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Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: CatwomanofV on 05/26/11 at 11:42 am


The person of the day...Helena Bonham Carter
Helena Bonham Carter (born 26 May 1966) is an English actress of film, stage, and television. She made her film debut in K. M. Peyton's A Pattern of Roses before winning her first leading role as the titular character in Lady Jane. She is known for her roles in films such as A Room with a View, Fight Club, and the Harry Potter series, as well as for frequently collaborating with director Tim Burton, her domestic partner since 2001. Bonham Carter is a two-time Academy Award nominee for her performances in The Wings of the Dove and The King's Speech; her portrayal of Queen Elizabeth in the latter film garnering her a BAFTA Award in 2011.
Bonham Carter has not received any formal training in acting. In 1979, she won a national writing contest and used the money to pay for her entry into the actors directory Spotlight. She made her professional acting début at the age of 16 in a television commercial. She also had a part in a minor TV film A Pattern of Roses.

Her first starring film role was as Lady Jane Grey in Lady Jane (1986), which was given mixed reviews by critics. The story reflected the tragic life of England's nine-days' Queen from her troubled adolescence and arranged marriage to her ill-fated accession and subsequent execution. Her breakthrough role was Lucy Honeychurch in A Room with a View, which was filmed after Lady Jane, but released beforehand. Bonham Carter also appeared in episodes of Miami Vice as Don Johnson's love interest during the 1986–87 season and then, in 1987 opposite Dirk Bogarde in The Vision and Stewart Granger in A Hazard of Hearts. Bonham Carter was originally cast in the role of Bess McNeill in Breaking the Waves, but backed out during production due to, "...the character's painful psychic and physical exposure," according to Roger Ebert. The role went to Emily Watson, who was nominated for an Academy Award for the role.

These early films led to her to being typecast as a "corset queen", and "English rose", playing pre- and early 20th century characters, particularly in Merchant-Ivory films. She played Olivia in Trevor Nunn's film version of Twelfth Night in 1996. She has since expanded her range, with her more recent films being Fight Club, Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit, and Tim Burton's Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Corpse Bride, Big Fish, Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street and Alice in Wonderland.

Bonham Carter speaks French fluently, starring in a 1996 French film Portraits chinois. In August 2001, she was featured in Maxim. She played her second Queen of England when she was cast as Anne Boleyn in the ITV1 mini-series Henry VIII; however her role was restricted, as she was pregnant with her first child at the time of filming. Bonham Carter was a member of the 2006 Cannes Film Festival jury that unanimously selected The Wind That Shakes the Barley as best film.

Bonham Carter played Bellatrix Lestrange in 2007's Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, 2009's Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, and the 2010–2011 film adaptations of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. Bonham Carter received positive reviews as Lestrange, described as a "shining but underused talent". She then played Mrs. Lovett, Sweeney Todd's (Johnny Depp) amorous accomplice in the film adaptation of Stephen Sondheim's Broadway musical, Sweeney Todd, the Demon Barber of Fleet Street. The film was released on 21 December 2007 in the US and 25 January 2008 in the UK. Directed by Tim Burton, Bonham Carter received a nomination for the Golden Globe for Best Actress for her performance. She won the Best Actress award in the 2007 Evening Standard British Film Awards for her performances in Sweeney Todd and Conversations With Other Women, along with another Best Actress award at the 2009 Empire Awards. Bonham Carter also appeared in the fourth Terminator film entitled Terminator Salvation, playing a small but pivotal role.
Helena Bonham Carter at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival in 2011.

In May 2006, Bonham Carter launched her own fashion line, "The Pantaloonies", with swimwear designer Samantha Sage. Their first collection, called Bloomin' Bloomers, is a Victorian style selection of camisoles, mop caps and bloomers. The duo are now working on Pantaloonies customised jeans, which Bonham Carter describes as "a kind of scrapbook on the bum".

