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Subject: The Y2K Era

Written By: mxcrashxm on 01/12/17 at 1:17 pm

I understand that this might be a senseless thread, but bear with me. We need to have a discussion about this era and how long it actually lasted. There were debates on that it either began in 1997/98 and ended in 2002/03 when it was truly much shorter than that. I mean Y2K is another name for 2000. There's no other way around it. It's been agreed upon that the era is its own period, but what is also associated with that time-frame? Looking at pop culture, it started in Summer 1999 and was finished by Summer 2001. So, this is the real Y2K era. The late 90s AND the early 00s had their own cultures.

Any thoughts?

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: TheKid99 on 01/12/17 at 1:24 pm

I would say Mid 1998 - November 2000

1998 is included as it seems to be the start of the transition into the Y2k era....

Optimism with a few excpetions (Columbine....) was in the air and alive and well...

the dot com bubble started bursting in April 2000.... many thought it would go back up again but by late 2000 is was becoming clear the economy was nearing recession....

I include 1998 because that was the year the US economy other than the brief long term capital management really started getting going along with the Nasdaq.
December 2000 - September 11th 2001 is what I would consider the transition into a new era... it was VERY slow.... we were just starting to really transition when 9/11 happened.... and changed our country

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: #Infinity on 01/12/17 at 1:56 pm

I'd say late 1997 to September 10, 2001. Late 1997 was about the time that classic 90s grunge/g-funk/scroungy/DGAF mindset was predominantly overtaken by the age of teen pop, teen shows and films, Dot Com, frosted tips, and counterculture that was more nihilistic than just jaded and puzzled. The period after 9/11 was similar to the latter half of the Y2K era in many ways, but 9/11 set the world on a significantly different idealistic trajectory, not to mention numerous other things were evolving into the core 2000s at the same time, i.e., reality television exploding, 6th generation gaming taking over, George W. Bush being the American President.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 01/12/17 at 1:57 pm

You should have called it millennium era nostalgia...

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 01/12/17 at 1:59 pm


I'd say late 1997 to September 10, 2001. Late 1997 was about the time that classic 90s grunge/g-funk/scrounginess mindset was predominantly overtaken by the age of teen pop, teen films and films, Dot Com, frosted tips, and counterculture that was more nihilistic than just jaded and puzzled.

1997 and 1998 was just regular late 90s. 1999 was the true start of the millennium era.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 01/12/17 at 2:02 pm

Hey Markese, I don't mean to be rude at all...  :-[ But could you rename your thread Y2K era nostalgia or can I make my own thread? ;)

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: mxcrashxm on 01/12/17 at 2:05 pm


Hey Markese, I don't mean to be rude at all...  :-[ But could you rename your thread Y2K era nostalgia or can I make my own thread? ;)
Well I didn't make it about nostalgia, but more on the boundaries about when the era began and ended and what is associated with the period.

You can make the Millennial nostalgia thread if you want and I'll gladly join you. :)

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 01/12/17 at 2:08 pm


Well I didn't make it about nostalgia, but more on the boundaries about when the era began and ended and what is associated with the period.

You can make the Millennial nostalgia thread if you want and I'll gladly join you :) .

Oops, I didn't read your OP. ;D :-[ Didn't realize this was a debate thread... :-X


And cool! I've been eager to make that thread for weeks!! After seeing the late 90s nostalgia and the late 2000s nostalgia thread. It got me thinking, hmm. Problem is the era was short lived. So I'll put it in the more than a decade thread. Since that was strangest time for pop culture EVER! ;D

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: #Infinity on 01/12/17 at 2:14 pm


1997 and 1998 was just regular late 90s. 1999 was the true start of the millennium era.


