inthe00s
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Subject: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: HazelBlue99 on 08/05/17 at 10:50 pm

Do you believe the current songs, TV shows and movies are targeted towards a Millennial audience? Or, do you believe that we are now firmly in Early Gen Z culture? I personally believe that 2012 was the last firm Millennial targeted year in pop culture. 2013-2015 was Millennial/Z and 2016 was the first outright year of Generation Z culture, in my opinion. What do you think?

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: bchris02 on 08/05/17 at 11:14 pm


Do you believe the current songs, TV shows and movies are targeted towards a Millennial audience? Or, do you believe that we are now firmly in Early Gen Z culture? I personally believe that 2012 was the last firm Millennial targeted year in pop culture. 2013-2015 was Millennial/Z and 2016 was the first outright year of Generation Z culture, in my opinion. What do you think?


We are leaning Gen Z.  There is still some Millennial influence, but it will likely be gone by 2020.  Pop music is targeted primarily at teenagers, with college students and twentysomethings being a secondary audience.  The graduating class of 2017 was the last Millennial graduating class (kids born in late 1999/early 2000).  Going forward, anybody still in high school is no longer a Millennial.  In just a few years, the last Millennials will be out of traditional college age.

I would say 2008-2011ish was the peak of Millennial culture.  2012 was the last year that was firmly Millennial.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Zelek3 on 08/06/17 at 1:17 am

I think we entered Gen Z culture in 2014 when the "post-ironic" "dank meme" culture popped up.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: wixness on 08/06/17 at 2:03 am

Sort of. Memes and other media with a memetic nature, like Teen Titans: Go, is proof we're in the new millennium as it has the pace that only people who have been overloaded with information would understand, but the fact that everything "dark" is no longer mainstream makes it seem like we're regressing back to the previous millennium, where it would be considered sinful to do certain things again.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: #Infinity on 08/06/17 at 2:21 am

Ehhh, 1999 was a firmly millennial year for popular culture, and people born that year are now becoming adults. Even though social media has garnered the reputation as a millennial stereotype, it's really the current crop of teenagers who are milking smartphones and social media to the 11. After all, many of them began living this way at a young age, as opposed to having spent their entire childhoods and most of their teens confined to desktop computers and living room electronics.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: HazelBlue99 on 08/06/17 at 2:32 am


Ehhh, 1999 was a firmly millennial year for popular culture, and people born that year are now becoming adults. Even though social media has garnered the reputation as a millennial stereotype, it's really the current crop of teenagers who are milking smartphones and social media to the 11. After all, many of them began living this way at a young age, as opposed to having spent their entire childhoods and most of their teens confined to desktop computers and living room electronics.


I actually feel as though i'm not in the current target age group for popular culture anymore, even though i'm only 18. I think popular culture is mostly aimed at roughly 11-16 year olds now.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Zelek3 on 08/06/17 at 2:36 am

I do find it odd that a lot of people refer to teens as millennials still, even though if you google it, it says 1980-1995 as the definition top result, I believe.

I don't want to get into a debate about whether or not that range is "correct". But are MILLIONS of people so dribbling, moronic, and brain-dead that they can't even use Google - the easiest thing to use ever - to learn the meaning of a word?

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: HazelBlue99 on 08/06/17 at 2:51 am


I do find it odd that a lot of people refer to teens as millennials still, even though if you google it, it says 1980-1995 as the definition top result, I believe.

I don't want to get into a debate about whether or not that range is "correct". But are MILLIONS of people so dribbling, moronic, and brain-dead that they can't even use Google - the easiest thing to use ever - to learn the meaning of a word?


I don't want to start a discussion on generations, but the boundaries for the Millennials are all over the place. I recently completed a research project on generations and some of the boundaries I came across were 1977-1994, 1980 - 1995, 1980 - 2000, 1981-2000 and 1982-2004. The term "millennial" has pretty much lost it's meaning and is now being applied to anyone who happens to be under the age of 18.

That doesn't surprise me, to be honest. There are a lot of dumb and stupid people in the world.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Zelek3 on 08/06/17 at 2:58 am


The term "millennial" has pretty much lost it's meaning and is now being applied to anyone who happens to be under the age of 18.

True but I'd say more like under 30.

As usual, these misconceptions about Millennials and their age were probably spread by utter trash like Wall Street Journal and Buzzfeed.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: 80sfan on 08/06/17 at 4:07 am


I don't want to start a discussion on generations, but the boundaries for the Millennials are all over the place. I recently completed a research project on generations and some of the boundaries I came across were 1977-1994, 1980 - 1995, 1980 - 2000, 1981-2000 and 1982-2004. The term "millennial" has pretty much lost it's meaning and is now being applied to anyone who happens to be under the age of 18.

That doesn't surprise me, to be honest. There are a lot of dumb and stupid people in the world.


Pure Millennials are at least 1983 to 1995.

I guess Gen X would be 1965 to 1981.

So Millenials would be 1982 to 2000, to me.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mqg96 on 08/06/17 at 8:17 am


Ehhh, 1999 was a firmly millennial year for popular culture, and people born that year are now becoming adults. Even though social media has garnered the reputation as a millennial stereotype, it's really the current crop of teenagers who are milking smartphones and social media to the 11. After all, many of them began living this way at a young age, as opposed to having spent their entire childhoods and most of their teens confined to desktop computers and living room electronics.


If anyone thinks millennial culture lasts 18 years then I don't know what's wrong with their heads. Millennial pop culture phased out 100% by 2014, but even by 2012 and 2013 the pop culture was in the Gen Y/Z transition.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: aja675 on 08/06/17 at 8:41 am

Yes, but barely. I'd say that today's pop culture caters to the Y-Z equivalent of this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oregon_Trail_Generation

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 08/06/17 at 8:56 am


We are leaning Gen Z.  There is still some Millennial influence, but it will likely be gone by 2020.  Pop music is targeted primarily at teenagers, with college students and twentysomethings being a secondary audience.  The graduating class of 2017 was the last Millennial graduating class (kids born in late 1999/early 2000). Going forward, anybody still in high school is no longer a Millennial.  In just a few years, the last Millennials will be out of traditional college age.

I would say 2008-2011ish was the peak of Millennial culture.  2012 was the last year that was firmly Millennial.

I agree with pretty much everything you said except that. I am apart of the High School Graduating Class of 2017 and 98% of us were born in late 1998-mid 1999.

The HS graduating Class of 2018 is where you have most late 1999-mid 2000 borns.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 08/06/17 at 9:41 am

A recent article by The Atlantic defined Gen Z as the "iGen" generation and defines people who are iGen as being born from 1995-2012. The defining characteristic is that those people "didn't grow up in a world without smartphones".

Once again, I roll my eyes at people seemingly thinking that the iPhone came out in 1994 or something ::).

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: bchris02 on 08/06/17 at 9:57 am


I agree with pretty much everything you said except that. I am apart of the High School Graduating Class of 2017 and 98% of us were born in late 1998-mid 1999.

The HS graduating Class of 2018 is where you have most late 1999-mid 2000 borns.


My bad.  In that case, class of 2018 is the last of the Millennials.  Really difficult to believe.  I would consider anybody born from 1996 to 2000 as a cusper. 

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 08/06/17 at 10:22 am


My bad.  In that case, class of 2018 is the last of the Millennials.  Really difficult to believe.  I would consider anybody born from 1996 to 2000 as a cusper.

I would add 1995 borns to that cusper definition.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: ZeldaFan20 on 08/06/17 at 11:44 am

100% Millennial culture began in 1999 and phased out in 2012. I'd say from 2013 to now we've been in a transitional phase between Y & Z culture, although since Late 2016 (Trump's Election, Brexit, start of Nintendo's renaissance with Pokemon Go, Chainsmokers entering peak in pop, etc.) I'd say was when we'd started to lean more towards Z culture.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: ZeldaFan20 on 08/06/17 at 11:49 am


Yes, but barely. I'd say that today's pop culture caters to the Y-Z equivalent of this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oregon_Trail_Generation


I agree, assuming we define the Gen X/Y Cusp as 1977-1982 or so, and the Y/Z Cusp as 1995-2000 or so, then the current year we're in would be the equivalent of 1999, when the very last X influences were around, while the upcoming Y influences were rising massively in popularity. 2017 is like the modern equivalent to 1999 from a cultural perspective.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: 2001 on 08/06/17 at 1:40 pm

Gen Z culture is in full force among Gen Zers and has been for quite a few years, probably since the late 2000s with Hannah Montana and the Wii/DS. My 12 year old sister is begging for a smartphone because everyone keeps asking for her Snapchat and Instagram, she says it's the first thing everyone asks her for when they meet. She plays Rolblox (kind of like Minecraft) and other games all day on her iPad.  She asks me who my favourite YouTuber is as if that's a thing everyone has. All her favourite musicians are either Disney stats or people who worked heavily with YouTube or other TV networks etc. I can go on forever.

Pure Gen Y elementary school culture ended sometime in 2004 or 2005, cusper went on until the end of the decade. After 2009/2010 it was pure Z.

Pure Gen Y high school ended 2010 or 2011. Cusper went on until 2014/15. After that it was Z.

Anyone of any age can be at uni, but the campus culture was pure Y up to about 2015/6. I'd say it's probably now in cusper territory.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 08/06/17 at 6:11 pm

Honestly no. I say the last year for Millennial culture was 2013. Since then, it's been all about Generation Z.


True but I'd say more like under 30.

As usual, these misconceptions about Millennials and their age were probably spread by utter trash like Wall Street Journal and Buzzfeed.
Well, they need to stop doing that. Millennials are in their 20s and 30s these days with some already approaching 40.


I do find it odd that a lot of people refer to teens as Millennials still, even though if you google it, it says 1980-1995 as the definition top result, I believe.

I don't want to get into a debate about whether or not that range is "correct". But are MILLIONS of people so dribbling, moronic, and brain-dead that they can't even use Google - the easiest thing to use ever - to learn the meaning of a word?
Agreed! Those folks need to realize that millennials are not teens and most of them have not been for about a decade.


A recent article by The Atlantic defined Gen Z as the "iGen" generation and defines people who are iGen as being born from 1995-2012. The defining characteristic is that those people "didn't grow up in a world without smartphones".

Once again, I roll my eyes at people seemingly thinking that the iPhone came out in 1994 or something ::).
Hopefully, the folks who wrote that article figures out that was a mistake. I mean, smartphones were not popular until 2011/12.


Gen Z culture is in full force among Gen Zers and has been for quite a few years, probably since the late 2000s with Hannah Montana and the Wii/DS. My 12-year-old sister is begging for a smartphone because everyone keeps asking for her Snapchat and Instagram, she says it's the first thing everyone asks her for when they meet. She plays Roblox (kind of like Minecraft) and other games all day on her iPad.  She asks me who my favourite YouTuber is as if that's a thing everyone has. All her favourite musicians are either Disney stats or people who worked heavily with YouTube or other TV networks etc. I can go on forever.

Pure Gen Y elementary school culture ended sometime in 2004 or 2005, cusper went on until the end of the decade. After 2009/2010 it was pure Z.

Pure Gen Y high school ended 2010 or 2011. Cusper went on until 2014/15. After that it was Z.

Anyone of any age can be at uni, but the campus culture was pure Y up to about 2015/6. I'd say it's probably now in cusper territory.

I semi agree with the bold. I think the cusp for elementary ended in 2006/07. Since the late 00s, it's been pure Z.

For HS, I think this is correct considering only the youngest Millennials were there at that point.

For Uni, I think pure Y ended around 2014 or 2015.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Zelek3 on 08/06/17 at 6:28 pm


Well, they need to stop doing that. Millennials are in their 20s and 30s these days with some already approaching 40.
Agreed! Those folks need to realize that millennials are not teens and most of them have not been for about a decade.

Yeah. As I said before, I really don't understand how millions of people are so retarded that they can't google the definition of what millennials are, and continue using the word to mean something else. Isn't Google the easiest thing to use ever?

It's like if, for instance, millions of voters kept referring to Bill Clinton as "Hillary", even though Google and every other source would say otherwise.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: 2001 on 08/06/17 at 7:35 pm


I semi agree with the bold. I think the cusp for elementary ended in 2006/07. Since the late 00s, it's been pure Z.


I could see that too. To me Hannah Montanna and High School Musical scream Gen Z. But I said 2010 because that's when the iPad came out. It wasn't instantly popular, but that's a good point to pick for when kids were getting smartphones/iPod Touch/tablets instead of dumbphones as presents. A pure Gen Y childhood wouldn't have cellphones at all, but a smartphone or smart device is truly Z :P That's also when we got we got Justin Bieber, Selena Gomez, "Party in the USA" and the like. My little sisters were into those since they were 4 years old in 2009, so they could really only be Z kid culture.



For Uni, I think pure Y ended around 2014 or 2015.


It's tricky but I could see it too.

2011-2012 is pure Y for sure. That's when we got Occupy Wall Street and (in Canada) the Montréal Student Protests. There's a such a strong gritty recession vibe from that year.

2012-2013 is still pure Y for me too. The 2012 election, Gangnam Style and Harlem Shake, and all the dumb songs that came out. It was still that silly Gen Y stuff. ;D

2013-2014 is when it gets tricky. Snapchat, selfies and Instagram became popular that year, but I'm not sure they were popular among uni students yet. I remember when it first came out, my friends thought Snapchat's only purpose could be sexting LOL. Instagram took a while to catch on too, even in 2016 a lot of my friends didn't have it yet. I'd honestly say it was still pure Y.

2014-2015 is probably cusp. I remember Tinder got really popular that year. The days of my creepy friends hitting on poor unsuspecting girls at the library were over, it was all expected to be online now. I'm starting to miss those days haha. I also had a couple of freshman girls hitting on me (I think) on the bus, and the first thing they asked me for was my Snapchat instead of my number. My phone was dead though thankfully, and I avoided them afterwards lol. It was still before Donald Trump or any of that "edgy memes" and alt-right junk though. The world wasn't peaceful at all that year, but I still feel it so quaint compared today.

2015-2016 I can agree is indisputably cusp. I took a freshman year writing course that year (as my gen ed credit), and one day, I walked into class, and it was DEAD quiet you could hear people breathing. Almost all the seats were filled, yet no one was talking. Everyone was on their phone and laptops, and clanking away. It was surreal. The silence was so awkward. I feel like if the classroom was full of people my age, people would realize the awkwardness of this situation and yell "Why is it so quiet?". And I'm a terribly shy person, so it wasn't normal for me to break silence AND the bystander effect at the same time. But I managed to say "that's a nice drawing" to a girl who was drawing on her tablet beside me, and start at least a small conversation. I'm pretty sure I wrote about this experience in the Generations thread. And people were looking at us when we started talking too, like it was out of the ordinary. Wow.