Bonham Carter joined the cast of partner Tim Burton's 2010 film, Alice in Wonderland as The Red Queen. Bonham Carter appears alongside Johnny Depp, Anne Hathaway, Christopher Lee and Alan Rickman. Bonham Carter's role was an amalgamation of two roles, The Queen of Hearts, and The Red Queen. In early 2009, Bonham Carter was named one of The Times newspaper's top 10 British Actresses of all time. Bonham Carter appeared on the list with fellow actresses Julie Andrews, Helen Mirren, Maggie Smith, Judi Dench and Audrey Hepburn.

In 2010, Bonham Carter played Queen Elizabeth in the film The King's Speech. As of January 2011, Bonham Carter had received numerous plaudits for her performance, including nominations for the BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role and the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. Bonham Carter won her first BAFTA Award but lost the Academy Award to Melissa Leo for The Fighter.

Bonham Carter signed to play author Enid Blyton in the BBC Four television biopic, Enid. It was the first depiction of Blyton's life on the screen, and Bonham Carter starred with Matthew Macfadyen and Denis Lawson. Bonham Carter also received her first Television BAFTA Nomination for Best Actress, for Enid. In 2010, she starred with Freddie Highmore in the Nigel Slater biopic Toast, which was filmed in the West Midlands and received a gala at the 2011 Berlin Film Festival. She has now been confirmed to be taking on the role of Miss Havisham in Mike Newell's adaptation of the Charles Dickens novel, Great Expectations.
Personal life

In 2001, she began her current relationship with director Tim Burton, whom she met while filming Planet of the Apes. Burton has taken to casting Bonham Carter in his movies, including Big Fish, Corpse Bride, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, and Alice in Wonderland. They live in Belsize Park, London, in neighbouring houses with a connecting doorway because they could not get along in the same house.

They purchased the houses when she became pregnant with the couple's first child, son Billy Raymond Burton, who was born on 4 October 2003. The couple maintains a close relationship with Johnny Depp, who appears in many of Burton's films. Depp is godfather to both of Burton and Bonham Carter's children, accepting the role after Burton persuaded Bonham Carter to ask him. At age 41, she gave birth to her second child, a daughter named Nell Burton, on 15 December 2007 in Central London. She says she named her daughter Nell after all the "Helens" in her family.

In August 2008, four of her relatives were killed in a safari bus crash in South Africa, and she was given indefinite leave from filming Terminator Salvation, returning later to complete filming.

In 2008, Bonham Carter and Burton put their American apartments up for sale. The apartments are in the Greenwich Village area, in New York City. The couple sold them for a collective $8.75 million. In early October 2008, it was released that Bonham Carter had become a patron of the charity Action Duchenne, the national charity established to support parents and sufferers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

