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Subject: Systems of a decade

Written By: mxcrashxm on 04/08/17 at 8:17 pm

Disclaimer: This is not a decadeology thread, but a topic about formulas regarding a decade.

I have been wanting to a have a discussion about the methods some people use when it comes to decades. As I have noticed, most folks here (and in person) use the thirds approach; however, there are two others I have not seen as much, and they are the halves and the quarters system. For those who are confused. Here's an example.

Thirds (Most common)

2000-02/03

2003/04-06

2006/07-09


Halves

2000-04

2005-09

Quarters

Jan 2000-Jun 2002

Jul 2002-Dec 2004

Jan 2005-Jun 2007

Jul 2007-Dec 2009


Which one do you think is useful and why?

I used to go by the thirds method, but not anymore because it seems confusing. The halves system looks cleaner to me.


Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/08/17 at 8:21 pm

As you obviously know, I use the thirds system. When I divide decades I also do a bit of rationale for when their was similar trends and music.

Also, good on you for making your own thread for this debate...;).

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: nintieskid999 on 04/08/17 at 8:32 pm

I divide by culture.
I divide the 60s into 1960-1963
and 1964-1969.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: Zelek3 on 04/08/17 at 9:09 pm

Thirds.

Obviously there's some spillover and imperfections; usually the very-end of the "-3" year will prove pivotal to the development of mid-decade culture (such as late 2003 having the explosion of crunk rap). While the very-end of the "-6" year will prove pivotal to late-decade culture (such as Trump getting elected in late 2016). But overall, it works pretty well.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/08/17 at 9:13 pm


Thirds.

Obviously there's some spillover and imperfections; usually the very-end of the "-3" year will prove pivotal to the development of mid-decade culture (such as late 2003 having the explosion of crunk rock). While the very-end of the "-6" year will prove pivotal to late-decade culture (such as Trump getting elected in late 2016). But overall, it works pretty well.

Yeah, I agree for pretty much every decade since the 1960s that statement is true.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: Zelek3 on 04/08/17 at 9:17 pm

Dangnabbit, when I said "crunk rock" I meant to say "crunk rap". :P

I don't think crunk rock is even a thing.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/08/17 at 9:22 pm


Dangnabbit, when I said "crunk rock" I meant to say "crunk rap". :P

I don't think crunk rock is even a thing.

Lil Jon has an album called Crunk Rock. There is also a genre called "Crunkcore" which the closest thing to "crunk rock".

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: #Infinity on 04/08/17 at 9:31 pm

It's usually easiest to just divide by thirds because then you can refer to things as early, mid, and late, which conveniently apply to anything.

Depending on the decade, however, it may be easier to stick with halves. This comes in handy when the biggest obvious shift happens in the middle of the decade. The most immediate example of this is the 1940s, which most people naturally split between the war years and the post-war years. However, it also works easily for the 1950s and 1970s. The first half of the 1950s was more or less a continuation of the late 40s, with 1955-ish providing the ascent of 50s culture most people are familiar with, like Rock and Roll, greasers, doo-wop, and beatniks. The 1970s work similarly, with the entire first half being a sort of aftermath to the countercultural revolution of the 1960s, while the whole second half was when all of the "classic" 70s culture reigned supreme, like disco, John Travolta, Happy Days, stagflation politics, bellbottoms, the first wave of SNL, and so on.

The quarter system, for the most part, overcomplicates things and is hard for description purposes. The closest example I can think of for appropriate usage, however, would be the 1980s. Divided by quarters, that decade is basically the 70s hybrid period (1980 to early 1982), the early "full on" period (late 1982 to roughly early 1985), the quintessential period (1985 through the first half of 1987), to the late period (late 1987 to 1989). There are reasonable shifts at the start of each quartile, but it's generally easiest to just go early (1980-1982/1983)/mid (1983/1984-1986)/late (1987-1989) for the sake of convenience.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/08/17 at 9:34 pm


It's usually easiest to just divide by thirds because then you can refer to things as early, mid, and late, which conveniently apply to anything.