Also, all my friends were on WhatsApp this year. I love WhatsApp so I'm not complaining. That's the best thing Gen Z popularized, thank you.  8)

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: 80sfan on 08/06/17 at 7:39 pm


I could see that too. To me Hannah Montanna and High School Musical scream Gen Z. But I said 2010 because that's when the iPad came out. It wasn't instantly popular, but that's a good point to pick for when kids were getting smartphones/iPod Touch/tablets instead of dumbphones as presents. A pure Gen Y childhood wouldn't have cellphones at all, but a smartphone or smart device is truly Z :P That's also when we got we got Justin Bieber, Selena Gomez, "Party in the USA" and the like. My little sisters were into those since they were 4 years old in 2009, so they could really only be Z kid culture.


It's tricky but I could see it too.

2011-2012 is pure Y for sure. That's when we got Occupy Wall Street and (in Canada) the Montréal Student Protests. There's a such a strong gritty recession vibe from that year.

2012-2013 is still pure Y for me too. The 2012 election, Gangnam Style and Harlem Shake, and all the dumb songs that came out. It was still that silly Gen Y stuff. ;D

2013-2014 is when it gets tricky. Snapchat, selfies and Instagram became popular that year, but I'm not sure they were popular among uni students yet. I remember when it first came out, my friends thought Snapchat's only purpose could be sexting LOL. Instagram took a while to catch on too, even in 2016 a lot of my friends didn't have it yet. I'd honestly say it was still pure Y.

2014-2015 is probably cusp. I remember Tinder got really popular that year. The days of my creepy friends hitting on poor unsuspecting girls at the library were over, it was all expected to be online now. I'm starting to miss those days haha. I also had a couple of freshman girls hitting on me (I think) on the bus, and the first thing they asked me for was my Snapchat instead of my number. My phone was dead though thankfully, and I avoided them afterwards lol. It was still before Donald Trump or any of that "edgy memes" and alt-right junk though. The world wasn't peaceful at all that year, but I still feel it so quaint compared today.

2015-2016 I can agree is indisputably cusp. I took a freshman year writing course that year (as my gen ed credit), and one day, I walked into class, and it was DEAD quiet you could hear people breathing. Almost all the seats were filled, yet no one was talking. Everyone was on their phone and laptops, and clanking away. It was surreal. The silence was so awkward. I feel like if the classroom was full of people my age, people would realize the awkwardness of this situation and yell "Why is it so quiet?". And I'm a terribly shy person, so it wasn't normal for me to break silence AND the bystander effect at the same time. But I managed to say "that's a nice drawing" to a girl who was drawing on her tablet beside me, and start at least a small conversation. I'm pretty sure I wrote about this experience in the Generations thread. And people were looking at us when we started talking too, like it was out of the ordinary. Wow.

Also, all my friends were on WhatsApp this year. I love WhatsApp so I'm not complaining. That's the best thing Gen Z popularized, thank you.  8)


You, you, you have to watch out for those cusps. I, I call them normies!  :(  :(  :(

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: 80sfan on 08/06/17 at 7:41 pm

Millennial culture is 'rotten' and 'toxic'!

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 08/06/17 at 7:58 pm


Yeah. As I said before, I really don't understand how millions of people are so retarded that they can't google the definition of what millennials are, and continue using the word to mean something else. Isn't Google the easiest thing to use ever?

It's like if, for instance, millions of voters kept referring to Bill Clinton as "Hillary", even though Google and every other source would say otherwise.
Maybe those people don't use Google, and instead use Ask.com, Yahoo, and even Bing.

;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D

That would be embarrassingly wrong. Everyone knows Bill and Hillary are two different people.


I could see that too. To me, Hannah Montanna and High School Musical scream Gen Z. But I said 2010 because that's when the iPad came out. It wasn't instantly popular, but that's a good point to pick for when kids were getting smartphones/iPod Touch/tablets instead of dumb phones as presents. A pure Gen Y childhood wouldn't have cell phones at all, but a smartphone or smart device is truly Z :P That's also when we got we got Justin Bieber, Selena Gomez, "Party in the USA" and the like. My little sisters were into those since they were 4 years old in 2009, so they could really only be Z kid culture.


It's tricky but I could see it too.

2011-2012 is pure Y for sure. That's when we got Occupy Wall Street and (in Canada) the Montréal Student Protests. There's a such a strong gritty recession vibe from that year.

2012-2013 is still pure Y for me too. The 2012 election, Gangnam Style and Harlem Shake, and all the dumb songs that came out. It was still that silly Gen Y stuff. ;D

2013-2014 is when it gets tricky. Snapchat, selfies, and Instagram became popular that year, but I'm not sure they were popular among uni students yet. I remember when it first came out, my friends thought Snapchat's only purpose could be sexting LOL. Instagram took a while to catch on too, even in 2016 a lot of my friends didn't have it yet. I'd honestly say it was still pure Y.

2014-2015 is probably cusp. I remember Tinder got really popular that year. The days of my creepy friends hitting on poor unsuspecting girls at the library were over, it was all expected to be online now. I'm starting to miss those days haha. I also had a couple of freshman girls hitting on me (I think) on the bus, and the first thing they asked me for was my Snapchat instead of my number. My phone was dead though thankfully, and I avoided them afterward lol. It was still before Donald Trump or any of that "edgy memes" and alt-right junk though. The world wasn't peaceful at all that year, but I still feel it so quaint compared today.

2015-2016 I can agree is indisputably cusp. I took a freshman year writing course that year (as my gen ed credit), and one day, I walked into class, and it was DEAD quiet you could hear people breathing. Almost all the seats were filled, yet no one was talking. Everyone was on their phone and laptops and clanking away. It was surreal. The silence was so awkward. I feel like if the classroom was full of people my age, people would realize the awkwardness of this situation and yell "Why is it so quiet?". And I'm a terribly shy person, so it wasn't normal for me to break silence AND the bystander effect at the same time. But I managed to say "that's a nice drawing" to a girl who was drawing on her tablet beside me and start at least a small conversation. I'm pretty sure I wrote about this experience in the Generations thread. And people were looking at us when we started talking like it was out of the ordinary. Wow.

Also, all my friends were on WhatsApp this year. I love WhatsApp so I'm not complaining. That's the best thing Gen Z popularized, thank you.  8)
Well Gen Z didn't exactly have a smartphone childhood. From 2004-05 to 2010, They had an ordinary experience like any kid before them.

Yeah, for uni it's tricky because most Millennials were done before 2011, and only the younger ones were there by then. I do agree with the descriptions of each school year though except that the 2014-15 is definitely on the cusp.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: 80sfan on 08/06/17 at 8:32 pm

If the early Millennials were born 1981/1982, that means that their culture started roughly 1993/1994.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Zelek3 on 08/06/17 at 9:10 pm


A recent article by The Atlantic defined Gen Z as the "iGen" generation and defines people who are iGen as being born from 1995-2012. The defining characteristic is that those people "didn't grow up in a world without smartphones".

I think The Atlantic was talking about teen years when they refer to "growing up".

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 08/06/17 at 9:59 pm


I think The Atlantic was talking about teen years when they refer to "growing up".

He actually wasn't. He even talked about his 3 kids born in 2006, 2009 & 2012 and how they are hooked on smartphones.

As a 1999 born, I get that smartphones became popular right as we became teens in 2012 (Smartphone usage in the U.S. passed 50% in this year) but we didn't grow up with the devices. At least differentiate a bit like how they do for Baby Boomers.

I just don't like being looked at in the same vain as a person who is 8 years old.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: nintieskid999 on 08/06/17 at 10:04 pm

This year is to Millennial culture as 1981 is to Boomer culture.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: ZeldaFan20 on 08/06/17 at 10:07 pm


This year is to Millennial culture as 1981 is to Boomer culture.


THIS. So I'm not the only one that sees the parallel between the Reagan shift which was what started pure Gen X youth Culture, and the Trump shift with pure Gen Z culture. Both correlate pretty well with the Chinese zodiac as well.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Brian06 on 08/06/17 at 10:31 pm

Part of the problem is people born in the '80s are getting older but the youngest millennials are still really young and in their early 20s, I mean it's debatable but even if you say it ends around mid '90s those people are still really really young. And the oldest millennials are only in their mid 30s which even though that is getting close to middle aged, it is not quite middle aged. Most articles really only talk about the 18+ crowd and teens aren't really talked about very much. It's early, it's probably starting to transition but it's early transition. Think 1998 or something, Gen X was considered the main young crowd even though Gen Y were becoming teens and starting to influence pop culture. Gradually over the next decade Gen Y took over from Gen X. Actually even in the early '80s the term generation X didn't even exist and in the media boomers were still the main young crowd, even though the older ones were pushing 40. I think boomers starting to turn 40 was the big turning point in the media and I've read a lot of these old articles in the google archives, that the media really started thinking about that younger generation after the boomers (sometimes called baby busters back then), who then received the name "Generation X" around 1990-1991. Over time things will change as Xers start to overtake boomers as the retirement aged generation and millennials overtake xers as the middle aged generation. This will likely happen during the 2020s as 1980s borns reach 40 and people born in the 21st century reach their 20s.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Zelek3 on 08/06/17 at 10:38 pm


As a 1999 born, I get that smartphones became popular right as we became teens in 2012 (Smartphone usage in the U.S. passed 50% in this year) but we didn't grow up with the devices. At least differentiate a bit like how they do for Baby Boomers.

When Gen Z gets older, we'll/they'll be differentiated more. It wasn't until 2015 that people started differentiating "old Millennials" and "young Millennials".

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: HazelBlue99 on 08/06/17 at 10:47 pm


As a 1999 born, I get that smartphones became popular right as we became teens in 2012 (Smartphone usage in the U.S. passed 50% in this year) but we didn't grow up with the devices. At least differentiate a bit like how they do for Baby Boomers.

I just don't like being looked at in the same vain as a person who is 8 years old.


I didn't even own a phone when I was a kid. The first phone I owned was a Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini and I got it just three months before my 13th birthday. Most people our age didn't receive their first phone until they were in their tweens or ages 12/13.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Brian06 on 08/06/17 at 10:52 pm


Yep. Slowly I'm seeing more think pieces about Gen Z.


Yeah I've noticed some more this year too, it'll be little by little as I said. And as millennials continue to move up the ladder and write more of these articles you'll see more and more articles by them writing about people younger than they are. It's just gradual and the reality is 2017 is still early and even the oldest millennials are still fairly young at 35ish, and youngest ones are very very young. Most gen z are a bunch of little kids, though the older ones are now in high school. High school crowd in 2017 is probably best described as cusp. College crowd late teens to mid 20s is generally late millennial. Young family crowd in their early and mid 30s is early millennial. People born in like '97 are probably still tail end millennial in reality, even if they're very late. I wouldn't call them quite true gen z like a 2005 born.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Zelek3 on 08/06/17 at 10:57 pm


I didn't even own a phone when I was a kid. The first phone I owned was a Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini and I got it just three months before my 13th birthday. Most people our age didn't receive their first phone until they were in their tweens or ages 12/13.
\
As I've said before, when older Gen Zs hit 30-35, it'll be our turn, and we'll/they'll be able to write smug thinkpieces separating ourselves from later Gen Zs who had smartphones since toddlerhood. Just be patient.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: ZeldaFan20 on 08/06/17 at 11:07 pm


Part of the problem is people born in the '80s are getting older but the youngest millennials are still really young and in their early 20s, I mean it's debatable but even if you say it ends around mid '90s those people are still really really young. And the oldest millennials are only in their mid 30s which even though that is getting close to middle aged, it is not quite middle aged. Most articles really only talk about the 18+ crowd and teens aren't really talked about very much. It's early, it's probably starting to transition but it's early transition. Think 1998 or something, Gen X was considered the main young crowd even though Gen Y were becoming teens and starting to influence pop culture. Gradually over the next decade Gen Y took over from Gen X. Actually even in the early '80s the term generation X didn't even exist and in the media boomers were still the main young crowd, even though the older ones were pushing 40. I think boomers starting to turn 40 was the big turning point in the media and I've read a lot of these old articles in the google archives, that the media really started thinking about that younger generation after the boomers (sometimes called baby busters back then), who then received the name "Generation X" around 1990-1991. Over time things will change as Xers start to overtake boomers as the retirement aged generation and millennials overtake xers as the middle aged generation. This will likely happen during the 2020s as 1980s borns reach 40 and people born in the 21st century reach their 20s.


This is pretty accurate, and you bring up many key points. Lets just go with the least controversial date range for Millennials as 1982-2000 (similar to the BB Generation in size, demographics, cultural relativity, and ironically the Chinese zodiac), then that would mean the Millennial generation as of 2017 is in a similar age range to when the Baby Boomers were back in 1981. It was clear back in 81' that youth culture was already swinging in Gen X direction, even if retrospectively people subconsciously didn't understand that (as you say, they were considered Baby Busters back then, and were seldomly mentioned). So even though youth culture seems to be swinging more Gen Z, that doesn't necessarily deter the masses from thinking Millennials are the main 'hip' group.

In 10-15 years, then people will retrospectively look back at the late 2010's and notice the shift in youth cultural attitudes which gave rise to the subsequent Gen Z culture. Heck I wonder what the media would call the Post Millennials 10 years from now cause like 'Gen Y', I don't realistically see 'Gen Z' sticking out for much longer. People tend to forget, but Gen Y/Z's were merely just placeholders derived from Generation X.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 08/06/17 at 11:10 pm


When Gen Z gets older, we'll/they'll be differentiated more. It wasn't until 2015 that people started differentiating "old Millennials" and "young Millennials".



I didn't even own a phone when I was a kid. The first phone I owned was a Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini and I got it just three months before my 13th birthday. Most people our age didn't receive their first phone until they were in their tweens or ages 12/13.

Yeah, that's true.


As I've said before, when older Gen Zs hit 30-35, it'll be our turn, and we'll/they'll be able to write smug thinkpieces separating ourselves from later Gen Zs who had smartphones since toddlerhood. Just be patient.

You're probably right!

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Zelek3 on 08/06/17 at 11:12 pm


In 10-15 years, then people will retrospectively look back at the late 2010's and notice the shift in youth cultural attitudes which gave rise to the subsequent Gen Z culture. Heck I wonder what the media would call the Post Millennials 10 years from now cause like 'Gen Y', I don't realistically see 'Gen Z' sticking out for much longer. People tend to forget, but Gen Y/Z's were merely just placeholders derived from Generation X.

I think the Gen Z name will stick until about 2032, then they will start using some catchier demonym. Remember that "Millennials" did not surpass "Gen Y" in popularity until about 2012, despite both terms coexisting for a long time before that.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Zelek3 on 08/06/17 at 11:20 pm


I do find it odd that a lot of people refer to teens as millennials still, even though if you google it, it says 1980-1995 as the definition top result, I believe.

I don't want to get into a debate about whether or not that range is "correct". But are MILLIONS of people so dribbling, moronic, and brain-dead that they can't even use Google - the easiest thing to use ever - to learn the meaning of a word?