On 5 January 2011, a photo was released of Bonham Carter and Burton walking on Coombe Hill, the Chilterns, with British Prime Minister David Cameron and his family. It has been suggested that the two couples were introduced through Nick Clegg whom Bonham Carter had performed alongside in a play while attending Westminster School.
Filmography
Films Year↓ Title↓ Role↓ Notes
1983 Pattern of Roses, AA Pattern of Roses Netty Bellinger
1985 Room with a View, AA Room with a View Lucy Honeychurch
1986 Lady Jane Lady Jane Grey
1987 Maurice Lady at Cricket Match (cameo role)
1987 Hazard of Hearts, AA Hazard of Hearts Serena Staverley
1988 Mask, TheThe Mask Iris
1988 Six Minutes with Ludwig The Star
1989 Francesco Chiara Offreduccio
1989 Getting It Right Lady Minerva Munday
1990 Hamlet Ophelia
1990 Early Life of Beatrix Potter, TheThe Early Life of Beatrix Potter Beatrix Potter
1991 Where Angels Fear to Tread Caroline Abbott
1991 Brown Bear's Wedding White Bear (voice)
1992 Howards End Helen Schlegel Nominated—BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role
1993 Dancing Queen Pandora/Julie aka Rik Mayall Presents Dancing Queen
1994 Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Elizabeth Frankenstein Nominated—Saturn Award for Best Actress
1994 Fatal Deception: Mrs. Lee Harvey Oswald Marina Oswald Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Miniseries or Television Film
1994 Dark-Adapted Eye, AA Dark-Adapted Eye Faith Severn (adult)
1994 Butter Dorothy
1995 Mighty Aphrodite Amanda Weinrib
1995 Margaret's Museum Margaret MacNeil Genie Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role
Chlotrudis Award for Best Actress (also for The Wings of the Dove)
Fantasporto International Fantasy Film Award for Best Actress
1995 Jeremy Hardy Gives Good Sex Herself (voice)
1996 Twelfth Night: Or What You Will Olivia
1996 Portraits chinois Ada
1997 Petticoat Expeditions, TheThe Petticoat Expeditions Narrator (voice)
1997 Keep the Aspidistra Flying Rosemary aka A Merry War
1997 Wings of the Dove, TheThe Wings of the Dove Kate Croy Boston Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actress
Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Chlotrudis Award for Best Actress (also for Margaret's Museum)
Dallas-Fort Worth Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Kansas City Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress
Las Vegas Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
London Film Critics Circle Award for British Actress of the Year
Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
National Board of Review Award for Best Actress
Society of Texas Film Critics Award for Best Actress
Southeastern Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Toronto Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Academy Award for Best Actress
Nominated—BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role
Nominated—Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama
Nominated—Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Satellite Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Drama
Nominated—Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role
1998 Merlin Morgan le Fay Nominated—Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress – Miniseries or a Movie
Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Series, Miniseries or Television Film
1998 Sweet Revenge Karen Knightly
1998 Theory of Flight, TheThe Theory of Flight Jane Thatchard Nominated—Satellite Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Drama
1999 Fight Club Marla Singer Empire Award for Best British Actress
1999 Women Talking Dirty Cora
1999 Nearly Complete and Utter History of Everything, TheThe Nearly Complete and Utter History of Everything Lily
2000 Carnivale Milly (voice)
2001 Planet of the Apes Ari Nominated—Empire Award for Best British Actress
Nominated—Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actress
2001 Novocaine Susan Ivey
2001 Football Mum
2002 Heart of Me, TheThe Heart of Me Dinah Nominated—British Independent Film Award for Best Actress
2002 Live from Baghdad Ingrid Formanek Nominated—Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress – Miniseries or a Movie
Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Miniseries or Television Film
2002 Till Human Voices Wake Us Ruby
2003 Big Fish Jennifer Hill/The Witch
2003 Henry VIII Anne Boleyn Fantasporto Award for Best Actress
Zee Cine Award – Critics' Choice Best Actress
2004 Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events Beatrice Baudelaire Uncredited cameo
2005 Conversations with Other Women Woman Evening Standard British Film Award for Best Actress
Tokyo International Film Festival Award for Best Actress
2005 Magnificent 7 Maggi Jackson
2005 Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit Lady Tottington (voice) Zee Cine Award for Best Voice Actress
Nominated—Annie Award for Best Voice Acting in an Animated Feature Production
2005 Corpse Bride Emily the Corpse Bride
(voice)
2005 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory Mrs. Bucket
2006 Sixty Six Esther Reubens
2007 Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix Bellatrix Lestrange Nominated—Fantasporto Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Scream Award for Scream Queen
2007 Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street Mrs. Lovett Empire Award for Best Actress
Evening Standard British Film Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
Nominated—Italian Online Movie Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role
Nominated—London Film Critics Circle Award for British Actress of the Year
Nominated—National Movie Award for Best Performance – Female
