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Subject: The "Urban" label

Written By: mxcrashxm on 05/05/18 at 11:35 pm

So, I have meant to discuss this topic for quite some time now, but I haven't had the chance because I had a busy schedule for the last few weeks. I noticed that over the years, whenever a black musician becomes mainstream, that person is automatically placed either into the Hip-Hop or R&B tag. However, what the music industry doesn't seem to understand is that what if that same artist ends up deciding to do something else other than R&B or Hip-hop? It appears that they don't even get a choice.

It just seems weird since not all African-Americans sing R&B songs or even rap. Besides, before hip-hop was even a genre, black artists were into everything from Rock and country to jazz and easy-listening tracks. Caucasians, Latinos, Asians, etc. also produce Hip-hop songs as well as R&B, but for some reason, the industry labels their songs as "pop." Last, R&B stands for Rhythm and Blues which derived from the second term. It honestly doesn't make any sense. Now, I'm aware that are African-American musicians who are or were not branded as R&B or Hip-hop by the music business, but there is a minimal of them. Michael Jackson, B.B King, Black Eyed Peas, Jason Derulo, Darius Rucker, and Khalid are a few black musicians who made music outside the urban title and even received tons of appeal from a broad audience. It's frankly a bummer that black artists are considered Hip-hop/R&B by the industry while the non-black musicians are not. In the end, music is music. The record labels shouldn't define it by ethnicity, but instead talented, passionate, and enthusiastic people. That's who gets the job done. BTW, I will link two articles down below so anyone who is interested can get a glimpse of my OP.

http://www.thefader.com/2014/09/12/popping-off-fka-twigs-beyonce-alt-r-and-b

https://pitchfork.com/thepitch/black-musicians-on-being-boxed-in-by-randb-and-rap-expectations-we-fit-in-so-many-things/

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 05/05/18 at 11:50 pm

I absolutely agree!

I was alluding to this very same topic in my post in that 106 & Park thread.

Here is my post: http://www.inthe00s.com/index.php?topic=52311.msg3707486#msg3707486

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: mxcrashxm on 05/06/18 at 12:02 am


I absolutely agree!

I was alluding to this very same topic in my post in that 106 & Park thread.

Here is my post: http://www.inthe00s.com/index.php?topic=52311.msg3707486#msg3707486
Yeah, I saw it. It's true that the term is used as a synonym for black people as well music for an African-American audience although the second part would be false since black folks have made music outside the urban designation for years and will continue to do so for a long time.

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 05/06/18 at 12:05 am


Yeah, I saw it. It's true that the term is used as a synonym for black people as well music for an African-American audience although the second part would be false since black folks have made music outside the urban designation for years and will continue to do so for a long time.

Yeah, that's true.

I hope it changes.

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: mqg96 on 05/06/18 at 12:11 am



It just seems weird since not all African-Americans sing R&B songs or even rap. Besides, before hip-hop was even a genre, black artists were into everything from Rock and country to jazz and easy-listening tracks. Caucasians, Latinos, Asians, etc. also produce Hip-hop songs as well as R&B, but for some reason, the industry labels their songs as "pop." Last, R&B stands for Rhythm and Blues which derived from the second term. It honestly doesn't make any sense. Now, I'm aware that are African-American musicians who are or were not branded as R&B or Hip-hop by the music business, but there is a minimal of them. Michael Jackson, B.B King, Black Eyed Peas, Jason Derulo, Darius Rucker, and Khalid are a few black musicians who made music outside the urban title and even received tons of appeal from a broad audience. It's frankly a bummer that black artists are considered Hip-hop/R&B by the industry while the non-black musicians are not. In the end, music is music. The record labels shouldn't define it by ethnicity, but instead talented, passionate, and enthusiastic people. That's who gets the job done. BTW, I will link two articles down below so anyone who is interested can get a glimpse of my OP.



Unfortunately, this applies to a lot of other situations too when it comes to black folks doing something out of the norm that the majority of their race isn't allowed to do. Or should I call it "stereotypes". When I was in high school when you were at a black party or a table filled with black folks, you had to listen to hip hop/R&B music and you had to know movies that were considered as "black", but if you were caught talking about something that was considered as "white culture", or if you were talking about/listening to other genres of music such as teen pop or country, then people would crush you to the ground shamefully. If you're a black person and you don't have the same exact political beliefs as the majority of black folks "ALL BLACKS MUST BE DEMOCRATS" then you're called a coon or uncle tom. There are coons out there I can't stand, but don't just automatically assume that a black person is an uncle tom if you're not educated and don't know the actual facts. It's really sad that our black community has sets restrictions on us like we're in prison. I love to explore so many different cultural stuff, but don't dictate my ENTIRE personality, that's a big pet peeve of mine.

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: mxcrashxm on 05/06/18 at 12:54 am


Unfortunately, this applies to a lot of other situations too when it comes to black folks doing something out of the norm that the majority of their race isn't allowed to do. Or should I call it "stereotypes." When I was in high school when you were at a black party or a table filled with black folks, you had to listen to hip-hop/R&B music, and you had to know movies thought of as "black." If you were caught talking about something thought of as "white culture," or if you were talking about/listening to other genres of music such as teen pop or country, then people would crush you to the ground shamefully. If you're a black person and you don't have the same exact political beliefs as the majority of black folks "ALL BLACKS MUST BE DEMOCRATS" then you're called a coon or uncle tom. There are coons out there I can't stand, but don't just automatically assume that a black person is an uncle tom if you're not educated and don't know the facts. It's unfortunate that our black community has set restrictions on us like we're in prison. I love to explore so many different cultural stuff, but don't dictate my ENTIRE personality, that's a big pet peeve of mine.
You know, I have felt the same way for years, and I even touched upon it a few years ago. There's genuinely nothing wrong with black people not fitting the black cultural norms. Besides, not all black folks even listen to hip-hop or even R&B (depends on the period) especially if they despise the themes the music portrays nowadays. Who wants to listen to a song where the rapper talks nothing but "b*tches & h*es" all day? That gets tiring. There is so much more to music towards African-Americans such as Jazz, Funk, Rock, EDM and even Motown. I actually have a friend who's our ethnicity and he doesn't even listen to hip-hop at all (maybe except the old-school stuff), but he listens to everything else. Unfortunately, I think he has been ridiculed by some people all because he's not a walking stereotype. He is his person, and that's all that matters.

