inthe00s
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Subject: Comic Books

Written By: woops on 12/26/08 at 3:07 pm

Does anybody collect, used to collect, or a casual fan of comic books? :)

I currently have a dozen Disney comics from the 1980's to present, which some hae reprints from  Carl Barks and other older comics.  8) :)


Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: Philip Eno on 12/26/08 at 3:15 pm

I used to collect the UK edition of MAD and the paperback that were published too. I may start the collection again.

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: Davester on 12/26/08 at 3:20 pm

  All I own now are "the Crow" and "Watchmen" and "300" graphic novels...

  In high school I bought comic books - Secret Wars, Crisis on Infinate Earths, Green Lantern, Superman, X-Men, Indiana Jones, Teen Titans, Watchmen, New Gods, Who's Who and Marvel Universe...

  Also owned the "Superman vs. Spiderman" issue, "Hulk vs. Batman" and "Teen Titans vs. X-Men".  I loved the cross-overs.  Traded these issues to a friend for Van Halen tickets...

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: apollonia1986 on 12/26/08 at 3:55 pm

I used to collect and read Archie comics.

Still do.  ;)

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: Philip Eno on 12/26/08 at 3:57 pm


I used to collect the UK edition of MAD and the paperback that were published too. I may start the collection again.
With the like of ebay, it is a great temptation.

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: Dagwood on 12/26/08 at 4:29 pm

I don't collect or read now, but when I was a kid I did  collect Mad Magazine.  I also liked Cracked and Archie.

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: loki 13 on 12/26/08 at 5:29 pm

I don't collect comic books anymore, it got way too expensive, but I used to be an avid collector into the 90's. I still have
my collection of a few hundred books stashed neatly in boxes. Mostly Marvel comics but I do have some DC and others.
I have the Death Of Superman series, the only Superman books I own. If I saw a first edition of anything I usually bought
it, which means I have some pretty bazaar titles. I have read every book in my collection but the titles I liked the most.

Ghost Rider
Thor
Namor (The Submariner)
Son Of Satan
Dare Devil
Howard the Duck
Spiderman (all titles)

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: snozberries on 12/26/08 at 9:48 pm


I used to collect and read Archie comics.

Still do.  ;)


I loved archie comics. I'd get them all but I never thought to save them  >:(  I especially loved the Little Archie storyline.


I collected Superman, spiderman, batman and Xmen comics. I have most of the Planet of the Apes comics from the 70s and I have all of the V comics from the mini-series/TV show. I also have random super hero comics like Cable and Spawn.

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: whistledog on 12/26/08 at 10:05 pm

I still read Archie Comics.  I find 'em at Value Village, so I buy 'em and read them in the bathroom LOL

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: gibbo on 12/27/08 at 2:42 am


I don't collect or read now, but when I was a kid I did  collect Mad Magazine.  I also liked Cracked and Archie.


I still have some Mad and Cracked magazines somewhere. I collect Phantom comics....

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: woops on 12/27/08 at 4:14 pm

Also have about 4 "Married with Children" comics  8)

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: Philip Eno on 01/21/09 at 4:31 am


I used to collect the UK edition of MAD and the paperback that were published too. I may start the collection again.
I saw my MAD collection over the Christmas holiday and I still cannot part with them.

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: woops on 03/28/09 at 6:58 pm

Out of curiousity, I bought a Paula Abdul "Rock & Roll" comic, which I thought was the super hero parody I've heard about...

Well, recently got Motley Crue & Bon Jovi issues a few days ago  8)

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: Reynolds1863 on 03/28/09 at 7:57 pm

I have early 70's Casper, Little Lulu, Archie and Disney comic books. 

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: coqueta83 on 03/28/09 at 7:57 pm

I never collected comics, but I used to love looking through my friend's father's Superman and Batman comic book collection. I also had a friend who collected practically everything that had to do with the comic book "Spawn".

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: woops on 04/29/09 at 1:23 am

several Looney Tunes...

