inthe00s
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Subject: Would you agree that?

Written By: belmont22 on 10/02/12 at 6:17 am

The mid 90's through to the end of the 00's was kind of a 'generation' for pop culture? A bit like the mid 60's through the end of the 70's was?

It's sort of interesting, being born in the late 80's or early 90's, because from early childhood all the way through the teens, pop culture more or less stayed roughly the same! Not that nothing changed at all of course, but there are a lot of things that make the years from about 1993 to 2009 sort of an era. This was the era that hip hop was mainstream and dominated music and pop culture. Hip hop was up and coming from 1985-1992 and still has a fairly strong presence now but 1993-2009 was like the hip hop age, the culture was just incredibly dominant especially in the second half of that period. Alternative rock as well, and pop punk, basically the modern kind of rock really overtook arena rock by 1993 and was relevant all the way up to 2009, by 2010 indie-hipster music kind of replaced post-grunge. In 1992 Nirvana were popular but GnR and Van Halen were still just as big if not bigger, by 1993 alt really became 'the' rock sound. Now though, rock in general isn't really popular unless you have a really broad definition of rock, I'd say Foster the People are more just indie and not really what I'd think of as being rock.

1993-2009 also had more or less the same slang, by about 2010 new slang words began to pop up, mostly Internet-influenced ones while 90's and 00's slang was mostly from skate culture and from hip hop. There's just so many things tying those 17 years together, just like there's a lot of things that make 1963-79 a distinct epoch. The mid-late 60s and the 70s were fast-changing times but they had an underpinning "grooviness" to them if that makes any sense. The mid-late 90s and 00s had an underpinning ironic feel to them, sort of an oxymoronic mixture of not giving a f*ck and being a conformist consumer. The 10's have kind of slowly started to change that as giving a f*ck is becoming urgent as global warming and our economy both continue to get worse, and with the economic meltdown that never ends Francis Fukuyama's capitalistic end of history is proving to be increasingly false.

It's only been since 2010 that 90's things have even started to become uncool and irrelevant. I mean individual 90's things like Pogs died out before the decade was even over but just the over-arching themes of the 90's seem equally applicable to the 00's for the most part, but not so much to now.


Subject: Re: Would you agree that?

Written By: belmont22 on 10/02/12 at 6:29 am

I find it kind of interesting that back in the early 00's, they could play songs from 1992, or even from the late 80's if it was underground or a Metallica song, and it would blend in seamlessly with the new releases, at least to as late as 2002. By 2003, rock slowly began to become emo and hipster as you had bands like White Stripes and All-American Rejects get popular but even they could blend in with quite a bit of 90's rock.

Subject: Re: Would you agree that?

Written By: MaxwellSmart on 10/03/12 at 7:20 pm

That?

That?

That the Cat in the Hat's where it's at?
:D

Subject: Re: Would you agree that?

Written By: whistledog on 10/04/12 at 6:35 pm

Would you agree that?

No.  I would agree this over that.  But maybe the other would beat them both

Subject: Re: Would you agree that?

Written By: Emman on 10/04/12 at 8:59 pm


The mid 90's through to the end of the 00's was kind of a 'generation' for pop culture? A bit like the mid 60's through the end of the 70's was?

It's sort of interesting, being born in the late 80's or early 90's, because from early childhood all the way through the teens, pop culture more or less stayed roughly the same! Not that nothing changed at all of course, but there are a lot of things that make the years from about 1993 to 2009 sort of an era. This was the era that hip hop was mainstream and dominated music and pop culture. Hip hop was up and coming from 1985-1992 and still has a fairly strong presence now but 1993-2009 was like the hip hop age, the culture was just incredibly dominant especially in the second half of that period. Alternative rock as well, and pop punk, basically the modern kind of rock really overtook arena rock by 1993 and was relevant all the way up to 2009, by 2010 indie-hipster music kind of replaced post-grunge. In 1992 Nirvana were popular but GnR and Van Halen were still just as big if not bigger, by 1993 alt really became 'the' rock sound. Now though, rock in general isn't really popular unless you have a really broad definition of rock, I'd say Foster the People are more just indie and not really what I'd think of as being rock.

1993-2009 also had more or less the same slang, by about 2010 new slang words began to pop up, mostly Internet-influenced ones while 90's and 00's slang was mostly from skate culture and from hip hop. There's just so many things tying those 17 years together, just like there's a lot of things that make 1963-79 a distinct epoch. The mid-late 60s and the 70s were fast-changing times but they had an underpinning "grooviness" to them if that makes any sense. The mid-late 90s and 00s had an underpinning ironic feel to them, sort of an oxymoronic mixture of not giving a f*ck and being a conformist consumer. The 10's have kind of slowly started to change that as giving a f*ck is becoming urgent as global warming and our economy both continue to get worse, and with the economic meltdown that never ends Francis Fukuyama's capitalistic end of history is proving to be increasingly false.

It's only been since 2010 that 90's things have even started to become uncool and irrelevant. I mean individual 90's things like Pogs died out before the decade was even over but just the over-arching themes of the 90's seem equally applicable to the 00's for the most part, but not so much to now.


I generally agree but I would change the dates slightly, like from maybe '67-'78 for the '60s/'70s relation and '95-'07 for the '90s/'00s relation, after around '77/'78 that's when things like new wave/early synth pop came in that kind of clearly distinguised itself from the late '60s, and it's becoming obvious that there was a cultural shift in '08. Although hip-hop was big in both decades it did evolve in it's sound and production from the mid '90s to mid '00s, especially compared to mainstream rock music which was basically the same watered down post-grunge sound going from '95 all the way to '09, almost 15 years of the same monotonous sound. 8-P

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