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Subject: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: Todd Pettingzoo on 12/22/17 at 11:42 am

I believe in cusps, but roughly:

X: 1964-1976

Y or Millennials: 1977-1994

Z or iPhone: 1995-2012

How does yours go?

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: Longaotian00 on 12/22/17 at 12:55 pm


I believe in cusps, but roughly:

X: 1964-1976

Y or Millennials: 1977-1994

Z or iPhone: 1995-2012

How does yours go?


Imo, 1977 is too early for millenials.

Boomer: 1946-1964

Gen X: 1965-1981

Y/Millenials: 1982-2000

Z/Plurals: 2001-2019

Alpha: 2020-

However, this is just what I think.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: Zelek3 on 12/22/17 at 1:36 pm

I believe the Millennials term has been fist-f*cked so much by the media and jokes that nowadays, most people generally associate it with teens born in the late 90s/early 2000s nowadays with their dang fidget spinners, dabbing, water bottle flip, post-irony, etc. When people make jokes about Millennials or bitch about Millennials, it's usually teens they're joking about.

I think retconning Gen Z to be Millennials and making Gen Y just Gen Y would probably reduce confusion among a lot of people.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: Longaotian00 on 12/22/17 at 1:52 pm


I believe the Millennials term has been fist-f*cked so much by the media and jokes that nowadays, most people generally associate it with teens born in the late 90s/early 2000s nowadays with their dang fidget spinners, dabbing, water bottle flip, post-irony, etc. When people make jokes about Millennials or bitch about Millennials, it's usually teens they're joking about.

I think retconning Gen Z to be Millennials and making Gen Y just Gen Y would probably reduce confusion among a lot of people.


Yup, Bascially Millenial has just become another term for young people, and the people who actually are millenials (born in the 80s) often aren't considered part of their own generation lol :P

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: Tyrannosaurus Rex on 12/24/17 at 9:38 am


Yup, Bascially Millenial has just become another term for young people, and the people who actually are millenials (born in the 80s) often aren't considered part of their own generation lol :P


Or sources will basically grab anyone who belongs in the 18-34 demographic and lump them as being millennials.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: Zelek3 on 12/24/17 at 5:25 pm

Gen Z will surely have more of a distinct identity by the 2020 election.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: Tyrannosaurus Rex on 12/24/17 at 10:36 pm


Imo, 1977 is too early for millenials.

Boomer: 1946-1964

Gen X: 1965-1981

Y/Millenials: 1982-2000

Z/Plurals: 2001-2019

Alpha: 2020-

However, this is just what I think.


I probably wouldn't add Boomers there because anyone who is not born between 1946 and 1964 is strictly not a Boomer according to many sources.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: Rainbowz on 12/25/17 at 4:05 pm

Just my opinion, but I personally think "cusps" when it comes to generations makes it more confusing. The generations are not set in stone and probably won't be for an extremely long time. I'm honestly even inclined to say that generations don't exist.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: violet_shy on 12/26/17 at 5:37 pm

I was born in 1980 and I am too old to be a Millenial. By 2000 I was 20 years old and NOT in High School... College years do not count because one has already come of age. I think I am more of an X-er (those born 1965 to 1981).

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: Tyrannosaurus Rex on 12/26/17 at 8:59 pm


I was born in 1980 and I am too old to be a Millenial. By 2000 I was 20 years old and NOT in High School... College years do not count because one has already come of age. I think I am more of an X-er (those born 1965 to 1981).


You were already at school when the Challenger explosion took place, you were already in high school when both the OJ Simpson trial and the Oklahoma City Bombing happened, and you already graduated high school by the time the Columbine Shooting occurred.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: violet_shy on 12/27/17 at 1:49 pm


You were already at school when the Challenger explosion took place, you were already in high school when both the OJ Simpson trial and the Oklahoma City Bombing happened, and you already graduated high school by the time the Columbine Shooting occurred.


Right. But why does that make me a Millennial? None of those horrible events took place during the Millenium. And When the Millenium began I was already 20 years old.

I don't even know why I am discussing this, but I just can't help it! ;D

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: Tyrannosaurus Rex on 12/27/17 at 1:51 pm


Right. But why does that make me a Millennial? None of those horrible events took place during the Millenium. And When the Millenium began I was already 20 years old.

I don't even know why I am discussing this, but I just can't help it! ;D


The things that I described make you more Gen X if anything.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: Longaotian00 on 12/27/17 at 3:03 pm


Right. But why does that make me a Millennial? None of those horrible events took place during the Millenium. And When the Millenium began I was already 20 years old.

I don't even know why I am discussing this, but I just can't help it! ;D


Becasue it's clear that you really don't wanna be a Milleninal ;D

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: violet_shy on 12/27/17 at 3:07 pm


Becasue it's clear that you really don't wanna be a Milleninal ;D


Yes I do. My boyfriend is a Millennial and I kinda wanted us to match! Lol ;D

Sometimes he makes fun of me because I'm so old. In a light hearted way of course. I wish I were more around his age.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: nintieskid999 on 01/04/18 at 11:05 am

Millennials are 1982-2004.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: Todd Pettingzoo on 01/04/18 at 3:38 pm


Imo, 1977 is too early for millenials.

Boomer: 1946-1964

Gen X: 1965-1981

Y/Millenials: 1982-2000

Z/Plurals: 2001-2019

Alpha: 2020-

However, this is just what I think.


1982 as the start of Gen Y/Millennials feels too arbitrary. 1977 makes the most sense from the research I've done.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: Zelek3 on 01/05/18 at 9:59 am


1982 as the start of Gen Y/Millennials feels too arbitrary. 1977 makes the most sense from the research I've done.

Todd, you're the only guy born in 1982 who calls himself a Millennial in the current year. Most people use Millennials now in a slang-y fashion to refer to late 90s/early 2000s borns who do something stupid.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: mxcrashxm on 01/07/18 at 12:29 pm


I believe in cusps, but roughly:

X: 1964-1976

Y or Millennials: 1977-1994

Z or iPhone: 1995-2012

How does yours go?
I have a feeling these will be the spans in the end. 2000 IS still somewhat in use as the generational cutoff for Millennials, but it's not much compared to the 1994/95 ending.