They were still heavily distinguished from the mid-90s in numerous ways that instead tied them more to the turn of the millennium. In a specific sense, I see spring 1999 to September 10, 2001 as the height of the Y2K era, but in broader terms, I think you can easily factor in the 1997-1998 school year as well. By then, you had South Park, the Internet as a full-on cultural juggernaut, mid-90s genra like g-funk and classic eurodance taking a backseat to stuff like "You Make Me Wanna" and "Quit Playing Games (With My Heart)," shows like Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Daria replacing Beavis & Butthead and The Simpsons, the Disney Afternoon being over and Cartoon Cartoons on Cartoon Network, gaming being dominated by titles like GoldenEye 007 and Final Fantasy VII, and bands like Third Eye Blind, Matchbox Twenty, and Sugar Ray overtaking older ones like Soundgarden, Gin Blossoms, and the Cranberries.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 01/12/17 at 2:21 pm


They were still heavily distinguished from the mid-90s in numerous ways that instead tied them more to the turn of the millennium. In a specific sense, I see spring 1999 to September 10, 2001 as the height of the Y2K era, but in broader terms, I think you can easily factor in the 1997-1998 school year as well. By then, you had South Park, the Internet as a full-on cultural juggernaut, mid-90s genra like g-funk and classic eurodance taking a backseat to stuff like "You Make Me Wanna" and "Quit Playing Games (With My Heart)," shows like Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Daria replacing Beavis & Butthead and The Simpsons, the Disney Afternoon being over and Cartoon Cartoons on Cartoon Network, gaming being dominated by titles like GoldenEye 007 and Final Fantasy VII, and bands like Third Eye Blind, Matchbox Twenty, and Sugar Ray overtaking older ones like Soundgarden, Gin Blossoms, and the Cranberries.

I understand what your sayin Jacqueline. But usually when I think of those things I think of the regular late 90s.
When I think of millennium era, I think of American Pie, Batman Beyond, Tony Hawk games, Pokemania, WWF, Brittney, NSYNC, early Christina Aguliera, Latin Pop craze, Golden Age Toonami, 2000 election, the debuts of series such as Sopranos, West Wing, Law and Order SVU, Family Guy, Futurama, Who wants to be millionaire, Angel, etc. 


Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: mxcrashxm on 01/12/17 at 2:24 pm


1997 and 1998 was just regular late 90s. 1999 was the true start of the millennium era.
I agree! The 1999-00 and 2000-01 years were more of the Millennial era.


I understand what your sayin Jacqueline. But over the years when I think of that stuff I think of the regular late 90s.
When I think of millennium era, I think of American Pie, Batman Beyond, Tony Hawk games, Pokemania, WWF, Brittney, NSYNC, early Christina Aguliera, Latin Pop craze, Golden Age Toonami, 2000 election, the debuts of series such as Sopranos, West Wing, Law and Order SVU, Family Guy, Futurama, Who wants to be millionaire, Angel, etc. 
Whoa!!! Same here. I used to believe that the Y2K timeframe were a combination of the late 90s/early, but in reality, they all have their own separate cultures.


I'd say late 1997 to September 10, 2001. Late 1997 was about the time that classic 90s grunge/g-funk/scroungy/DGAF mindset was predominantly overtaken by the age of teen pop, teen shows and films, Dot Com, frosted tips, and counterculture that was more nihilistic than just jaded and puzzled. The period after 9/11 was similar to the latter half of the Y2K era in many ways, but 9/11 set the world on a significantly different idealistic trajectory, not to mention numerous other things were evolving into the core 2000s at the same time, i.e., reality television exploding, 6th generation gaming taking over, George W. Bush being the American President.



