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Subject: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: belmont22 on 12/28/12 at 4:33 pm

People born from 1977 to 1979 (I'd include '80 in there too and maybe '81 if you have an exceptionally good memory) seem transitional between Gen X and Y.

On one hand, they are very much old enough to be an authority on what life in the 1980s was like. Someone born in 1977 also became a teenager in 1990 and entered high school in 1991, so they were younger teenagers during the last gasp of 80s trends such as glam metal, neon and synthpop and also plenty old enough to have been deep into grunge and the first wave of gangsta rap a couple years later.

And they would have turned 20 in 1997 and were already 'adults' technically for 5 years by the time it was the year 2000. So all of that makes them pretty Generation-Xy as Weird Al would say, right?

But on the other hand, late 70s borns are actually young enough to be 'digital natives' to a certain degree. They grew up with digital video games, were only small children when the first personal computers were on the market, and in theory could have been using online services in their preteens (highly unlikely but possible).

The Internet also became mainstream when they were still teenagers, so it's not like the Net was some strange technology to them that didn't emerge until they were already grown up and had kids of their own, they were familiar with digital technology from childhood and the Internet was just another huge step in that direction.

Hell a late 70s born could have been chatting to friends on AIM and ICQ in high school!

Some of the people here were born in the late 70s/beginning of the 80s. What generation do you feel like you belong to more?


Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: Lemonmelon on 12/28/12 at 4:52 pm

An authority on what the 1980s was like? What does someone born in 1979 know about watching mainstream television in 1981? What does someone born in 1977 know about buying the latest Motorhead CD in 1980? If you weren't born by about June 30, 1972 you won't have a mature enough perspective on the early 80s!

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: Lemonmelon on 12/28/12 at 4:54 pm

To be an authority you need to be at least seven (and turning eight) in the first year of the decade.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: belmont22 on 12/28/12 at 5:20 pm


To be an authority you need to be at least seven (and turning eight) in the first year of the decade.


Maybe on the entire decade, yeah. But I mean someone born in 1979 would at least remember the decade nearly in full so they would be at least in part speaking from first hand experience.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: Lemonmelon on 12/28/12 at 5:31 pm


Maybe on the entire decade, yeah. But I mean someone born in 1979 would at least remember the decade nearly in full so they would be at least in part speaking from first hand experience.


They are barely authorities of the late 80s since the weren't seven turning eight until 1987. To remember the 80s good enough you can be born as late as 1982 (if you focus on the later 80s) but to be an "authority" on even the mid-80s you can't be born in 1978 or 1979 because turning eight any later than in 1983 would be too late.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: MarkMc1990 on 12/28/12 at 5:36 pm

I think it's safe to say that 1977-1981 represents the XY cusp (can be classed in either one). Kind of like how 1995-2000 (or '90s births in general) have been classed as both Y and Z.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: Lemonmelon on 12/28/12 at 5:43 pm


I think it's safe to say that 1977-1981 represents the XY cusp (can be classed in either one). Kind of like how 1995-2000 (or '90s births in general) have been classed as both Y and Z.


If 1982 can only be pure y, then so is 1981. People born in 1980 tend to relate better to people born in 1979.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: warped on 12/28/12 at 5:43 pm


as late as 1982.


I met a girl named "Jenny" in 1982.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: Lemonmelon on 12/28/12 at 5:45 pm


I met a girl named "Jenny" in 1982.


I met someone called Jenny in 1996. Your point?

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: MarkMc1990 on 12/28/12 at 5:46 pm


If 1982 can only be pure y, then so is 1981. People born in 1980 tend to relate better to people born in 1979.


I'm just going by the fact that 1982 is a popular starting year for Gen Y among demographers (usually presented on the basis that they were the first to graduate high school in the 2000s)

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: warped on 12/28/12 at 5:48 pm


I met someone called Jenny in 1996. Your point?


Yes, it's my point. It's 40-30, and I'm serving for the match. If I win, first time I've won gold since the 90s.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: Lemonmelon on 12/28/12 at 6:07 pm

You play tennis? Well you are wierd with those comments.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: snozberries on 12/28/12 at 7:07 pm


I met a girl named "Jenny" in 1982.



did you get her number?

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: belmont22 on 12/28/12 at 7:09 pm



did you get her number?


867-5309

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: warped on 12/28/12 at 7:10 pm



did you get her number?