Just my opinion, but I think "cusps" when it comes to generations makes it more confusing. The generations are not set in stone and probably won't be for an extremely long time. I'm honestly even inclined to say that generations don't exist.
I agree! They do because there are folks out there who don't agree being included in a generation especially the Millennial cohort due to them mainly discussing the changes in technology, and not everything else.


Most people use Millennials now in a slang fashion to refer to the late 90s/early 2000s borns who do something stupid.
And those people are stupid. I hope the Millennial use in that context declines soon. Oh, the main reason why there is an official title for the X/Y cusp right now is that the thirtysomethings honestly don't know whether they are Gen Xers or the Millennials due to some misinformation, and the fast-paced changes that have happened in these last two decades.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: Zelek3 on 01/07/18 at 12:56 pm


And those people are stupid. I hope the Millennial use in that context declines soon. Oh, the main reason why there is an official title for the X/Y cusp right now is that the thirtysomethings honestly don't know whether they are Gen Xers or the Millennials due to some misinformation, and the fast-paced changes that have happened in these last two decades.

It won't decline for a while because "Millennial" sounds funny/insulting to be applied to a young person, no matter what type of young person they are. They could be 40 or 12 but if you're young and you're annoying someone, you get called a Millennial, that's just the way it is.

Maybe it'll decline by the 2020 election because that's when the media will probably start covering and/or bitching about Gen Z on a larger scale and perhaps find a catchy demonym for them (there's a bunch already, like Plurals or Homelanders, but it's not settled on). This would be the first election they will have a big impact on because many of them will be legible to vote.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: mxcrashxm on 01/07/18 at 2:08 pm


It won't decline for a while because "Millennial" sounds funny/insulting to be applied to a young person, no matter what type of young person they are. They could be 40 or 12, but if you're young and you're annoying someone, you get called a Millennial, that's just the way it is.

Maybe it'll decline by the 2020 election because that's when the media will probably start covering and bitching about Gen Z on a larger scale and perhaps find a catchy demonym for them (there's a bunch already, like Plurals or Homelanders, but it's not settled on). This election would be the first they will have a significant impact on because many of them will be legible to vote.
Just wait until they're going to be embarrassed in the future when all those young people are Gen Z and Alphas, and with the actual generation, somewhat being middle aged. It's going to be hilarious!

I think so too. I understand there were already some Zers who were eligible to vote, but they were a minority. Yeah, 2020 will be the one where they will demonstrate their potential. Hell, I'll even say that these midterms coming in November Gen Z will play a part in them as well.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: ZeldaFan20 on 01/07/18 at 2:41 pm


Just wait until they're going to be embarrassed in the future when all those young people are Gen Z and Alphas, and with the actual generation, somewhat being middle aged. It's going to be hilarious!

I think so too. I understand there were already some Zers who were eligible to vote, but they were a minority. Yeah, 2020 will be the one where they will demonstrate their potential. Hell, I'll even say that these midterms coming in November Gen Z will play a part in them as well.


Speaking about Gen Z's political potential, it seems many are already eagerly anticipating in engaging in the political process. I saw this interview the other day with Black-ish actress Yara Shahidi about her own starred show Grown-ish.

zT7Nd85ZOAA

The new series, which is set to debut this month, will focus on her character's journey through her first year at college. The show seems to be pretty culturally and politically conscious dealing with issues that are core to college students today. The interview was also significant because it discussed about Yara's acceptance to Harvard University and her ambitions on getting engaged in politics. Btw, she's 17, so I'm assuming she was born in 2000ish.

I've also read many articles suggesting that Gen Z is expected to be much more politically engaged than Millennials, this interview (along with anecdotes with people I know in the generation) seems to be the case. On the flip side though, Gen Z seems to be a lot more extremist in their views. Right leaning Zers are heavily into the Alt-Right Movement, or at the very least are pretty damned Red-Pilled. Left leaning Zers are your typical SJWs (although arguably to a new extreme) and or may subscribe to the Antifa movement.

Yara's views seem to be close to mine, Left Leaning Libertarian, which is what I'd argue is the new American political center and what most Millennials political views would probably align to. But the younger generation's view on leftism seems to be more on the authoritarian side of things. Same could be said with right leaning Millennials vs. Gen Zers, with right leaning Millennials being typically more in the Right-Libertarian or traditional Conservative camp (Christian-Right, Moderate, etc.). However the Zers, as mentioned, are MUCH more extreme with their right leaning views, obviously not all Alt-Right (that'd be scary to say the least :(), but they are much more hardline on issues like immigration and globalism than people my age.

I'm wondering if other people could attest to what I'm saying.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: Zelek3 on 01/07/18 at 2:46 pm

The sources that people cite for Gen Z being conservative actually usually say they're fiscally conservative and socially liberal, but the "fiscally" part is usually left out of the link's title to deliberately push an agenda.

If these past 3 years have taught me anything it's that if conservatives say something over and over again through memes, their wish is often granted. So if they keep saying "Gen Z is conservative" over and over I honestly think Gen Z might end up swinging more conservative socially.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: ZeldaFan20 on 01/07/18 at 2:53 pm


The sources that people cite for Gen Z being conservative actually usually say they're fiscally conservative and socially liberal, but the "fiscally" part is usually left out to deliberately push an agenda.

If these past 3 years have taught me anything it's that if meme-savvy conservatives say something over and over again through memes, their wish is often granted. So if they keep saying "Gen Z is conservative" over and over I honestly think Gen Z might end up swinging more conservative socially.


Good points. Whats strangely ironic about it is that, if you use the Chinese Zodiac in relation to generations (meaning BB were born 1946-1964, X 1965-1981, Y 1982-2000, Z 2001-2017), that means in the year 2018 we would be in the equivalent to where the BB/Xers were in 1982. Baby Boomers at large we more liberal, and Xers at large were more conservative. However, the younger Baby Boomers and Older Xers were the most conservative, aka Generation Jones. Basically those born from 1959-1966, as they were the first time voters of the 1980 & 1984 elections and all voted decidedly for Reagan.