I agree that we have set limitations on ourselves and it's secretly destroying us. We need to realize that it's ok not to know everything about the black culture. While we all share the identity, it doesn't present a full image of us, but rather a small portion of it. We are all into different cultures that interest us and others shouldn't be outraged over that especially if it doesn't concern them.

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 05/06/18 at 10:36 am


You know, I have felt the same way for years, and I even touched upon it a few years ago. There's genuinely nothing wrong with black people not fitting the black cultural norms. Besides, not all black folks even listen to hip-hop or even R&B (depends on the period) especially if they despise the themes the music portrays nowadays. Who wants to listen to a song where the rapper talks nothing but "b*tches & h*es" all day? That gets tiring. There is so much more to music towards African-Americans such as Jazz, Funk, Rock, EDM and even Motown. I actually have a friend who's our ethnicity and he doesn't even listen to hip-hop at all (maybe except the old-school stuff), but he listens to everything else. Unfortunately, I think he has been ridiculed by some people all because he's not a walking stereotype. He is his person, and that's all that matters.

I agree that we have set limitations on ourselves and it's secretly destroying us. We need to realize that it's ok not to know everything about the black culture. While we all share the identity, it doesn't present a full image of us, but rather a small portion of it. We are all into different cultures that interest us and others shouldn't be outraged over that especially if it doesn't concern them.

Yep, this is true.

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: Looney Toon on 05/06/18 at 1:19 pm

I laugh as there is a LOT of genres that were created or popularized by those who are black. For African American music genres the genres are
Boogie-woogie
Blues
Chicago house
Detroit techno
Disco
Doo-wop
Funk
Jazz
Ragtime
Hip hop
Trap
Rhythm and blues
Rock and roll
Soul
Spiritual

These genres and some of their subgenres are known to have been created/popularized by blacks. The problem with the "Urban" label in modern music is that it literally neglects 80% of music with us only have Rap/RnB now. I'm not sure how or why this happened as it's almost like people today have forgotten a majority of black music that was played throughout history. Now I don't expect people to know EVERY black/urban genre, but when all a person can tell me is that black music "is like rap & rnb" it does disappoint me. The "Urban" label can be used to described for a lot of black genres predating Hip Hop. For example  Jazz/Big Band Swing was played in urban environments and was played by a lot blacks. I don't mind the Urban label, but I am upset that nowadays Urban label seems to only relate to rap/rnb and nothing else.

I'm not the biggest fan of modern hip hop since I don't really like the idea of all artists trying to give off this image of struggle, money, drugs, sex, crime, gritty/dark tone etc etc all the time. From say the late 2000s - 2010s I'm mainly into underground (or somewhat obscure) stuff now since they have more enjoyable styles.
hWAJtWpYczoZUPp5YjbSdQ
I get a nice vibe from some of the more jazzy Hip Hop.


But hey this is all just me rambling.
Now if you want a full list of genres created by blacks then wikipedia gots ya covered.

African-American music
Boogie-woogie
Blues
Chicago house
Detroit techno
Disco
Doo-wop
Funk
Jazz
Ragtime
Hip hop
Trap
Rhythm and blues
Rock and roll
Soul
Spiritual
Afro-Caribbean music
Dance hall
Dub
Ragga
Reggae
Ska
Calypso
Black British music
2-step garage
Bassline
British black gospel
British blues
UK hip hop
British jazz
British soul
Drum and bass
Dubstep
Grime
Old school jungle
Ragga jungle
UK garage
UK funky
UK Gospel
Music of Africa
Middle Eastern and North African music traditions
Music of West Africa
→Afrobeats →Afropop →Jùjú

Sub-Saharan African music traditions
→Coupé-Décalé →Soukous

Cuba
Son
Rumba
Yuka
Batá
Haiti
Compas
Zouk
Brazilian music
Afoxé
Capoeira
Maracatu
Samba
Samba reggae
Funk carioca
Music of the Dominican Republic
Bachata
Merengue
Music of Ecuador
Bambuco
Bomba
Uruguay
Candombe
Puerto Rico
Plena
Bomba
Reggaeton
Peru
Festejo
Cueca
Landó


So many genres I didn't even know about. Probably due to a lot of them not being in my region (although I am familiar with British genres like UK garage and stuff).

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 05/06/18 at 1:20 pm


I laugh as there is a LOT of genres that were created or popularized by those who are black. For African American music genres the genres are
Boogie-woogie
Blues
Chicago house
Detroit techno
Disco
Doo-wop
Funk
Jazz
Ragtime
Hip hop
Trap
Rhythm and blues
Rock and roll
Soul
Spiritual

These genres and some of their subgenres are known to have been created/popularized by blacks. The problem with the "Urban" label in modern music is that it literally neglects 80% of music with us only have Rap/RnB now. I'm not sure how or why this happened as it's almost like people today have forgotten a majority of black music that was played throughout history. Now I don't expect people to know EVERY black/urban genre, but when all a person can tell me is that black music "is like rap & rnb" it does disappoint me. The "Urban" label can be used to described for a lot of black genres predating Hip Hop. For example  Jazz/Big Band Swing was played in urban enviornments and was played by a lot blacks. I don't mind the Urban label, but I am upset that nowadays Urban label seems to only relate to rap/rnb and nothing else.


But hey this is all just me rambling.
Now if you want a full list of genres created by blacks then wikipedia gots ya covered.



So many genres I didn't even know about. Probably due to a lot of them not being in my region (although I am familiar with British genres like UK garage and stuff).

This is 100% the truth!