Nominated—Saturn Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Scream Award for Best Actress in a Horror Movie or Show
2009 Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince Bellatrix Lestrange Nominated—Scream Award for Best Villain
2009 Terminator Salvation Dr. Serena Kogan Nominated—Scream Award for Best Cameo
2009 Enid Enid Blyton International Emmy Award for Best Performance by an Actress
Nominated—BAFTA TV Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Broadcasting Press Guild Award for Best Actress
2009 Gruffalo, TheThe Gruffalo Mother Squirrel (voice)
2010 Alice in Wonderland The Red Queen Nominated—Comedy Film Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated—London Film Critics' Circle Award for Actress of the Year in a Supporting Role
Nominated—MTV Movie Award for Best Villain
Nominated—National Movie Award for Performance of the Year
2010 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 Bellatrix Lestrange
2010 King's Speech, TheThe King's Speech Queen Elizabeth American Film Institute Award – A Year of Excellence Award
BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role
British Independent Film Award for Best Supporting Actress
British Independent Film Award – The Richard Harris Award
Hollywood Award for Best Supporting Actress
Italian Online Movie Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role
Santa Barbara International Film Festival Award for Best Ensemble Cast
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture
Nominated—Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated—Alliance of Women Film Journalists Award for Best Ensemble Cast
Nominated—Alliance of Women Film Journalists Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated—Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Acting Ensemble
Nominated—Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated—Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated—Dallas-Fort Worth Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated—Denver Film Critics Society Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated—Detroit Film Critics Society Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated—Empire Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture
Nominated—Houston Film Critics Society Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated—Iowa Film Critics Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated—London Film Critics Circle Award for British Actress of the Year
Nominated—National Movie Award for Performance of the Year
Nominated—North Texas Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated—Phoenix Film Critics Society Award for Best Acting Ensemble
Nominated—Phoenix Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role
Nominated—Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role
Nominated—St. Louis Gateway Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated—Washington D.C. Area Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
2010 Toast Joan Potter Nominated—Broadcasting Press Guild Award for Best Actress
2011 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 Bellatrix Lestrange, Hermione Granger Post-production
2012 Dark Shadows Dr. Julia Hoffman Filming
Television Year↓ Title↓ Role↓ Notes
1987 Miami Vice Dr. Theresa Lyons Multiple Guest Arc
- "Duty and Honor"
- "Theresa"
1987 Screen Two Jo Marriner Episode: "The Vision"
1989 Theatre Night Raina Petkoff Episode: "Arms and the Man"
1991 Jackanory Reader Multiple Guest Arc
- "The Way to Sattin Shore: Part 1"
- "The Way to Sattin Shore: Part 2"
- "The Way to Sattin Shore: Part 3"
- "The Way to Sattin Shore: Part 4"
- "The Way to Sattin Shore: Part 5"
1994 Absolutely Fabulous Dream Saffron Episode: "Hospital"
1994 Good Sex Guide, TheThe Good Sex Guide Herself Episode: "Episode #2.1"
1996 Great War and the Shaping of the 20th Century, TheThe Great War and the Shaping of the 20th Century Vera Brittain Multiple Guest Arc
- "Slaughter"
- "Explosion"
Stage and radio Year↓ Production↓ Role↓ Notes
1985 Reluctant Debutante, TheThe Reluctant Debutante Unknown Performed on BBC Radio 4
1987 Tempest, TheThe Tempest Unknown Performed at Oxford Playhouse
1988 Woman in White, TheThe Woman in White Laura Fairlie Performed at Greenwich Theatre, London
1989 Happiest of All Princesses, TheThe Happiest of All Princesses Unknown Performed on BBC Radio 4
1989 Chalk Garden, TheThe Chalk Garden Unknown Performed at Windsor/Yvonne Arnaud Theatre, Guildford
1991 House of Bernarda Alba, TheThe House of Bernarda Alba Magdalena Performed at Nottingham Playhouse
1992 Barber of Seville, TheThe Barber of Seville Rosina Performed at Palace Theatre, Watford
1992 Trelawney of the Wells Imogen Parrot Performed at Comedy Theatre, London
1993 Secret Garden, TheThe Secret Garden Narrator by Frances Burnett
1993 Whales' Song, TheThe Whales' Song Narrator by Dyan Sheldon
1994 Seagull, TheThe Seagull Nina Mikhailovna Zarechnaya Performed on BBC Radio 4
1994 Dog So Small, AA Dog So Small Narrator by Philippa Pearce
1994 Way to Sattin Shore, TheThe Way to Sattin Shore Narrator by Philippa Pearce
1995 Song of Love Unknown Performed on BBC Radio 4
1995 Remember Me Narrator
1996 Capture the Castle, II Capture the Castle Rose Performed on BBC Radio 4
1997 House by the Sea, AA House by the Sea Unknown Performed on BBC Radio 4
1997 Diary of Anne Frank, TheThe Diary of Anne Frank Narrator
1998 Lantern Slides Violet Bonham Carter Performed on BBC Radio 4
2000 As You Like It Rosalind Performed on BBC Radio 4
2004 Rubenstein Kiss, TheThe Rubenstein Kiss Unknown Postponed
2010 Private Lives Amanda Performed on BBC Radio 4
http://i300.photobucket.com/albums/nn12/scaryxairy/helena.jpg
http://i162.photobucket.com/albums/t261/NellieBlye8/Helena%20Bonham%20Carter/Helena.jpg