Depending on the decade, however, it may be easier to stick with halves. This comes in handy when the biggest obvious shift happens in the middle of the decade. The most immediate example of this is the 1940s, which most people naturally split between the war years and the post-war years. However, it also works easily for the 1950s and 1970s. The first half of the 1950s was more or less a continuation of the late 40s, with 1955-ish providing rise the changes most people are familiar with, like Rock and Roll, greasers, doo-wop, and beatniks. The 1970s work similarly, with the entire first half being a sort of aftermath to the countercultural revolution of the 1960s, while the whole second half was when all of the "classic" 70s culture reigned supreme, like disco, John Travolta, Happy Days, stagflation politics, bellbottoms, the first wave of SNL, and so on.

The quarter system, for the most part, overcomplicates things and is hard for description purposes. The closest example I can think of for appropriate usage, however, would be the 1980s. Divided by quarters, that decade is basically the 70s hybrid period (1980 to early 1982), the early "full on" period (late 1982 to roughly early 1985), the quintessential period (1985 through the first half of 1987), to the late period (late 1987 to 1989). There are reasonable shifts at the start of each quartile, but it's generally easiest to just go early (1980-1982/1983)/mid (1983/1984-1986)/late (1987-1989) for the sake of convenience.

This post is detailed and on point. Nice job #Infinity :).

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: ArcticFox on 04/08/17 at 9:38 pm

I think it goes by Presidential election terms instead. Every other decade has the same pattern with the "even-numbered decades" having only two distinct periods/are shorter, while the "odd-numbered decades" have three distinct periods/are longer. At the beginning of the first year of a new Presidential term, the culture is the same as the era before (January-May), while the rest of the year (June-December) belongs with the new era. I see American popular culture as going by school years, not calendar years.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/08/17 at 9:48 pm


I think it goes by Presidential election terms instead. Every other decade has the same pattern with the "even-numbered decades" having only two distinct periods/are shorter, while the "odd-numbered decades" have three distinct periods/are longer. At the beginning of the first year of a new Presidential term, the culture is the same as the era before (January-May), while the rest of the year (June-December) belongs with the new era. I see American popular culture as going by school years, not calendar years.

Only if a President is in office for one term then the culture of the time period is relatively the same. The culture changes either slighlty or drastically from their first full year vs their last full year.

Ronald Reagan: 1982 culture was mostly different from 1988 culture.
Bill Clinton: 1994 culture was mostly different from 2000 culture.
George W. Bush: 2002 culture was totally different from 2008 culture.
Barack Obama: 2010 culture was different from 2016 culture.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: 80sfan on 04/08/17 at 9:49 pm

I oversimplify it, to my own detriment.  :o

0- Early
1-Early
2-Early

3 to 6- Mid

7 to 9- Late

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/08/17 at 9:52 pm


I oversimplify it, to my own detriment.  :o

0- Early
1-Early
2-Early

3 to 6- Mid

7 to 9- Late

So you consider 1973, 1983, 1993, 2003 and 2013 as the beginning of the middle of their respective decades?

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: 80sfan on 04/08/17 at 10:19 pm


So you consider 1973, 1983, 1993, 2003 and 2013 as the beginning of the middle of their respective decades?


I'd say 75%+ of the time, yes.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: mxcrashxm on 04/09/17 at 10:51 pm


I think it goes by Presidential election terms instead. Every other decade has the same pattern with the "even-numbered decades" having only two distinct periods/are shorter, while the "odd-numbered decades" have three distinct periods/are longer. At the beginning of the first year of a new Presidential term, the culture is the same as the era before (January-May), while the rest of the year (June-December) belongs with the new era. I see American popular culture as going by school years, not calendar years.
I think this is another great way because there are certain school years don't line up with the next.


I divide by culture.
I divide the 60s into 1960-1963
and 1964-1969.
Culture is a good as well, but remember there some decades that can be divided into 4 or 5 eras all at once.


Also, good on you for making your own thread for this debate...;).
Well, I have actually thought about it for sometime now. Almost every site I go on, the majority uses the thirds system with some using the halves technique.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/15/17 at 4:33 pm

I'll rather use the thirds system, since they don't seem to be complicated when charting them. It's also better since most people prefer a decade with the early, mid, and late portion of the terms.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: Mr Steamer on 04/15/17 at 4:46 pm


It's usually easiest to just divide by thirds because then you can refer to things as early, mid, and late, which conveniently apply to anything.