I had her number, but she keeps self deleting it and coming back as another one.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: af2010 on 12/28/12 at 7:13 pm

I'd say they're on the cusp, but probably lean more towards X.  They would've just been old enough for grunge, but probably a little old for teen pop.  The typical person born in the late 70s probably didn't use the internet regularly until after high school.  Early 80s would be cuspers who probably lean more towards Y; they would've been too young for the initial grunge movement, but still young enough for teen pop, and were a lot more likely to have used the internet towards the end of high school.  I think 1979/1980 is a good dividing line; someone born in the 80s being gen X just doesn't sound quite right.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: snozberries on 12/28/12 at 7:13 pm


I had her number, but she keeps self deleting it and coming back as another one.


I hate when they do that

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: nintieskid999 on 12/28/12 at 7:22 pm


They are barely authorities of the late 80s since the weren't seven turning eight until 1987. To remember the 80s good enough you can be born as late as 1982 (if you focus on the later 80s) but to be an "authority" on even the mid-80s you can't be born in 1978 or 1979 because turning eight any later than in 1983 would be too late.


Someone born in 1982 didn't turn 8 in the 80s. Someone born in 1976 or 1977 would remember the 80s far more in most cases. Are you saying their memories were the same?

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: joeman on 12/28/12 at 7:25 pm


Someone born in 1982 didn't turn 8 in the 80s. Someone born in 1976 or 1977 would remember the 80s far more in most cases. Are you saying their memories were the same?


I agree with you there.  Also, I do think a lot of the 90s era of fads IMO started around 1988(give or take) and was little different than the rest of the 80s.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: nintieskid999 on 12/28/12 at 7:29 pm


I agree with you there.  Also, I do think a lot of the 90s era of fads IMO started around 1988(give or take) and was little different than the rest of the 80s.


Yeah I basically think 1987 was the last of the core 80s era. 88 and 89 were 80s but starting to transition. It was more cynical and music was starting to transition towards rap dance and house. 88 was also the end of the Reagan era.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: joeman on 12/28/12 at 7:31 pm


Yeah I basically think 1987 was the last of the core 80s era. 88 and 89 were 80s but starting to transition. It was more cynical and music was starting to transition towards rap dance and house. 88 was also the end of the Reagan era.


Yeah, in 1988 Heathers came out and in 1990 Pump Up the Volume came out, and they didn't have that cheesy 80s vibe(loud synth bass music, freeze frames, etc..) but were a bit more cynical and had alternative rock soundtracks.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: Howard on 12/28/12 at 7:38 pm


Maybe on the entire decade, yeah. But I mean someone born in 1979 would at least remember the decade nearly in full so they would be at least in part speaking from first hand experience.


someone born in 1979 probably would remember the 90's more.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: Howard on 12/28/12 at 7:39 pm


867-5309


;D

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: nintieskid999 on 12/28/12 at 7:41 pm


Yeah, in 1988 Heathers came out and in 1990 Pump Up the Volume came out, and they didn't have that cheesy 80s vibe(loud synth bass music, freeze frames, etc..) but were a bit more cynical and had alternative rock soundtracks.


What do you think of the 1987 top 100 vs the 1988 top 100?

Here is 1987:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dvhQ9n358-A

Here is 1988

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rqUQ2BLvD8o

Here is 1989

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XevWPzDAV5E

My conclusion was 88 and 89 were 80s but starting to transition out.

Here is 1990.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sigBbScLUrs
I don't consider it 80s but it has a lot of 80s influence. I think however that people overestimate how 80s 1990 was.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: nintieskid999 on 12/28/12 at 7:44 pm

The biggest change I saw was between 1989 and 1990. I don't see why people act like 1990 was like 1985 or something.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: belmont22 on 12/28/12 at 7:46 pm


I agree with you there.  Also, I do think a lot of the 90s era of fads IMO started around 1988(give or take) and was little different than the rest of the 80s.


I think 1988 to 1993 had a co-existence of both era's fads, with 88-90 leaning more towards 80s and 91-93 towards the 90s. New Jack Swing and Hip House are musical trends I associate with the late 80s and early 90s but with neither decade in full.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: nintieskid999 on 12/28/12 at 7:50 pm


But 1972 would have a better idea of the 80s than the 1976 and 1977 people would. I said 1982 would have memories of the late 80s, just like those born in 1977 would but don't confuse having memories of Sesame Street with being an authority.

People born in 76 and 77 remember 80s music. They would also remember the mid 80s much more than someone born in 82. 76 and 77ers would be too old for sesame street after the early 80s.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: nintieskid999 on 12/28/12 at 7:52 pm

Late 70s born people are late Gen Xers. A different type of Gen X than say a Brat Packer born in 1968.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: joeman on 12/28/12 at 7:54 pm


People born in 76 and 77 remember 80s music. They would also remember the mid 80s much more than someone born in 82. 76 and 77ers would be too old for sesame street after the early 80s.