"Bugs Bunny & Friends: A Comic Celebration", featuring 18 stories spanning from 1940 to the 1990's
3 modern Looney Tunes comics
1990 3 part Bugs Bunny comic

also several Beavis & But--Head & Rock N' Roll comics

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: Michael C. on 05/01/09 at 4:32 pm

Years ago................I bought Batman , Detective {a Batman title} . Hawk and Dove , The Brave and the Bold {a monthly team up} and,whenever the issue looked good....The Flash , Green Arrow and Superman titles.

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: gibbo on 05/01/09 at 4:42 pm


I have early 70's Casper, Little Lulu, Archie and Disney comic books. 


I had some of those comics but my children have lieterally destroyed them! Archie was excellent...also had some Hot Stuff (the little devil), Wendy the witch, Stumbo the giant, Little Lotta and Little Audrey. They were in addition to the Superman, Spiderman, Avengers, Batman, Green Lantern, Legion of Super Heroes, Donald Duck, Goofy, Mickey Mouse,  etc etc.

But my favourite was always The Phantom.

I pretty much read mostl the 60/70's comics

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: Reynolds1863 on 05/01/09 at 9:53 pm


I had some of those comics but my children have lieterally destroyed them! Archie was excellent...also had some Hot Stuff (the little devil), Wendy the witch, Stumbo the giant, Little Lotta and Little Audrey. They were in addition to the Superman, Spiderman, Avengers, Batman, Green Lantern, Legion of Super Heroes, Donald Duck, Goofy, Mickey Mouse,  etc etc.

But my favourite was always The Phantom.

I pretty much read mostl the 60/70's comics


Hot Stuff was a great comic book. :)

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: Michael C. on 05/02/09 at 9:21 am

 



http://img261.imageshack.us/img261/3476/hotstuff.th.gif

WOW !!
I forgot all about Hot Stuff



Hot Stuff was a great comic book. :)

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: woops on 06/06/09 at 4:04 pm

Recently bought several Looney Tunes comics...  8)

Also saw a "Tom & Jerry" comic about two weeks ago, but didn't buy since I'm aware that some animated cartoon based comics have been altered (Plus, some slapstick comedy doesn't translate well into comics).


The Disney comics are OK, though I'm not big on the Donald Ducks (I'll definately get trashed by the Legion of Donaldists). A few are OK, but the Barks/Rosa comics rely more on mystery/adventure. Though they  have great artwork. (Well, it did influenced many people like director Steven Speilburg for  the 'Indiana Jones' movies).

There was a story from Don Rosa that spoofed superheroes that might be relevant for the decline of sales, which Donald disliked "Marvin Monkey" comics since they thought were too childish, but  Huey, Duey, & Louie insists that the comics are very intelligent, rely on problem solving without superpowers, and pretty much a diss on superhero comics  (ie move mountains...which Donald, from a potion, tries until it crumbled...are impossible).  

edited: a sentence didn't sound right

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: Samwise on 06/06/09 at 10:07 pm

I love superhero movies, but I'm intimidated by most comic series, especially the really long-running ones like Superman, Batman and Spiderman. There's always decades of backstory that I'd have to fill myself in on. A friend of mine who's a huge comic geek tried to assure me by telling me about this "Crisis on Infinite Worlds" thing and how it fixed that problem, but my eyes just started glazing over. But I'll read all kinds of manga, since usually those series have a set end; none of them have been going on since the 50's or anything, with most of the issues out of print. With manga, you can buy all the books and read the whole story. (Are we counting manga as comics? Because if so, I could go on all day!)

I do like reading the graphic novels that mess with those familiar superhero stories, though. Like Superman: Red Son. It's an alternate history where, instead of landing in Smallville, Kansas, baby Kal-El landed on a collectivist farm in Soviet Russia. That was really cool. It's a Bird wasn't technically a Superman story, but it was sort of an examination of what Superman means, and that was really interesting. I also liked V for Vendetta. As for non-superhero graphic novels, I like Maus by Art Spiegelman and Blankets by Craig Thompson.