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: Looney Toon on 05/06/18 at 1:34 pm

I did like Hip Hop during the late 80s/early 90s since a lot of the music would reference/sample old black from from the 40s-60s such as funk and jazz.
LtLrbJFwBWse-eMDCliY6s


Anyways I'm not sure where the issue began. One may blame the rise of Hip Hop throughout the 1980s/1990s and how it's like all forms of black music at the time had to always have hip hop mixed with it. In the 1980s-1990s we had new Jack sing (Hip Hop + RnB), Jazz Rap (Hip Hop + Jazz), G-Funk (Gansta Rap + Funk), Hip Hop Soul (Hip Hop + Soul), Hip House (Hip Hop + House) etc etc. Guess it felt like hip hop was everywhere as a lot of other black music genres ended up getting mixed with hip hop.

As for myself I blame Gansta rap for starting popularizing the whole gritty dark theme for hip hop. Fast forward to today and all artists just sound like a bunch of try-hards. Hip Hop CAN give feel-good-vibes and be fun (and that's how it used to be), but after gangsta rap took over this changed. Now we got Trap music (which if you like the genre then more power to ya) which is just hurting black music in my opinion like how mumble rap and rap autotune was doing.

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: Dundee on 05/06/18 at 1:56 pm


I laugh as there is a LOT of genres that were created or popularized by those who are black. For African American music genres the genres are
Boogie-woogie
Blues
Chicago house
Detroit techno
Disco
Doo-wop
Funk
Jazz
Ragtime
Hip hop
Trap
Rhythm and blues
Rock and roll
Soul
Spiritual


Yup! Not only that but out of Disco both Hip Hop and EDM were birthed. Out of Rythm and Blues (R&B), Rock and Roll was born. Insane the ammount of music genres originating from black Americans!

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: Looney Toon on 05/06/18 at 3:31 pm

Here is a funny one. I talk to many older folk who try to brag about the stuff they grew up with. Talking about how they remember RnB and Hip Hop from the 1970s-1980s. When I listen to it they say dumb things like "what do you know about that kind of music?" or "people your age don't listen to old stuff" or the dreaded "that's the music of our generation you wouldn't be into that old stuff like us".

But there was one time where I was listening to 1940s Big Band Swing. When they walked by they were like "what are you listening to?" I told them that it as some classic old time swing jazz. I asked them if they wanted to join and listen, but they said "nah, I that stuff sounds too old to me".

http://i0.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/facebook/001/312/011/fc4.jpg




I still get these moments with older folk.  People who try to brag about how they had old classic stuff, yet when I show them some REAL old classic stuff they go "nah, I ain't interested in that" or "nah, this stuff sounds too old" for me. A lot of adults I met only like whatever they had during their childhood-teen years. Anything before or after is out of the question. I even run into people talking about how they grew up with classic 80s hip hop meanwhile I'm listening to 60s funk or Surf Rock and 50s Jump Blues.

As for younger folks it pains me when they don't know what Big Band Swing is. Forgive me if this sounds steretypical/racially offensive (it's not me intention), but if you're a black person who is really into music, but the only Jazz genre you know is "Jazz" then what are doing being an aspiring music artist? And once again they also give me the dreaded "nah, I don't listen to that old stuff, but I am a big fan of here"

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: SpyroKev on 05/06/18 at 3:40 pm

Its something I wouldn't worry too much about. The discussion has merit but, the Hip Hop and R&B label is an undeniably nice definition of black. Toon just put out facts so, labelers are gonna want to see diversity in music genres of definition.

A African American is going to give you a glimpse that he/she is going to be interested in Hip Hop/R&B.
A Asian and European is going to give you a glimpse that he/she is going to be interested in Rock and Pop.

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: Looney Toon on 05/06/18 at 3:44 pm


Yup! Not only that but out of Disco both Hip Hop and EDM were birthed. Out of Rythm and Blues (R&B), Rock and Roll was born. Insane the ammount of music genres originating from black Americans!


Yeah, especially when it comes to dance, party, get-together kind of music. A bit of a generalization here, but it is obvious when you realize that blacks tend to create a bunch of different dance moves/styles. Prefer to make things you can get up and move to. 

So many dance styles like the Bus Stop, Hammertime, Jitterbug, Set de flop, Hand stand, the worm, electric slide, moonwalk, running man, KC two step, dougie and a ton more.

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: Looney Toon on 05/06/18 at 3:48 pm


Its something I wouldn't worry too much about. The discussion has merit but, the Hip Hop and R&B label is an undeniably nice definition of black. Toon just put out facts so, labelers are gonna want to see diversity in music genres of definition.

A African American is going to give you a glimpse that he/she is going to be interested in Hip Hop/R&B.
A Asian and European is going to give you a glimpse that he/she is going to be interested in Rock and Pop.


I suppose it isn't something to get too worked up about. My issues with the topic are something only I ever really obsess over. My problem is that it feels like black music is just getting a bit too limited. Made so many genres yet now only perform 1 or 2 of the same ones. But I'm sure this may change/evolve as time moves on. Just need a new artist willing to popularize something else which always tends to happen.

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: Voiceofthe70s on 05/06/18 at 3:52 pm


Here is a funny one. I talk to many older folk who try to brag about the stuff they grew up with. Talking about how they remember RnB and Hip Hop from the 1970s-1980s. When I listen to it they say dumb things like "what do you know about that kind of music?" or "people your age don't listen to old stuff" or the dreaded "that's the music of our generation you wouldn't be into that old stuff like us".

But there was one time where I was listening to 1940s Big Band Swing. When they walked by they were like "what are you listening to?" I told them that it as some classic old time swing jazz. I asked them if they wanted to join and listen, but they said "nah, I that stuff sounds too old to me".


I still get these moments with older folk.  People who try to brag about how they had old classic stuff, yet when I show them some REAL old classic stuff they go "nah, I ain't interested in that" or "nah, this stuff sounds too old" for me. A lot of adults I met only like whatever they had during their childhood-teen years. Anything before or after is out of the question. I even run into people talking about how they grew up with classic 80s hip hop meanwhile I'm listening to 60s funk or Surf Rock and 50s Jump Blues.