They were still heavily distinguished from the mid-90s in numerous ways that instead tied them more to the turn of the millennium. In a specific sense, I see spring 1999 to September 10, 2001 as the height of the Y2K era, but in broader terms, I think you can easily factor in the 1997-1998 school year as well. By then, you had South Park, the Internet as a full-on cultural juggernaut, mid-90s genra like g-funk and classic eurodance taking a backseat to stuff like "You Make Me Wanna" and "Quit Playing Games (With My Heart)," shows like Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Daria replacing Beavis & Butthead and The Simpsons, the Disney Afternoon being over and Cartoon Cartoons on Cartoon Network, gaming being dominated by titles like GoldenEye 007 and Final Fantasy VII, and bands like Third Eye Blind, Matchbox Twenty, and Sugar Ray overtaking older ones like Soundgarden, Gin Blossoms, and the Cranberries.
Wasn't the late 90s period more of its own? There are some things that make it distinct from the Y2K period.


I would say Mid 1998 - November 2000

1998 is included as it seems to be the start of the transition into the Y2k era....

Optimism with a few excpetions (Columbine....) was in the air and alive and well...

the dot com bubble started bursting in April 2000.... many thought it would go back up again but by late 2000 is was becoming clear the economy was nearing recession....

I include 1998 because that was the year the US economy other than the brief long term capital management really started getting going along with the Nasdaq.
December 2000 - September 11th 2001 is what I would consider the transition into a new era... it was VERY slow.... we were just starting to really transition when 9/11 happened.... and changed our country
You know, I forgot about the transitions for some reason, so I put two years for the entire period; however, your span could work.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 01/12/17 at 2:25 pm

So yeah, 97 were the earliest signs of the era coming, but 1999 was when the era truly came. 1997 was kinda like the 90s 2006, and 1999 was kinda like the 90s 2008.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: muppethammer26 on 01/12/17 at 2:51 pm


So yeah, 97 were the earliest signs of the era coming, but 1999 was when the era truly came. 1997 was kinda like the 90s 2006, and 1999 was kinda like the 90s 2008.


More like 2007 for 1997 and 2009 for 1999.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: Tyrannosaurus Rex on 01/12/17 at 3:27 pm


I would say Mid 1998 - November 2000

1998 is included as it seems to be the start of the transition into the Y2k era....

Optimism with a few excpetions (Columbine....) was in the air and alive and well...

the dot com bubble started bursting in April 2000.... many thought it would go back up again but by late 2000 is was becoming clear the economy was nearing recession....

I include 1998 because that was the year the US economy other than the brief long term capital management really started getting going along with the Nasdaq.
December 2000 - September 11th 2001 is what I would consider the transition into a new era... it was VERY slow.... we were just starting to really transition when 9/11 happened.... and changed our country


I, for some odd reason, thought that Thurston (another school shooting in the late 90's) was more sad than Columbine, even though Thurston has significantly less notoriety.

Though I feel bad for the shooter (Kip Kinkel), I am NOT supporting the actions that Kip Kinkel did at Thurston High School and to his parents in May 1998.

Kip Kinkel, the then-15-year-old perpetrator, was depressed, had Asperger's, and often heard voices in his head. He not only killed two of his peers, but he also killed both of his parents the night before the shooting. Additionally, he attempted to kill himself (but did not) because of the depression and anguish he was going through. In the aftermath of his deeds, he is now serving 111 years in prison without parole. When you look at one of his mugshots after the shooting, it almost looked as if he were crying, and when you look at the other mugshot, it looked as if he were motionless. He spent more of his life at prison than being free.

I imagine how his life is now, probably must feel like hell to be him.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: Tyrannosaurus Rex on 01/12/17 at 3:49 pm


More like 2007 for 1997 and 2009 for 1999.


I thought that 1997 was the year where all early 90's ties were broken and that it was the year where the 90's started forming its later identity, though the stuff from it did not explode yet.

1997 equivalents from other decades

00's: 2006
80's: 1988
70's: 1976
60's: 1966 or 1967

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: bchris02 on 01/12/17 at 4:19 pm


I'd say late 1997 to September 10, 2001. Late 1997 was about the time that classic 90s grunge/g-funk/scroungy/DGAF mindset was predominantly overtaken by the age of teen pop, teen shows and films, Dot Com, frosted tips, and counterculture that was more nihilistic than just jaded and puzzled. The period after 9/11 was similar to the latter half of the Y2K era in many ways, but 9/11 set the world on a significantly different idealistic trajectory, not to mention numerous other things were evolving into the core 2000s at the same time, i.e., reality television exploding, 6th generation gaming taking over, George W. Bush being the American President.