I see a similar political essence for people in our mini generation, aka Late Millennials/Early Zers, so those born from 1995-2002. Even though most 18-34 year olds (the epitome of the Millennial generation) voted for Clinton over Trump, the first time voters (aka b. 1995-98'), while voted for Clinton, were more receptive to Trump than older Millennials. If trends continue, I predict the 99'-02' cohort to continue down that path.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: mxcrashxm on 01/07/18 at 3:21 pm


Speaking about Gen Z's political potential, it seems many are already eagerly anticipating in engaging in the political process. I saw this interview the other day with Black-ish actress Yara Shahidi about her starred show Grown-ish.

zT7Nd85ZOAA

The new series, which is set to debut this month, will focus on her character's journey through her first year at college. The show seems to be pretty culturally and politically conscious dealing with issues that are core to college students today. The interview was also significant because it discussed Yara's acceptance to Harvard University and her ambitions on getting engaged in politics. Btw, she's 17, so I'm assuming she was born in 2000ish.

I've also read many articles suggesting that Gen Z is expected to engage much more than Millennials politically, this interview (along with anecdotes with people I know in the generation) seems to be the case. On the flip side though, Gen Z appears to be a lot more extremist in their views. Right-leaning Zers are heavily into the Alt-Right Movement, or at the very least are damned Red-Pilled. Left-leaning Zers are your typical SJWs (although arguably to a new extreme) and or may subscribe to the Antifa movement.

Yara's views seem to be close to mine, Left-Leaning Libertarian, which is what I'd argue is the new American political center and what most Millennials political views would probably align. But the younger generation's perspective on leftism seems to be more on the authoritarian side of things. Folks could say the same with right-leaning Millennials vs. Gen Zers, with right-leaning Millennials being typically more in the Right-Libertarian or traditional Conservative camp (Christian-Right, Moderate, etc.). However, the Zers, as mentioned, are MUCH more extreme with their right-leaning views, obviously not all Alt-Right (that'd be scary, to say the least :(), but they are much more hardline on issues like immigration and globalism than people my age.

I'm wondering if other people could attest to what I'm saying.
Damn! That's an excellent analysis of the political spectrum. I try to keep up that stuff, but you did it better than I could ever have. I agree with everything. Millennials are more left-libertarian than what the media assumes them as. As for Gen Z, it seems they are all over the place so far. 2020 is sure going to be one hell of an election.

As for your views and hers, I'm in the same bracket as well although in other places we would be considered a classic liberal where have visions of both the left and the right.


The sources that people cite for Gen Z being conservative usually say they're fiscally conservative and socially liberal, but the "fiscally" part is usually left out of the link's title to push an agenda deliberately.

If these past three years have taught me anything, it's that if conservatives say something over and over again through memes, their leaders often grant their wishes. So if they keep saying "Gen Z is conservative" over and over I honestly think Gen Z might end up swinging more conservative socially.
Agreed they do! Just because they considered moderate doesn't mean they are automatically the social description. They could honestly be the fiscally one and still fight for LGBT rights, feminism, racism, etc.


Good points. Whats strangely ironic about it is that, if you use the Chinese Zodiac concerning generations (meaning BB were born 1946-1964, X 1965-1981, Y 1982-2000, Z 2001-2017), that means in the year 2018 we would be in the equivalent to where the BB/Xers were in 1982. Baby Boomers at large we more liberal, and Xers at large were more conservative. However, the younger Baby Boomers and Older Xers were the most conservative, aka Generation Jones. Those born from 1959-1966, as they were the first time voters of the 1980 & 1984 elections and all voted decidedly for Reagan.

I see a similar political essence for people in our mini-generation, aka Late Millennials/Early Zers, so those born from 1995-2002. Even though most 18-34-year-olds (the epitome of the Millennial generation) voted for Clinton over Trump, the first time voters (aka b. 1995-98'), while voted for Clinton, were more receptive to Trump than older Millennials. If trends continue, I predict the 99'-02' cohort to continue down that path.
Was the equivalent the same in 2000 when the younger Xers and Older Millennials were at that age?

Interesting you say that the first-time voters of 2016 were more receptive to Trump. Where does leave those who were the 2012 first-time voters in the 2016 election?

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: Zelek3 on 01/07/18 at 3:25 pm


1982 as the start of Gen Y/Millennials feels too arbitrary. 1977 makes the most sense from the research I've done.

Eh, Strauss and Howe supposedly also did a lot of research and surveys before picking 1982 (HS class of 2000) as the break from Gen X to Millennials. It's been said that generally, the class of 1999 (born 1981) was still "rough and tough" like Gen X but the class of 2000 (born 1982) represented an attitudinal shift to Millennials with kindness and a "can do" attitude. That definitely doesn't speak for everyone in those classes though, but it's what was found generally through surveys.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: nintieskid999 on 01/07/18 at 4:03 pm


Eh, Strauss and Howe supposedly also did a lot of research and surveys before picking 1982 (HS class of 2000) as the break from Gen X to Millennials. It's been said that generally, the class of 1999 (born 1981) was still "rough and tough" like Gen X but the class of 2000 (born 1982) represented an attitudinal shift to Millennials with kindness and a "can do" attitude. That definitely doesn't speak for everyone in those classes though, but it's what was found generally through surveys.


Strauss and Howe ends Millennials in 2004 and so does the US Government.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: nintieskid999 on 01/07/18 at 4:04 pm


Good points. Whats strangely ironic about it is that, if you use the Chinese Zodiac in relation to generations (meaning BB were born 1946-1964, X 1965-1981, Y 1982-2000, Z 2001-2017), that means in the year 2018 we would be in the equivalent to where the BB/Xers were in 1982. Baby Boomers at large we more liberal, and Xers at large were more conservative. However, the younger Baby Boomers and Older Xers were the most conservative, aka Generation Jones. Basically those born from 1959-1966, as they were the first time voters of the 1980 & 1984 elections and all voted decidedly for Reagan.