I agree here.

Also, going back to the original post, I agree with most of what you were saying.  Alot of sitcoms that carried through the 90s started in the 80s, such as Family Matters, Full House, Save By the Bell, Fresh Prince of Bel Air, Simpsons(imo changed in 1997 when it went to different direction).

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: belmont22 on 12/28/12 at 7:57 pm




Here is 1990.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sigBbScLUrs
I don't consider it 80s but it has a lot of 80s influence. I think however that people overestimate how 80s 1990 was.


Actually some 1990 songs do sound surprisingly 90s, but I think music was probably the most advanced thing about that year. The whole feeling of the year, at least from what I gather from videos I've seen recorded then just seems so much closer to 1986 than it does to 1993. Of course I was only a baby so I can't speak from first-person experience.

1993 was pretty stereotypical of what I think of the 90s, gangsta rap and grunge ruling the radio, flannel everywhere, girls started to bare their belly buttons more. 1990 still had that super girly 80s kind of look for women and that rednecky look for men and many people of both sexes still had big hair. Curls were more popular than the super-straight hair that dominated in the post-"Rachel" era though actually straight hair was more popular throughout the 80s than many people think.

The early 90s (1990-92) were hard times for the economy and inner city crime but as far as popular culture and the attitude of people goes, they are pretty innocent compared to the ten years after 1992.

The mid 90s up to the mid 00s were all about being 'hard' and controversial. Eminem's Marshall Mathers LP from 1999 actually sounds dated because it's so angry and hateful compared to modern hip hop.

And not only that but the later 90s and early 00s were a lot more self-conscious than the 80s and early 90s.

In the later part of the 90s everyone was either a cynic or a do-gooder. I think that's always been one of the major differences. The 80s/early 90s seemed to be mostly about having a good time and at least in comparison lacked cynicism and political correctness.

Bill Clinton was also president in 1993 which is a huge difference. In 1990 George HW Bush was president and Ronald Reagan was still a major public figure.

The economy was still good in the early part of 1990 as well - the 'yuppie' thing kind of died out to a degree when the economy tanked though it made a revival when the tech boom started.

1990 did have quite a bit of hip hop even compared to 1989 but it's of the 'old school' brand - it's more akin to the rap of the 80s than it is to the gangsta rap of the mid 90s to mid 00s. I think people under-estimate how much of a part of the 80s, especially the late 80s, hip hop was.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: belmont22 on 12/28/12 at 8:03 pm


I agree here.

Also, going back to the original post, I agree with most of what you were saying.  Alot of sitcoms that carried through the 90s started in the 80s, such as Family Matters, Full House, Save By the Bell, Fresh Prince of Bel Air, Simpsons(imo changed in 1997 when it went to different direction).


Simpsons probably started to change because of South Park. Early Simpsons was overall pretty family-friendly but after South Park and then Family Guy got popular they seemed to want to up the ante by putting tons of gore in some episodes. I saw a video of all the Itchy and Scratchy episodes and it's interesting, and disturbing to see how much more violent they got over the years.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: belmont22 on 12/28/12 at 8:03 pm


Yeah, in 1988 Heathers came out and in 1990 Pump Up the Volume came out, and they didn't have that cheesy 80s vibe(loud synth bass music, freeze frames, etc..) but were a bit more cynical and had alternative rock soundtracks.


I haven't seen Pump Up The Volume, but I have seen Heathers and in my opinion it's incredibly 80s, it's just a very dark 80s movie lol.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: joeman on 12/28/12 at 8:04 pm


Except both of you are missing the point. All I said was that those born in 1982 had memories from the 80s. NOTHING ELSE! I never said they were authority. My point was that those born in 1977 or so are too young to be authoritive on the 80s. I said 1972 were seven by January 1st, 1980. Keep 1982 out of it, they have nothing to do with my point. You have to be born in 1972 or earlier to be authoritive of the 80s. By the way, shows like Beavis and Butthead were still going into late 97. Late 97 may have been when the tide started changing but 98 is the real new era.


Lemonmelon, I don't really care whether someone born in 1982 has memories, or authorities, or whatever.  My point was that a lot of 90s era feel dates back to the late 80s.  I will say that because of this a lot of the late 70s babies that started puberty are probably more like the 80s born in a sense.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: joeman on 12/28/12 at 8:06 pm


Simpsons probably started to change because of South Park. Early Simpsons was overall pretty family-friendly but after South Park and then Family Guy got popular they seemed to want to up the ante by putting tons of gore in some episodes. I saw a video of all the Itchy and Scratchy episodes and it's interesting, and disturbing to see how much more violent they got over the years.