I would say any time in 1997 is a little too soon.  Late 1998 is the earliest I would say the era started.

To me, the general "Y2K" zeitgeist lasted primarily from the summer of 1999 through George W. Bush's inauguration.  Of course, there was gaining influences starting approximately six months before that and waning influences six months after.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: bchris02 on 01/12/17 at 4:26 pm


So yeah, 97 were the earliest signs of the era coming, but 1999 was when the era truly came. 1997 was kinda like the 90s 2006, and 1999 was kinda like the 90s 2008.


This is a great comparison. 1997 was a year that for the most part was entirely classic '90s. At that point, the culture had begun to show signs of being "played out" but nothing new was on the horizon yet to really replace it. I would also say 1998 was like the 2007 year of the 90s. In 2007, trends were still mostly '00s but there was a sense that things were starting to move forward. It was the same was in 1998 as it related to 90s culture.

The real change happened in 1999. Just compare the sound of Top 40 between fall 1997 and fall 1999. It is quite different for only being two years apart.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 01/12/17 at 5:26 pm


More like 2007 for 1997 and 2009 for 1999.

I disagree... there wasn't any kind of shift in 2007. 2006 on the other hand...
2009 being 1999 like is debatable. But 2008 saw great change so did 1999.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: #Infinity on 01/12/17 at 5:31 pm

Okay, this thread is quickly slipping into a series of nitpicky tangents. Can we all just agree that the Y2K era occurred within the vicinity 1999 and 2000, with the date range varying depending on how many layers you're willing to include under this artificial umbrella? I won't act like 1997 and 1998 are identical 1999-2001, but I think there are undoubtedly a lot of connections between the former and latter.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: SpyroKev on 01/12/17 at 5:31 pm

I'm going to agree the Y2K Era is 1998-2001. In my own biasness though, its 1997-2002 because those are actually my favorites eras. 2003 is the bonus.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: mqg96 on 01/12/17 at 7:58 pm

I used to think the Y2K era was both late 90's and early 2000's culture, but now I realize that Y2K culture is separate from late 90's culture and early 2000's culture. Late 90's culture was from late 1996-1998, Y2K culture (or peak of millennial) was from 1999-mid 2001, and early 2000's culture was from late 2001-2003.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: 2001 on 01/12/17 at 8:07 pm

1996-2003 is its own minidecade imo. The early Internet era. 1999/2000 would be the mid portion of the decade, I guess the Y2K era xD

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: 80sfan on 01/12/17 at 8:10 pm

Most people here seem to believe that the Y2K era was 1997 to 2001.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: JordanK1982 on 01/12/17 at 10:17 pm

I'd ask Zelek since he's an expert on the topic of Saddam Hussein and his mini era. 😜

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: mxcrashxm on 01/15/17 at 9:01 pm


Okay, this thread is quickly slipping into a series of nitpicky tangents. Can we all just agree that the Y2K era occurred within the vicinity 1999 and 2000, with the date range varying depending on how many layers you're willing to include under this artificial umbrella? I won't act like 1997 and 1998 are identical 1999-2001, but I think there are undoubtedly a lot of connections between the former and latter.
Yeah, this era was pretty much late 1999 to mid 2001. I agree that there were connections from the late 90s to this period; however, they were quite small.


Most people here seem to believe that the Y2K era was 1997 to 2001.
Not just here, but everywhere else online as well. In reality this was a short period, and by 2001 it was obviously over.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: Baltimoreian on 01/15/17 at 9:14 pm


I thought that 1997 was the year where all early 90's ties were broken and that it was the year where the 90's started forming its later identity, though the stuff from it did not explode yet.