As for younger folks it pains me when they don't know what Big Band Swing is. Forgive me if this sounds steretypical/racially offensive (it's not me intention), but if you're a black person who is really into music, but the only Jazz genre you know is "Jazz" then what are doing being an aspiring music artist? And once again they also give me the dreaded "nah, I don't listen to that old stuff, but I am a big fan of here"


I think this ties in with the phenomenon we have discussed in other threads. How a lot of young people today listen, for example, to music of the 60s and 70s (and yes, the dreaded 80's), but it was basically unheard of for those of us in the 60s and 70s to listen to music of forty and fifty years before. It just wasn't done. The EXCEPTION being that which was deemed "authentic" such as blues and folk by the likes of Robert Johnson, Leadbelly, Charlie Patton, Woody Guthrie, etc.  And it was artists such as those who influenced the artists of the 60s such as Bob Dylan and Eric Clapton. I'm simplifying a bit, but that's basically it.

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: piecesof93 on 05/06/18 at 5:31 pm

I hear what y'all are saying but Jazz, Blues, Disco, etc are not popular in the mainstream world. That's why the word Urban is limited to Hip-Hop and R&B. Those are the most popular genres of music and that is what gets played on the radio. So of course labels are gonna use that term, even if the music of the artist does not fit neatly into that mold. The word Urban connects with a broader audience when it comes to causal listeners of music. Causal listeners of music don't go out of their way to search for jazz or blues acts, they look for "urban" artists. It's marketing.

Furthermore, artists who embrace the urban label, especially when their music is more alternative than Hip-Hop or R&B, may even introduce casual listeners of music to a wider variety of genres because those genres are apparent in the artists' music.

For example, someone who strictly listened to urban radio in 2008 (which would include people like Lil Wayne, Rick Ross, The Game, 50 Cent, etc) might've heard a Kid Cudi song as well because the press puts him into that urban label. Kid Cudi often includes elements of alternative/rock in his music. So hearing his songs on "urban" radio and labeling Cudi as "urban" would've exposed heavy hip-hop/r&b listeners to different genre  of music. In turn, they may even seek out similar music and get put onto rock music. This seems to be true for a couple of people I know

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 05/06/18 at 5:36 pm


I hear what y'all are saying but Jazz, Blues, Disco, etc are not popular in the mainstream world. That's why the word Urban is limited to Hip-Hop and R&B. Those are the most popular genres of music and that is what gets played on the radio. So of course labels are gonna use that term, even if the music of the artist does not fit neatly into that mold. The word Urban connects with a broader audience when it comes to causal listeners of music. Causal listeners of music don't go out of their way to search for jazz or blues acts, they look for "urban" artists. It's marketing.

Furthermore, artists who embrace the urban label, especially when their music is more alternative than Hip-Hop or R&B, may even introduce casual listeners of music to a wider variety of genres because those genres are apparent in the artists' music.

For example, someone who strictly listened to urban radio in 2008 (which would include people like Lil Wayne, Rick Ross, The Game, 50 Cent, etc) might've heard a Kid Cudi song as well because the press puts him into that urban label. Kid Cudi often includes elements of alternative/rock in his music. So hearing his songs on "urban" radio and labeling Cudi as "urban" would've exposed heavy hip-hop/r&b listeners to different genre  of music. In turn, they may even seek out similar music and get put onto rock music. This seems to be true for a couple of people I know

But are pop music, rock music and even electronic music not also "urban"? :-X

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: piecesof93 on 05/06/18 at 5:56 pm


But are pop music, rock music and even electronic music not also "urban"? :-X

They are not currently perceived as urban (even though they originate in urban communities) and are also predominantly white.

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 05/06/18 at 5:59 pm


They are not currently perceived as urban (even though they originate in urban communities) and are also predominantly white.

Yeah, that's the problem we're (or at least I am) pointing out.

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: SpyroKev on 05/06/18 at 6:02 pm


I suppose it isn't something to get too worked up about. My issues with the topic are something only I ever really obsess over. My problem is that it feels like black music is just getting a bit too limited. Made so many genres yet now only perform 1 or 2 of the same ones. But I'm sure this may change/evolve as time moves on. Just need a new artist willing to popularize something else which always tends to happen.


You are exactly right. It will repeatedly evolve over time. Right now, its Trap associated music as far as AA's.

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: mxcrashxm on 05/06/18 at 6:41 pm


I laugh as there is a LOT of genres that were created or popularized by those who are black. For African American music genres the genres are
Boogie-woogie
Blues
Chicago house
Detroit techno
Disco
Doo-wop
Funk
Jazz
Ragtime
Hip-hop
Trap
Rhythm and blues
Rock and roll
Soul
Spiritual

These genres and some of their subgenres are known to have been created/popularized by blacks. The problem with the "Urban" label in modern music is that it neglects 80% of music with us only have Rap/RnB now. I'm not sure how or why this happened as it's almost like people today have forgotten a majority of black music that was played throughout history. Now I don't expect people to know EVERY black/urban genre, but when all a person can tell me is that black music "is like rap & r&b" it does disappoint me. The "Urban" label can be used to describe for a lot of black genres predating Hip Hop. For example, Jazz/Big Band Swing was played in urban environments and was represented by a lot of blacks. I don't mind the Urban label, but I am upset that nowadays Urban name seems to only relate to rap/RnB and nothing else.

I'm not the biggest fan of modern hip hop since I don't like the idea of all artists trying to give off this image of struggle, money, drugs, sex, crime, gritty/dark tone, Etc all the time. From saying the late 2000s - 2010s I'm mainly into underground (or somewhat obscure) stuff now since they have more fun styles.
hWAJtWpYczoZUPp5YjbSdQ
I get a nice vibe from some of the jazzier Hip Hop.


But hey this is all just me rambling.
Now if you want a full list of genres created by blacks, then Wikipedia gots you covered.



So many genres I didn't even know about. Probably due to a lot of them not being in my region (although I am familiar with British types like UK garage and stuff).
Yeah, this is what I mean. There is much more to black music than just Hip-hop and R&B, and that not every African-American musician is interested in producing those kinds of songs. I mean, here are examples black people producing non-urban music.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uSD4vsh1zDA

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZEHsIcsjtdI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XWJrPzAUzAs

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xcwd_Nz6Zog


I hear what y'all are saying but Jazz, Blues, Disco, etc are not popular in the mainstream world. That's why the word Urban is limited to Hip-Hop and R&B. Those are the most popular genres of music and that is what gets played on the radio. So of course labels are gonna use that term, even if the music of the artist does not fit neatly into that mold. The word Urban connects with a broader audience when it comes to causal listeners of music. Causal listeners of music don't go out of their way to search for jazz or blues acts, they look for "urban" artists. It's marketing.