Depending on the decade, however, it may be easier to stick with halves. This comes in handy when the biggest obvious shift happens in the middle of the decade. The most immediate example of this is the 1940s, which most people naturally split between the war years and the post-war years. However, it also works easily for the 1950s and 1970s. The first half of the 1950s was more or less a continuation of the late 40s, with 1955-ish providing the ascent of 50s culture most people are familiar with, like Rock and Roll, greasers, doo-wop, and beatniks. The 1970s work similarly, with the entire first half being a sort of aftermath to the countercultural revolution of the 1960s, while the whole second half was when all of the "classic" 70s culture reigned supreme, like disco, John Travolta, Happy Days, stagflation politics, bellbottoms, the first wave of SNL, and so on.

The quarter system, for the most part, overcomplicates things and is hard for description purposes. The closest example I can think of for appropriate usage, however, would be the 1980s. Divided by quarters, that decade is basically the 70s hybrid period (1980 to early 1982), the early "full on" period (late 1982 to roughly early 1985), the quintessential period (1985 through the first half of 1987), to the late period (late 1987 to 1989). There are reasonable shifts at the start of each quartile, but it's generally easiest to just go early (1980-1982/1983)/mid (1983/1984-1986)/late (1987-1989) for the sake of convenience.

I disagree with you on many of these points.

Greaser fashion actually became popular in late 1953 when "The Wild One" film starring Marlon Brando was released. In 1954 Elvis recorded his first song "That's Alright Mama", most rock historians mark that as the birth of rock and roll. (rock around the clock was also from 1954)

Disco actually hit the mainstream in 1974 with George McCrae's "Rock Your Baby".

1987 was not part of the quintessential 80's. The quintessential 80's was more 1983 to mid '86 as new wave and synthpop began to decline in the fall of 1986.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/15/17 at 4:52 pm


I disagree with you on many of these points.

Greaser fashion actually became popular in late 1953 when "The Wild One" film starring Marlon Brando was released. In 1954 Elvis recorded his first song "That's Alright Mama", most rock historians mark that as the birth of rock and roll. (rock around the clock was also from 1954)

Disco actually hit the mainstream in 1974 with George McCrae's "Rock Your Baby".

1987 was not part of the quintessential 80's. The quintessential 80's was more 1983 to mid '86 as new wave and synthpop began to decline in the fall of 1986.

1987 still felt pretty '80s but I'm not sure if it's quintessential '80s.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: #Infinity on 04/15/17 at 5:04 pm

Greaser fashion actually became popular in late 1953 when "The Wild One" film starring Marlon Brando was released.

1953 and 1954 were transitional years from the post-war decade to the classic 50s. Fashion did not change overnight when The Wild One hit theaters, and although the new fashion did start to creep in soon afterwards, the greaser look was more firmly established by the late 1950s.

In 1954 Elvis recorded his first song "That's Alright Mama", most rock historians mark that as the birth of rock and roll. (rock around the clock was also from 1954)

None of Elvis' songs charted anywhere significant on the Hot 100 until "Heartbreak Hotel" in 1956. "Rock Around the Clock" may have been recorded in 1954, but it wasn't a smash hit until summer 1955. Bill Haley & His Comets did achieve big success in late 1954 with "Shake, Rattle and Roll," but 1955 was the first full year that rock and roll was a full-fledged movement.

Disco actually hit the mainstream in 1974 with George McCrae's "Rock Your Baby".

There were a handful of hit songs in 1973 and 1974 that are arguably disco, but the genre was not a sweeping phenomenon until 1975. Most hit songs in 1973 and 1974 were either singer/songwriter, pop rock, soul, or funk.

1987 was not part of the quintessential 80's. The quintessential 80's was more 1983 to mid '86 as new wave and synthpop began to decline in the fall of 1986.

They certainly didn't die off in the late 1980s, they actually continued quite strong well beyond that. The synthpop band Erasure became popular around the beginning of 1987, and they would continue achieving massive success well into the 90s. Groups like Duran Duran, Tears for Fears, Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark, INXS, Information Society, and so on were still extremely popular in the late 80s, and like Erasure, many remained commercially relevant as late as the mid-late 1990s.


1987 still felt pretty '80s but I'm not sure if it's quintessential '80s.