1997 equivalents from other decades

00's: 2006
80's: 1988
70's: 1976
60's: 1966 or 1967


It's more like 2007, since 2006 was like the early 2000s (to some people).

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: Zelek3 on 01/15/17 at 9:49 pm


It's more like 2007, since 2006 was like the early 2000s (to some people).

It wasn't really like the early 2000s, but it was the last year to have vestiges of the early 2000s, I'd say.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: 80sfan on 01/15/17 at 10:25 pm


Yeah, this era was pretty much late 1999 to mid 2001. I agree that there were connections from the late 90s to this period; however, they were quite small.
Not just here, but everywhere else online as well. In reality this was a short period, and by 2001 it was obviously over.


From Spice Girls (1997) to 9/11 (2001).

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: ZeldaFan20 on 01/15/17 at 10:35 pm

It depends on what you're referring to. If you were to ask me my opinion, I see the period from roughly Late 1997 to the end of 2003 (or early 2004 at the latest) as one big era. A transitional era from the Core 90's which lasted from 1992/1993 - 1996/1997 and the Core 00's which lasted from 2004/2005 - 2008/2009.

The Millennium Era, as I like to call it, was unique from either time periods. Now if you're asking about specifically the Y2K Period, I agree with the general consensus with starting it around Late 1998 around when the year 2000 was quickly looming towards us and pop culture was rapidly changing from the core 90's & ending it around 9/11 which ushered in a new Western World zeitgeist. Someone mentioned how the Y2K period was the 'bread & butter' of the overall larger Millennium period and I agree.

The period from Late 1996 - Mid 1998 is distinctly Late 90's Culture, while the period from Late 2001 - Early 2004 being distinctly Early 00's Culture. There's a little overlap at both ends as they both are gradually transitioning in or out of the Millennium Era and out from/into their respective core decade's cultures (that would be 1997/8 & 2003/4 respectively).

But overall a larger Late 1997 - Early 2004 period, or 1998 - 2003 if your talking about FULL years, with it peaking around the 1999-2000 school year, is what I'd consider the Millennium Era, not distinctly 90's or 00's, a mixture of both decade's cultures.

These are (IMO) the quintessential Millennium Era things relating to each form of pop culture:

Movies:

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51EG732BV3L.jpg


Television:

http://fontmeme.com/images/Buffy-the-Vampire-Slayer-TV-Series.jpg


Music:

5Uu3kCEEc98


Cartoons:

http://img09.deviantart.net/f8f2/i/2011/186/9/0/cartoon_cartoons___color_by_ssgba1380-d25yiwc.jpg

Fads:

http://cdn.playbuzz.com/cdn/416ad44f-9eb0-4316-9802-3a800f17975d/f6d51966-d224-4d5c-97e1-083ba45bede7_560_420.jpg


Fashion:

https://thepilver.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/nsync-1.jpg


Technology:

http://www.computer-retro.de/Bilder/iMac/Siemens-Nixdorf-Scenic-Pro-D5-Intel-Pentium-166-CPU-32MB-EDO-RAM-Quantum-Fireball-ST-1620AT-HDD-Toshiba-XM-6002B-CD-ROM-Cirrus-Logic-CL-GD5446-on-Board-Grafik-Intel-430HX-(Triton-II)-Realtek-NIC-AVM-FritzCard-W26361-D969-X-02-Phoenix-1997_thumb.jpg

Cars:

http://bestcarmag.com/sites/default/files/24354972000_sebring_silver_metallic_honda_crv_w640.jpeg


Gaming:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3265/2801862368_df8fdfdafc_o.jpg


Toys:
http://vignette4.wikia.nocookie.net/official-furby/images/5/5d/Black_White_Furby_whit_brown_eyes.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20131110170718

& other notable Quintessential Era things:

The Peak in Popularity for The WB & Kids WB

http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj47/ActionMan_2008/WB-1.jpeg~original

http://vignette2.wikia.nocookie.net/90scartoons/images/1/18/Kids_WB_Logo.png/revision/latest?cb=20140801042644



The Attitude Era for WWF

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/f/fa/WWF_Attitude_PSX_cover.jpg


The transition from VHS to DVDs

https://1006-w08.wikispaces.com/file/view/emersondvd/32346605/emersondvd


Peak in popularity for cult classics like Hey Arnold, Spongebob Squarepants (Seasons 1-3), & Dragon Ball Z (Western Dubbing)

http://sev.h-cdn.co/assets/15/48/1448299117-maxresdefault-3.jpg

http://img.cmovieshd.com/images/2016-10/movie-spongebob-squarepants-season-1-big.jpg

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/51mD4Im5ePU/hqdefault.jpg


Technology like Cell Phones & Email becoming common place

http://i2.kym-cdn.com/entries/icons/original/000/008/134/nokia-3310-troubleshooting.jpg

http://pixel.nymag.com/imgs/fashion/daily/2013/11/15/15-aol-sex-predator-2.w529.h352.jpg


Also the peak of the Web 1.0 Era

g5oa5kKkHjQ


All of these I mentioned above were at their quintessential peak in popularity during the 1999-2002 period, while still being VERY relevant during the 1997/8 & 2003/4 periods respectively, hence the larger 'Millennium Period'. Hopefully I spared you guys further arguing ;)

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: #Infinity on 01/16/17 at 12:19 am

If we're strictly referring to the Y2K era, without the regular late 90s (spring 1997 to winter 1998/1999) or early 2000s (September 11, 2001 to mid/late 2003) factoring in, this is pretty much Y2K culture in general:

Music:
* Y2K teen pop at its commercial height, post-Spice Girls; represented by acts like Britney Spears (...Baby One More Time and Oops!...I Did It Again), Backstreet Boys (Millennium), S Club 7 (before Paul left), Steps, 98 Degrees (98 Degrees and Rising, Revelation), LFO (self-titled debut only), Christina Aguilera (ditto), Mandy Moore (So Real, I Wanna Be With You, self-titled), and so on.
* Latin pop. This begins with Ricky Martin's "Livin' La Vida Loca" and extends to Enrique Iglesias, Marc Anthony, Jennifer Lopez, Santana, and so on. This trend is actually still relevant through the entirety of the early 2000s, before being overtaken by reggaeton in the mid-2000s, but it absolutely dominated the world during the regular Y2K era.
* Cash Money Records and Aftermath. If Puffy/Mase-era Bad Boy Records and No Limit Records were the faces of late 90s hip hop, the Y2K era was dominated by Cash Money and Aftermath. Both labels had been struggling for a few years prior, but suddenly took the world by storm in 1999.
* Nu-metal and rap-rock. Limp Bizkit, Godsmack, Slipknot, KoRn, Infest-era Papa Roach, you get the idea.

Television:
* Dawson's Creek
* Freaks and Geeks
* Buffy the Vampire Slayer
* Ally McBeal
* Futurama
* The Powerpuff Girls
* Pokemon Indigo League, Orange Islands, and Johto Journeys

Movies:
* Gross-out comedies like American Pie
* The Matrix
* Austin Powers
* The Blair Witch Project
* The Mummy
* Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace
* The first 3 Pokemon movies

Fashion:
* Frosted tips
* Tube tops
* Pigtails
* Bob cuts
* T-shirts
* Sweatpants
* Light colors
* A&F

Gaming:
* Sega Dreamcast
* Game Boy Color
* DualShock-era PS1 games
* Half-Life 1
* LoZ: Oot & MM
* RollerCoaster Tycoon
* Silent Hill
* Super Smash Bros. 64
* Pokemon RBY and GSC