Furthermore, artists who embrace the urban label, especially when their music is more alternative than Hip-Hop or R&B, may even introduce casual listeners of music to a broader variety of genres because those genres are apparent in the artists' music.

For example, someone who strictly listened to urban radio in 2008 (which would include people like Lil Wayne, Rick Ross, The Game, 50 Cent, etc) might've heard a Kid Cudi song as well because the press puts him into that urban label. Kid Cudi often includes elements of alternative/rock in his music. So hearing his songs on "urban" radio and labeling Cudi as "urban" would've exposed heavy hip-hop/r&b listeners to different genre  of music. In turn, they may even seek out similar music and get put onto rock music. This seems to be true for a couple of people I know.
I understand what you mean that the term can introduce people who don't listen to urban music to that type of songs, but the thing is there are a few artists who are African-American who wasn't considered Hip-hop or R&B, and they were MJ, BEP, Rhianna, and Khalid. They are labeled as something else.

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: piecesof93 on 05/06/18 at 7:13 pm

Dude. It is easier to market black artists to black audiences and vice versa. It's become pretty clear to me that when media says urban music, they are not necessarily referring to the music itself but are referring to the artists and the audience that listens, just like you said. Urban is not being used to denote the origins of the music.

When Jazz was predominantly black artists with a black audience, it was called black music. When Rock n Roll was predominantly black artists with a black audience, it was called black music. Same goes for the other genres.

Here's how it goes:
1. Genre starts off with black artists and a black audience
2. Said genre begins gaining traction in white communities and becomes mainstream.
3. White audiences begin to outweigh black audiences.
4. Because the white audience is now larger than the black audience, the genre begins seeing more white artists
5. White artists exceed black artists and now the genre is predominantly led by white artists and the black audience leaves the genre to create another.
6. The "urban" label is then dropped from said genre.

In 2018, we're having a conversation about why "urban" is synonymous with Hip-Hop and R&B and how it limits black artists, but in 50 years those genres won't even be considered  urban anymore. This process has already begun for rap music. It is the most popular genre in the western world and it's largest audience is white. The only thing that keeps rap urban right now is the fact that most artists of this genre are black. Once these rap artists get replaced, it will no longer be urban or black anymore and Hip-Hop's 40+ years of history will be forgotten.  So this conversation won't even matter anymore.

As far as other black artists being labeled as something other than hip-hop/r&b, that's also a marketing strategy. MJ wasn't always referred to the King of Pop. If I remember correctly, he was first called the King of R&B or something. It was changed to appeal to white audiences. It's all very calculated.

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: mxcrashxm on 05/06/18 at 7:46 pm


It is easier to market black artists to black audiences and vice versa. It's become pretty clear to me that when media says urban music, they are not necessarily referring to the music itself but are referring to the artists and the audience that listens, just like you said. Urban is not being used to denote the origins of the music.

When Jazz was predominantly black artists with a black audience, it was called black music. When Rock n Roll was mostly black artists with a black audience, it was called black music. Same goes for the other genres.

Here's how it goes:
1. Genre starts off with black artists and a black audience
2. Said genre begins gaining traction in white communities and becomes mainstream.
3. White audiences start to outweigh black audiences.
4. Because the white audience is now more substantial than the black audience, the genre begins seeing more white artists
5. White artists exceed black artists, and now the style is predominantly led by white artists, and the black audience leaves the genre to create another.
6. The "urban" label is then dropped from said genre by the music business.

In 2018, we're having a conversation about why "urban" is synonymous with Hip-Hop and R&B and how it limits black artists, but in 50 years those genres won't even be considered urban anymore. This process has already begun for rap music. It is the most popular genre in the western world and it's the largest audience is white. The only thing that keeps rap urban right now is the fact that most artists of this genre are black. Once these rap artists get replaced, it will no longer be urban or black anymore and Hip-Hop's 40+ years of history will be forgotten.  So this conversation won't even matter anymore.

As far as other black artists being labeled as something other than hip-hop/r&b, that's also a marketing strategy. MJ wasn't always referred to the King of Pop. If I remember correctly, he was first called the King of R&B or something. It was changed to appeal to white audiences. It's all very calculated.
I think I'm starting to see your point. I should have known that before the pre-hip-hop genres became mainstream, they were classified as black music by the music industry. I mean, Jazz, Rock N Roll (and even Hip-hop) were presented as the devil's music at one point, but that's most likely because those people were either haters or proud racists. I agree with hip-hop though. I have a feeling it will be no longer be considered urban in the 2030s or possibly in the next decade.

It's still strange how most non-black musicians are considered pop though by the music industry. There are tons I can name off where their music sounds urbaner than what they're branded as in their genres. I'll link a few examples.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ph54wQG8ynk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J_ub7Etch2U

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ycy30LIbq4w

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Vv-BfVoq4g

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bJuWlMFToNo

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: mwalker1996 on 05/07/18 at 4:54 pm

I never'd quite understood the label since a lot of Blacks live in rural and suburban areas as well. When it comes to African Americans society and most Blacks make a cookie cutter mold of what "being Black" is. I'm into a lot of mainstream Black culture, but I also have a huge interest in other things from other cultures that aren't normally seen as Black. I'm into anime,  pop music, Latian music, Nintendo, Geography and Poetry.

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: yelimsexa on 05/10/18 at 6:34 am

IMO "Urban" could imply any form of popular music that isn't considered "Country", which implies music that tends to gear towards rural and small town audiences and contains lyrics that are often more whiny or repetitive. Unfortunately, "Country" is seen as nearly exclusively white and tends to get a lot of flail towards non-whites, and in many places where country is popular, gospel is the only choice for them, which is the least urban of all black-oriented genres and isn't very popular in the mainstream. Then you have "Folk" often blurs the lines between the two and is generally the more grass-roots side of pop music.

