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Subject: Liner Notes- Your Favorite

Written By: KKay on 06/26/06 at 8:26 am

Ever read some really good or funny liner notes with your albums or CDs?  Tell us about them here.....

I really enjoyed the little booklet that comes with the Eagles double CD... a whole song-by-song "how we wrote it" or notes about recording- a little pretentious, but still very interesting (and lots of cute pictures of my boy, Timothy). 

Maybe someone out there can help me with this one (or else I'll dig out the album when I"m home) but the Hollies have an album with a great little promotional note on the back ...it uses every hip cliche there was...
something like "these boys kick out the hep jams that you cats really dig- get some crazy rock action with these long-haired boppers ...."
I MUST type out the text..it's genious...



Subject: Re: Liner Notes- Your Favorite

Written By: KKay on 06/26/06 at 10:01 am

I really enjoy it when the liner notes give you more insight into the music...


AMBIENT MUSIC
The concept of music designed specifically as a background feature in the environment was pioneered by Muzak Inc. in the fifties, and has since come to be known generically by the term Muzak. The connotations that this term carries are those particularly associated with the kind of material that Muzak Inc. produces - familiar tunes arranged and orchestrated in a lightweight and derivative manner. Understandably, this has led most discerning listeners (and most composers) to dismiss entirely the concept of environmental music as an idea worthy of attention.

Over the past three years, I have become interested in the use of music as ambience, and have come to believe that it is possible to produce material that can be used thus without being in any way compromised. To create a distinction between my own experiments in this area and the products of the various purveyors of canned music, I have begun using the term Ambient Music.

An ambience is defined as an atmosphere, or a surrounding influence: a tint. My intention is to produce original pieces ostensibly (but not exclusively) for particular times and situations with a view to building up a small but versatile catalogue of environmental music suited to a wide variety of moods and atmospheres.

Whereas the extant canned music companies proceed from the basis of regularizing environments by blanketing their acoustic and atmospheric idiosyncracies, Ambient Music is intended to enhance these. Whereas conventional background music is produced by stripping away all sense of doubt and uncertainty (and thus all genuine interest) from the music, Ambient Music retains these qualities. And whereas their intention is to `brighten' the environment by adding stimulus to it (thus supposedly alleviating the tedium of routine tasks and levelling out the natural ups and downs of the body rhythms) Ambient Music is intended to induce calm and a space to think.

Ambient Music must be able to accomodate many levels of listening attention without enforcing one in particular; it must be as ignorable as it is interesting.

BRIAN ENO
September 1978

Subject: Re: Liner Notes- Your Favorite

Written By: Dominic L. on 06/28/06 at 11:15 am

Music for Airports... That's a great album.

Subject: Re: Liner Notes- Your Favorite

Written By: KKay on 06/28/06 at 12:15 pm


Music for Airports... That's a great album.


Yeah, I love it...
Eno is interesting to read...he did a project for Bowie called "games for musicains" in which he devised different characters and peronalities for the musicians to play during recording Bowie's album ...to keep the sound fresh and interesting every day.
i'll find the link of ryou.

Subject: Re: Liner Notes- Your Favorite

Written By: Dominic L. on 06/28/06 at 1:07 pm


Yeah, I love it...
Eno is interesting to read...he did a project for Bowie called "games for musicains" in which he devised different characters and peronalities for the musicians to play during recording Bowie's album ...to keep the sound fresh and interesting every day.
i'll find the link of ryou.


I think I heard about that...

Subject: Re: Liner Notes- Your Favorite

Written By: KKay on 06/30/06 at 10:14 am

Sad story...

The tour ended on July 31, 1980 in Long Beach, California, when tempers boiled over into what Bill Szymczyk memorably described as "The Long Night At Wrong Beach." Frey and Felder spent the entire show describing to each other the beating each planned to administer backstage - "Only three more songs until I kick your ass, pal," Frey recalls Felder telling him near the end of the band's set. Felder recalls Frey making a similar threat to him just as they began to sing "The Best Of My Love." As soon as the show was over, mayhem broke out. Frey launched an assault on Felder, who protected himself with his guitar. Within seconds, the rest of the band had joined in. It took a dozen roadies to pull the warring factions apart.

It was the end of the Eagles, although the band still owed Warners a live record from the tour. Eagles Live (released in November 1980) was mixed by Frey and Henley on opposite coasts - the two decided they couldn't bear to be in the same state, let alone the same studio, and as Bill Szymczyk put it, the record's perfect three-part harmonies were fixed "courtesy of Federal Express." After credits that listed no less than five attorneys, the album's liner notes simply said, "Thank you and goodnight."

Subject: Re: Liner Notes- Your Favorite

Written By: HawkTheSlayer on 08/08/06 at 3:00 am

Here's one....

"The Best Of The Who" mainly describes how Pete Townshend & their manager, Kit Lambert, would battle it out between sessions. Apparently, Lambert had notions he wanted the Who to see & reach, but Townshend had his own ideas, and would block Lambert from doing these things.
Lambert wanted to make the Who more popular by trying to fit their image into modern social standards; Townshend wanted to tell the world "f*** off", essentially.

The main session recorded and quoted here, was the Stargroves session, which Townshend described as "boozy", and the following session, at Shepperton Studios, which was characterized as "sober-faced".

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