Technology:
* iMac '98
* Windows 98
* Windows 2000
* Commercial peak of CDs
* DVD's are the luxurious alternative to VHS
* Dot Com-era Internet
* Tamagotchi

Events:
* Y2K scare
* Columbine Massacre and aftermath
* Napster scandal
* 2000 American Election season
* Height of the Dot Com Bubble

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: bchris02 on 01/16/17 at 1:38 am


If we're strictly referring to the Y2K era, without the regular late 90s (spring 1997 to winter 1998/1999) or early 2000s (September 11, 2001 to mid/late 2003) factoring in, this is pretty much Y2K culture in general:

Music:
* Y2K teen pop at its commercial height, post-Spice Girls; represented by acts like Britney Spears (...Baby One More Time and Oops!...I Did It Again), Backstreet Boys (Millennium), S Club 7 (before Paul left), Steps, 98 Degrees (98 Degrees and Rising, Revelation), LFO (self-titled debut only), Christina Aguilera (ditto), Mandy Moore (So Real, I Wanna Be With You, self-titled), and so on.
* Latin pop. This begins with Ricky Martin's "Livin' La Vida Loca" and extends to Enrique Iglesias, Marc Anthony, Jennifer Lopez, Santana, and so on. This trend is actually still relevant through the entirety of the early 2000s, before being overtaken by reggaeton in the mid-2000s, but it absolutely dominated the world during the regular Y2K era.
* Cash Money Records and Aftermath. If Puffy/Mase-era Bad Boy Records and No Limit Records were the faces of late 90s hip hop, the Y2K era was dominated by Cash Money and Aftermath. Both labels had been struggling for a few years prior, but suddenly took the world by storm in 1999.
* Nu-metal and rap-rock. Limp Bizkit, Godsmack, Slipknot, KoRn, Infest-era Papa Roach, you get the idea.

Television:
* Dawson's Creek
* Freaks and Geeks
* Buffy the Vampire Slayer
* Ally McBeal
* Futurama
* The Powerpuff Girls
* Pokemon Indigo League, Orange Islands, and Johto Journeys

Movies:
* Gross-out comedies like American Pie
* The Matrix
* Austin Powers
* The Blair Witch Project
* The Mummy
* Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace
* The first 3 Pokemon movies

Fashion:
* Frosted tips
* Tube tops
* Pigtails
* Bob cuts
* T-shirts
* Sweatpants
* Light colors
* A&F

Gaming:
* Sega Dreamcast
* Game Boy Color
* DualShock-era PS1 games
* Half-Life 1
* LoZ: Oot & MM
* RollerCoaster Tycoon
* Silent Hill
* Super Smash Bros. 64
* Pokemon RBY and GSC

Technology:
* iMac '98
* Windows 98
* Windows 2000
* Commercial peak of CDs
* DVD's are the luxurious alternative to VHS
* Dot Com-era Internet
* Tamagotchi

Events:
* Y2K scare
* Columbine Massacre and aftermath
* Napster scandal
* 2000 American Election season
* Height of the Dot Com Bubble


EXCELLENT breakdown.

For music, one thing I would add is Eminem's Marshal Mathers LP.  That album would probably be one of the top three of the era.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: #Infinity on 01/16/17 at 2:16 am


EXCELLENT breakdown.

For music, one thing I would add is Eminem's Marshal Mathers LP.  That album would probably be one of the top three of the era.


That album factors in with the Aftermath category I listed, actually. It was basically Eminem who completely rejuvinated Dr. Dre's career, along with the Chronic 2001 album, which also featured Eminem.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: af2010 on 01/16/17 at 9:55 am


It depends on what you're referring to. If you were to ask me my opinion, I see the period from roughly Late 1997 to the end of 2003 (or early 2004 at the latest) as one big era. A transitional era from the Core 90's which lasted from 1992/1993 - 1996/1997 and the Core 00's which lasted from 2004/2005 - 2008/2009.