As far as "too old", the proper term should be "too simple", as vocal dynamics were a lot less prior to advancements in modern mixing technology, even though there are some wonderfully written compositions, though of course if with lyrics, the slang used could be completely out of touch or too much of a straight path like many love songs, along with the fact that vocal styles change over time in addition to the instrumentation, production mixing, and lyrical content, and the "urban" genres tend to see the most rapid changes out of all of these combined. That's why most classic hits stations have dropped most of the '60s and early '70s, due to not bad music but a generation that feels that it being before their time isn't for them. Keep in mind that the first Generation Xers were born by many definitions after Beatlemania, and the first Millennials before their parents heard about what MTV is. 

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 05/10/18 at 8:23 am


IMO "Urban" could imply any form of popular music that isn't considered "Country", which implies music that tends to gear towards rural and small town audiences and contains lyrics that are often more whiny or repetitive. Unfortunately, "Country" is seen as nearly exclusively white and tends to get a lot of flail towards non-whites, and in many places where country is popular, gospel is the only choice for them, which is the least urban of all black-oriented genres and isn't very popular in the mainstream. Then you have "Folk" often blurs the lines between the two and is generally the more grass-roots side of pop music.

As far as "too old", the proper term should be "too simple", as vocal dynamics were a lot less prior to advancements in modern mixing technology, even though there are some wonderfully written compositions, though of course if with lyrics, the slang used could be completely out of touch or too much of a straight path like many love songs, along with the fact that vocal styles change over time in addition to the instrumentation, production mixing, and lyrical content, and the "urban" genres tend to see the most rapid changes out of all of these combined. That's why most classic hits stations have dropped most of the '60s and early '70s, due to not bad music but a generation that feels that it being before their time isn't for them. Keep in mind that the first Generation Xers were born by many definitions after Beatlemania, and the first Millennials before their parents heard about what MTV is.

There are only very few country songs that I like and 95% of them are "pop country" lol.

I just can't relate to country music because:

*Most of the songs sound the same.
*I'm not from a rural area. I'm a city boy.
*A lot of country songs are boring, IMO.
*I'm not White (let's be honest, 90% of country music fans are White).

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: 1999 Baby, 2000s Kid on 05/10/18 at 9:58 am


There are only very few country songs that I like and 95% of them are "pop country" lol.

I just can't relate to country music because:

*Most of the songs sound the same.
*I'm not from a rural area. I'm a city boy.
*A lot of country songs are boring, IMO.
*I'm not White (let's be honest, 90% of country music fans are White).


I'm white and from a rural area, but I also can't relate to country music. I actually despise it tbh.

I agree about most sounding the same and being boring, bro country in particular is pretty awful imo. The only country I like is Marty Robbins and a few old songs like "Big Iron" by Marty Robbins, he's probably more 'western' than 'country' though and is an exception.

999RqGZatPs

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: mqg96 on 05/10/18 at 10:31 am


There are only very few country songs that I like and 95% of them are "pop country" lol.

I just can't relate to country music because:

*Most of the songs sound the same.
*I'm not from a rural area. I'm a city boy.
*A lot of country songs are boring, IMO.
*I'm not White (let's be honest, 90% of country music fans are White).


Country is not the genre I focus on mostly either, but here's some country songs I actually enjoy. It just has a dreamy vibe just like some hip hop music where I care about the sound/beat more than the lyrics. Being an SEC college football fan has helped me out with a lot of this music too.

0ggKe409_F4

rf7GfUORHtw

8PvebsWcpto

zDo0H8Fm7d0

I love Florida Georgia line btw; and their group name makes me think of the World's Largest Outdoor Cocktail Party rivalry in college football, go search that on google and you'll see what I mean! Now once again like I mentioned before, race is so irrelevant when it comes to my taste in music. America is supposed to be a free country with so much diversity I could care less about that. As I explained before it's sad this country has been so divisive and worried about racial stereotypes these days. I'm gonna just be me and participate in what I feel is comfortable. I don't give AF what the majority of the black crowd or white crowd does.

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 05/10/18 at 10:37 am


I'm white and from a rural area, but I also can't relate to country music. I actually despise it tbh.

Well, that must be torture then :D.

BTW, where are you from?


I agree about most sounding the same and being boring, bro country in particular is pretty awful imo. The only country I like is Marty Robbins and a few old songs like "Big Iron" by Marty Robbins, he's probably more 'western' than 'country' though and is an exception.

999RqGZatPs

Yeah, that song is not bad. I prefer that over the country music of today.

Some old country music songs that I like are:

LwDMFOLIHxU

byQIPdHMpjc

0zDjnDAwmig

However, I guess that these are considered to be more "Rockabilly" than country.

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 05/10/18 at 10:38 am


Country is not the genre I focus on mostly either, but here's some country songs I actually enjoy. It just has a dreamy vibe just like some hip hop music where I care about the sound/beat more than the lyrics. Being an SEC college football fan has helped me out with a lot of this music too.

0ggKe409_F4

rf7GfUORHtw

8PvebsWcpto

zDo0H8Fm7d0

Yeah, those last two songs are among the few country songs that I like ;D

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: 1999 Baby, 2000s Kid on 05/10/18 at 12:57 pm


Well, that must be torture then :D.

BTW, where are you from?


;D I try to avoid hearing it when I can, but I've been hearing more often since I've been getting out more. I don't mind if other people like it, I just personally don't.

I'm from a small town in Central Texas, from the Waco area.


Yeah, that song is not bad. I prefer that over the country music of today.

Some old country music songs that I like are:

LwDMFOLIHxU

byQIPdHMpjc

0zDjnDAwmig

However, I guess that these are considered to be more "Rockabilly" than country.


I think the first song is decent, I like the last one, but all the second song makes me think of is Hannah Montana, lol.

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 05/10/18 at 1:44 pm


;D I try to avoid hearing it when I can, but I've been hearing more often since I've been getting out more. I don't mind if other people like it, I just personally don't.

I'm from a small town in Central Texas, from the Waco area.

Gotcha! O0


I think the first song is decent, I like the last one, but all the second song makes me think of is Hannah Montana, lol.

