2:05 am


I have had fun with this quiz, thanks everybody for participating.


That was a cool quiz! Thanks for preparing it.

Subject: Re: Impossible Trivia II (Over)

Written By: Badfinger-fan on 04/08/06 at 2:20 am


I have had fun with this quiz, thanks everybody for participating.
right on Mushroom,nice quiz.  I was happy I knew 1 answer, the Beatles song and only because I'd just been given this book for my birthday in Feb.  A Hard Days Write, the story behind every Beatles song" but I didn't google, and glad to see your support on another thread  ;) Jesus, Messiah, Man, Myth. 

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