Actually i'll have to eat my words slightly. This is what it says in google if you type in "Millennials years". A bit different from 1980-1995.

http://i.imgur.com/9RbHRw0.png

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: aja675 on 08/06/17 at 11:21 pm

My personal definition is 1980-2000, but then again, I don't expect everyone to agree with me.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 08/06/17 at 11:26 pm

Well, 1995-2000 is the year that you can choose to end Gen Y.

I have seen:

*1977-1994
*1980-1995
*1980-2000
*1981-1994
*1981-1995
*1981-1997
*1981-1998
*1981-1999
*1982-1996
*1982-2000
*1982-2004

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Brian06 on 08/06/17 at 11:36 pm

You're going to start seeing more and more articles like this with time. I mean the exact years may differ in each article but the idea is somebody who identifies as millennial writing about the generation after them.

https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/life/95504718/just-like-that-my-generation-is-out-of-date

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Setemstraight on 08/07/17 at 12:04 am


True but I'd say more like under 30.

As usual, these misconceptions about Millennials and their age were probably spread by utter trash like Wall Street Journal and Buzzfeed.

No early 30s is millennial

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Zelek3 on 08/07/17 at 12:06 am


No early 30s is millennial

Technically they are but the media typically portrays Millennials as being under-30s.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Setemstraight on 08/07/17 at 12:26 am


Technically they are but the media typically portrays Millennials as being under-30s.

Actually more like 25 and under. Primary 18 to 25 or college age

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Longaotian00 on 08/07/17 at 2:19 am


I agree with pretty much everything you said except that. I am apart of the High School Graduating Class of 2017 and 98% of us were born in late 1998-mid 1999.

The HS graduating Class of 2018 is where you have most late 1999-mid 2000 borns.


I'm in class of 2017, and everyone is born in early 1999-early 2000! ;)

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: HazelBlue99 on 08/07/17 at 2:52 am


I'm in class of 2017, and everyone is born in early 1999-early 2000! ;)


That applies to me as well. :) I assume New Zealand has a similar school system to Australia? Our school year finishes in mid-December, but because i'm in Year 12, we finish in early November. When do you finish school?

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Longaotian00 on 08/07/17 at 3:26 am


That applies to me as well. :) I assume New Zealand has a similar school system to Australia? Our school year finishes in mid-December, but because i'm in Year 12, we finish in early November. When do you finish school?


I finish in early November aswell! Except strangely, I'm in year 13! :D

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: HazelBlue99 on 08/07/17 at 3:27 am


I finish in early November aswell! Except strangely, I'm in year 13! :D


Are you including kindergarten? Because if so, I am as well. :P

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Longaotian00 on 08/07/17 at 3:31 am


Are you including kindergarten? Because if so, I am as well. :P


Umm No, in NZ year 13 is our last year of school as it runs from year 1-13. If I was to include kindergarten the I would be year 14 LOL :)

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: HazelBlue99 on 08/07/17 at 3:35 am


Umm No, in NZ year 13 is our last year of school as it runs from year 1-13. If I was to include kindergarten the I would be year 14 LOL :)


Ah ok. So Year 1 is the start of primary school? In Australia, our school system goes from Kindergarten - Year 12. Does NZ have a middle school? We only have primary schools (which are known as elementary schools in the US) and high schools here. :)

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Longaotian00 on 08/07/17 at 3:40 am


Ah ok. So Year 1 is the start of primary school? In Australia, our school system goes from Kindergarten - Year 12. Does NZ have a middle school? We only have primary schools (which are known as elementary schools in the US) and high schools here. :)


Yeah, New Zealand does have middle school except we call it Intermediate School! They can either be part of primary schools, high schools or a completely seperate school. The intermediate school I went to was part of High School and I was there for year 7&8 in 2011/2012.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: HazelBlue99 on 08/07/17 at 3:44 am


Yeah, New Zealand does have middle school except we call it Intermediate School! They can either be part of primary schools, high schools or a completely seperate school. The intermediate school I went to was part of High School and I was there for year 7&8 in 2011/2012.


That's interesting to hear! Our primary schools go from Kindergarten - Year 6 and our high schools go from Year 7 - Year 12.

Do you have to do end of year exams for your final year of high school? For our final two weeks, we need to do exams which goes towards our HSC (High School Certificate).

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Longaotian00 on 08/07/17 at 4:15 am


That's interesting to hear! Our primary schools go from Kindergarten - Year 6 and our high schools go from Year 7 - Year 12.

Do you have to do end of year exams for your final year of high school? For our final two weeks, we need to do exams which goes towards our HSC (High School Certificate).


Yup, unfortunately this will be my third year sitting senior NCEA exams  8-P

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Longaotian00 on 08/07/17 at 4:34 am


That's interesting to hear! Our primary schools go from Kindergarten - Year 6 and our high schools go from Year 7 - Year 12.



Btw, what year(s) did you attend kindergarten?

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: HazelBlue99 on 08/07/17 at 4:36 am


Btw, what year(s) did you attend kindergarten?


I started kindergarten (and primary school) in February 2005. :) Does New Zealand have pre-school before kids start primary school? I was in pre-school for two years (2003 and 2004).

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Longaotian00 on 08/07/17 at 4:43 am


I started kindergarten (and primary school) in February 2005. :) Does New Zealand have pre-school before kids start primary school? I was in pre-school for two years (2003 and 2004).


Wow! Ok I guess we use different names so it's a bit of a mess. So I attended Kindergarten in 2002, and then I went to Preschool for two years aswell in 2003 & 2004. Then I started compulsory primary school during February 2005, so we literally started and finished our school years in the exact some months ;).

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: HazelBlue99 on 08/07/17 at 4:49 am


Wow! Ok I guess we use different names so it's a bit of a mess. So I attended Kindergarten in 2002, and then I went to Preschool for two years aswell in 2003 & 2004. Then I started compulsory primary school during February 2005, so we literally started and finished our school years in the exact some months ;).


Yep. :) Is Kindergarten in New Zealand just like a daycare thing? That's what our pre-schools (which aren't compulsory either) are like.

I think Australia and New Zealand have pretty similar school systems, it's just that we use different names for different things, like you mentioned. Australia and New Zealand do have a lot in common. :)

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 08/07/17 at 9:59 am


I'm in class of 2017, and everyone is born in early 1999-early 2000! ;)

That's because you're from New Zealand not the U.S.A.

bchris02 and I are Americans so we were talking about the HS Class of 2017 in the U.S. :P

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 08/07/17 at 6:26 pm


Part of the problem is people born in the '80s are getting older but the youngest millennials are still really young and in their early 20s, I mean it's debatable but even if you say it ends around mid-'90s those people are still really really young. And the oldest millennials are only in their mid-30s which even though that is getting close to middle aged, it is not quite middle aged. Most articles really only talk about the 18+ crowd and teens aren't really talked about very much. It's early, it's probably starting to transition but it's early transition. Think 1998 or something, Gen X was considered the main young crowd even though Gen Y were becoming teens and starting to influence pop culture. Gradually over the next decade, Gen Y took over from Gen X. Actually even in the early '80s, the term generation X didn't even exist and in the media, boomers were still the main young crowd, even though the older ones were pushing 40. I think boomers starting to turn 40 was the big turning point in the media and I've read a lot of these old articles in the google archives, that the media really started thinking about that younger generation after the boomers (sometimes called baby busters back then), who then received the name "Generation X" around 1990-1991. Over time things will change as Xers start to overtake boomers as the retirement aged generation and millennials overtake Xers as the middle aged generation. This will likely happen during the 2020s as 1980s borns reach 40 and people born in the 21st century reach their 20s.
I understand that Millennials are still a young generation, but they're not THAT young. Even if 1995-96 was considered the end, those people most likely are either finishing up university and have already done so. On top of that, they have been in the workforce for quite some time, and some of them even already have a home (depends on where one lives), are married and have children along with the rest of the generation.

I agree though that the transition will truly take place in the next decade with some older Millennials already pushing 40, and some of the younger ones pushing 30; however, that change could happen as early as right now, next year or 2019, and we might not even be aware of it.


No early 30s is millennial
And mid-30s.


Actually more like 25 and under. Primary 18 to 25 or college age
No. Zelek is right. I see the under 30s more than the under 25s in articles.


In 10-15 years, then people will retrospectively look back at the late 2010's and notice the shift in youth cultural attitudes which gave rise to the subsequent Gen Z culture. Heck, I wonder what the media would call the Post Millennials 10 years from now cause like 'Gen Y', I don't realistically see 'Gen Z' sticking out for much longer. People tend to forget, but Gen Y/Z's were merely just placeholders derived from Generation X.



I think the Gen Z name will stick until about 2032, then they will start using some catchier demonym. Remember that "Millennials" did not surpass "Gen Y" in popularity until about 2012, despite both terms coexisting for a long time before that.
Well actually, there's already many names for Gen Z such as Plurals, Homelanders, Centennials, Founders etc. I think the Z moniker will phase out in next decade.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 08/07/17 at 6:30 pm

Millennials are anyone born from 1982-present ;) :P

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 08/07/17 at 6:32 pm


Millennials are anyone born from 1982-present ;) :P
;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D

ReignMan, you crack me up!

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Brian06 on 08/07/17 at 6:41 pm


I understand that Millennials are still a young generation, but they're not THAT young. Even if 1995-96 was considered the end, those people most likely are either finishing up university and have already done so. On top of that, they have been in the workforce for quite some time, and some of them even already have a home (depends on where one lives), are married and have children along with the rest of the generation.


Yeah and I said that the older millennials are indeed getting close to middle aged, while people born in 1995-1996 are still really young. The problem is like the focus of young people is say people in their early-mid 20s generally, and those people even though late in the generation they're generally still millennials. It'll definitely be different when even those people born at the tail end of the generation are at least 30 and people born in say the early-mid 2000s are in their early 20s.  Not too many write about 15 year olds is what I'm saying. Most of these articles are only about 18+ year olds and don't really talk about high school aged teenagers much. In the 18+ spectrum, 21 is obviously very very young being only a couple years more than 18. Generations will probably change gradually over the next 5-10 years as millennials transition into middle age and generation z become young adults. It'll be really interesting to watch that change take place.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 08/07/17 at 7:01 pm


;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D

ReignMan, you crack me up!

HAHA, no problem :P.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 08/07/17 at 7:04 pm


Yeah, and I said that the older millennials are indeed getting close to middle aged, while people born in 1995-1996 are still really young. The problem is the focus of young people is say people in their early-mid 20s generally, and those people even though late in the generation they're generally still millennials. It'll definitely be different when even those people born at the tail end of the generation are at least 30 and people born in say the early-mid 2000s are in their early 20s.  Not too many write about 15-year-olds is what I'm saying. Most of these articles are only about 18+-year-olds and don't really talk about high school aged teenagers much. In the 18+ spectrum, 21 is obviously very very young being only a couple years more than 18. Generations will probably change gradually over the next 5-10 years as millennials transition into middle age and generation z become young adults. It'll be really interesting to watch that change take place.
Yeah, that's true of the general focus towards young people although I see it extend to 30 in articles as well. It's just that the folks who write those journals need to understand that the average Millennial is over the early-mid 20s at this point, and some of Gen Z (depends on the start) are already young adults.

I do understand that 21 is very young in the 18+ group, but some people by that age could already have kids, own a home (again depends on where they live), be married, and even have a full-time job.

Oh, and yeah, it will be interesting to watch that happening although it's somewhat already unfolding in our eyes since some younger Millennials are already either near or will be closer to 30 in the next few years.


HAHA, no problem :P.
;) ;) ;) ;) :) :) :) :) :)

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 08/07/17 at 7:06 pm

If you exclude the legal drinking age (in the U.S.), what are the big differences between an 18 year old and a 21 year old? ???

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 08/07/17 at 7:20 pm


If you exclude the legal drinking age (in the U.S.), what are the big differences between an 18-year-old and a 21-year-old? ???
Not much honestly. Both can own a home, join the military, be married, etc.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 08/07/17 at 7:26 pm


Not much honestly. Both can own a home, join the military, be married, etc.

That is true. So, how come people view 18 year olds and 21 year olds slightly differently?

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 08/07/17 at 7:34 pm


That is true. So, how come people view 18-year-olds and 21-year-olds slightly differently?
I think that has to do with that 18-year-olds are usually fresh out of HS, don't own a place, not married, have no children, and have a part time job while 21-year-olds could usually be married, have kids, own a place, and have a full-time job. OTT, you're not much different from 21-year-olds.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 08/07/17 at 7:37 pm


I think that has to do with that 18-year-olds are usually fresh out of HS, don't own a place, not married, have no children, and have a part time job while 21-year-olds could usually be married, have kids, own a place, and have a full-time job. OTT, you're not much different from 21-year-olds.

OK, I got it. I was suspecting that.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Setemstraight on 08/07/17 at 9:06 pm


I understand that Millennials are still a young generation, but they're not THAT young. Even if 1995-96 was considered the end, those people most likely are either finishing up university and have already done so. On top of that, they have been in the workforce for quite some time, and some of them even already have a home (depends on where one lives), are married and have children along with the rest of the generation.

I agree though that the transition will truly take place in the next decade with some older Millennials already pushing 40, and some of the younger ones pushing 30; however, that change could happen as early as right now, next year or 2019, and we might not even be aware of it.
And mid-30s.
No. Zelek is right. I see the under 30s more than the under 25s in articles.
Well actually, there's already many names for Gen Z such as Plurals, Homelanders, Centennials, Founders etc. I think the Z moniker will phase out in next decade.

No. Zelek is right. I see the under 30s more than the under 25s in articles.

No alot of articles it varies. Some under 25, others under 30 and others under 35. BUT it's primarily late teens and early 20s, the college years. I don't know what country you're in but in America the media and journalism had always used 18 to 25 when referring to any kind of "youth movement"

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 08/07/17 at 9:13 pm


No. Zelek is right. I see the under 30s more than the under 25s in articles.

No alot of articles it varies. Some under 25, others under 30 and others under 35. BUT it's primarily late teens and early 20s, the college years. I don't know what country you're in but in America the media and journalism had always used 18 to 25 when referring to any kind of "youth movement"
Yeah, I'm from here. If that's the case, then most Millennials would not even be in the youth movement, but instead Generation Z since that's who is mainly in college right now

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Setemstraight on 08/07/17 at 9:27 pm


Yeah, I'm from here. If that's the case, then most Millennials would not even be in the youth movement, but instead Generation Z since that's who is mainly in college right now

I agree 100%. I don't think anyone 25 and under should be considered a millennial really. Late 20s to mid 30s to me is true millennials. I don't think the millennial generation is as big as its portrayed.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 08/07/17 at 9:29 pm


I agree 100%. I don't think anyone 25 and under should be considered a millennial really. Late 20s to mid 30s to me is true millennials. I don't think the millennial generation is as big as its portrayed.
Well, right now there are very few Millennials under 25, and they are the ones who are also done with college. The youngest so far with many sources is 22.