Well, of course, it's Miley Cyrus's father ;D.

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: 1999 Baby, 2000s Kid on 05/10/18 at 1:51 pm


Well, of course, it's Miley Cyrus's father ;D


;D Yeah, that's why it makes me think of it. I never heard of that song before watching Hannah Montana, so it just reminds me of the show. :P

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: 90s Guy on 05/10/18 at 1:52 pm

I hate most country music with a passion.

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 05/10/18 at 2:03 pm


;D Yeah, that's why it makes me think of it. I never heard of that song before watching Hannah Montana, so it just reminds me of the show. :P

Same here. The song came out in 1992 so it makes sense.

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 05/10/18 at 2:03 pm


I hate most country music with a passion.

Welcome to the club!

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: Rainbowz on 05/10/18 at 6:51 pm


There are only very few country songs that I like and 95% of them are "pop country" lol.

I just can't relate to country music because:

*Most of the songs sound the same.
*I'm not from a rural area. I'm a city boy.
*A lot of country songs are boring, IMO.
*I'm not White (let's be honest, 90% of country music fans are White).

Wait, what? I seriously thought you were.  :o

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 05/10/18 at 7:21 pm


Wait, what? I seriously thought you were.  :o

LOL, what made you think that? :P

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: mqg96 on 05/10/18 at 7:35 pm


Wait, what? I seriously thought you were.  :o



If you've known his posts and avatars as TheReignMan99 and Black Panther. He's definitely black (correct me if I'm wrong ReignMan) His posts always remind me of the younger brother of Eric (or Eazy-E-1995). I don't think you were on this site when Eric was on here more regularly. He's been very busy in his personal life lately. The Lion and the Panther.

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 05/10/18 at 7:39 pm



If you've known his posts and avatars as TheReignMan99 and Black Panther. He's definitely black (correct me if I'm wrong ReignMan) His posts always remind me of the younger brother of Eric (or Eazy-E-1995). I don't think you were on this site when Eric was on here more regularly. He's been very busy in his personal life lately. The Lion and the Panther.

You got it!

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: Rainbowz on 05/10/18 at 8:27 pm



If you've known his posts and avatars as TheReignMan99 and Black Panther. He's definitely black (correct me if I'm wrong ReignMan) His posts always remind me of the younger brother of Eric (or Eazy-E-1995). I don't think you were on this site when Eric was on here more regularly. He's been very busy in his personal life lately. The Lion and the Panther.

I know that his old username used to be TheReignMan99. But I seriously thought he was white this whole time for some reason. My life is a lie.  ;D

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 05/10/18 at 9:22 pm


I know that his old username used to be TheReignMan99. But I seriously thought he was white this whole time for some reason. My life is a lie.  ;D

Like I asked earlier, why?

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: Rainbowz on 05/11/18 at 4:48 am


Like I asked earlier, why?

I don’t know, that’s why I said “for some reason” ;D

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: 90s Guy on 05/11/18 at 9:04 am

About the urban label:
To be honest, I've personally never associated the urban label with black people or "black things". Living in Brooklyn, I associate it with the vibe of the city, the club scene. Most of the stuff (music, clothes) which tend to be labelled urban is generally liked by the White, Hispanic, and Arab populations of my neighborhood. Fades? Tons here have them. A lot of white/hispanic/arab people here go to "urban" barbershops. They listen to hip hop, trap or reggaeton. I live in south Brooklyn, the "white bearded hipster" in plaid doesn't exist around here. The only times I've ever met people who could be described as hipsters aesthetically was when I was in College. Over here, you see girls going out in their stretch pants or even PJ pants, white guys, hispanic, or arab guys with baggy pants, a fade (or, in the case of most hispanic guys), a ponytail (not a man bun - just a regular pony tail). There's not very many Black people in my particular section of Brooklyn, but that doesn't stop the neighborhood from liking "urban" stuff.

Take hot sauce. Apparently hot sauce is a "black thing." I always thought it was just a city thing. I was turned onto it by my Italian/Mexican ex in 2012, who put it on everything, and now I do. So when in 2016 the whole Hillary hot sauce incident happened and you had people saying she was co-opting "black culture" I was a bit shocked. You go to a restaurant around here, even back in '12, and you hear people ask for it, of all races.

Then again, I view Brooklyn as the great unifier.

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: mqg96 on 05/11/18 at 9:07 am


Take hot sauce. Apparently hot sauce is a "black thing." I always thought it was just a city thing. I was turned onto it by my Italian/Mexican ex in 2012, who put it on everything, and now I do. So when in 2016 the whole Hillary hot sauce incident happened and you had people saying she was co-opting "black culture" I was a bit shocked. You go to a restaurant around here, even back in '12, and you hear people ask for it, of all races.

Then again, I view Brooklyn as the great unifier.


Growing up I was always taught first that hot sauce or spicy things was considered so "Mexican", "Hispanic", or "Latino" long before I started hearing it being a "black thing". Either way, it's all a bunch of BS stereotypes. It doesn't matter who you are.

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: xenzue on 05/17/18 at 2:07 pm


When Jazz was predominantly black artists with a black audience, it was called black music. When Rock n Roll was predominantly black artists with a black audience, it was called black music. Same goes for the other genres.

Here's how it goes:
1. Genre starts off with black artists and a black audience
2. Said genre begins gaining traction in white communities and becomes mainstream.
3. White audiences begin to outweigh black audiences.
4. Because the white audience is now larger than the black audience, the genre begins seeing more white artists
5. White artists exceed black artists and now the genre is predominantly led by white artists and the black audience leaves the genre to create another.
6. The "urban" label is then dropped from said genre.


This is pretty much how it's always been since the start of the 20th century. Jazz was birthed in the 1900s in New Orleans, by the late 1920s it had already spawned many regional subgenres, one of which would later become mainstream with white people in the 1930s. By the 1940s, Black musicians (and later the black audience) had already abandoned mainstream swing music, preferring R&B, Bebop Jazz, Gospel, or Rock & Roll. Eventually the same thing happened to Rock & Roll, and many people think the same will happen to Hip Hop.