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: woops on 08/10/09 at 4:56 pm

"The Muppet Show" comics from Boom! are extremely creepy!  :o

http://www.majorspoilers.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/07a/boom072909sneak/MuppetShow_PW_01_rev-2.jpg

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: Davester on 08/16/09 at 1:41 am


  Currently reading Red Sonja (Dynamite Comics) which is set to end this Ocotber or November.  Frank Cho painted this excellent cover.  Frank Cho is best known for the college campus classic "Liberty Meadows"...

  http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2006-6/1193336/RSQFWcollectionmassmar.jpg

  I started reading the Red Sonja paperbacks when I was in high school.  Read and re-read them.  Boris Vallejo's cover art is simply amazing...

  http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2006-6/1193336/redsonja.gif

  The original Red Sonja first appeared in Conan the Barbarian #23 (February 1973) as a minor character then, due to her popularity, appeared in her own series by Marvel comics.  I never kept-up with the Marvel Version...

  Dynamite's interpretation of "Fire Hair" is a bit different.  She was the sole survivor after her villiage was destroyed and the inhabitants slaughtered.  Sonja herself was raped...er, um... "sexually assulted" and left for dead.  The goddess Scathach, hearing Sonja's pleas for vengeance granted her some vague special power - enhanced fighting abilities - on the condition that she would never lie with a man unless defeated in fair combat.  Anyway, she sets off on a mission of revenge and general injustice fighting.  Somewhere along the line she died or was killed...

  Dynamite portrays her as a woman of noble birth, leading a sheltered and pampered life.  Royalty.  Lady Sonja Hampton of Dorn...

  As the series ends, a new one begins.  It's called Queen Sonja, so apparentlly she's moved-up in the world...

  Here's a linky to Frankie Cho's websight if you're curious- http://www.libertymeadows.com/

  Warning:  The site linked above contains some harmless comic nudity and links to more of the same, but a teeny bit worse.  Nothing more than you've watched on TV or peeked-at in your older brother's secret porn stash.  I doubt it'll scar you for life unless you're a conservative republican christian fundie...  :)

 

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: gibbo on 08/16/09 at 2:32 am

Hey..today my Mum called to ask when I was going to come and collect an old box of comics that she had stored away. I didn't even know she had them .... they were comics dating back to prior to when I got married (and left home the final time). ;D

In the box were 125+ comics (;isted below):
1x Road Runner
1x Woody Woodpecker
1x Top Cat
1x Dennis the Menace
2x Spooky/Casper Jumbo Specials
3x Bugs Bunny/Daffy Duck Specials
14x Fastern Gun Western (DC Comics)
22x Various Superman, Batman, Flash, Lois Lane & Legion of Super Heroes Albums (Planet Comics)
11x Defenders, Thor, Hulk, Spiderman, Captain America (Marvel Comics)
33x Archie, Sabrina, Betty & Veronica, etc
32x Donald Duck, Scrooge, Beagle Boys etc (Disney Comics  ...and the old covers before the glossy covers came out)
8x Phantom Comics (the old non glossy covers)
6x The smaller pocket sized mini comics of Archie
3x Commando (pocket sized comics)
7x June and School Friend (pocket sized) ...Some of our British members may recall these comics (The Silent Three etc). These are older than the other comics in the box. I suspect they may be from the 60's!

All in all...a veritable treasure trove... :)

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: robby76 on 08/16/09 at 9:50 am

I avidly collected Archie and GI Joe comics in the 80s. They were the main ones.

Apart from that I did delve into an issue or two of rarer stuff like Ewoks, Madballs and Toxic Cruuu-sader!

http://www.timelineuniverse.net/images/Ewoks.jpg      http://www.newkadia.com/Covers/S/M/Madballs/madballs1.jpg

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: woops on 09/04/09 at 2:04 pm

http://www.schoollibraryjournal.com/articles/blog/540000654/20090604/toon.JPG
source: historian Michael Barrier's blog
August 27, 2009:

Classic Children's Comics (for Grownups, Too)
I've mentioned here a couple of times The Toon Treasury of Classic Children's Comics, the compilation assembled by Art Spiegelman and his wife, Françoise Mouly, with a little help from a crew of superannuated funny-animal comic-book readers, me among them. It has just been published by Abrams, and you can order a copy from amazon.com by clicking on this link. I heartily recommend that you do so. In this age of bloody, super-serious, never-ending graphic novels, it's a delight to pick up a book filled with mostly short, mostly very funny stories that parents can enjoy along with their young children.