I see a similar political essence for people in our mini generation, aka Late Millennials/Early Zers, so those born from 1995-2002. Even though most 18-34 year olds (the epitome of the Millennial generation) voted for Clinton over Trump, the first time voters (aka b. 1995-98'), while voted for Clinton, were more receptive to Trump than older Millennials. If trends continue, I predict the 99'-02' cohort to continue down that path.


But SJWs are around in all of the Millennial Generation. Zoe Quinn and Anita Sarkeesian are early Millennial and SJW.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: ZeldaFan20 on 01/07/18 at 5:43 pm


Damn! That's an excellent analysis of the political spectrum. I try to keep up that stuff, but you did it better than I could ever have. I agree with everything. Millennials are more left-libertarian than what the media assumes them as. As for Gen Z, it seems they are all over the place so far. 2020 is sure going to be one hell of an election.

As for your views and hers, I'm in the same bracket as well although in other places we would be considered a classic liberal where have visions of both the left and the right.
Agreed they do! Just because they considered moderate doesn't mean they are automatically the social description. They could honestly be the fiscally one and still fight for LGBT rights, feminism, racism, etc.
Was the equivalent the same in 2000 when the younger Xers and Older Millennials were at that age?

Interesting you say that the first-time voters of 2016 were more receptive to Trump. Where does leave those who were the 2012 first-time voters in the 2016 election?


Yeah we're politically very similar. Classical Liberal would actually be Right-Leaning Libertarian, since they are more right leaning economically. Overall though, both sides are part of the same Libertarian cone, both are anti-interventionist, skeptical of authority, ending War on Drugs, etc.

The 2000 election is a good example too. In fact theres arguably more comparisons with the 2016 election and the 2000 election, rather than the 1980 election. One, as you mentioned, was that the first time voters in 2000 were the Late Xer's/Early Yers, 2016 (depending on definition) were the peak of the cusp between the Y/Z generations.

2000 & 2016 were also VERY contested generations. Riddled with scandals and controversies, both elections led to a Republican winning the presidency over the electoral college, but without winning the popular vote.



Eh, Strauss and Howe supposedly also did a lot of research and surveys before picking 1982 (HS class of 2000) as the break from Gen X to Millennials. It's been said that generally, the class of 1999 (born 1981) was still "rough and tough" like Gen X but the class of 2000 (born 1982) represented an attitudinal shift to Millennials with kindness and a "can do" attitude. That definitely doesn't speak for everyone in those classes though, but it's what was found generally through surveys.


I agree. 1981ers, while Y in many aspects, had a lot of X traits to them as well. Personally I'd say the lean slightly, just because they were in high school from 1995-1999, peak of their youth being the 1997-1998 school year which was arguably the first school year to lean Y cultured. However, for simplicity sake, I'm willing to end X with the Class of 99'.



But SJWs are around in all of the Millennial Generation. Zoe Quinn and Anita Sarkeesian are early Millennial and SJW.


But they aren't representative to the generation as a whole. Even then, most SJWs (at least from my experience) are typically my age or WAY younger.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 01/07/18 at 5:59 pm


Millennials are 1982-2004.


I agree.

Early Millennials: 1982-1986
Late Millennials: 1987-2000

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: ZeldaFan20 on 01/07/18 at 6:04 pm


I agree.

Early Millennials: 1982-1986
Late Millennials: 1987-2004


2004 ???

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: nintieskid999 on 01/07/18 at 6:11 pm



But they aren't representative to the generation as a whole. Even then, most SJWs (at least from my experience) are typically my age or WAY younger.


But they are. Many of the early Millennial SJWs were around in the Occupy movement and protests and it ended up causing some rifts. Many radical bloggers on Tumblr are also born in the 80s. Also Millennials go up to 2004. I think SJW will end up becoming both a Millennial and early Generation Z thing.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: mxcrashxm on 01/07/18 at 6:23 pm


Yeah, we're politically very similar. However, since Classical Liberal is more right-leaning economically, they are Right-Leaning Libertarian. Overall, both sides are part of the same Libertarian cone, both are anti-interventionist, skeptical of authority, ending War on Drugs, etc.

The 2000 election is a good example too. In fact, there's arguably more comparisons with the 2016 election and the 2000 election, rather than the 1980 election. One, as you mentioned, was that the first time voters in 2000 were the Late Xer's/Early Millennials, 2016 (depending on definition) were the peaks of the cusp between the Y/Z generations.

2000 & 2016 were also VERY contested generations. Both elections had a handful of scandals and controversies, which led to a Republican winning the presidency over the electoral college but without winning the popular vote.

But they aren't representative of the generation as a whole. Even then, most SJWs (at least from my experience) are typically my age or WAY younger.
Oh, so I was a little off. Thanks for clarifying that. At least I know now where at I'm at politically.

Agreed they were and that they have left an impact that we're feeling the effects of today.

I agree with the SJWs. There were assumptions that Millennials were the SJW generation, but that had turned to be false especially since most were out of college long before the movement came to mind.

Oh, and you haven't answered my question yet. You mentioned that the first-time voters of 2016 were more receptive to Trump. So Where did that leave those who were the 2012 first-time voters in the 2016 election?


2004 ???
Don't listen to him. He's just trying to troll people.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: Zelek3 on 01/07/18 at 6:54 pm


Yeah we're politically very similar. Classical Liberal would actually be Right-Leaning Libertarian, since they are more right leaning economically. Overall though, both sides are part of the same Libertarian cone, both are anti-interventionist, skeptical of authority, ending War on Drugs, etc.

The 2000 election is a good example too. In fact theres arguably more comparisons with the 2016 election and the 2000 election, rather than the 1980 election. One, as you mentioned, was that the first time voters in 2000 were the Late Xer's/Early Yers, 2016 (depending on definition) were the peak of the cusp between the Y/Z generations.