It's a large generation only because more people were born during that time frame.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Zelek3 on 08/07/17 at 9:32 pm


Well, right now there are very few Millennials under 25, and they are the ones who are also done with college. The youngest so far with many sources is 22.

It's a large generation only because more people were born during that time frame.

Some 22 year olds aren't done with college yet.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 08/07/17 at 9:49 pm


Some 22 year olds aren't done with college yet.
That's true if they started late or they went further than a bachelor's degree.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: nintieskid999 on 08/07/17 at 10:25 pm

The youngest Millennials are 16-17.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Setemstraight on 08/08/17 at 2:15 am


Well, right now there are very few Millennials under 25, and they are the ones who are also done with college. The youngest so far with many sources is 22.

It's a large generation only because more people were born during that time frame.

I'm talking about the real years I mentioned above. If they stop  adding years to the generation then it won't be as big. They say millennials out number baby boomers BUT that's because they keep extending the birth years in both directions.

I believe those born between the early 80s to the early 90s are true millennials.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 08/08/17 at 1:40 pm


I'm talking about the real years I mentioned above. If they stop adding years to the generation then it won't be as big. They say Millennials out number baby boomers BUT that's because they keep extending the birth years in both directions.

I believe those born between the early 80s to the early 90s are true millennials.
So what you're saying is that Millennials span about 15 years?

Yeah, I know what you mean; however, the reason they say Millennials out number Boomers is not just there are more of them (throughout the Millennial time frame, there were about 4 million each year with a few years even surpassing it), and that Boomers themselves are dying as well.

If you wanna know, the articles didn't actually start extending the ending range until a few years ago. In the late 00s, I read a textbook (don't remember the name) and the end of Gen Y was 1994. I even found articles from that time period, and some in 2010 using the same ending year. Honestly, the only reason why it keeps getting extended is that most people writing these pieces don't seem to know who a millennial truly is.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: bchris02 on 08/08/17 at 2:52 pm


That's true if they started late or they went further than a bachelor's degree.


22 is the typical age to graduate with a bachelors degree, providing you didn't change your major or take any semesters off.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 08/08/17 at 2:56 pm


22 is the typical age to graduate with a bachelors degree, providing you didn't change your major or take any semesters off.
Correct, but Zelek3 was saying that there are some 22 year olds still in school for the reasons he provided or that they decided to earn a master's degree.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: ZeldaFan20 on 08/08/17 at 10:57 pm

Unfortunately this misconception ain't ending anytime soon ;D

rUMBj3mwFTA

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Zelek3 on 08/08/17 at 11:22 pm


Unfortunately this misconception ain't ending anytime soon ;D

rUMBj3mwFTA

Colbert said millennials go from 1980 up to early 2000s (more like mid nineties). FAKE news. ;D

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: aja675 on 08/08/17 at 11:39 pm


Colbert said millennials go from 1980 up to early 2000s (more like mid nineties). FAKE news. ;D
To be fair, I do agree with that.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mach!ne_he@d on 08/09/17 at 2:07 pm


Gen Z culture is in full force among Gen Zers and has been for quite a few years, probably since the late 2000s with Hannah Montana and the Wii/DS. My 12 year old sister is begging for a smartphone because everyone keeps asking for her Snapchat and Instagram, she says it's the first thing everyone asks her for when they meet. She plays Rolblox (kind of like Minecraft) and other games all day on her iPad.  She asks me who my favourite YouTuber is as if that's a thing everyone has. All her favourite musicians are either Disney stats or people who worked heavily with YouTube or other TV networks etc. I can go on forever.

Pure Gen Y elementary school culture ended sometime in 2004 or 2005, cusper went on until the end of the decade. After 2009/2010 it was pure Z.

Pure Gen Y high school ended 2010 or 2011. Cusper went on until 2014/15. After that it was Z.

Anyone of any age can be at uni, but the campus culture was pure Y up to about 2015/6. I'd say it's probably now in cusper territory.


Yeah, that's pretty much how I feel about it too.

You know, even though stuff like Snapchat and Instagram are often perceived as being Gen Y things by the media, I'm starting to wonder if we wont look back maybe ten years from now and see some second wave social media stuff like that as being Gen Z. As hot as those websites have been lately, I don't know of anybody my age that actually uses them.

To your other point, here's how I would view the generations from a school standpoint.

Peak Gen Y Elementary School, Stereotypical Year, 1994-95; No cell phones, no online access. 16-bit gaming is still dominant, but early 3D systems are starting to launch. Golden Age Nick, Fox Kids, and ABC and CBS Saturday mornings are still the main topics of conversation among most kids. Hot music is stuff like Take That and Ace of Base. Power Rangers was the dominant kid fad.

Peak Gen Y and Gen Z Cusper Elementary School, Stereotypical Year, 2004-05; Most kids still don't have cell phones, but a few might. All schools have online access now. PlayStation 2, Xbox and Gamecube are the dominant consoles, but the 7th gen will soon launch. Saturday morning cartoons are dead, and Nick, Cartoon Network and Disney are the main topics for kids. Hot music is stuff like Usher and Kelly Clarkson. Yu-Gi-Oh was arguably the dominant kid fad, though perhaps waning a bit.

Peak Gen Z Elementary School, Stereotypical Year, 2011-12; Probably about half the kids have smartphones while the other half don't. Tablets are becoming more popular. PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 and Wii are the dominant consoles. YouTube now gets talked about more than Nick, Cartoon Network and Disney do. Hot music is stuff like Adele and LMFAO. Minecraft was arguably the top kid fad by this point.

Now on the high school front.

Peak Gen Y High School, Stereotypical Year, 2004-05; Teens getting their own flip phones starts becoming huge. Sales for the iPod start picking up. Debates about the Iraq War and George W. Bush abound. Hip-Hop, Garage Rock, and Post-Grunge are the biggest music genres, but Emo also starts to emerge. Halo 2 LAN parties are a big thing. Kids start to hear of MySpace, but most of their time is still spent on AOL Messenger.

Peak Gen Y and Gen Z Cusp High School, Stereotypical Year, 2014-15; All kids have smartphones and tablets. The iPod is basically irrelevant. Debates about Obama's second term abound. Rock music is pretty much dead, while pop music remains the dominant genre. MySpace is irrelevant, while even Facebook begins to take a backseat to the emergence of new platforms like Snapchat.

Peak Gen Z High School, Stereotypical Year, Too Early To Tell.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 08/10/17 at 10:13 am


Yeah, that's pretty much how I feel about it too.

You know, even though stuff like Snapchat and Instagram are often perceived as being Gen Y things by the media, I'm starting to wonder if we won't look back maybe ten years from now and see some second wave social media stuff like that as being Gen Z. As hot as those websites have been lately, I don't know of anybody my age that actually uses them.

To your other point, here's how I would view the generations from a school standpoint.

Peak Gen Y Elementary School, Stereotypical Year, 1994-95; No cell phones, no online access. 16-bit gaming is still dominant, but early 3D systems are starting to launch. Golden Age Nick, Fox Kids, and ABC and CBS Saturday mornings are still the main topics of conversation among most kids. Hot music is stuff like Take That and Ace of Base. Power Rangers was the dominant kid fad.

Peak Gen Y and Gen Z Cusper Elementary School, Stereotypical Year, 2004-05; Most kids still don't have cell phones, but a few might. All schools have online access now. PlayStation 2, Xbox and Gamecube are the dominant consoles, but the 7th gen will soon launch. Saturday morning cartoons are dead, and Nick, Cartoon Network, and Disney are the main topics for kids. Hot music is stuff like Usher and Kelly Clarkson. Yu-Gi-Oh was arguably the dominant kid fad, though perhaps waning a bit.

Peak Gen Z Elementary School, Stereotypical Year, 2011-12; Probably about half the kids have smartphones while the other half don't. Tablets are becoming more popular. PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 and Wii are the dominant consoles. YouTube now gets talked about more than Nick, Cartoon Network and Disney do. Hot music is stuff like Adele and LMFAO. Minecraft was arguably the top kid fad by this point.

Now on the high school front.

Peak Gen Y High School, Stereotypical Year, 2004-05; Teens getting their own flip phones starts becoming huge. Sales for the iPod start picking up. Debates about the Iraq War and George W. Bush abound. Hip-Hop, Garage Rock, and Post-Grunge are the biggest music genres, but Emo also starts to emerge. Halo 2 LAN parties are a big thing. Kids start to hear of MySpace, but most of their time is still spent on AOL Messenger.

Peak Gen Y and Gen Z Cusp High School, Stereotypical Year, 2014-15; All kids have smartphones and tablets. The iPod is basically irrelevant. Debates about Obama's second term abound. Rock music is pretty much dead, while the pop music remains the dominant genre. MySpace is irrelevant, while even Facebook begins to take a backseat to the emergence of new platforms like Snapchat.

Peak Gen Z High School, Stereotypical Year, Too Early To Tell.
I'm starting to think the same way. Despite that, some Millennials do have Snapchat, Instagram, and Vine (before it died), I truly think those sites are more for Gen Z than ever. Ever since they emerged, most people have not asked me what's my username for any of those platforms, nor do most of my friends or peers have one. I agree that in the future, Snapchat, Instagram, and the rest will be seen as Gen Z social media platforms rather than Millennial.

As for the generations from a school standpoint, I agree with these descriptions, but I have to wonder why is the peak Y/Z school culture 10 years away from peak Y and 7 years from peak Z?

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: bchris02 on 08/10/17 at 12:36 pm

In terms of social media, Facebook is Gen Y.  SnapChat is more of a Gen Z thing.  Instagram is both but leans Gen Z.  I've never had either.

Millennial social media was and always will be Facebook, MySpace, and to an extent twitter.

Facebook is not cool among today's youth because it's seen as for old people.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 08/10/17 at 12:54 pm


In terms of social media, Facebook is Gen Y.  SnapChat is more of a Gen Z thing.  Instagram is both but leans Gen Z.  I've never had either.

Millennial social media was and always will be Facebook, MySpace, and to an extent twitter.

Facebook is not cool among today's youth because it's seen as for old people.
Agreed! That's how I see these social media platforms although for Twitter, it seems more for all generations because of celebrities (who use that site much more than non-celebrites).

Oh,  and I'm not entirely sure if AOL is considered social media; however, if it is, then I see that platform towards Gen Y than X.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 08/10/17 at 1:47 pm


In terms of social media, Facebook is Gen Y.  SnapChat is more of a Gen Z thing.  Instagram is both but leans Gen Z.  I've never had either.

Millennial social media was and always will be Facebook, MySpace, and to an extent twitter.

Facebook is not cool among today's youth because it's seen as for old people.

I agree (mostly).

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: ZeldaFan20 on 08/10/17 at 8:27 pm

This recent articles relays a lot about what we have been talking about:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2017/08/10/stop-trying-to-make-millennial-happen/?utm_term=.3820cdfd5311

I agree with some of her points, I feel people place too much emphasis on labels for groupings, and not so much on the quantitate and objective substance. She also makes a point how the 'Millennial' label doesn't actually resonate to most so called Millennials, in fact only about 1 in 4 Millennials relate to the term. However, as said before, while generations are social constructs by nature; theoretically you could make generations for about anything be it 90's kids (b. 1982-1991), one's own personal generation (so anybody 3-4 years older or younger than yourself), or just straight up random generations (Generation IDGAF b. Sept 1995-March 1996, that means only Zelek, Eric, Marquis, & Me are welcome ;D). However, that doesn't necessarily negate the actual generation itself, let alone the reasoning behind certain key factors within a generation, birth dates/rates, events that shaped it, etc.

So yeah Millennials do exist, hence why the article http://pa1.narvii.com/6119/773bbd3af835acfd827753ebf0d333cb44cf34ed_hq.gif me.

Despite that we all have our own subjective opinions on where it ends or begins, but generally speaking a Millennial could theoretically be born as early as the late 70's or as late as the early 00's. Obviously those born in the mid 80's through the mid 90's are the sweet spot, but even then theres a big difference between 1984-1986 borns and 1994-1996 borns, and of course everybody born in between, let alone the diverse amount of people from different racial, ethnic, economic, & political backgrounds that forms the generation. But (again) generally speaking most Millennials are more liberal than their Gen X/BB predecessors, be it Gay marriage, Drug use, etc. They were the most supportive of Bernie Sanders, and even the more conservative Millennials are more Rand Paulish like Millennials than they are Mitt Romney Millennials, if that makes any sense.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Voiceofthe70s on 08/10/17 at 8:43 pm


This recent articles relays a lot about what we have been talking about:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2017/08/10/stop-trying-to-make-millennial-happen/?utm_term=.3820cdfd5311


I read the article and went deeper and read another article referenced within it:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2015/04/01/your-generational-identity-is-a-lie/?tid=a_inl&utm_term=.031d8a4468a6

That one made me chuckle because it brought up some things I had long forgotten. For example, circa 1985 an early name for the as yet unnamed Generation X was "Baby Busters". I thought it was ridiculous back then and I think it's ridiculous now. And one of the first things Millennials were referred to as by the media was "Nexters". Who comes up with this nonsense?

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: ZeldaFan20 on 08/10/17 at 8:54 pm


I read the article and went deeper and read another article referenced within it:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2015/04/01/your-generational-identity-is-a-lie/?tid=a_inl&utm_term=.031d8a4468a6

That one made me chuckle because it brought up some things I had long forgotten. For example, circa 1985 an early name for the as yet unnamed Generation X was "Baby Busters". I thought it was ridiculous back then and I think it's ridiculous now. And one of the first things Millennials were referred to as by the media was "Nexters". Who comes up with this nonsense?


Haha good point! Its important to note that it takes time before a generational identity is formed. In retrospect, Gen X youth culture was already taking over Baby Boomer youth culture by around 1981 with Ronald Reagan's presidency beginning marking a conservative shift from the liberal 'Boomer era', with New Wave & synthpop music getting big, 80's fashion trends emerging, and of course the launch of MTV. It was a steady climb for much of the early 80's, but it was noticeable even at the time that things were certainly changing from the more liberal ambiance of the 60's & 70's. However, at the time Boomers were still the major target demographic, despite most members of that generation being young adults by then, so well past their youth stages (ages 9-24, with teenaged years being the 'meat and potatoes'). So in short, it takes time for these generational labels to be defined.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 08/10/17 at 9:32 pm


This recent article relays a lot of what we have been talking about:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2017/08/10/stop-trying-to-make-millennial-happen/?utm_term=.3820cdfd5311

I agree with some of her points, I feel people place too much emphasis on labels for groupings, and not so much on the quantitate and objective substance. She also makes a point how the 'Millennial' label doesn't actually resonate to most so called Millennials, in fact only about 1 in 4 Millennials relate to the term. However, as said before, while generations are social constructs by nature; theoretically you could make generations for about anything be it 90's kids (b. 1982-1991), one's own personal generation (so anybody 3-4 years older or younger than yourself), or just straight up random generations (Generation IDGAF b. Sept 1995-March 1996, that means only Zelek, Eric, Marquis, & Me are welcome ;D). However, that doesn't necessarily negate the actual generation itself, let alone the reasoning behind certain key factors within a generation, birth dates/rates, events that shaped it, etc.