1987 was when things were first starting to evolve out of the 80s zeitgeist, but still the year was overwhelmingly of its decade, future 90s culture still hardly having been established at all.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/15/17 at 5:08 pm


1987 was when things were first starting to evolve out of the 80s zeitgeist, but still the year was overwhelmingly of its decade, future 90s culture still hardly having been established at all.

Yeah, I agree with that assessment.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: Mr Steamer on 04/15/17 at 6:30 pm


There were a handful of hit songs in 1973 and 1974 that are arguably disco, but the genre was not a sweeping phenomenon until 1975. Most hit songs in 1973 and 1974 were either singer/songwriter, pop rock, soul, or funk.

Disco didn't actually become a sweeping phenomenon until the release of the Saturday Night Fever movie in December 1977. Also, what do you mean disco songs before 1975 were not disco? If they're disco, they're disco.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: Baltimoreian on 04/15/17 at 6:47 pm


Disco didn't actually become a sweeping phenomenon until the release of the Saturday Night Fever movie in December 1977. Also, what do you mean disco songs before 1975 were not disco? If they're disco, they're disco.


I disagree with that. How could it be only a phenomenon in only a few years? Disco was the top genre during the 70s. Saturday Night Fever had to get some popular inspirations in order to make the movie happen.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/16/17 at 3:14 am


1987 was not part of the quintessential 80's. The quintessential 80's was more 1983 to mid '86 as new wave and synthpop began to decline in the fall of 1986.


But it didn't. In 1987-1990 songs such as You Are The Girl, Don't Look Down, Mony Mony, Cradle of Love, I Bet Your Pardon, True Faith, She Drives Me Crazy, The Promise, Enjoy the Silence, Policy of Truth were all top 40 new wave hits; a couple even hitting #1. Look at the bands/songs Jacqueline previously mentioned, too, like Duran Duran, Erasure and INXS who remained popular in the late 80's and beyond.
Depeche Mode's Violator, one of the absolute greatest new wave/synthpop records of all time, came out in 1990 and continues/expands upon the sound they began on 1984's Some Great Reward.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: Zelek3 on 04/16/17 at 3:22 am

I agree with Jordan. I don't see why Wikipedia says new wave died in the mid 80s; they're off by 5 years there.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/16/17 at 3:26 am

Yeah, it doesn't really make any sense.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: Mr Steamer on 04/16/17 at 6:10 am


But it didn't. In 1987-1990 songs such as You Are The Girl, Don't Look Down, Mony Mony, Cradle of Love, I Bet Your Pardon, True Faith, She Drives Me Crazy, The Promise, Enjoy the Silence, Policy of Truth were all top 40 new wave hits; a couple even hitting #1. Look at the bands/songs Jacqueline previously mentioned, too, like Duran Duran, Erasure and INXS who remained popular in the late 80's and beyond.
Depeche Mode's Violator, one of the absolute greatest new wave/synthpop records of all time, came out in 1990 and continues/expands upon the sound they began on 1984's Some Great Reward.

There were some very early roots of what would become 90's culture in 1986, with RUN-DMC and The Beastie Boys first entering the scene. That's another reason I exclude 1986 (or at least the second half of the year) from the peak 80's.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/16/17 at 6:21 am


There were some very early roots of what would become 90's culture in 1986, with RUN-DMC and The Beastie Boys first entering the scene. That's another reason I exclude 1986 (or at least the second half of the year) from the peak 80's.


What does that have to do with anything I said? I was talking about new wave's continued popularity in the late 80's and you just started going on about a different topic without even leading into it. ???

But if you insist... That's still distinctly 80's hip hop. If that counts as an "early root" of 90's culture then 1984 must have those traces too as Chaka Khan's I Feel For You and New Edition's Cool It Now were both top 40 hits that blended pop music and rnb with rap music in ways never done before. 

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: Mr Steamer on 04/16/17 at 7:19 am


What does that have to do with anything I said? I was talking about new wave's continued popularity in the late 80's and you just started going on about a different topic without even leading into it. ???

But if you insist... That's still distinctly 80's hip hop. If that counts as an "early root" of 90's culture then 1984 must have those traces too as Chaka Khan's I Feel For You and New Edition's Cool It Now were both top 40 hits that blended pop music and rnb with rap music in ways never done before.