2000 & 2016 were also VERY contested generations. Riddled with scandals and controversies, both elections led to a Republican winning the presidency over the electoral college, but without winning the popular vote.


I agree. 1981ers, while Y in many aspects, had a lot of X traits to them as well. Personally I'd say the lean slightly, just because they were in high school from 1995-1999, peak of their youth being the 1997-1998 school year which was arguably the first school year to lean Y cultured. However, for simplicity sake, I'm willing to end X with the Class of 99'.

Zelda, would you say this viral chart is an accurate representation of Y vs Z childhood, or are there things wrong with it?

https://i.redd.it/r6794hpmvlyz.jpg

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: Tyrannosaurus Rex on 01/07/18 at 7:35 pm


Speaking about Gen Z's political potential, it seems many are already eagerly anticipating in engaging in the political process. I saw this interview the other day with Black-ish actress Yara Shahidi about her own starred show Grown-ish.

zT7Nd85ZOAA

The new series, which is set to debut this month, will focus on her character's journey through her first year at college. The show seems to be pretty culturally and politically conscious dealing with issues that are core to college students today. The interview was also significant because it discussed about Yara's acceptance to Harvard University and her ambitions on getting engaged in politics. Btw, she's 17, so I'm assuming she was born in 2000ish.

I've also read many articles suggesting that Gen Z is expected to be much more politically engaged than Millennials, this interview (along with anecdotes with people I know in the generation) seems to be the case. On the flip side though, Gen Z seems to be a lot more extremist in their views. Right leaning Zers are heavily into the Alt-Right Movement, or at the very least are pretty damned Red-Pilled. Left leaning Zers are your typical SJWs (although arguably to a new extreme) and or may subscribe to the Antifa movement.

Yara's views seem to be close to mine, Left Leaning Libertarian, which is what I'd argue is the new American political center and what most Millennials political views would probably align to. But the younger generation's view on leftism seems to be more on the authoritarian side of things. Same could be said with right leaning Millennials vs. Gen Zers, with right leaning Millennials being typically more in the Right-Libertarian or traditional Conservative camp (Christian-Right, Moderate, etc.). However the Zers, as mentioned, are MUCH more extreme with their right leaning views, obviously not all Alt-Right (that'd be scary to say the least :(), but they are much more hardline on issues like immigration and globalism than people my age.

I'm wondering if other people could attest to what I'm saying.


I am nervous if that will be the norm.

Both the Alt-right and SJWs are very dangerous.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: TheEarly90sFan on 01/07/18 at 7:37 pm


2004 ???


I changed it to 2000.


He's just trying to troll people.


And you know this how, exactly?  ???

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: nintieskid999 on 01/07/18 at 7:43 pm


Oh, so I was a little off. Thanks for clarifying that. At least I know now where at I'm at politically.

Agreed they were and that they have left an impact that we're feeling the effects of today.

I agree with the SJWs. There were assumptions that Millennials were the SJW generation, but that had turned to be false especially since most were out of college long before the movement came to mind.

Oh, and you haven't answered my question yet. You mentioned that the first-time voters of 2016 were more receptive to Trump. So Where did that leave those who were the 2012 first-time voters in the 2016 election?
Don't listen to him. He's just trying to troll people.


Strauss and Howe are generational experts. As Millennials go up to 2004, the last Millennials will be graduating 4 year college around 2022 or 2023.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: Tyrannosaurus Rex on 01/07/18 at 7:48 pm


Strauss and Howe are generational experts. As Millennials go up to 2004, the last Millennials will be graduating 4 year college around 2022 or 2023.


You mean high school?

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: mxcrashxm on 01/07/18 at 7:55 pm


I am nervous if that will be the norm.

Both the Alt-right and SJWs are very dangerous.
I agree with that although the former would be more dangerous that's for sure. The SJWs are just doing what's right for the world, but they are alienating themselves.


I was serious.
That span is still incorrect.


Strauss and Howe are generational experts. As Millennials go up to 2004, the last Millennials will be graduating 4-year college around 2022 or 2023.
They are and always will be, but how long ago did they determine the span of Millennials being 1982-2004? That range in truth has been in use for a while, and one of them passed away a decade ago. A lot has changed since then, so there's no way it can still be 2004 let alone possibly 2000.


You mean high school?
Whoa! I didn't even catch her error. Yeah, a 2004 person would not graduate from a 4-year college until 2026 or 2027 at the latest and that's about another decade from now.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: nintieskid999 on 01/07/18 at 8:15 pm

They are and always will be, but how long ago did they determine the span of Millennials being 1982-2004? That range in truth has been in use for a while, and one of them passed away a decade ago. A lot has changed since then, so there's no way it can still be 2004 let alone possibly 2000.

This range is still being used and the White House agrees. 2008 influenced a lot more than 2001. The crisis will end around 2028 and people born in 2004 will fight in the crisis war.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: mxcrashxm on 01/07/18 at 8:19 pm


This range is still in use, and the White House agrees. 2008 influenced a lot more than 2001. The crisis will end around 2028 and people born in 2004 will fight in the crisis war.
I agree that 2008 was significant, but so was 2001, Oh, and aren't we already in a crisis where our freedom is being threatened, and WW3 is possible?

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: nintieskid999 on 01/07/18 at 8:28 pm


I agree that 2008 was significant, but so was 2001, Oh, and aren't we already in a crisis where our freedom is being threatened, and WW3 is possible?


This crisis era has been since 2008. 2001 was not significant for younger Millennials. Everything resumed as normal for them. They see the early 2000s as an idyllic time. 2008 however shook them up and influenced their lives.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: nintieskid999 on 01/07/18 at 8:30 pm


I agree that 2008 was significant, but so was 2001, Oh, and aren't we already in a crisis where our freedom is being threatened, and WW3 is possible?