She is an outstanding actress and is very beautiful.



Cat

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Philip Eno on 05/27/11 at 1:18 am


The person of the day...Helena Bonham Carter
Helena Bonham Carter (born 26 May 1966) is an English actress of film, stage, and television. She made her film debut in K. M. Peyton's A Pattern of Roses before winning her first leading role as the titular character in Lady Jane. She is known for her roles in films such as A Room with a View, Fight Club, and the Harry Potter series, as well as for frequently collaborating with director Tim Burton, her domestic partner since 2001. Bonham Carter is a two-time Academy Award nominee for her performances in The Wings of the Dove and The King's Speech; her portrayal of Queen Elizabeth in the latter film garnering her a BAFTA Award in 2011.
Bonham Carter has not received any formal training in acting. In 1979, she won a national writing contest and used the money to pay for her entry into the actors directory Spotlight. She made her professional acting début at the age of 16 in a television commercial. She also had a part in a minor TV film A Pattern of Roses.

Her first starring film role was as Lady Jane Grey in Lady Jane (1986), which was given mixed reviews by critics. The story reflected the tragic life of England's nine-days' Queen from her troubled adolescence and arranged marriage to her ill-fated accession and subsequent execution. Her breakthrough role was Lucy Honeychurch in A Room with a View, which was filmed after Lady Jane, but released beforehand. Bonham Carter also appeared in episodes of Miami Vice as Don Johnson's love interest during the 1986–87 season and then, in 1987 opposite Dirk Bogarde in The Vision and Stewart Granger in A Hazard of Hearts. Bonham Carter was originally cast in the role of Bess McNeill in Breaking the Waves, but backed out during production due to, "...the character's painful psychic and physical exposure," according to Roger Ebert. The role went to Emily Watson, who was nominated for an Academy Award for the role.

These early films led to her to being typecast as a "corset queen", and "English rose", playing pre- and early 20th century characters, particularly in Merchant-Ivory films. She played Olivia in Trevor Nunn's film version of Twelfth Night in 1996. She has since expanded her range, with her more recent films being Fight Club, Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit, and Tim Burton's Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Corpse Bride, Big Fish, Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street and Alice in Wonderland.

Bonham Carter speaks French fluently, starring in a 1996 French film Portraits chinois. In August 2001, she was featured in Maxim. She played her second Queen of England when she was cast as Anne Boleyn in the ITV1 mini-series Henry VIII; however her role was restricted, as she was pregnant with her first child at the time of filming. Bonham Carter was a member of the 2006 Cannes Film Festival jury that unanimously selected The Wind That Shakes the Barley as best film.