Right. What I was saying before was, the kind of new wave that has that futuristic/electronic/space kind of feel to it seemed to fade away after 1985. That's why I think 1985 was really the last "true" year of the 80's.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/16/17 at 10:03 am


There were some very early roots of what would become 90's culture in 1986, with RUN-DMC and The Beastie Boys first entering the scene. That's another reason I exclude 1986 (or at least the second half of the year) from the peak 80's.

Nope, Run DMC and The Beastie Boys were distinctly '80s hip hop.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/16/17 at 10:04 am


Right. What I was saying before was, the kind of new wave that has that futuristic/electronic/space kind of feel to it seemed to fade away after 1985. That's why I think 1985 was really the last "true" year of the 80's.

Nope again, 1987 was the last true '80s year.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: Mr Steamer on 04/16/17 at 11:01 am


Nope again, 1987 was the last true '80s year.

Actually you know what, I'll agree, 1987 was the last true 80's year. 1988-1991 (possibly 1992 as well) was really when the transition toward the 90's began. As these years saw the rise of hardcore rap, euro house, new jack swing and grunge.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/16/17 at 5:36 pm


Right. What I was saying before was, the kind of new wave that has that futuristic/electronic/space kind of feel to it seemed to fade away after 1985. That's why I think 1985 was really the last "true" year of the 80's.


1985 new wave doesn't really sound that different from the stuff coming out through the rest of the decade. Honestly, the original new wave sound started changing and diverging off into a million different sub-genres in 1983 and 1984. Depeche Mode's Violator sounds very futuristic. 8)


Nope, Run DMC and The Beastie Boys were distinctly '80s hip hop.


This. 8)

However, I'd still say '88 and '89 are true 80's years.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/16/17 at 5:38 pm


This. 8)

However, I'd still say '88 and '89 are true 80's years.

The '80s zeitgeist were gone by 1987 but 1988 and 1989 were still the "identifiable" '80s.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/16/17 at 5:42 pm


The '80s zeitgeist were gone by 1987 but 1988 and 1989 were still the "identifiable" '80s.


If the 80's "zeitgeist" was gone by 1987 than '88 and '89 wouldn't be identifiable 80's because they would lack that "zeitgeist".

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/16/17 at 5:44 pm


If the 80's "zeitgeist" was gone by 1987 than '88 and '89 wouldn't be identifiable 80's because they would lack that "zeitgeist".

Nope, zeitgeist means "the defining spirit or mood of a particular period of history as shown by the ideas and beliefs of the time." 1988 and 1989 had a slightly different mood from 1984-1986/1987 because of the slight change in fashion, the '88 Presidential Election, Bush 41 as Prez, gangsta rap becoming mainstream because of N.W.A., fall of the Berlin Wall, etc.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/16/17 at 5:49 pm


Nope, zeitgeist means "the defining spirit or mood of a particular period of history as shown by the ideas and beliefs of the time." 1988 and 1989 had a slightly different mood from 1984-1986/1987 because of the slight change in fashion, the '88 Presidential Election, Bush 41 as Prez, gangsta rap becoming mainstream because of N.W.A., etc.


But the overall defining mood and spirit of '88 and '89 was predominately 80's. Hair metal, Madonna, new wave, hi-nrg pop, NES, big hair, shaped skateboards, Beetlejuice, Die Hard, Say Anything, etc.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/16/17 at 5:51 pm


But the overall defining mood and spirit of '88 and '89 was predominately 80's. Hair metal, Madonna, new wave, hi-nrg pop, NES, big hair, shaped skateboards, Beetlejuice, Die Hard, Say Anything, etc.

Yes but it wasn't "core" '80s and thus not '80s zeitgeist.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/16/17 at 5:57 pm


Yes but it wasn't "core" '80s and thus not '80s zeitgeist.


Those two things don't have to be mutually exclusive. It may not be the definitive part of the decade like '84 to '87 but it still carries the mood/feel, thus still retaining the "zeitgeist".

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/16/17 at 5:59 pm


Those two things don't have to be mutually exclusive. It may not be the definitive part of the decade like '84 to '87 but it still carries the mood/feel, thus still retaining the "zeitgeist".

The mood slightly changed because of the things I mentioned earlier so I respectfully disagree. Anyways, we're just going to keep going in circles...:P.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/16/17 at 6:00 pm


The mood slightly changed because of the things I mentioned earlier so I respectfully disagree. Anyways, we're just going to keep going in circles...:P.