I agree with this. I've always viewed the late 90s through the early 00s as one era. I know some people think the late 90s/Millennium Era/early 00s are all separate, but when you start dividing eras up into 2-year increments you can't really call that a cultural era.

I would end it a year earlier though, in 02/03. Teen pop was pretty much dead by 2002 and crunk blew up in 2003, which to me is the genre most easily associated with the 00s. But it was a gradual transition, and I agree that if you really want to narrow it down, it peaked around 99/00, with each earlier/later year being less "Y2K."

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: Baltimoreian on 01/16/17 at 10:08 am


It depends on what you're referring to. If you were to ask me my opinion, I see the period from roughly Late 1997 to the end of 2003 (or early 2004 at the latest) as one big era. A transitional era from the Core 90's which lasted from 1992/1993 - 1996/1997 and the Core 00's which lasted from 2004/2005 - 2008/2009.


It's like that, except I think 2003-04 was the start of the core 2000s in my opinion.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 01/16/17 at 10:40 pm


From Spice Girls (1997)

Spice Girls was regular late 90s. They weren't apart of the Y2K era...

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: Zelek3 on 01/16/17 at 10:54 pm

If 1998-2003ish is called the Y2K Era, then what is the era that spans from 2004 to 2007? The Emo/MySpce era?

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: af2010 on 01/16/17 at 11:18 pm


Spice Girls was regular late 90s. They weren't apart of the Y2K era...


Same culture man. I remember it.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: mxcrashxm on 01/16/17 at 11:20 pm


If 1998-2003ish is called the Y2K Era, then what is the era that spans from 2004 to 2007? The Emo/MySpce era?
Yeah, pretty much.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: #Infinity on 01/16/17 at 11:43 pm


Spice Girls was regular late 90s. They weren't apart of the Y2K era...


Well, to be fair, all five former members had successful solo careers around the Y2K era, albeit not in the United States. It certainly wasn't the Spicemania/Spice World age any longer, though.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 01/17/17 at 10:23 am


Same culture man. I remember it.

Not exactly the two eras were distinct from each other. I'm not going to get into this again. I've said my piece earlier.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 01/17/17 at 10:24 am


Well, to be fair, all five former members had successful solo careers around the Y2K era, albeit not in the United States. It certainly wasn't the Spicemania/Spice World age any longer, though.

Yeah that's true. You nailed right on the head. :)


Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: Eazy-EMAN1995 on 01/17/17 at 10:28 am


If 1998-2003ish is called the Y2K Era, then what is the era that spans from 2004 to 2007? The Emo/MySpce era?

IMO, 2004- mid 2008, mid to late 00s.
And early 00s culture(Late 2001-2003) was actually separate from the actual millennium era years(1999-2001).

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: Baltimoreian on 01/17/17 at 12:30 pm


IMO, 2004- mid 2008, mid to late 00s.
And early 00s culture(Late 2001-2003) was actually separate from the actual millennium era years(1999-2001).


It's more like 2004-early 2009 for me.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: af2010 on 01/17/17 at 2:12 pm


Not exactly the two eras were distinct from each other. I'm not going to get into this again. I've said my piece earlier.


Every single year is distinct if you really want to break it down to that level. My point is that a 2 year period doesn't constitute an era. There were obviously some differences between say, 1998 and 2002, but the culture was similar enough to group them together. The biggest difference was that 2002 was post 9/11, which as others have noted didn't have much of an impact on popular culture (which is what we're talking about). You have a right to your opinion, but as someone who was an adolescent at the time I can tell you the culture wasn't that different.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: 2001 on 01/17/17 at 7:11 pm

The movie Kids (1995) looks very Y2K era to me, almost. It might be the sk8er fashion though.

Subject: Re: The Y2K Era

Written By: nintieskid999 on 01/17/17 at 9:52 pm

Late 1998 to mid 2001.

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