I agree.  Even back in early 90s standards, choking a kid was obscene, nowadays we have Family Guy with multiple mother-son rape jokes and whathaveyou/

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: joeman on 12/28/12 at 8:07 pm


In your opinion does Home Alone feel more like the aftermath of the 80s, or the 90s coming in. For me, it's kind of the former.


I agree here too, so is Problem Child(mainly due to John Ritter, who was a famous celeb in the 80s).

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: belmont22 on 12/28/12 at 8:09 pm


In your opinion does Home Alone feel more like the aftermath of the 80s, or the 90s coming in. For me, it's kind of the former.


I think Home Alone seems 80s because when I watched it as a little kid in the mid/late 90s it seemed like an older movie to me. I've always thought it and Honey I Shrunk The Kids were pretty similar in feel.

John Hughes directed it too so it has a certain similarity to movies like Sixteen Candles and Ferris Bueller.

The sequels do seem 90s though. Can't get more 90s than a Talkboy!

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: Howard on 12/28/12 at 8:22 pm


People born in 76 and 77 remember 80s music. They would also remember the mid 80s much more than someone born in 82. 76 and 77ers would be too old for sesame street after the early 80s.


I think people born in 76 and 77 maybe would be too young to remember 80's music.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: Gomparlaso on 12/28/12 at 8:37 pm


Except both of you are missing the point. All I said was that those born in 1982 had memories from the 80s. NOTHING ELSE! I never said they were authority.


You did say it was authority. You made a mistake! Error!

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: belmont22 on 12/28/12 at 8:41 pm


My point exactly. They may remember 1989 very well, but 1980 is part of the era too. To have "authority" over an era you need to be there for the full monty.


So someone born in 1920 wouldn't have any authority on the 20th century, by that logic?

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: Lemonmelon on 12/28/12 at 8:42 pm


So someone born in 1920 wouldn't have any authority on the 20th century, by that logic?


I'm talking in the sense of decades, not centuries. Keep with the program.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: belmont22 on 12/28/12 at 8:45 pm


I'm talking in the sense of decades, not centuries. Keep with the program.


I'm aware but still, I think if you experience a significant fraction of an era, like at least half, you can be a first had 'authority' on it.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: Lemonmelon on 12/28/12 at 8:50 pm


I'm aware but still, I think if you experience a significant fraction of an era, like at least half, you can be a first had 'authority' on it.


1972 and before: FULL 80s authority
1973-1982: Varying amounts of 80s authority

I just think you need to turn seven to have a portion of authority but you would need to be at least seven on the first day to have the full monty.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: mach!ne_he@d on 12/28/12 at 9:32 pm


People born from 1977 to 1979 (I'd include '80 in there too and maybe '81 if you have an exceptionally good memory) seem transitional between Gen X and Y.

On one hand, they are very much old enough to be an authority on what life in the 1980s was like. Someone born in 1977 also became a teenager in 1990 and entered high school in 1991, so they were younger teenagers during the last gasp of 80s trends such as glam metal, neon and synthpop and also plenty old enough to have been deep into grunge and the first wave of gangsta rap a couple years later.

And they would have turned 20 in 1997 and were already 'adults' technically for 5 years by the time it was the year 2000. So all of that makes them pretty Generation-Xy as Weird Al would say, right?

But on the other hand, late 70s borns are actually young enough to be 'digital natives' to a certain degree. They grew up with digital video games, were only small children when the first personal computers were on the market, and in theory could have been using online services in their preteens (highly unlikely but possible).

The Internet also became mainstream when they were still teenagers, so it's not like the Net was some strange technology to them that didn't emerge until they were already grown up and had kids of their own, they were familiar with digital technology from childhood and the Internet was just another huge step in that direction.

Hell a late 70s born could have been chatting to friends on AIM and ICQ in high school!

Some of the people here were born in the late 70s/beginning of the 80s. What generation do you feel like you belong to more?


For me, a cultural "generation" is defined by people who meet certain universal hallmarks. My personal definitions for Gen Y have always been someone that is too young to have gotten into first wave Grunge, or to have been anything other than a child during the 1980's, but old enough to have experienced some life before widespread internet use, and to clearly remember 9/11. I also think that being old enough to have voted in at least one of the elections involving Obama (whether you voted for him or not) is an important cultural touchstone for Yers, which is why things start getting a little "cuspy", so to speak, after 1994.