One thing that many people often forget is that White people will one day not be the majority of the population, and Gen Z is already close to a 50/50 white/non-white population. The future of hip hop maybe completely different because of how America's demographics has dramatically changed, and with streaming, the playing level is much more even. Black artists don't have to "whiten" their music to thrive anymore.

I think Hip Hop is already approaching the 5th stage, but with a twist to it. We're now seeing Latino hip hop artists reach go mainstream (Cardi B, Lil Pump, 6IX9INE, Princess Nokia, Smokepurpp, etc.) as well as white hip hop artists(Post Malone, Bhad Bhabi, G-Eazy, Eminem, Iggy Azalea, Macklemore,...), and Asian artists are now becoming relevant too (NAV and Rich Brian). The question is, will young Black people still abandon hip hop?

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: mwalker1996 on 05/17/18 at 4:39 pm


About the urban label:
To be honest, I've personally never associated the urban label with black people or "black things". Living in Brooklyn, I associate it with the vibe of the city, the club scene. Most of the stuff (music, clothes) which tend to be labelled urban is generally liked by the White, Hispanic, and Arab populations of my neighborhood. Fades? Tons here have them. A lot of white/hispanic/arab people here go to "urban" barbershops. They listen to hip hop, trap or reggaeton. I live in south Brooklyn, the "white bearded hipster" in plaid doesn't exist around here. The only times I've ever met people who could be described as hipsters aesthetically was when I was in College. Over here, you see girls going out in their stretch pants or even PJ pants, white guys, hispanic, or arab guys with baggy pants, a fade (or, in the case of most hispanic guys), a ponytail (not a man bun - just a regular pony tail). There's not very many Black people in my particular section of Brooklyn, but that doesn't stop the neighborhood from liking "urban" stuff.

Take hot sauce. Apparently hot sauce is a "black thing." I always thought it was just a city thing. I was turned onto it by my Italian/Mexican ex in 2012, who put it on everything, and now I do. So when in 2016 the whole Hillary hot sauce incident happened and you had people saying she was co-opting "black culture" I was a bit shocked. You go to a restaurant around here, even back in '12, and you hear people ask for it, of all races.

Then again, I view Brooklyn as the great unifier.
Oh intresting, Brooklyn has changed a lot in the last decade with the rapid genterfication going on, but you guys in South Brooklyn still preserve the the classic Brooklyn vibe. Most people think of Brooklyn as being hipster or straight hood.

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: TheReignMan99 on 05/17/18 at 5:17 pm


Oh intresting, Brooklyn has changed a lot in the last decade with the rapid genterfication going on, but you guys in South Brooklyn still preserve the the classic Brooklyn vibe. Most people think of Brooklyn as being hipster or straight hood.

Only Williamsburg and Downtown Brookyln is hipster and basically "mini-Manhattan".

The rest of Brooklyn is completely different. Also, many of the "hoods" are pretty safe nowadays. East NY didn't even have a single murder until a few weeks ago.

Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: 90s Guy on 05/17/18 at 6:46 pm


Only Williamsburg and Downtown Brookyln is hipster and basically "mini-Manhattan".

The rest of Brooklyn is completely different. Also, many of the "hoods" are pretty safe nowadays. East NY didn't even have a single murder until a few weeks ago.


Eh, it depends on where in East NY. My current girl grew up in the Starrett City projects and she said in the last few years of her living there (she moved out in 2013 or 2014) it was becoming unsafe.

Where I am though, I've never witnessed any major crime. It's generally a quiet part of Brooklyn. The only major violence I knew about was back when I was in HS there was a lot of fights between the Arab groups and Hispanics at Fort Hamilton, and there was always feuds over 13th Avenue around that time too. Certain people weren't allowed to go to 13th Avenue without there being a big fight. That's really the only crap I've ever seen. Nowadays all those crews are gone.

Lately, the past year or so, I've noticed a MASSIVE influx of the homeless, particularly of the disturbed variety. I've been living at my current residence for two years and there weren't nearly as many homeless people as there are now. One girl, she's pregnant, and she's set up camp for the past few months on the block. Sad. I've also noticed a LOT of stores - even ones that had been around for DECADES - shutting down or moving in the past six months because of the high rents. One store had been like, a landmark of this area from at least the 80s and then whoosh, couple of months ago, went out of business. I do believe the city may begin to get "bad" again in the next decade.


Subject: Re: The "Urban" label

Written By: mwalker1996 on 05/17/18 at 8:02 pm


Eh, it depends on where in East NY. My current girl grew up in the Starrett City projects and she said in the last few years of her living there (she moved out in 2013 or 2014) it was becoming unsafe.

Where I am though, I've never witnessed any major crime. It's generally a quiet part of Brooklyn. The only major violence I knew about was back when I was in HS there was a lot of fights between the Arab groups and Hispanics at Fort Hamilton, and there was always feuds over 13th Avenue around that time too. Certain people weren't allowed to go to 13th Avenue without there being a big fight. That's really the only crap I've ever seen. Nowadays all those crews are gone.

Lately, the past year or so, I've noticed a MASSIVE influx of the homeless, particularly of the disturbed variety. I've been living at my current residence for two years and there weren't nearly as many homeless people as there are now. One girl, she's pregnant, and she's set up camp for the past few months on the block. Sad. I've also noticed a LOT of stores - even ones that had been around for DECADES - shutting down or moving in the past six months because of the high rents. One store had been like, a landmark of this area from at least the 80s and then whoosh, couple of months ago, went out of business. I do believe the city may begin to get "bad" again in the next decade.
Yea true, I grew up in Queens, but all of my family was raised in Brooklyn so I'm mostly in the Black neighborhoods in Brooklyn. I visted neighborhoods like Bed-stuy, East New York, Brownsville, Crown Heights, Bushwick, Flatbush, Carnise and I also visted neighborhoods like Park Slope, Bay Ridge and Dumbo. Brooklyn gets a tough repuation mainly because of the war on drugs, Italian Mobsters of the 20s and 30s and with rappers like Jay-Z and Biggie being from there. From my experience, if you tell somebody your from Brooklyn you automaticly get street-cred hence why so many hipsters want to live there.

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