This is a wonderful book, beautifully reproduced (I wish my own Smithsonian Book of Comic-Book Comics had turned out half as well), and distinguished by a lineup of stories that range from certified classics—three duck stories by Carl Barks, loads of Walt Kelly and John Stanley, and cameos by Harvey Kurtzman, Basil Wolverton, Jack Cole, and Jules Feiffer at their most kid-friendly—to the intriguingly odd. You might be familiar with "Intellectual Amos" by André LeBlanc, and I'd certainly heard of it (it was a backup feature in the Spirit weekly), but I can't remember ever reading one of those stories.

There's also a sampling of what you might call middle-of-the-road kids' comics, the short, formula-flavored stories that DC and ACG turned out in enormous quantities in the '40s and '50s. I'm afraid I'll never warm up to Sheldon Mayer, or to Nutsy Squirrel, or the Fox and the Crow, or...but it's good to have a chance to revisit opinions that, in my case, have been locked in place for decades. There's even one story each for Dennis the Menace and Little Archie. The weight of the book is so clearly tilted toward really good stuff that I can't work up any indignation about the more questionable calls; and there are, after all, people who will buy the book because Little Archie is in it. (The Harvey comics are missing entirely, though—a source of frustration to some, I'm sure, but not to me.)

Spiegelman and Mouly have contributed an excellent introduction to their book, and there are lots of evocative reproductions of comic-book covers and ads and such, all serving very well to summon up a lost four-color world that remains far more real to me than much of my everyday life when I was a child. I struggle to remember the name and face of my fifth-grade teacher, but I can tell you exactly where I was when I bought the October 1952 issue of Walt Disney's Comics & Stories, with the wonderful Barks story about Donald Duck's "hypno-gun" (included in the new book). The Toon Treasury of Classic Children's Comics reminds me why it is not at all strange that my memories should have ordered themselves in that way.

There is, incidentally, one overlap with my Smithsonian Book: John Stanley's Little Lulu story, "Five Little Babies." Everyone involved want to avoid such duplication, but there seemed to be no other Lulu story that so perfectly exemplified Stanley's brilliance when he was working with that character.



Read several pages of "Classic Children's Comics" at Border's and found it enjoyable and interesting since it's like a time capsule of a bygone era with great illustration andcould be enjoyed from baby boomers, new generation of children, fans of vintage comics, etc.

Though one gripe would be the omission of  Dell Looney Tunes & Merry Melodies comics. (Guessing there's not much of the very well known or comics based from animated cartoons due to rights from bigger companies or more fucused on comic book/strip characters)

There's still many notable characters from Dennis the Menace, Little Lulu, Droopy, Fox & Crow,  Alice In Wonderland (not Disney), and even Donald Duck (probably the most recognizable & probably one of the most costly  of the bunch).

I found "Little Archie" interesting since I wasn't aware of it, though would have to do research since I'm not sure if it started out that way and later became teenagers or were created for younger readers while the Archie comic appealed to  teens.

Also great that it has a selection of Little Lulu stories (about three) since most of the the Dark Horse reprints are done in black & white (where the original comics were in color).

I'll probably get it when it's sold for a better price. :)

"Little Archie" (1956)

So it was created for younger readers and lasted 'til the early 1990's.

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: woops on 09/18/09 at 10:44 pm

Just got 5 "Josie & The Pussycats" comics from the '70's for a buck each  8) :-*



Also 4 modern Looney Tunes comic books.

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: woops on 09/21/09 at 3:24 pm

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2112/2069751729_b174813a67_o.jpg


Recently got the Classic Children's Comics book  8)

Enjoyed Little Lulu, Donald Duck (especially "Bee Bumbler"), Patsy Pancake and his penguin butler (pic above), and even the "Little Archie" story featured. Also the illustrations...

... though I find "Sugar & Spike" a bit cloying.