On the flip side of that you have the late 70's. I'm inclined to say that they are Xers, but not as firmly so as someone born in the earlier parts of the decade. It probably depends on the individual. Let's take someone born in 1979 for example. A 79er would have been 12 years old when Nirvana exploded, so clearly old enough to have been a fan, but on the flip side, they would only be aged 18-20 in the late 90's and thus possibly still young enough to have gotten into Nu Metal, which is a type of music I usually associate with Gen Y.

As I mentioned in a previous post, I have an older cousin born in 1979, and she always felt like a different generation than me, but I was 12 and she was 20 the last time we had frequent interactions with each other, so that probably skewed my view on that a bit.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: MarkMc1990 on 12/29/12 at 3:02 am


Here is 1990.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sigBbScLUrs
I don't consider it 80s but it has a lot of 80s influence. I think however that people overestimate how 80s 1990 was.


I actually think the opposite is true, from the POV of the general population anyway. I think if you asked a random person on the street how someone would have dressed in 1990, they would probably name baggy pants and other trends associated with the mid and late '90s. They would be assuming that because 1990 was in the decade of the '90s, that the same stereotypical '90s fashion trends must apply throughout the entire decade. However, it's more likely that someone in 1990 would have been wearing high-waisted/tight-fitting acid wash jeans, permed bangs, turtleneck sweaters, big glasses, and other things that tend to be considered "more 80s". (I base this observation off what I see in my family's photos and home videos from that era)

In terms of that video, it's pretty mixed between glam metal, cheesy ballads, and dance pop (80s) and hip hop (more 90s). Not even close to pure 80s, but I'm willing to bet it more closely resembles 1985 than 1995, maybe just by a hair.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: belmont22 on 12/29/12 at 5:03 am


I actually think the opposite is true, from the POV of the general population anyway. I think if you asked a random person on the street how someone would have dressed in 1990, they would probably name baggy pants and other trends associated with the mid and late '90s. They would be assuming that because 1990 was in the decade of the '90s, that the same stereotypical '90s fashion trends must apply throughout the entire decade. However, it's more likely that someone in 1990 would have been wearing high-waisted/tight-fitting acid wash jeans, permed bangs, turtleneck sweaters, big glasses, and other things that tend to be considered "more 80s". (I base this observation off what I see in my family's photos and home videos from that era)

In terms of that video, it's pretty mixed between glam metal, cheesy ballads, and dance pop (80s) and hip hop (more 90s). Not even close to pure 80s, but I'm willing to bet it more closely resembles 1985 than 1995, maybe just by a hair.


I even think the hip hop has more of an 80s sound to it. Rappers in the 80s and into the very early 90s had a different sort of 'delivery' if you will, than the 90s rappers. Gangsta rap from 1992 onwards tended to have more of a 'slow' slurring sort of delivery, there was some of this as early as 1988 (Geto Boys and Ice T for instance) but for the most part 1990 was dominated by MC Hammer and Beastie Boys type rhyming which I think of as being very late 80s.

Tone Loc's "Funky Cold Medina" is actually an early example of what I think of 90s style rapping as sounding like, I think Snoop Dogg might have even been influenced by him. That song came out in 1988 and was still played often throughout the 90s, it actually even sounds a little bit like some 90s alternative music.

1990 definitely wasn't pure 80s as far as music goes but I'd say probably two thirds of the songs that were popular in 1990 sound at least somewhat 80s. I agree about it being slightly closer to 1985 than to 1995 and music was actually in my opinion the most "90s" thing about 1990.

Even 1988 and '89 had a surprising number of hit songs that sound like they could have been made a decent ways into the 90s.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: Howard on 12/29/12 at 7:04 am


My point exactly. They may remember 1989 very well, but 1980 is part of the era too. To have "authority" over an era you need to be there for the full monty.


I was born in 1974 and I barely remembered 80's music.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: Howard on 12/29/12 at 7:45 pm


This was a big hit in 1980. If you don't remember this being popular, you don't reach the "full monty" standard.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k_C0SK490h8



good hit.

Subject: Re: Would you consider people born in the late 70s part of Generation Y?

Written By: Inlandsvägen1986 on 01/01/13 at 5:22 pm


1973-1982: Varying amounts of 80s authority


I know that you are proud being born in 1982. However I think that this birthyear is quite overrated - at least when it comes to 'claim' the 80s. Somebody born in that year remembers the mid-late 80s how I remember 1990,1991,1992 and 1993. I have memories of these years, but I don't think they are that clear and vivid that I could talk about pop culture from that era. So what would an 82er actually know so well about the late 80s?

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