Also according to Strauss and Howe, if this crisis ends up playing out like the Civil War and people are demoralized after the whole crisis with either no victory or the victory with lots of loss, the Millennials will transform into a generation similar to the Silent Generation or at least partially like them.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: Longaotian00 on 01/07/18 at 8:52 pm


Zelda, would you say this viral chart is an accurate representation of Y vs Z childhood, or are there things wrong with it?

https://i.redd.it/r6794hpmvlyz.jpg


I wouldn't, why do they use teenagers for Y and then Z is just a bunch of little kids on phones

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: mxcrashxm on 01/07/18 at 8:59 pm


This crisis era has been since 2008. 2001 was not significant for younger Millennials. Everything resumed as normal for them. They see the early 2000s as an idyllic time. 2008 however shook them up and influenced their lives.
So, the crisis era will be 20 years by the time it ends in 2028?

If 2004 is the cutoff, then there's no way that the younger half could have been affected by the Great recession or any of the other events.


Also according to Strauss and Howe, if this crisis ends up playing out like the Civil War and people are demoralized after the whole crisis with either no victory or the victory with lots of loss, the Millennials will transform into a generation similar to the Silent Generation or at least partially like them.
I think you mean the greatest generation who fought in WW2. I agree though because in fact, there are similarities between the Millennials and the WW2 cohort.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: nintieskid999 on 01/07/18 at 10:39 pm


So, the crisis era will be 20 years by the time it ends in 2028?

If 2004 is the cutoff, then there's no way that the younger half could have been affected by the Great recession or any of the other events.
I think you mean the greatest generation who fought in WW2. I agree though because in fact, there are similarities between the Millennials and the WW2 cohort.


No I don't. If the crisis is successful they will become like the GI Generation. If it's not and they're demoralized at the end they will become more like the Silent Generation. This is what happened after people felt demoralized during the Civil War. This is what I meant. By that logic though someone born in 1924 couldn't be a part of the GI Generation. Someone born in 1924 was only 5 when the economy crashed in 1929.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: yelimsexa on 01/08/18 at 7:35 am


Zelda, would you say this viral chart is an accurate representation of Y vs Z childhood, or are there things wrong with it?

https://i.redd.it/r6794hpmvlyz.jpg

Note that this culture is generally for pre-teen audiences, and thus the target range is generally for 3 to 12 year olds. Adolescent trends like Saturday Night Fever, Footloose, hair metal, and grunge aren't included. I was 11 when the "Early Millennial culture" range ended, but 21 (senior year in college) when the "Late Millennial culture" period ended, despite being an early member of the generation.


If you expanded that, this is how I'd see Gen X from experiences and friends:

Early Generation X childhood culture (Sometimes known as late Generation Jones for the earlier end or Boomer/X cuspers):

Popularity: 1971-1977

Primary audience: Born Early/mid-late '60s

-Pong consoles, but board games dominate
-The Brady Bunch
-Scooby-Doo
-Josie and the Pussycats
-Golden age of Mr. Rogers Neighborhood (the rest up through late Millennials would enjoy the silver/bronze age until its end in 2001)
-The Electric Company
-Pet Rock
-The Jackson 5
-The Osmonds
-The Partridge Family
-Disaster movie geeks (Airport, Earthquake, etc.)
-Jaws
-Rocky
-Schoolhouse Rock
-Winnie The Pooh
-Wooly Willy
-Not Ready For Primetime Players-era SNL
-Redline era Hot Wheels
-Spends more time playing outdoors than in each successive sub-generation
-Typical room would have shag carpet, strange wallpaper designs, and lots of wicker/wood furniture, and if there's a TV, it's often black & white unless if a wealthier family

Transitional or shared between Early and Core X:
-Star Wars (A New Hope)
-Zoom
-Golden Age (pre-Mr. Hooper's Death) Sesame Street

Core Gen X culture

Popularity: 1978-1984

Primary audience: Born Very late '60s-mid '70s

-Atari 2600, Intellivision, Colecovision
-Early Tiger-style electronic handheld games
-Stickers
-New wave bands
-Primary Star Wars toyaholics
-The Smurfs
-Superfriends
-Video arcades
-Pac-Man
-Pinwheel
-Heathcliff
-The Muppet Show
-The Fox and the Hound
-Dungeons and Dragons
-SCTV
-Roller skating at the rink
-Sony Walkman
-Speak 'n Spell/Math
-Silver Age horror flicks/franchises (Halloween, Friday The 13th, etc.)
-Three's Company
-Due to this being the heart of Disney's dark age, a lot of Walt-era nostalgia
-Typical room style dominated by hardwood with a TV with dials that's less woody than their early Gen X predecessors

Transition between Core and late Gen X:
-Commodore 64
-Garfield
-The Smurfs
-Madonna wannabes
-3-2-1- Contact

Late Gen X culture

Popularity: 1984-1990

Primary audience: Born mid-late '70s/very early '80s

-Nintendo Entertainment System, Atari 7800, or Sega Master System gaming consoles
-The Cosby Show
-Ghostbusters
-Transformers
-Gobots
-Masters of the Universe
-Rainbow Brite
-G1 My Little Pony
-Cabbage Patch Kids
-Care Bears
-Double Dare
-Teddy Ruxpin
-Inspector Gadget
-Swatches
-Hulk Hogan/classic era WWF
-You Can't Do That On Television
-New Kids On The Block
-The Great Mouse Detective
-Claymation animation
-Feivel: An American Tail
-Who Framed Roger Rabbit?
-Disney's Gummi Bears
-Reading Rainbow
-Silver Age Sesame Street, with Snuffie speaking and Elmo a recurring character
-Alfie and Alfie-II talking robot by Playskool
-Bedroom is designed with pastel carpets, wall coverings, and artificial plants

Transitional between late X and early Millennial:

-Game Boy
-The Land Before Time series
-The Little Mermaid
-Full House
-Roseanne
-My Buddy
-Muppet Babies
-Square One TV
-Sony Discman
-Snap Bracelet
-The Oregon Trail