Bonham Carter played Bellatrix Lestrange in 2007's Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, 2009's Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, and the 2010–2011 film adaptations of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. Bonham Carter received positive reviews as Lestrange, described as a "shining but underused talent". She then played Mrs. Lovett, Sweeney Todd's (Johnny Depp) amorous accomplice in the film adaptation of Stephen Sondheim's Broadway musical, Sweeney Todd, the Demon Barber of Fleet Street. The film was released on 21 December 2007 in the US and 25 January 2008 in the UK. Directed by Tim Burton, Bonham Carter received a nomination for the Golden Globe for Best Actress for her performance. She won the Best Actress award in the 2007 Evening Standard British Film Awards for her performances in Sweeney Todd and Conversations With Other Women, along with another Best Actress award at the 2009 Empire Awards. Bonham Carter also appeared in the fourth Terminator film entitled Terminator Salvation, playing a small but pivotal role.
Helena Bonham Carter at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival in 2011.

In May 2006, Bonham Carter launched her own fashion line, "The Pantaloonies", with swimwear designer Samantha Sage. Their first collection, called Bloomin' Bloomers, is a Victorian style selection of camisoles, mop caps and bloomers. The duo are now working on Pantaloonies customised jeans, which Bonham Carter describes as "a kind of scrapbook on the bum".

Bonham Carter joined the cast of partner Tim Burton's 2010 film, Alice in Wonderland as The Red Queen. Bonham Carter appears alongside Johnny Depp, Anne Hathaway, Christopher Lee and Alan Rickman. Bonham Carter's role was an amalgamation of two roles, The Queen of Hearts, and The Red Queen. In early 2009, Bonham Carter was named one of The Times newspaper's top 10 British Actresses of all time. Bonham Carter appeared on the list with fellow actresses Julie Andrews, Helen Mirren, Maggie Smith, Judi Dench and Audrey Hepburn.

In 2010, Bonham Carter played Queen Elizabeth in the film The King's Speech. As of January 2011, Bonham Carter had received numerous plaudits for her performance, including nominations for the BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role and the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. Bonham Carter won her first BAFTA Award but lost the Academy Award to Melissa Leo for The Fighter.

Bonham Carter signed to play author Enid Blyton in the BBC Four television biopic, Enid. It was the first depiction of Blyton's life on the screen, and Bonham Carter starred with Matthew Macfadyen and Denis Lawson. Bonham Carter also received her first Television BAFTA Nomination for Best Actress, for Enid. In 2010, she starred with Freddie Highmore in the Nigel Slater biopic Toast, which was filmed in the West Midlands and received a gala at the 2011 Berlin Film Festival. She has now been confirmed to be taking on the role of Miss Havisham in Mike Newell's adaptation of the Charles Dickens novel, Great Expectations.
Personal life

In 2001, she began her current relationship with director Tim Burton, whom she met while filming Planet of the Apes. Burton has taken to casting Bonham Carter in his movies, including Big Fish, Corpse Bride, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, and Alice in Wonderland. They live in Belsize Park, London, in neighbouring houses with a connecting doorway because they could not get along in the same house.

They purchased the houses when she became pregnant with the couple's first child, son Billy Raymond Burton, who was born on 4 October 2003. The couple maintains a close relationship with Johnny Depp, who appears in many of Burton's films. Depp is godfather to both of Burton and Bonham Carter's children, accepting the role after Burton persuaded Bonham Carter to ask him. At age 41, she gave birth to her second child, a daughter named Nell Burton, on 15 December 2007 in Central London. She says she named her daughter Nell after all the "Helens" in her family.

In August 2008, four of her relatives were killed in a safari bus crash in South Africa, and she was given indefinite leave from filming Terminator Salvation, returning later to complete filming.