Fair enough. :P

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: Mr Steamer on 04/16/17 at 7:32 pm


Those two things don't have to be mutually exclusive. It may not be the definitive part of the decade like '84 to '87 but it still carries the mood/feel, thus still retaining the "zeitgeist".

I think in some ways, after 1989 it's as if they took a step back in pop culture which is why (in my opinion) 1990 feels more 80's than 1988 and 1989. There seems to have been a slight revival of certain 80's trends in that year, such as synthpop, adult contemporary and neon colors. Am I wrong? What do you think?

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/16/17 at 7:35 pm


I think in some ways, after 1989 it's as if they took a step back in pop culture which is why (in my opinion) 1990 feels more 80's than 1988 and 1989. There seems to have been a slight revival of certain 80's trends in that year, such as synthpop, adult contemporary and neon colors. Am I wrong? What do you think?

Well, I was about a decade away from being born but to me 1990 was the last full hurrah for the '80s. I just love the time period 1987-1995/1996 (especially 1988-1993).

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: 80sfan on 04/16/17 at 7:56 pm


Disco didn't actually become a sweeping phenomenon until the release of the Saturday Night Fever movie in December 1977. Also, what do you mean disco songs before 1975 were not disco? If they're disco, they're disco.


I don't know what constitutes a 'movement', but I agree with most people when they say that 1975 was when disco became huge.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: 80sfan on 04/16/17 at 7:58 pm

1987 is quintessential 80's to me. Not sure about 1988, and definitely not 1989, to me.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/16/17 at 8:02 pm


1987 is quintessential 80's to me. Not sure about 1988, and definitely not 1989, to me.

I don't consider 1988 and 1989 quintensential '80s but I do consider them "identifiable" '80s.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: 80sfan on 04/16/17 at 8:05 pm


I don't consider 1988 and 1989 quintensential '80s but I do consider them "identifiable" '80s.


I always saw that big hair peaked around 1987/1988. It makes sense that 1988 and after isn't part of the quintessential 1980's!  :D  :(  :(

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: 80sfan on 04/16/17 at 8:07 pm


1953 and 1954 were transitional years from the post-war decade to the classic 50s. Fashion did not change overnight when The Wild One hit theaters, and although the new fashion did start to creep in soon afterwards, the greaser look was more firmly established by the late 1950s.

None of Elvis' songs charted anywhere significant on the Hot 100 until "Heartbreak Hotel" in 1956. "Rock Around the Clock" may have been recorded in 1954, but it wasn't a smash hit until summer 1955. Bill Haley & His Comets did achieve big success in late 1954 with "Shake, Rattle and Roll," but 1955 was the first full year that rock and roll was a full-fledged movement.

There were a handful of hit songs in 1973 and 1974 that are arguably disco, but the genre was not a sweeping phenomenon until 1975. Most hit songs in 1973 and 1974 were either singer/songwriter, pop rock, soul, or funk.

They certainly didn't die off in the late 1980s, they actually continued quite strong well beyond that. The synthpop band Erasure became popular around the beginning of 1987, and they would continue achieving massive success well into the 90s. Groups like Duran Duran, Tears for Fears, Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark, INXS, Information Society, and so on were still extremely popular in the late 80s, and like Erasure, many remained commercially relevant as late as the mid-late 1990s.

1987 was when things were first starting to evolve out of the 80s zeitgeist, but still the year was overwhelmingly of its decade, future 90s culture still hardly having been established at all.


Yes, yes, and yes. Elvis was a local star pre-1956! People seem to forget that.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: 80sfan on 04/16/17 at 8:10 pm

I think we're getting 'when rock was born' with 'when rock became mainstream' mixed up. The two are different. I don't believe that historians have a precise, or one event, that marks the birth of Rock and Roll. But most historians would put the beginning of Rock And Roll in the mainstream as 1954, or 1955.

Shake, Rattle, and Roll, or Rock Around The Clock are perfect 'markers' to look at as when Rock became popular in the mainstream.