Of course, these lists are estimates and keep in mind that many of these cross with multiple generations. Although the NES was my first console (system as I liked to call it due to the "S" in NES), I've retroactively purchased an Atari 2600, played one at a friend's house as a kid, and continued to play consoles until early in the Gamecube era, around the time that I became too bust with other things in life.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: ZeldaFan20 on 01/08/18 at 8:27 am


Zelda, would you say this viral chart is an accurate representation of Y vs Z childhood, or are there things wrong with it?

https://i.redd.it/r6794hpmvlyz.jpg


I'd say its pretty accurate. In your opinion which group would you identify with? For me it would be group 3 easily, but I do relate with group 2 heavily in relation to my early childhood. Despite me being in my late childhood during group 4 though, minus game consoles like the Wii, I really don't have much nostalgia for this era.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: Zelek3 on 01/08/18 at 8:40 am


I'd say its pretty accurate. In your opinion which group would you identify with? For me it would be group 3 easily, but I do relate with group 2 heavily in relation to my early childhood. Despite me being in my late childhood during group 4 though, minus game consoles like the Wii, I really don't have much nostalgia for this era.

3rd one definitely. It was a nice time.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: Tyrannosaurus Rex on 01/08/18 at 8:47 am


3rd one definitely. It was a nice time.


I don't know if I should say this, but as a 1999 born, I also identify with mostly the 3rd one. There are also elements from the second (PS1, Crash Bandicoot, Spyro) and the fourth (Wii, Diary of a Wimpy Kid, Silly Bands) that I identify with as well.

I also played with pogs (seen in the 1st one) as a kid.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: nintieskid999 on 01/08/18 at 1:22 pm

People say people born in 2004 aren't Millennials but by that logic people born in 1924 aren't a part of the GI Generation. They were only 5 when the Great Depression started.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: mxcrashxm on 01/08/18 at 1:40 pm


No, it won't. If the crisis is successful, they will become like the GI Generation. If it's not and they're demoralized at the end, they will become more like the Silent Generation. This aspect is what happened after people felt demoralized during the Civil War. By that logic, though someone born in 1924 couldn't be a part of the GI Generation. Someone born in 1924 was only 5 when the economy crashed in 1929.
But that depends on a continuing war. What if that doesn't happen? That's one thing we're trying to avoid.

Well, there's a lot more than just an economic crisis. There's politics, pop culture, the general atmosphere etc.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: mqg96 on 01/19/18 at 10:11 am

I agree, throughout my months I've been off this site. Watching the daily news, ESPN, TV shows on Netflix, etc. These generational terms after the Boomers are starting to get out of hand now. So many average people use the word "Millennial" to the point where they're not even talking about those born in the 80's anymore. They'll use "Millennial" like they're including 2000's borns in there as well. I'm come to conclusion that this is a better definition to classify generations based off how the WORLD is using it lately. Now I vowed that I would no longer be involved in these discussions, but after watching some TV lately and hearing people using these terms so wrongly, I have to bring up my new opinion on this.

Early Boomers (core group): 1945-1954

Late Boomers or Generation Jones: 1955-1964

Generation X: 1965-1979

Generation Y: 1980-1989

Millennials: 1990-1999

Generation Z: 2000-2009

I've come to conclusion. Make Generation Y separate from "Millennials", because it's confusing everybody. Make Generation Y a halfway point between Generation X and Millennials, that way it'll make the early 80's feel better for those who get offended by the term "millennial" but at the same time they still aren't Generation X.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: 80sfan on 01/19/18 at 10:47 am

For me, the Millennials are 1982 to 2000.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: nintieskid999 on 01/19/18 at 11:08 am


For me, the Millennials are 1982 to 2000.


For me they are 1982-2004 with the 1982-1988 cohorts being the equivalent of the old Interbellum Generation.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: 80sfan on 01/19/18 at 12:18 pm


For me they are 1982-2004 with the 1982-1988 cohorts being the equivalent of the old Interbellum Generation.


Whoa. I need to keep up with what you know now!  :D  :D  :D

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: ZeldaFan20 on 01/19/18 at 1:17 pm


I agree, throughout my months I've been off this site. Watching the daily news, ESPN, TV shows on Netflix, etc. These generational terms after the Boomers are starting to get out of hand now. So many average people use the word "Millennial" to the point where they're not even talking about those born in the 80's anymore. They'll use "Millennial" like they're including 2000's borns in there as well. I'm come to conclusion that this is a better definition to classify generations based off how the WORLD is using it lately. Now I vowed that I would no longer be involved in these discussions, but after watching some TV lately and hearing people using these terms so wrongly, I have to bring up my new opinion on this.

Early Boomers (core group): 1945-1954

Late Boomers or Generation Jones: 1955-1964

Generation X: 1965-1979

Generation Y: 1980-1989

Millennials: 1990-1999

Generation Z: 2000-2009

I've come to conclusion. Make Generation Y separate from "Millennials", because it's confusing everybody. Make Generation Y a halfway point between Generation X and Millennials, that way it'll make the early 80's feel better for those who get offended by the term "millennial" but at the same time they still aren't Generation X.


I agree, this is a good compromise. Btw, in the few months you have left the 'generationology' obsession has (thankfully) died down. However, there has been a recent resurgence in 'decadeology' though ;D.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: mqg96 on 01/19/18 at 2:49 pm


I agree, this is a good compromise. Btw, in the few months you have left the 'generationology' obsession has (thankfully) died down. However, there has been a recent resurgence in 'decadeology' though ;D.


I broke up Baby Boomers into Early Boomers and Late Boomers/Generation Jones as you can see, and I broke up Generation Y/Millennials into 2 separate sub-generations, because it seems like everywhere you go people get offended when you call them a "millennial", but when you call them Generation Y they don't get offended at all. It's pretty obvious in society lately that over half of the total population believes that Generation Y and Millennial are separate terms when that's not true, it's always been the same thing. But your average daily people will never view it that way. There's even people who believe Millennials are the same thing as Generation Z! The confusion! That's why I believe Generation Y should be all 80's born's and Millennials should be all 90's born's. Make the 2 groups separate but still kinda in one whole generation, just like how Baby Boomers should be broken up into Early Boomers and Generation Jones. Generation X and Generation Z remain the same, but I would extend Generation Z to 2014 as of now.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: TwilightPrince16 on 01/24/18 at 9:57 pm

I think the term "Millennial" in 2018 necessarily belongs to a birth range, it just a word for "young adults".