So yeah Millennials do exist, hence why the article http://pa1.narvii.com/6119/773bbd3af835acfd827753ebf0d333cb44cf34ed_hq.gif me.

Despite that we all have our own subjective opinions on where it ends or begins, but generally speaking a Millennial could theoretically be born as early as the late 70's or as late as the early 00's. Obviously those born in the mid 80's through the mid 90's are the sweet spot, but even then there's a big difference between 1984-1986 borns and 1994-1996 borns, and of course everybody born in between, let alone the diverse amount of people from different racial, ethnic, economic, & political backgrounds that form the generation. But (again) generally speaking most Millennials are more liberal than their Gen X/BB predecessors, be it Gay marriage, Drug use, etc. They were the most supportive of Bernie Sanders, and even the more conservative Millennials are more Rand Paulish like Millennials than they are Mitt Romney Millennials if that makes any sense.
Yeah, that is actually true. I don't see any of my friends and peers, and or anyone else (that's a Millennial) refer themselves as one because of the negative connotation. It's why I made a thread not too long ago asking if that term will decline in use and will Gen Y come back as the designation.

While it's accurate that we all come from different backgrounds, there are things that define generations as whole that you mentioned with events, traits, and other important aspects.

You're also correct on the political spectrum. Throughout last year, most Millennial liberals all went out for Bernie to where they attended his conventions and were even willing to vote for him in the primaries. I actually had a friend who went to a Bernie conference, and he told me he had a great time.


I read the article and went deeper and read another article referenced within it:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2015/04/01/your-generational-identity-is-a-lie/?tid=a_inl&utm_term=.031d8a4468a6

That one made me chuckle because it brought up some things I had long forgotten. For example, circa 1985 an early name for the as yet unnamed Generation X was "Baby Busters". I thought it was ridiculous back then and I think it's ridiculous now. And one of the first things Millennials were referred to as by the media was "Nexters". Who comes up with this nonsense?
I did some research a while back, and I found more old names for Gen X and Gen Y. Do you remember Gen X being called "13th Generation", "Slackers", "Unlucky", "Latch-Key", "MTV" and Gen Y (before Millennials stuck) being called, "Echo Boomers", "Generation Net" (short for the internet), "Y2K", "Why?", "Baby Boomlets", "MyPod", "Gen 9/11" and even "Gen We"?

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 08/10/17 at 10:33 pm

I find interesting that every Millennial group EXCEPT Whites overwhelmingly supported Hillary.

White Millenials in the 2016 election voted 48% for Trump and 43% for Hillary. Also, "Among white young adults, 46 percent of males supported Trump, while only 33 percent of females did." Very interesting indeed.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: af2010 on 08/11/17 at 7:57 pm

It all depends on how you define the "Millennial Generation." If you end it in 1995 (towards the early end of the spectrum), then the current pop culture would already be predominantly Gen Z. If you end it in 2000 (which seems to be about the average ending point), then we would be in a transition. Anything later than that would mean we're still in "Millennial Culture."

But none of this really matters because generations are made up.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: ZeldaFan20 on 08/11/17 at 9:25 pm


It all depends on how you define the "Millennial Generation." If you end it in 1995 (towards the early end of the spectrum), then the current pop culture would already be predominantly Gen Z. If you end it in 2000 (which seems to be about the average ending point), then we would be in a transition. Anything later than that would mean we're still in "Millennial Culture."

But none of this really matters because generations are made up.


My personal subjective opinion on the cutoff date for Millennial/Z is somewhere in between 1995 & 2000. However, even if we were to include everybody born upto 2000 as a Millennial, then that would mean that while youth culture is still in the peak of the transition, that starting next school year (17'-18') we would be leaning more Z.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mach!ne_he@d on 08/13/17 at 10:55 am

Here's something that's a bit interesting I've noticed as the birth years for Gen Y gets pushed back even as late as 2000. A lot of guys around my age, mostly born between 1985 and 1989, are now starting to consider themselves part of the so-called 'MTV Generation', or the X/Y Cusp. Lately, it seems like pretty much everybody born during the '80s now considers themselves between Gen X and Gen Y.

As an example, a few days ago I saw a post online from a guy born 1988 that said he doesn't consider himself Gen Y because he had already graduated high school by the time modern social media really exploded, and already graduated college by the time modern stuff like smartphones took off. He also said that he believes the fact that he grew up without a computer also separates him from later Gen Yers. That was another mid or late '80s born that said he considered himself an X/Y hybrid.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Tyrannosaurus Rex on 08/13/17 at 11:28 am


Here's something that's a bit interesting I've noticed as the birth years for Gen Y gets pushed back even as late as 2000. A lot of guys around my age, mostly born between 1985 and 1989, are now starting to consider themselves part of the so-called 'MTV Generation', or the X/Y Cusp. Lately, it seems like pretty much everybody born during the '80s now considers themselves between Gen X and Gen Y.

As an example, a few days ago I saw a post online from a guy born 1988 that said he doesn't consider himself Gen Y because he had already graduated high school by the time modern social media really exploded, and already graduated college by the time modern stuff like smartphones took off. He also said that he believes the fact that he grew up without a computer also separates him from later Gen Yers. That was another mid or late '80s born that said he considered himself an X/Y hybrid.


I sometimes see Gen Y's end date being as late as 2004.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 08/13/17 at 6:13 pm


I find interesting that every Millennial group EXCEPT Whites overwhelmingly supported Hillary.

White Millenials in the 2016 election voted 48% for Trump and 43% for Hillary. Also, "Among white young adults, 46 percent of males supported Trump, while only 33 percent of females did." Very interesting indeed.
He barely won with White Millennials considering it was a 5 percent lead. Had Bernie been on the ticket, then Trump would have had fewer white votes overall.


My personal subjective opinion on the cutoff date for Millennial/Z is somewhere in between 1995 & 2000. However, even if we were to include everybody born up to 2000 as a Millennial, then that would mean that while youth culture is still at the peak of the transition, that starting next school year (17'-18') we would be leaning more Z.
I have a feeling the ending of the Millennials could be earlier. All these days I'm seeing the end being between 1994-96, not much anywhere else. I agree with the rest of your statement though. Even if the cutoff is 2000, the upcoming school year is pretty much Gen Z.


Here's something that's a bit interesting I've noticed as the birth years for Gen Y gets pushed back even as late as 2000. A lot of guys around my age, mostly born between 1985 and 1989, are now starting to consider themselves part of the so-called 'MTV Generation', or the X/Y Cusp. Lately, it seems like pretty much everybody born during the '80s now considers themselves between Gen X and Gen Y.

As an example, a few days ago I saw a post online from a guy born 1988 that said he doesn't consider himself Gen Y because he had already graduated high school by the time modern social media really exploded, and already graduated college by the time modern stuff like smartphones took off. He also said that he believes the fact that he grew up without a computer also separates him from later Gen Yers. That was another mid or late '80s born that said he considered himself an X/Y hybrid.
I have noticed that as well. In fact, I found a post from a 1991 person even saying the same thing that he sees himself as an X/Y hybrid. It's really showing that they want Gen Y to start much later than it should be, and that's not correct. All those folks are Millennials, plain and simple.

Oh, and if you can find that post from that guy, that would be great. Oh, and does he mean modern social media being Twitter, Instagram, and Snapchat?

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 08/13/17 at 6:19 pm


He barely won with White Millennials considering it was a 5 percent lead. Had Bernie been on the ticket, then Trump would have had fewer white votes overall.

5% is not "barely". Anyways, all I said is that it was very interesting that White Millennials were the ONLY Millennial group to not overwhelmingly support Hillary.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 08/13/17 at 6:27 pm


5% is not "barely". Anyways, all I said is that it was very interesting that White Millennials were the ONLY Millennial group to not to support Hillary.
That's only because they didn't trust her for a variety of factors.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 08/13/17 at 6:46 pm


That's only because they didn't trust her for a variety of factors.

But they willingly to trust Trump of all people for "a variety of factors"? ???. Hmmmm....

Also, I reiterate..."White Millennials were the ONLY Millennial group to not overwhelmingly support Hillary."

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 08/13/17 at 7:54 pm


But they willingly to trust Trump of all people for "a variety of factors"? ???. Hmmmm....

Also, I reiterate..."White Millennials were the ONLY Millennial group to overwhelmingly not to support Hillary."
Well some hated Hillary. Some were brainwashed under Trump. Some wanted Bernie to win but went to trump after he lost the primaries. 

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 08/13/17 at 8:10 pm


Well some hated Hillary. Some were brainwashed under Trump. Some wanted Bernie to win but went to trump after he lost the primaries.

The same thing can be said for most other Millennial groups but ONCE AGAIN "White Millennials were the ONLY Millennial group to overwhelmingly not to support Hillary." In comparison, 9 percent of Black Millennials and 24 percent of Hispanic Millennials voted for Trump.

Also, the ONLY White demographic group to not vote for Trump was college educated White women that voted 51% for Hillary and 45% for Trump. White women overall voted 53% for Trump and 43% for Hillary...the ONLY demographic group of women that didn't overwhelmingly support Hillary. Do you see a pattern here?

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: HazelBlue99 on 08/14/17 at 3:58 am


I have a feeling the ending of the Millennials could be earlier. All these days I'm seeing the end being between 1994-96, not much anywhere else.


That's interesting, because when I was undertaking my research project, I found more articles suggesting that the Millennials ended after 2000. Most of them weren't just Australian articles either.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 08/14/17 at 10:06 am


The same thing can be said for most other Millennial groups but ONCE AGAIN "White Millennials were the ONLY Millennial group to overwhelmingly not to support Hillary." In comparison, 9 percent of Black Millennials and 24 percent of Hispanic Millennials voted for Trump.

Also, the ONLY White demographic group to not vote for Trump was college educated White women that voted 51% for Hillary and 45% for Trump. White women overall voted 53% for Trump and 43% for Hillary...the ONLY demographic group of women that didn't overwhelmingly support Hillary. Do you see a pattern here?
Yeah, I do; however, I was providing reasons on why they supported or voted him in the first place compared to Hillary. Everything you said is still accurate though.


That's interesting because when I was undertaking my research project, I found more articles suggesting that the Millennials ended after 2000. Most of them weren't just Australian articles either.
Well, they're most likely using the one that ends in 2004 which is inaccurate for many reasons. It sounds like they want to keep the Millennial generation as young as possible when that's inevitable.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: af2010 on 08/14/17 at 6:12 pm


Here's something that's a bit interesting I've noticed as the birth years for Gen Y gets pushed back even as late as 2000. A lot of guys around my age, mostly born between 1985 and 1989, are now starting to consider themselves part of the so-called 'MTV Generation', or the X/Y Cusp. Lately, it seems like pretty much everybody born during the '80s now considers themselves between Gen X and Gen Y.

As an example, a few days ago I saw a post online from a guy born 1988 that said he doesn't consider himself Gen Y because he had already graduated high school by the time modern social media really exploded, and already graduated college by the time modern stuff like smartphones took off. He also said that he believes the fact that he grew up without a computer also separates him from later Gen Yers. That was another mid or late '80s born that said he considered himself an X/Y hybrid.


From what I can gather, most people start Gen Y around 1980 and end it somewhere between 1995-2000. If that's the case, we're either core Millennials (if it ends in 95) or early wave (if it ends in 2000)... but definitely not X/Y "hybrids." Now if the end date gets pushed back to the mid 2000s (Strauss and Howe say 2004), then we might be borderline cuspers... but still predominantly Gen Y.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: bchris02 on 08/14/17 at 10:20 pm


From what I can gather, most people start Gen Y around 1980 and end it somewhere between 1995-2000. If that's the case, we're either core Millennials (if it ends in 95) or early wave (if it ends in 2000)... but definitely not X/Y "hybrids." Now if the end date gets pushed back to the mid 2000s (Strauss and Howe say 2004), then we might be borderline cuspers... but still predominantly Gen Y.


If we are Gen Y still, we are late Gen Y.  Core Millennial culture was in the late '00s and early '10s.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 08/14/17 at 10:55 pm


If we are Gen Y still, we are late Gen Y.  Core Millennial culture was in the late '00s and early '10s.
I don't think we are anymore. For the last few years, pop culture seems to be more Gen Z. I semi agree with the second statement, but Core Millennial culture was also the mid-00s as well.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Rainbowz on 11/06/17 at 6:23 am

IMO I think millennial culture is probably on its last legs. I honestly can’t see it lasting past the year 2020.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Philip Eno on 11/06/17 at 6:35 am


IMO I think millennial culture is probably on its last legs. I honestly can’t see it lasting past the year 2020.
It is the millennial culture that sit at bus stops, on the trains, walking down the pavement, staring at their phones, so when the millennial culture ends, will the phones be put away?

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Rainbowz on 11/06/17 at 8:23 am


It is the millennial culture that sit at bus stops, on the trains, walking down the pavement, staring at their phones, so when the millennial culture ends, will the phones be put away?

It could happen but I highly doubt it will

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Philip Eno on 11/06/17 at 8:27 am


It could happen but I highly doubt it will
Can future technology ever replace the mobile phone?

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: 2001 on 11/06/17 at 1:02 pm


It is the millennial culture that sit at bus stops, on the trains, walking down the pavement, staring at their phones, so when the millennial culture ends, will the phones be put away?


Time goes faster when you're not staring at traffic waiting for the bus.  :P

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Philip Eno on 11/06/17 at 1:06 pm


Time goes faster when you're not staring at traffic waiting for the bus.  :P
You can always read a book?

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: 2001 on 11/06/17 at 1:12 pm


You can always read a book?


That's true, I listen to an audio book sometimes. You never know though, some people could be reading a book on their phone :P

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Philip Eno on 11/06/17 at 1:15 pm


That's true, I listen to an audio book sometimes. You never know though, some people could be reading a book on their phone :P
To true, but if they are nodding they heads, it must be music.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Zelek3 on 11/06/17 at 3:54 pm

Millennial childhood culture ended in 2006 (Eric listed a bunch of reasons why).

Millennial teen culture ended in 2013/2014.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Setemstraight on 11/07/17 at 8:02 am


It is the millennial culture that sit at bus stops, on the trains, walking down the pavement, staring at their phones, so when the millennial culture ends, will the phones be put away?

No because its more of a new way of life then a generational thing. I mean you have Baby Boomers and Early Gen Xers doing the same thing as well as the Gen Zers(or whatever they're called)

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 11/17/17 at 8:37 pm


IMO I think millennial culture is probably on its last legs. I honestly can’t see it lasting past the year 2020.
Same here although I have a feeling it ended much earlier than we thought.


Millennial childhood culture ended in 2006 (Eric listed a bunch of reasons why).