For me, personally, I always saw Rock Around The Clock as 'that last push' that put Rock in the spotlight.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: 80sfan on 04/16/17 at 8:12 pm


I would have thought 1974 since that year had loads of disco hits from "Rock Your Baby", "Can't Get Enough Of Your Love", "Kung Fu Fighting", "The Sound of Philadelphia", "Rock The Boat" etc. 1973 though was in my opinion when disco first started to establish itself with "Love Train" being the first disco song to reach #1 although no one would have took any notice to the genre in that year.


Interesting!

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: Mr Steamer on 04/16/17 at 8:14 pm


I think we're getting 'when rock was born' with 'when rock became mainstream' mixed up. The two are different. I don't believe that historians have a precise, or one event, that marks the birth of Rock and Roll. But most historians would put the beginning of Rock And Roll in the mainstream as 1954, or 1955.

Shake, Rattle, and Roll, or Rock Around The Clock are perfect 'markers' to look at as when Rock became popular in the mainstream.

For me, personally, I always saw Rock Around The Clock as 'that last push' that put Rock in the spotlight.

The first true rock and roll song was probably "Rocket 88" by Ike Turner from 1951, that was a huge success on the R&B charts that year. Just thought I'd point that out.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: 80sfan on 04/16/17 at 8:19 pm


The first true rock and roll song was probably "Rocket 88" by Ike Turner from 1951, that was a huge success on the R&B charts that year. Just thought I'd point that out.


I took a Rock and Roll class in college, and record sales went waaay up in the late 50's, in big part to Rock.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: nintieskid999 on 04/16/17 at 9:07 pm


The '80s zeitgeist were gone by 1987 but 1988 and 1989 were still the "identifiable" '80s.


1987 was super 80s. 1988 and 1989 were still very 80s but not the live it up, flashy 80s. I think even up to 1992 was pretty 80s. My point is people born in 84 and 85 don't personally remember the deregulated and free 80s era.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/16/17 at 9:10 pm


1987 was super 80s. 1988 and 1989 were still very 80s but not the live it up, flashy 80s. I think even up to 1992 was pretty 80s. My point is people born in 84 and 85 don't personally remember the deregulated and free 80s era.

LOL, OK but why did you respond to me on this thread? ;D

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/16/17 at 10:35 pm


I think in some ways, after 1989 it's as if they took a step back in pop culture which is why (in my opinion) 1990 feels more 80's than 1988 and 1989. There seems to have been a slight revival of certain 80's trends in that year, such as synthpop, adult contemporary and neon colors. Am I wrong? What do you think?


Not really. I think as '90 progressed you could see more and more of what would become the definitive 90's popping up. You could make strong cases for 1988 and 1989's (especially 1988) overall 80's identity but 1990 is a bit different.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: 80sfan on 04/16/17 at 11:23 pm


Not really. I think as '90 progressed you could see more and more of what would become the definitive 90's popping up. You could make strong cases for 1988 and 1989's (especially 1988) overall 80's identity but 1990 is a bit different.


I agree. But you could definitely tell that people weren't 100% ready to dump the big hair and clothing yet.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/16/17 at 11:38 pm


I agree. But you could definitely tell that people weren't 100% ready to dump the big hair and clothing yet.


Exactly. Just because one or two newer things had started to pop up, it doesn't mean 1988 and 1989 had completely jumped ship and we ended up in "more 90's territory now".

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/16/17 at 11:39 pm


Exactly. Just because one or two newer things had started to pop up, it doesn't mean 1988 and 1989 had completely jumped ship and we ended up in "more 90's territory now".

Yeah, that year was 1993 (for some 1992).

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/16/17 at 11:41 pm


Yeah, that year was 1993 (for some 1992).


I'd probably say 1992.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/16/17 at 11:42 pm


I'd probably say 1992.

You're that "some" ;).

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/16/17 at 11:43 pm


You're that "some" ;).


I'm glad you're being all-inclusive or else I might be triggered. :P ;D

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/16/17 at 11:48 pm


I'm glad you're being all-inclusive or else I might be triggered. :P ;D

LMAO, you truly are a legend ;D.

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: JordanK1982 on 04/16/17 at 11:49 pm


LMAO, you truly are a legend ;D.


Thanks, dude. ;) 8)

Subject: Re: Systems of a decade

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 04/16/17 at 11:54 pm


Thanks, dude. ;) 8)

You're welcome :).

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