While people born in 1995 might be Generation Z, however they are still viewed as "Millennials" in 2018. A young adult is ages 18-35, in 2018, that's 1983-2000. In five years, I wouldn't be surprised if people described an 18 year old in 2023 (born in 2005) as a Millennial, unless Gen Z gets a better name by then. Generations overall should be 20 years.

Generation X:
1961-1981 (Range can be extended a few years both ways.)

Millennials:
1981-2001 (Range can be extended a few years both ways.)

These are liberal ranges. Gen X is also mixed in with Late Boomers/Gen Jones and Xennials. Millennials are mixed with Xennials and Generation Z. The next range will be roughly 2001-2021.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: Zelek3 on 01/24/18 at 10:44 pm


I think the term "Millennial" in 2018 necessarily belongs to a birth range, it just a word for "young adults".

While people born in 1995 might be Generation Z, however they are still viewed as "Millennials" in 2018. A young adult is ages 18-35, in 2018, that's 1983-2000. In five years, I wouldn't be surprised if people described an 18 year old in 2023 (born in 2005) as a Millennial, unless Gen Z gets a better name by then. Generations overall should be 20 years.

We'll see. The media might start covering/bitching about Gen Z as a distinct entity in greater detail as the 2020 election approaches, allowing them to separate better from Millennials.

I see more articles and posts recently on sites about how Gen Z is different/distinct from Millennials, as well as more people IRL talking about Gen Z, so I think they're gaining their own identity slowly.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: TwilightPrince16 on 01/24/18 at 10:46 pm


We'll see. The media might start covering/bitching about Gen Z as a distinct entity in greater detail as the 2020 election approaches, allowing them to separate better from Millennials.

Good point! I'm pretty sure early Millennials were viewed as GenXers at one point, then they split off into their own generation.

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: SeaCaptainMan97 on 02/20/18 at 10:28 pm


I agree, throughout my months I've been off this site. Watching the daily news, ESPN, TV shows on Netflix, etc. These generational terms after the Boomers are starting to get out of hand now. So many average people use the word "Millennial" to the point where they're not even talking about those born in the 80's anymore. They'll use "Millennial" like they're including 2000's borns in there as well. I'm come to conclusion that this is a better definition to classify generations based off how the WORLD is using it lately. Now I vowed that I would no longer be involved in these discussions, but after watching some TV lately and hearing people using these terms so wrongly, I have to bring up my new opinion on this.

Early Boomers (core group): 1945-1954

Late Boomers or Generation Jones: 1955-1964

Generation X: 1965-1979

Generation Y: 1980-1989

Millennials: 1990-1999

Generation Z: 2000-2009

I've come to conclusion. Make Generation Y separate from "Millennials", because it's confusing everybody. Make Generation Y a halfway point between Generation X and Millennials, that way it'll make the early 80's feel better for those who get offended by the term "millennial" but at the same time they still aren't Generation X.



Good breakdown.
Personally for me, I believe that generations should be a lineal thing. I made a thread about this a while ago, but was unfortunately shut down because people made a wrong assumption and thought I was just creating another generation debate thread.

Basically, generation spans go in a cycle of 9 years.
By lineal, I mean that those in a certain generation are most likely to be parented by someone from three generations before their own, as they'd be 19-35 years older than them, and probably around 95-99% of all childbirths in the First World are to 19-35 year old parents. Albeit, many in a certain generation are also likely to have parents from only two generations before their own if they were younger parents, or four generations before their own if they were older parents, but generally speaking, the majority would have parents from three generations before their own.

1991-1999 = Millennials
Children of the Reagan Generation (1964-1972)
Grandchildren of the Civil Rights Generation (1937-1945)
Great-Grandchildren of the Depression Generation (1910-1918)
Great-Great-Grandchildren of the Edwardian Generation (1883-1891)

2000-2008 = I-Generation
Children of Generation X (1973-1981)
Grandchildren of the Baby Boomers (1946-1954)
Great-Grandchildren of the World War II Generation (1919-1927)
Great-Great-Grandchildren of the World War I Generation (1892-1900)

2009-2017 = Generation Alpha
Children of Generation Y (1982-1990)
Grandchildren of Generation Jones (1955-1963)
Great-Grandchildren of the Silent Generation (1928-1936)
Great-Great-Grandchildren of the Prohibition Generation (1901-1909)


What do you think of this breakdown?

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: TwilightPrince16 on 02/21/18 at 6:18 pm


2009-2017 = Generation Alpha
Children of Generation Y (1982-1990)

Wow, I thought I was the only won who actually agrees with ending Gen Y at 1990.

Here's my 15-year generation theory

Baby Boomers: 1946-1960

Generation X: 1961-1975

Generation Y: 1976-1990

Generation Z: 1991-2005

Generation Alpha: 2006-2020

Subject: Re: Every generational timeline after Baby Boomers is hard to pinpoint.

Written By: meesa on 03/09/18 at 8:57 am

I am bumping this thread, because I was recently asked why I locked a topic about generation Y/Z and microgenerations.

This is not the only thread available to discuss this type of topic- this isn't even the only board with these threads to discuss Y/Z, the differences, the cut off between, etc as this thread is more inclusive for generational discussion.

I understand that we have people on the boards here that are interested in these subjects, and I don't take issue with the discussion or the people. It's nice to see new people join and be actively involved because you bring new ideas and discussion! What I do take issue with is creating several threads that basically are discussing the same thing. By using fewer threads to discuss these differences, it helps the board not be so scattered, filled up with many threads that are all about the same subject matter, and can drive the discussion to a bigger audience and debate by limiting it to fewer places.

Thanks

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