Millennial teen culture ended in 2013/2014.
I agree with the teen culture, but for the childhood period, it may have ended in 2004 rather than 2006.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: d90 on 11/18/17 at 1:18 am


It is the millennial culture that sit at bus stops, on the trains, walking down the pavement, staring at their phones, so when the millennial culture ends, will the phones be put away?

I doubt it. Generations Z uses cellphones a lot as well

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Tyrannosaurus Rex on 11/20/17 at 3:25 pm


I doubt it. Generations Z uses cellphones a lot as well


I would probably even say they use it more than Millennials.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Rainbowz on 11/20/17 at 6:07 pm


I would probably even say they use it more than Millennials.

Nah, everyone uses their phone a lot. It's 2017

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Zelek3 on 11/20/17 at 6:17 pm


Same here although I have a feeling it ended much earlier than we thought.
I agree with the teen culture, but for the childhood period, it may have ended in 2004 rather than 2006.

2004-2006 was the transition period. By 2007, after Kim Possible ended, it was pretty much fully Gen Z childhood.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: ZeldaFan20 on 11/20/17 at 7:58 pm


2004-2006 was the transition period. By 2007, after Kim Possible ended, it was pretty much fully Gen Z childhood.


Yeah I agree with this. 2003 was the last firm Y kid cultured year, 2007 was the first firm Z kid cultured year.

Similarly for youth culture, 2012 was the last firm Y youth cultured year, and (as it seems now) 2017 or 2018 may be the first firm Z youth cultured year.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Rainbowz on 11/20/17 at 9:00 pm


Yeah I agree with this. 2003 was the last firm Y kid cultured year, 2007 was the first firm Z kid cultured year.

Similarly for youth culture, 2012 was the last firm Y youth cultured year, and (as it seems now) 2017 or 2018 may be the first firm Z youth cultured year.

Just out of curiosity, what are your reasons for 2017 or 2018 probably being first firm Z youth culture years?

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Zelek3 on 11/20/17 at 9:06 pm


Similarly for youth culture, 2012 was the last firm Y youth cultured year, and (as it seems now) 2017 or 2018 may be the first firm Z youth cultured year.

I'd consider things like Super 8, the movie Chronicle, Harlem Shake, Hunger Games, initial popularity of electropop, etc. as Y/Z teen cusp. Stuff like fidget spinners, dabbing, and The edge of seventeen are firmly Z teen culture.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: LooseBolt on 11/20/17 at 9:41 pm


2012 was the last year that was firmly Millennial.


Disagree; the political nature of some songs in the last handful of years is a much more Millennial feature. I would specifically cite to Stressed Out by twentyonepilots (which I believe commenters have even called "the millennial anthem"), Rx by Theory of a Deadman, pretty much the entire new A Tribe Called Quest album, Revolution Radio (Green Day being a decidedly Gen X/Xennial band), etc.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: HazelBlue99 on 11/21/17 at 12:12 am


Childhood peak: 8 / Teen hood peak: 16 / 20s peak: 25

Mid 00s kids: 1995-1998 (YZ Cuspers)
Late 00s kids: 1998-2001 (YZ Cuspers)


Not sure if I would agree with that, to be honest. As someone born in 1999, I would consider myself to have been a child of both the Mid 2000s and Late 2000s, despite the fact that I was 8 years old in 2007.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Rainbowz on 11/21/17 at 6:56 am


Not sure if I would agree with that, to be honest. As someone born in 1999, I would consider myself to have been a child of both the Mid 2000s and Late 2000s, despite the fact that I was 8 years old in 2007.

I highly disagree with it as well. Decade kids have NOTHING to do with generations.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: HazelBlue99 on 11/21/17 at 9:14 am


You are right, you're a Mid 00s/Late 00s/Early 10s kid, with a 2:3.5:0.5 ratio, late 00s being the majority.


I don't consider myself to be an Early '10s kid at all, even if I was still 11 and 12 in 2010 and 2011. By that stage, I was more of a pre-teen and I was a teenager for half of the Early 2010s anyway. I wasn't even in my core childhood in the 2010s.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Tyrannosaurus Rex on 11/21/17 at 10:20 am


I highly disagree with it as well. Decade kids have NOTHING to do with generations.


The whole "decade/kids/teens/adults" thing never happened with Gen X, Boomers, Silents, GI, Lost, and everyone else before them.

However, one thing I have seemed to notice as a college student is that a lot of people born in the late 90's seem to identify as Z more than Y.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Rainbowz on 11/21/17 at 1:49 pm


The whole "decade/kids/teens/adults" thing never happened with Gen X, Boomers, Silents, GI, Lost, and everyone else before them.

However, one thing I have seemed to notice as a college student is that a lot of people born in the late 90's seem to identify as Z more than Y.

Yeah, I've only seen it with Gen Y and Z. And honestly, decade kid charts are a terrible way to define a generation IMO, cause then that would only make a generation ten years. Hell, I don't even know if there is an exact age range of childhood. I've seen 3-12 mostly used tho.

For me, it's the opposite. I've noticed most people born in the late 90s consider themselves either Y/Z or Late Y.

One of the most commonly used reasons I've noticed for people considering themselves Y/Z or Late Y is simply because "I didn't grow up with Smartphones, Tablets, or iPads when I was 3 or something" which is a Gen Z stereotype and honestly not growing up with technology during childhood is possible for anyone no matter their birth year. Nobody is going to call a 2008 born who has never held an electronic device before Gen Y lol  ;D

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: 1999 Baby, 2000s Kid on 11/21/17 at 3:23 pm


Yeah, I've only seen it with Gen Y and Z. And honestly, decade kid charts are a terrible way to define a generation IMO, cause then that would only make a generation ten years. Hell, I don't even know if there is an exact age range of childhood. I've seen 3-12 mostly used tho.

For me, it's the opposite. I've noticed most people born in the late 90s consider themselves either Y/Z or Late Y.

One of the most commonly used reasons I've noticed for people considering themselves Y/Z or Late Y is simply because "I didn't grow up with Smartphones, Tablets, or iPads when I was 3 or something" which is a Gen Z stereotype and honestly not growing up with technology during childhood is possible for anyone no matter their birth year. Nobody is going to call a 2008 born who has never held an electronic device before Gen Y lol  ;D



The whole "decade/kids/teens/adults" thing never happened with Gen X, Boomers, Silents, GI, Lost, and everyone else before them.

However, one thing I have seemed to notice as a college student is that a lot of people born in the late 90's seem to identify as Z more than Y.


I agree with you guys on the decade kid thing. With late 90's borns, at least in the US, I'd say more would identify with Gen Z in real life, but on these forums, I'm one of the only late 90's borns that considers myself Gen Z, lol.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Rainbowz on 11/21/17 at 4:03 pm


I agree with you guys on the decade kid thing. With late 90's borns, at least in the US, I'd say more would identify with Gen Z in real life, but on these forums, I'm one of the only late 90's borns that considers myself Gen Z, lol.

Lol I consider myself early Gen Z and I was born in 2002

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 11/21/17 at 5:13 pm


I agree with you guys on the decade kid thing. With late 90's borns, at least in the US, I'd say more would identify with Gen Z in real life, but on these forums, I'm one of the only late 90's borns that considers myself Gen Z, lol.



Lol I consider myself early Gen Z and I was born in 2002

Most of my friends either don't care or don't know about the whole generational debate.

The few that do care for the most part consider themselves Gen Y/Late Gen Y.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: 1999 Baby, 2000s Kid on 11/21/17 at 6:31 pm


Most of my friends either don't care or don't know about the whole generational debate.

The few that do care for the most part consider themselves Gen Y/Late Gen Y.


I don't have real life friends, since I'm homeschooled, so I can't say what they think, lol. It's sad. ;D

Yeah, everyone grows up differently, so I can understand why some see themselves as late Y or Y/Z. :)

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: 2001 on 11/21/17 at 6:41 pm


I agree with you guys on the decade kid thing. With late 90's borns, at least in the US, I'd say more would identify with Gen Z in real life, but on these forums, I'm one of the only late 90's borns that considers myself Gen Z, lol.


How come you identify more with Z than Y?

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Rainbowz on 11/21/17 at 6:59 pm


How come you identify more with Z than Y?

Because Gen Z is the new, hip and young generation  8)

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: 1999 Baby, 2000s Kid on 11/21/17 at 7:24 pm



How come you identify more with Z than Y?


There's a lot of factors to it, I guess it depends on what you think defines the generations.

Some factors would be that I've never known a world without the Internet being used by almost everyone I knew, I've grown up on YouTube, Xbox Live, browsing the Internet, outside of school, I spent most of my time online as a kid, don't remember 9/11 (although that's US centric and some people don't see it as a valid reason), etc.

I only found out what Dial Up and AIM were within the last few years, I didn't even know there was a 2008 crash until a few years ago.

These things might not mean much, if not, what do you think defines these generations, so I can give a better answer, lol. :P

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 11/21/17 at 7:51 pm


One of the most commonly used reasons I've noticed for people considering themselves Y/Z or Late Y is simply because "I didn't grow up with Smartphones, Tablets, or iPads when I was 3 or something" which is a Gen Z stereotype and honestly not growing up with technology during childhood is possible for anyone no matter their birth year. Nobody is going to call a 2008 born who has never held an electronic device before Gen Y lol  ;D
This! I honestly can't tell you how many times I've seen people all over online use the technology factor to put themselves as Gen Y (or Gen X for the Older Millennials). They don't seem to understand that generations are much more than just technology. The other factors are never taken into consideration for some reason when these discussions come up. Those folks need to look at social, political, cultural and other aspects to get a better grasp of generations.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: 2001 on 11/21/17 at 8:07 pm


Because Gen Z is the new, hip and young generation  8)


Pfft, we're more hip than you. While you've been dabbing, everyday I've been SHUFFLIN'! I have more tattoos than the years you've been alive and I have tried ALL of Starbucks' Pumpkin Spice offerings!! Get off my parents' lawn!


There's a lot of factors to it, I guess it depends on what you think defines the generations.

Some factors would be that I've never known a world without the Internet being used by almost everyone I knew, I've grown up on YouTube, Xbox Live, browsing the Internet, outside of school, I spent most of my time online as a kid, don't remember 9/11 (although that's US centric and some people don't see it as a valid reason), etc.

I only found out what Dial Up and AIM were within the last few years, I didn't even know there was a 2008 crash until a few years ago.

These things might not mean much, if not, what do you think defines these generations, so I can give a better answer, lol. :P


I see. I can relate to your first part about not knowing a world before the Internet. But I was in high school when YouTube and Xbox LIVE got popular and lost my teenage job in the recession  :-[ And of course I knew the struggles of dial up all too well. ;D

So you think that if you were a kid in the late 2000s = Generation Z?

I'm not sure 100% sure what makes someone Gen Z or Gen Y. I guess my sisters born 2005 would be Gen Z. On their 12th birthday, they got smartphones. On my 12th birthday, I got a digital camera (before that, we used disposable film cameras). I guess that's what the difference would be: Gen Y saw the tech go from its (relative) infancy to blossom to the world we live in today, while Gen Z skipped straight to the end.

That's not to say I grew up old school dinosaur style though. When I was 12, I spent a good portion of my day playing Runescape and World of Warcraft (MMOs), and my sisters today spend a lot of time playing Rolblox and Minecraft. Some things don't change. ;D

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Zelek3 on 11/21/17 at 8:27 pm


This! I honestly can't tell you how many times I've seen people all over online use the technology factor to put themselves as Gen Y (or Gen X for the Older Millennials). They don't seem to understand that generations are much more than just technology. The other factors are never taken into consideration for some reason when these discussions come up. Those folks need to look at social, political, cultural and other aspects to get a better grasp of generations.

Yeah, like the Buzzfeed video about generations. There were people claiming that being born in 2004 didn't make them Gen Z! :o

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 11/21/17 at 8:32 pm


Yeah, like the Buzzfeed video about generations. There were people claiming that being born in 2004 didn't make them Gen Z! :o
Well, they're stupid. A 2004 person is definitely Gen Z without a doubt.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: 1999 Baby, 2000s Kid on 11/21/17 at 8:33 pm


Pfft, we're more hip than you. While you've been dabbing, everyday I've been SHUFFLIN'! I have more tattoos than the years you've been alive and I have tried ALL of Starbucks' Pumpkin Spice offerings!! Get off my parents' lawn!

I see. I can relate to your first part about not knowing a world before the Internet. But I was in high school when YouTube and Xbox LIVE got popular and lost my teenage job in the recession  :-[ And of course I knew the struggles of dial up all too well. ;D

So you think that if you were a kid in the late 2000s = Generation Z?

I'm not sure 100% sure what makes someone Gen Z or Gen Y. I guess my sisters born 2005 would be Gen Z. On their 12th birthday, they got smartphones. On my 12th birthday, I got a digital camera (before that, we used disposable film cameras). I guess that's what the difference would be: Gen Y saw the tech go from its (relative) infancy to blossom to the world we live in today, while Gen Z skipped straight to the end.

That's not to say I grew up old school dinosaur style though. When I was 12, I spent a good portion of my day playing Runescape and World of Warcraft (MMOs), and my sisters today spend a lot of time playing Rolblox and Minecraft. Some things don't change. ;D


I'm not exactly for sure what makes someone Gen Y or Z either, I wouldn't say being a late 2000's kid makes you Gen Z, but based on what I've seen from everyone else's definitions overall, I'd say I'm Gen Z.  Tech is still advancing and changing a lot, so I wouldn't say Gen Z skipped to the end, as we'll see technology change even more in the future, which is pretty exciting to me. We'll probably get holograms of musical artists and realistic VR simulators, are you ready for it? :D

Funny you mention the birthday thing though, because I actually got a smartphone on my 12th birthday. ;D Believe it or not, out of the people I knew my age, I was one of the last people to get a phone.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Rainbowz on 11/21/17 at 8:35 pm


Pfft, we're more hip than you. While you've been dabbing, everyday I've been SHUFFLIN'! I have more tattoos than the years you've been alive and I have tried ALL of Starbucks' Pumpkin Spice offerings!! Get off my parents' lawn!

That's because dabbing is one of the latest dance trends. Every day I'm shufflin' is so 2011 this is 2017 that dance outdated as hell my guy. 

Dab > Shuffle

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 11/21/17 at 9:44 pm


I'm not sure 100% sure what makes someone Gen Z or Gen Y.



I'm not exactly for sure what makes someone Gen Y or Z either.
Well, there are a lot of things that place people into millennials or Gen Z.

The first one is the economy. Millennials are the ones who had economic prosperity during their childhood and adolescence. These were the people who had aspirations to become anything they want only to see that get taken away from them when the Great Recession as they entered adulthood. While there were Millennials who were in the workforce before the economic crisis, most of them only had their careers for a few years. Gen Z is those who missed out on that economic prosperity and were mainly children when the Great Recession happened. That event had caused them to be pragmatic with their money and think about what's the best for them, not what their parents think what's best for them.