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: Womble on 09/23/09 at 6:32 pm

I used to read Little Dot. Anyone remember her? She had a nemesis named little Lotta . There was also Little Audrey. They were all from Harvey Comics.
http://cdn.comixology.com/2008/AUG08/midsize/AUG080039_m.jpg

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: gibbo on 09/23/09 at 6:35 pm


I used to read Polka Dot. Anyone remember her? She had a nemesis named Big Lotta . There was also Little Audrey. They were all from Harvey Comics.
http://cdn.comixology.com/2008/AUG08/midsize/AUG080039_m.jpg


I remember them as Little (Polka) Dot and Little Lotta and Little Audrey. Harvey Comics also did the Richie Rich, Jackie Jokers, Hot Stuff, Casper, Wendy (the witch) and Stumbo the Giant comics....

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: woops on 09/23/09 at 6:41 pm

Only familiar with Casper, Little Audrey, Richie Rich, and Baby Huey from animated cartoons...and wasn't really interested in them.

Though never bothered with the comics (saw some Little Audrey and Baby Huey comics in the kid friendly section)

Little Lulu (ironically Audrey was based from her...)  featured a rich character that reminds me of Richie Rich...  :D

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: gibbo on 09/23/09 at 6:44 pm


Only familiar with Casper, Little Audrey, Richie Rich, and Baby Huey from animated cartoons...and wasn't really interested in them.

Though never bothered with the comics (saw some Little Audrey and Baby Huey comics in the kid friendly section)

Little Lulu (ironically Audrey was based from her...)  featured a rich character that reminds me of Richie Rich...  :D





Oh....I forgot to mention Little Lulu and Baby Huey! There are probably others ....but they don't come to mind right now...

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: woops on 09/23/09 at 6:51 pm

Little Lulu was published by Dell Comics (though in the 1940's to the early '60's)

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: woops on 09/27/09 at 3:51 pm

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/617s2iWaEfL._SS500_.jpg

There's going to be another classic comic treasury that'll be out in 2010.

source: amazon
Product Description
The first collection of its kind, this huge, luxurious volume lovingly collects the brilliant kids' comics that such luminaries as Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko, Frank Frazetta, Walt Kelly, Dr. Seuss, Syd Hoff, Jules Feiffer, George Carlson, John Stanley, Dan deCarlo, Sheldon Mayer, Carl Barks, and myriad other brilliant geniuses created during the heyday of kids comics in the 1940s, '50s, and beyond. Astute comic book fans and their eager kids alike will love the funny and beautiful full-color stories of slap-stick superheroes, fantastic fairy tales, and awesome anthropomorphic animals.


Worth checking...

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: woops on 10/04/09 at 4:43 pm

Got 4 modern Looney Tunes comics, 2 Tom & Jerry reprints, and an ancient Bugs Bunny 'Dell Giant' issue  from 1960.  8)

Plus a "Josie & The Pussycats" from 1990 (featuring a story of the band time travelling to film a music video)

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: Davester on 10/08/09 at 1:14 am

  The Magdalena is a sword wielding warrior nun.  A woman is chosen and trained by the Knights of Malta, once per generation, to defend the Catholic church against supernatural enemies.  With a premise like that I HAD to check it out...

  I'll let Wiki do the descripton...

  "After the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus Christ, Mary Magdalene, reputed to be his wife, gave birth to a daughter, Sarah. From this child is descended the holy lineage of the Magdalena, a royal bloodline that passes great power and great honor from mother to daughter. The Magdalena serves as the warrior and protector of the Catholic Church.

  The Magdalena has the ability to see into the human heart, to show people the error of their ways and give them the choice to redeem their sins. There is only one in a generation, and she alone stands and takes arms against the evils of the world. Apart from the powers she is born with, the Magdalena wields the Spear of Destiny, the spear that pierced the side of Christ, as a holy and formidable weapon against the twisted and the evil.

  Since the Middle Ages, the Roman Catholic Church has been the Magdalena's employer. They raise her from childhood and train her until she is ready to take hold of her destiny. It is the Inquisition, a secretive and mystical but powerful council of cardinals, that oversees the Magdalena's activities and chooses her missions."
   

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: woops on 10/14/09 at 12:58 pm

Three modern Looney Tunes, an early '90's Tom & Jerry reprint (with a karate mouse), and a mid '60's Top Cat  8)


About two weeks ago, some '70's comic books of Looney Tunes, Pink Panther, Tom & Jerry, and Disney.