The second one is politics. Millennials are those who witnessed 9/11, the War on Terror, Hurricane Katrina and entered the military to fight the Afghanistan War, Iraq War, and ISIS. They are mostly liberals and are associated with the Democratic party due to the disastrous results of the Bush administration. They are the ones who were first-time voters in the 2000 presidential election and the following election years. (They could actually vote back in 1996, but they were a very small minority). In addition, these were also the folks who put Obama in the White House and made history with him being the first black president. Gen Z is the ones who never witnessed a peacetime due to growing up after 9/11 as children along with the two disastrous wars. They were first-time voters in the 2016 presidential election and were never able to vote for Obama. Most of them are adolescents in a chaotic world with bombings, shootings, other terrorist attacks, and hostility, happening every other day. Because most have not voted yet, they are not affiliated with both political parties or both ideologies. That will happen in 2020 when half of them are able to vote.

The third is pop culture. Artists that define them well are Green Day, Beyonce, Blink 182, Usher, Lil' Jon, Radiohead, Weezer, Gorillaz, Linkin Park, My Chemical Romance, Nickleback, Spice Girls, Britney Spears, Eminem, Black Eyed Peas, Justin Timberlake etc. Movies that describe them are American Pie, Dude, Where's My Car?, Not Another Teen Movie, Thirteen, Mean Girls, Superbad, Juno, Pineapple Express, Scott Pilgrim, Social Network and This Is The End. Since the Gen Z pop culture had just started a few years ago, there hasn't been much to define them just yet; however, there are artists who describe them being T-Swift, Selena Gomez, Ariana Grande, Justin Beiber, Ed Sheeran, etc.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: 1999 Baby, 2000s Kid on 11/21/17 at 10:20 pm


Well, there are a lot of things that place people into millennials or Gen Z.

The first one is the economy. Millennials are the ones who had economic prosperity during their childhood and adolescence. These were the people who had aspirations to become anything they want only to see that get taken away from them when the Great Recession as they entered adulthood. While there were Millennials who were in the workforce before the economic crisis, most of them only had their careers for a few years. Gen Z is those who missed out on that economic prosperity and were mainly children when the Great Recession happened. That event had caused them to be pragmatic with their money and think about what's the best for them, not what their parents think what's best for them.

The second one is politics. Millennials are those who witnessed 9/11, the War on Terror, Hurricane Katrina and entered the military to fight the Afghanistan War, Iraq War, and ISIS. They are mostly liberals and are associated with the Democratic party due to the disastrous results of the Bush administration. They are the ones who were first-time voters in the 2000 presidential election and the following election years. (They could actually vote back in 1996, but they were a very small minority). In addition, these were also the folks who put Obama in the White House and made history with him being the first black president. Gen Z is the ones who never witnessed a peacetime due to growing up after 9/11 as children along with the two disastrous wars. They were first-time voters in the 2016 presidential election and were never able to vote for Obama. Most of them are adolescents in a chaotic world with bombings, shootings, other terrorist attacks, and hostility, happening every other day. Because most have not voted yet, they are not affiliated with both political parties or both ideologies. That will happen in 2020 when half of them are able to vote.

The third is pop culture. Artists that define them well are Green Day, Beyonce, Blink 182, Usher, Lil' Jon, Radiohead, Weezer, Gorillaz, Linkin Park, My Chemical Romance, Nickleback, Spice Girls, Britney Spears, Eminem, Black Eyed Peas, Justin Timberlake etc. Movies that describe them are American Pie, Dude, Where's My Car?, Not Another Teen Movie, Thirteen, Mean Girls, Superbad, Juno, Pineapple Express, Scott Pilgrim, Social Network and This Is The End. Since the Gen Z pop culture had just started a few years ago, there hasn't been much to define them just yet; however, there are artists who describe them being T-Swift, Selena Gomez, Ariana Grande, Justin Beiber, Ed Sheeran, etc.


I'd be Gen Z if we go off of this, although I don't think the 2008 recession affected us mentally that much, I wasn't even aware that it existed back then, personally.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Rainbowz on 11/21/17 at 10:23 pm


I'd be Gen Z if we go off of this, although I don't know if the 2008 recession affected most of us mentally that much, I wasn't even aware that it existed back then, personally.

Same here

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 11/21/17 at 10:32 pm

When first got into the generational debate I saw Gen Y/Millennials being defined either as 1981-1999 or 1982-2000 or 1982-2004.

I chose the 1982-2000 definition because it made the most sense to me and still does.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: 1999 Baby, 2000s Kid on 11/21/17 at 11:51 pm


When first got into the generational debate I saw Gen Y/Millennials being defined either as 1981-1999 or 1982-2000 or 1982-2004.

I chose the 1982-2000 definition because it made the most sense to me and still does.


I may feel differently, but I understand where you're coming from and respect your opinion. :)

In the end, it doesn't matter.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: HazelBlue99 on 11/21/17 at 11:52 pm

Who cares about generations. It doesn't have any influence on your day-to-day life at all. People don't judge you for being "X, Y or Z" and even if they did, they're just making themselves look foolish, because generations honestly aren't that important.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Zelek3 on 11/22/17 at 12:05 am


Who cares about generations. It doesn't have any influence on your day-to-day life at all. People don't judge you for being "X, Y or Z" and even if they did, they're just making themselves look foolish, because generations honestly aren't that important.

Yeah, but this topic wasn't made the discuss the boundaries of generations, it was meant to discuss whether or not we're still in Millennial culture, but then it got sidetracked with birth year discussion. Let's get back to the topic.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: 1999 Baby, 2000s Kid on 11/22/17 at 12:11 am


Who cares about generations. It doesn't have any influence on your day-to-day life at all. People don't judge you for being "X, Y or Z" and even if they did, they're just making themselves look foolish, because generations honestly aren't that important.


I don't care that much, I didn't even really know about generations before I signed up for this site last year, but hey, if I'm just spending time on Internet forums about pop culture and people mention it, might as well give my opinion, you know? :P

Sorry for going along with the off topic discussion though, I'll admit I do that sometimes, and can understand how that would irritate people.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Zelek3 on 11/22/17 at 12:14 am


I don't care that much, I didn't even really know about generations before I signed up for this site last year, but hey, if I'm just spending time on Internet forums about pop culture and people mention it, might as well give my opinion, you know? :P

Sorry for going along with the off topic discussion though, I'll admit I do that sometimes, and can understand how that would irritate people.

It's ok, I got off topic too.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: HazelBlue99 on 11/22/17 at 12:14 am


I don't care that much, I didn't even really know about generations before I signed up for this site last year, but hey, if I'm just spending time on Internet forums about pop culture and people mention it, might as well give my opinion, you know? :P

Sorry for going along with the off topic discussion though, I'll admit I do that sometimes, and can understand how that would irritate people.


Please don't feel bad and my post wasn't aimed at you or anyone in particular. I can understand why people enjoy talking about generations, but sometimes the reality behind it is often forgotten, which is that they ultimately have no relevance in day-to-day life.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: 1999 Baby, 2000s Kid on 11/22/17 at 12:28 am


It's ok, I got off topic too.



Please don't feel bad and my post wasn't aimed at you or anyone in particular. I can understand why people enjoy talking about generations, but sometimes the reality behind it is often forgotten, which is that they ultimately have no relevance in day-to-day life.


Yeah, I get you, and it is very true.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 11/22/17 at 12:42 am


I'd be Gen Z if we go off of this, although I don't think the 2008 recession affected us mentally that much, I wasn't even aware that it existed back then, personally.
Yeah, I would agree with that. I mean most Zers were kids when it occurred and were not paying attention to the economy; however, it did hurt their parents which caused them to be careful with their money.


Who cares about generations. It doesn't have any influence on your day-to-day life at all. People don't judge you for being "X, Y or Z" and even if they did, they're just making themselves look foolish, because generations honestly aren't that important.
We can honestly say the same thing with all the other groups. ;) I mean who really cares if someone is white? Who cares if someone is lesbian? Who cares if someone is fat? Who cares if someone is a guy?

What really matters to most people is personality, not the identity of a group. I do understand what you mean about generations though.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: HazelBlue99 on 11/22/17 at 12:53 am


We can honestly say the same thing with all the other groups. ;) I mean who really cares if someone is white? Who cares if someone is lesbian? Who cares if someone is fat? Who cares if someone is a guy?

What really matters to most people is personality, not the identity of a group. I do understand what you mean about generations though.


To be honest, I was sort of venting when I made my earlier post. However, I do agree that someone's own, unique personality and identity is what matters above everything else.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 11/22/17 at 1:01 am


To be honest, I was sort of venting when I made my earlier post. However, I do agree that someone's own, unique personality and identity is what matters above everything else.
No worries. Everyone has to vent from time to time. I do it sometimes as well. And yeah, someone's personality is the most important, but the problem is that most folks want to see more than just personality.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 11/22/17 at 3:37 am


I may feel differently, but I understand where you're coming from and respect your opinion. :)

In the end, it doesn't matter.

Fantastic :).

Now, let's back to the topic ;).

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mach!ne_he@d on 11/22/17 at 7:32 am


Pfft, we're more hip than you. While you've been dabbing, everyday I've been SHUFFLIN'! I have more tattoos than the years you've been alive and I have tried ALL of Starbucks' Pumpkin Spice offerings!! Get off my parents' lawn!

I see. I can relate to your first part about not knowing a world before the Internet. But I was in high school when YouTube and Xbox LIVE got popular and lost my teenage job in the recession  :-[ And of course I knew the struggles of dial up all too well. ;D

So you think that if you were a kid in the late 2000s = Generation Z?

I'm not sure 100% sure what makes someone Gen Z or Gen Y. I guess my sisters born 2005 would be Gen Z. On their 12th birthday, they got smartphones. On my 12th birthday, I got a digital camera (before that, we used disposable film cameras). I guess that's what the difference would be: Gen Y saw the tech go from its (relative) infancy to blossom to the world we live in today, while Gen Z skipped straight to the end.

That's not to say I grew up old school dinosaur style though. When I was 12, I spent a good portion of my day playing Runescape and World of Warcraft (MMOs), and my sisters today spend a lot of time playing Rolblox and Minecraft. Some things don't change. ;D


When I was 12 I was playing Pokemon on my Game Boy Color, so I guess that's pretty close to dinosaur territory.

But I do agree with what you said about the difference between Y and Z. That's how I make the difference as well. For me, I was 12 before I got my first computer, 17 before I got my first mobile phone, 19 by the time YouTube and social media started taking off, and 21 by the time I got my first HDTV. That can't be compared to a kid that had all of those things by the time they were 5. It's like comparing a Boomer that know what it was like when their parents got their first TV set as a kid, compared to a Gen Xer that grew up always having television.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Setemstraight on 11/22/17 at 9:59 am


I may feel differently, but I understand where you're coming from and respect your opinion. :)

In the end, it doesn't matter.

What's your definition?

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Rainbowz on 11/22/17 at 12:00 pm


Same here although I have a feeling it ended much earlier than we thought.


I agree. I think 2017 will probably be seen as the first 100% Gen z culture year.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Rainbowz on 11/24/17 at 1:12 pm




That's not to say I grew up old school dinosaur style though. When I was 12, I spent a good portion of my day playing Runescape and World of Warcraft (MMOs), and my sisters today spend a lot of time playing Rolblox and Minecraft. Some things don't change. ;D

I'm 15 and I've been playing ROBLOX since I was 11. I love that game  :)

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: pink.panda_v3 on 11/24/17 at 6:22 pm


I'm 15 and I've been playing ROBLOX since I was 11. I love that game  :)

ROBLOX. Nowadays it's infested with online daters and hashtags.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: pink.panda_v3 on 11/24/17 at 6:23 pm

I'm not so sure what defines 'Millennial culture' ???

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Rainbowz on 11/24/17 at 10:57 pm


Teens/adolescents: Ages 12-20 (Early: 12-14) (Mid: 15-17) (Late: 18-20)
Young adults: Ages 21-26

Gen X/Y Cusp: 1977-1983 Core Millennials: 1984-1994 Gen Y/Z Cusp: 1995-2001 Core Gen Z: 2002-2009

2010's teen culture
Early adolescents: 1996-1998 (Gen Y/Z Cusp)
Mid adolescents: 1993-1995 (Millennials,  Gen Y/Z Cusp)
Late adolescents: 1990-1992 (Millennials)
Y: 55.555% YZ: 44.444%

2010's adult culture
Young adults: 1984-1989 (Millennials)

2011's teen culture
Early adolescents: 1997-1999 (Gen Y/Z Cusp)
Mid adolescents: 1994-1996 (Millennials, Gen Y/Z Cusp)
Late adolescents: 1991-1993 (Millennials)
Y: 44.444% YZ: 55.555%

2011's adult culture
Young adults: 1985-1990 (Millennials)

2012's teen culture
Early adolescents: 1998-2000 (Gen Y/Z Cusp)
Mid adolescents: 1995-1997 (Gen Y/Z Cusp)
Late adolescents: 1992-1994 (Millennials)
Y: 33.333% YZ: 66.666%

2012's adult culture
Young adults: 1986-1991

2013's teen culture
Early adolescents: 1999-2001 (Gen Y/Z Cusp)
Mid adolescents: 1996-1998 (Gen Y/Z Cusp)
Late adolescents: 1993-1995 (Millennials, Gen Y/Z Cusp)
Y: 22.222% YZ: 77.777%

2013's adult culture
Young adults: 1987-1992

2014's teen culture
Early adolescents: 2000-2002 (Gen Y/Z Cusp, Gen Z)
Mid adolescents: 1997-1999 (Gen Y/Z Cusp)
Late adolescents: 1994-1996 (Millennials, Gen Y/Z Cusp)
Y: 11.111% YZ: 77.777% Z: 11.111%

2014's adult culture
Young adults: 1988-1993 (Millennials)

2015's teen culture
Early adolescents: 2001-2003 (Gen Y/Z Cusp, Gen Z)
Mid adolescents: 1998-2000 (Gen Y/Z Cusp)
Late adolescents: 1995-1997 (Gen Y/Z Cusp)
YZ: 77.777% Z: 22.222%

2015's adult culture
Young adults: 1989-1994 (Millennials)

2016's teen culture
Early adolescents: 2002-2004 (Gen Z)
Mid adolescents: 1999-2001 (Gen Y/Z Cusp)
Late adolescents: 1996-1998 (Gen Y/Z Cusp)
YZ: 66.666% Z: 33.333%

2016's adult culture
Young adults: 1990-1995 (Millennials, Gen Y/Z Cusp)

2017's teen culture
Early adolescents: 2003-2005 (Gen Z)
Mid adolescents: 2000-2002 (Gen Y/Z Cusp, Gen Z)
Late adolescents: 1997-1999 (Gen Y/Z Cusp)
YZ: 55.555% Z: 44.444%

2017's adult culture
Young adults: 1991-1996 (Millennials, Gen Y/Z Cusp)

2018's teen culture
Early adolescents: 2004-2006 (Gen Z)
Mid adolescents: 2001-2003 (Gen Y/Z Cusp, Gen Z)
Late adolescents: 1998-2000 (Gen Y/Z Cusp)
YZ: 44.444% Z: 55.555%

2018's adult culture
Young adults: 1992-1997 (Millennials, Gen Y/Z Cusp)

2019's teen culture
Early adolescents: 2005-2007 (Gen Z)
Mid adolescents: 2002-2004 (Gen Z)
Late adolescents: 1999-2001 (Gen Y/Z Cusp)
YZ: 33.333% Z: 66.666%

2019's adult culture
Young adults: 1993-1998 (Millennials, Gen Y/Z Cusp)

2020's teen culture
Early adolescents: 2006-2008 (Gen Z)
Mid adolescents: 2003-2005 (Gen Z)
Late adolescents: 2000-2002 (Gen Y/Z Cusp, Gen Z)
YZ: 22.222% Z: 77.777%

2020's adult culture
Young adults: 1994-1999

2021's teen culture
Early adolescents: 2007-2009 (Gen Z)
Mid adolescents: 2004-2006 (Gen Z)
Late adolescents: 2001-2003 (Gen Y/Z Cusp, Gen Z)
YZ: 11.111% Z: 88.888%

2021's adult culture
Young adults: 1995-2000 (Gen Y/Z Cusp)

2022's teen culture
Early adolescents: 2008-2010 (Gen Z, Gen Z/Alpha Cusp)
Mid adolescents: 2005-2007 (Gen Z)
Late adolescents: 2002-2004 (Gen Z)
Z: 88.888% ZA: 11.111%

2022's adult culture
Young adults: 1996-2001 (Gen Y/Z Cusp)

2023's teen culture
Early adolescents: 2009-2011 (Gen Z, Gen Z/Alpha Cusp)
Mid adolescents: 2006-2008 (Gen Z)
Late adolescents: 2003-2005 (Gen Z)
Z: 77.777% ZA: 22.222%

2023's adult culture
Young adults: 1997-2002 (Gen Y/Z Cusp, Gen Z)

2024's teen culture
Early adolescents: 2010-2012 (Gen Z/Alpha Cusp)
Mid adolescents: 2007-2009 (Gen Z)
Late adolescents: 2004-2006 (Gen Z)
Z: 66.666% ZA: 33.333%

2024's adult culture
Young adults: 1998-2003 (Gen Y/Z Cusp, Gen Z)

2025's teen culture
Early adolescents: 2011-2013 (Gen Z/Alpha Cusp)
Mid adolescents: 2008-2010 (Gen Z, Gen Z/Alpha Cusp)
Late adolescents: 2005-2007 (Gen Z)
Z: 55.555% ZA: 44.444%

2025's adult culture
Young adults: 1999-2004 (Gen Y/Z Cusp, Gen Z)

2026's teen culture
Early adolescents: 2012-2014 (Gen Z/Alpha Cusp)
Mid adolescents: 2009-2011 (Gen Z, Gen Z/Alpha Cusp)
Late adolescents: 2006-2008 (Gen Z)
Z: 44.444% ZA: 55.555%

2026's adult culture
Young adults: 2000-2005 (Gen Y/Z Cusp, Gen Z)

2027's teen culture
Early adolescents: 2013-2015 (Gen Z/Alpha Cusp)
Mid adolescents: 2010-2012 (Gen Z/Alpha Cusp)
Late adolescents: 2007-2009 (Gen Z)
Z: 33.333% ZA: 66.666%

2027's adult culture
Young adults: 2001-2006 (Gen Y/Z Cusp, Gen Z)

2028's teen culture
Early adolescents: 2014-2016 (Gen Z/Alpha Cusp, Gen Alpha)
Mid adolescents: 2011-2013 (Gen Z/Alpha Cusp)
Late adolescents: 2008-2010 (Gen Z, Gen Z/Alpha Cusp)
Z: 22.222% ZA: 66.666% A: 11.111%

2028's adult culture
Young adults: 2002-2007 (Gen Z)

I disagree with this. How is a 2001 born Y/Z Cusp and a 2002 born 100% Z? It makes no sense. If 2001 is Y/Z Cusp, then 2002 should be early generation Z. And personally as someone born that year I don't consider myself core z.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Rainbowz on 11/24/17 at 11:44 pm


1994
Y: 100% Z: 0%

1995
Y: 87.5% Z: 12.5%

1996
Y: 75% Z: 25%

1997
Y: 62.5% Z: 37.5%

1998
Y: 50% Z: 50%

1999
Y: 37.5% Z: 62.5%

2000
Y: 25% Z: 75%

2001
Y: 12.5 Z: 87.5%

2002
Y: 0% Z: 100%

The Gen Y/Z Cusp is 1995-2001, 2001 and 2002 borns still have a lot in common, it's just that 1995-2001 borns are mutually connected to both Gen Y and Z. Jeremy's cousin Pete is on the mom's side of the family and cousin Jason is on the dad's side of the family, both are his cousins, but Peter and Jason are not first cousins, they're second cousins and have no biological relation. It works the same way with generations, Jeremy was born in 1998, his cousin Pete was born in 1994 and his cousin Jason was born in 2002, he's in the same generation as both, but Pete and Jason are not in the same generation.

This still doesn't answer my question. What specific reasons make them Y/Z or core z? You do realize that there is such thing as Late Y and Early Z right? 1994 is way too late to qualify as a core millennial and I can't say I've heard anyone else say they were, but I guess that depends on what you define as "Gen Y"

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 11/25/17 at 4:38 am


1996
Y: 75% Z: 25%

1997
Y: 62.5% Z: 37.5%

1998
Y: 50% Z: 50%

1999
Y: 37.5% Z: 62.5%

This doesn't make much sense, IMO. 1998 & 1999 borns are 99.8% the same, lol.

Also, a 1996 born is 75% Gen Y....in what way? No offense to most 1996 borns like ZeldaFan20 but c'mon....I don't agree with that.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Tyrannosaurus Rex on 11/25/17 at 7:26 am


This doesn't make much sense, IMO. 1998 & 1999 borns are 99.8% the same, lol.

Also, a 1996 born is 75% Gen Y....in what way? No offense to most 1996 borns like ZeldaFan20 but c'mon....I don't agree with that.


I would probably say that 1999 is 50/50, when it comes to cusps and the like. The thing is, I research a lot of this stuff. Once I tell this guy about some of my experiences, then his perception may change.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 11/25/17 at 11:21 am


I would probably say that 1999 is 50/50, when it comes to cusps and the like. The thing is, I research a lot of this stuff. Once I tell this guy about some of my experiences, then his perception may change.

Yep.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Rainbowz on 11/25/17 at 11:32 am


This doesn't make much sense, IMO. 1998 & 1999 borns are 99.8% the same, lol.

Also, a 1996 born is 75% Gen Y....in what way? No offense to most 1996 borns like ZeldaFan20 but c'mon....I don't agree with that.

The whole entire thing doesn't even make sense tbh

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Rainbowz on 11/25/17 at 1:06 pm

No I'm the real sexy gangster  8)

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: unicornic on 11/25/17 at 1:18 pm


♪Damn it feels good to be a ganster!♪


No I'm the real sexy gangster  8)

I hate to tell you guys, but I have never seen anyone born after 2001 act like a sexy gangster. We 2001 borns are the last group of kids who signed up for Club Penguin without our parents permission. We were the last to wear thug life glasses and a backwards cap during our young years. Here’s how the generations should go:

1st January 8.5 Billion BC - 31st December 2001 babies: Sexy gangster generation

1st January 2002 - now: Core z

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Rainbowz on 11/25/17 at 1:24 pm


I hate to tell you guys, but I have never seen anyone born after 2001 act like a sexy gangster. We 2001 borns are the last group of kids who signed up for Club Penguin without our parents permission. We were the last to wear thug life glasses and a backwards cap during our young years. Here’s how the generations should go:

1st January 8.5 Billion BC - 31st December 2001 babies: Sexy gangster generation

1st January 2002 - now: Core z

;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Tyrannosaurus Rex on 11/25/17 at 4:18 pm


I hate to tell you guys, but I have never seen anyone born after 2001 act like a sexy gangster. We 2001 borns are the last group of kids who signed up for Club Penguin without our parents permission. We were the last to wear thug life glasses and a backwards cap during our young years. Here’s how the generations should go:

1st January 8.5 Billion BC - 31st December 2001 babies: Sexy gangster generation

1st January 2002 - now: Core z


The Universe has been around for 13.8 billion years.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: prodanny288 on 11/25/17 at 4:44 pm


I hate to tell you guys, but I have never seen anyone born after 2001 act like a sexy gangster. We 2001 borns are the last group of kids who signed up for Club Penguin without our parents permission. We were the last to wear thug life glasses and a backwards cap during our young years. Here’s how the generations should go:

1st January 8.5 Billion BC - 31st December 2001 babies: Sexy gangster generation

1st January 2002 - now: Core z

I disagree 99999999% with this. How are 2001 borns a sexy gangster and 2002 borns core z  ???? It makes no sense. We 2002 borns are the one and only sexy generation out there. Here’s how it’s REALLY done:
8.5 Billion BC - 2001: Gen Y
January 1st 2002 - Dec 31 2002: Gen smexy
January 1st 2003 onwards: 5000% gen z

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 11/25/17 at 5:01 pm


The Universe has been around for 13.8 billion years.

It's a joke fam.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: 2001 on 11/25/17 at 6:21 pm


1000 year generation theory

Baby Boomers (b. 1000 BC to 1 BC) (C/O 988 BC to 19 AD): The last generation to grow up in Core/Mid 2000s culture.

Generation X (b. 1 AD to 1000 AD) (C/O 19 AD to 1018 AD): Last people to remember cassette tapes and the Atari 6900.

Millennials (b. 1001 AD to 2000 AD) (C/O 1020 AD to 2018 AD) The last generation that didn't have an iPhone+XL 12 growing up. They are very liberal and 93% of these guys voted for Barack Obama, 9000% of them felt the Bern!

Generation Z (b. 2001 AD to 3000 AD) (C/O 2019 AD to 3018 AD): The eldest of the Gen is only 5 years old, so to be determined...


I start noticing some Gen Z traits in those born in the early 1680s, especially 1682 borns, but even those born upto the mid-1840s do have some Gen X traits here and there.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: d90 on 11/25/17 at 10:21 pm


1000 year generation theory

Baby Boomers (b. 1000 BC to 1 BC) (C/O 988 BC to 19 AD): The last generation to grow up in Core/Mid 2000s culture.

Generation X (b. 1 AD to 1000 AD) (C/O 19 AD to 1018 AD): Last people to remember cassette tapes and the Atari 6900.

Millennials (b. 1001 AD to 2000 AD) (C/O 1020 AD to 2018 AD) The last generation that didn't have an iPhone+XL 12 growing up. They are very liberal and 93% of these guys voted for Barack Obama, 9000% of them felt the Bern!

Generation Z (b. 2001 AD to 3000 AD) (C/O 2019 AD to 3018 AD): The eldest of the Gen is only 5 years old, so to be determined...

The Baby Boomers were born after the Greatest Generation(b.3000 BC to 2001 BC) fought against the Dinosaurs .

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Longaotian00 on 11/26/17 at 4:08 am


1000 year generation theory

Baby Boomers (b. 1000 BC to 1 BC) (C/O 988 BC to 19 AD): The last generation to grow up in Core/Mid 2000s culture.

Generation X (b. 1 AD to 1000 AD) (C/O 19 AD to 1018 AD): Last people to remember cassette tapes and the Atari 6900.

Millennials (b. 1001 AD to 2000 AD) (C/O 1020 AD to 2018 AD) The last generation that didn't have an iPhone+XL 12 growing up. They are very liberal and 93% of these guys voted for Barack Obama, 9000% of them felt the Bern!

Generation Z (b. 2001 AD to 3000 AD) (C/O 2019 AD to 3018 AD): The eldest of the Gen is only 5 years old, so to be determined...


Damn so my anicent ass is in with people who graduated High School in 1020? ;D ;D

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Rainbowz on 11/26/17 at 8:11 am


I disagree 99999999% with this. How are 2001 borns a sexy gangster and 2002 borns core z  ???? It makes no sense. We 2002 borns are the one and only sexy generation out there. Here’s how it’s REALLY done:
8.5 Billion BC - 2001: Gen Y
January 1st 2002 - Dec 31 2002: Gen smexy
January 1st 2003 onwards: 5000% gen z

;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D
I see you mocking my post I made XD

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: 2001 on 11/26/17 at 5:07 pm


Damn so my anicent ass is in with people who graduated High School in 1020? ;D ;D


1020 was a great time when people didn't look at their phones and obsess over social media all day. There was more face to face communication.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: ofkx on 11/26/17 at 5:13 pm


1020 was a great time when people didn't look at their phones and obsess over social media all day. There was more face to face communication.

1020 is recent though! I remember the good ole' days back in the A.D. 20's. Jesus was all the rage back then!  ;D

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: Rainbowz on 11/26/17 at 6:12 pm


1020 was a great time when people didn't look at their phones and obsess over social media all day. There was more face to face communication.

That's not true. People always kept on staring at their iStone's back then

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: 2001 on 11/26/17 at 6:30 pm


1020 is recent though! I remember the good ole' days back in the A.D. 20's. Jesus was all the rage back then!  ;D


You remember Jesus? I take it you're one of those wretched Baby Boomers...


That's not true. People always kept on staring at their iStone's back then


The iStone was very primitive though. You could hit it over people's heads but idk a giant iPhone probably hurts more.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: 80sfan on 11/26/17 at 8:10 pm


The Universe has been around for 13.8 billion years.


Some say 13.7 billion. Sorry, I'm obsessed with precision.  ;D

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: bchris02 on 11/27/17 at 11:32 pm


1020 was a great time when people didn't look at their phones and obsess over social media all day. There was more face to face communication.


I don't know.  There would have been war and plague back then.  Between the fall of Rome and the Renaissance, most people lived short, miserable lives.  It's an era I would not have wanted to live in.

Subject: Re: Are we still in Millennial culture?

Written By: mxcrashxm on 11/29/17 at 5:34 pm

The sarcasm in this thread is hilarious! ;D ;D ;D ;D


I do realize there is an Early, Core, and Late part of every generation, but I wasn't doing that, by "Core Millennials" I meant Millennials who can't possibly be Gen X or Gen Z.

I use cusps because I believe every generation has grey areas, transitional periods are unavoidable and generations are no exception to the rule.
And that's where it gets confusing and frustrating. It would actually be a better idea to put generations into 2 parts. It's working very well for the Boomer and Millennial cohorts.


I agree. I think 2017 will probably be seen as the first 100% Gen z culture year.
I think so unless it turns out to be much earlier.


I'm not so sure what defines 'Millennial culture' ???
Millennial culture is what defines and targets Millennials. It pretty much has ended and Gen Z has taken over.

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