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: Davester on 10/14/09 at 6:14 pm


Three modern Looney Tunes, an early '90's Tom & Jerry reprint (with a karate mouse), and a mid '60's Top Cat  8)


About two weeks ago, some '70's comic books of Looney Tunes, Pink Panther, Tom & Jerry, and Disney.


  Are you in it for the collecting or the reading?  I dunno, seems like folks would better enjoy actually watching a Looney Tunes cartoon rather than reading it in a comic.  Bugs Bunny's antics would seem to fall a little flat in the pages of a comic.  A Tom & Jerry comic book seems like a quaint curiosity...

  I mean, why the comic books when you can just rent the actual cartoons..?  

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: Davester on 10/14/09 at 6:18 pm


  Come to think of it, comic books in general may be a quaint curiosity anymore...

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: woops on 10/14/09 at 7:17 pm


  Are you in it for the collecting or the reading?  I dunno, seems like folks would better enjoy actually watching a Looney Tunes cartoon rather than reading it in a comic.  Bugs Bunny's antics would seem to fall a little flat in the pages of a comic.  A Tom & Jerry comic book seems like a quaint curiosity...

  I mean, why the comic books when you can just rent the actual cartoons..?  


Actually both. Though the earlier comics tend to be hit or miss and pretty much collect them as memorabilia. Also for the ads, which range from politically incorrect (ie BB guns) to interesting (seeing superheroes like Spiderman pitching snack cakes).

I agree that slapstick doesn't always translate well onto paper, though some artists like David Alvarez have pulled the character's expressions  and the drawings very well on the modern DC incarnation of the Looney Tunes comics from 1998 to around 2004.

The older Looney Tunes comics are hit or miss since most of the stories could've been told with different characters like from Disney or Hanna Barbera.

Most comics based on animated cartoons are very different like Donald Duck for example since Carl Barks expanded his personality, a bit smarter, adventurous, and coherent opposed to the irritable duck that is hard to understand. Also the early Road Runner comics that featured the bird speaking in rhyme and with three sons.  (honestly prefer the theatrical shorts and the DC incarnatiion).

Tomk & Jerry also spoke on the comics, but still acted like themselves and the artwork and some of the expressions from the Harvey reprints (taken from 1950's/1960's Dell issues) are good and a notch better than the Looney Tunes comics from the era.




An interview of former Looney Tunes comic illustrator David Alvarez


Interview of comic book writer Dan Slott (who wrote several stories for Looney Tunes comics)
http://toolooney.goldenagecartoons.com/alvarez1.jpg

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: Foo Bar on 10/14/09 at 7:54 pm


I agree that slapstick doesn't always translate well onto paper, though some artists like David Alvarez have pulled the character's expressions  and the drawings very well on the modern DC incarnation of the Looney Tunes comics from 1998 to around 2004.


Now there's an interesting idea -- take the comic books, and use the wild takes like the ones in the page you've shown, as keyframes.  Animate around it using modern software (you'd have to be a skilled animator; I'm not just talking about simply morphing from keyframe to keyframe, but the tools are now cheap enough that a talented amateur could probably pull it off), and voila, new Looney Tunes cartoons. 

It wouldn't be the reincarnation of Chuck Jones, Tex Avery, or Bob Clampett, but it'd be the next best thing.  You couldn't do the voices without Mel Blanc (or a few years' worth of improvement in software), but the Road Runner cartoons would translate beautifully.

Subject: Re: Comic Books

Written By: Step-chan on 10/24/09 at 12:24 am

I've had Betty & Veronica, Super Mario, Captain N and even an Alf comic or two. Also own alittle of Ninja High School and Gold Digger.

I also have this one comic book book called "Kendra"(Not sure I spelled that right), it's abit more mature in content.

I can't find it on the net.... I'll have to find the comic book(I still have it) to see if there was anything in the title I missed.

Edit:

No wonder I had problems, it's called "Kendra Legacy of the blood". And another look shows that I have the first issue.(which is the only issue I have)

:o

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