In 2008, Bonham Carter and Burton put their American apartments up for sale. The apartments are in the Greenwich Village area, in New York City. The couple sold them for a collective $8.75 million. In early October 2008, it was released that Bonham Carter had become a patron of the charity Action Duchenne, the national charity established to support parents and sufferers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

On 5 January 2011, a photo was released of Bonham Carter and Burton walking on Coombe Hill, the Chilterns, with British Prime Minister David Cameron and his family. It has been suggested that the two couples were introduced through Nick Clegg whom Bonham Carter had performed alongside in a play while attending Westminster School.
Filmography
Films Year↓ Title↓ Role↓ Notes
1983 Pattern of Roses, AA Pattern of Roses Netty Bellinger
1985 Room with a View, AA Room with a View Lucy Honeychurch
1986 Lady Jane Lady Jane Grey
1987 Maurice Lady at Cricket Match (cameo role)
1987 Hazard of Hearts, AA Hazard of Hearts Serena Staverley
1988 Mask, TheThe Mask Iris
1988 Six Minutes with Ludwig The Star
1989 Francesco Chiara Offreduccio
1989 Getting It Right Lady Minerva Munday
1990 Hamlet Ophelia
1990 Early Life of Beatrix Potter, TheThe Early Life of Beatrix Potter Beatrix Potter
1991 Where Angels Fear to Tread Caroline Abbott
1991 Brown Bear's Wedding White Bear (voice)
1992 Howards End Helen Schlegel Nominated—BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role
1993 Dancing Queen Pandora/Julie aka Rik Mayall Presents Dancing Queen
1994 Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Elizabeth Frankenstein Nominated—Saturn Award for Best Actress
1994 Fatal Deception: Mrs. Lee Harvey Oswald Marina Oswald Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Miniseries or Television Film
1994 Dark-Adapted Eye, AA Dark-Adapted Eye Faith Severn (adult)
1994 Butter Dorothy
1995 Mighty Aphrodite Amanda Weinrib
1995 Margaret's Museum Margaret MacNeil Genie Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role
Chlotrudis Award for Best Actress (also for The Wings of the Dove)
Fantasporto International Fantasy Film Award for Best Actress
1995 Jeremy Hardy Gives Good Sex Herself (voice)
1996 Twelfth Night: Or What You Will Olivia
1996 Portraits chinois Ada
1997 Petticoat Expeditions, TheThe Petticoat Expeditions Narrator (voice)
1997 Keep the Aspidistra Flying Rosemary aka A Merry War
1997 Wings of the Dove, TheThe Wings of the Dove Kate Croy Boston Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actress
Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Chlotrudis Award for Best Actress (also for Margaret's Museum)
Dallas-Fort Worth Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Kansas City Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress
Las Vegas Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
London Film Critics Circle Award for British Actress of the Year
Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
National Board of Review Award for Best Actress
Society of Texas Film Critics Award for Best Actress
Southeastern Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Toronto Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Academy Award for Best Actress
Nominated—BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role
Nominated—Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama
Nominated—Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Satellite Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Drama
Nominated—Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role
1998 Merlin Morgan le Fay Nominated—Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress – Miniseries or a Movie
Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Series, Miniseries or Television Film
1998 Sweet Revenge Karen Knightly
1998 Theory of Flight, TheThe Theory of Flight Jane Thatchard Nominated—Satellite Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Drama
1999 Fight Club Marla Singer Empire Award for Best British Actress
1999 Women Talking Dirty Cora
1999 Nearly Complete and Utter History of Everything, TheThe Nearly Complete and Utter History of Everything Lily
2000 Carnivale Milly (voice)
2001 Planet of the Apes Ari Nominated—Empire Award for Best British Actress
Nominated—Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actress
2001 Novocaine Susan Ivey
2001 Football Mum
2002 Heart of Me, TheThe Heart of Me Dinah Nominated—British Independent Film Award for Best Actress
2002 Live from Baghdad Ingrid Formanek Nominated—Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress – Miniseries or a Movie
Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Miniseries or Television Film
2002 Till Human Voices Wake Us Ruby
2003 Big Fish Jennifer Hill/The Witch
2003 Henry VIII Anne Boleyn Fantasporto Award for Best Actress
Zee Cine Award – Critics' Choice Best Actress
2004 Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events Beatrice Baudelaire Uncredited cameo
2005 Conversations with Other Women Woman Evening Standard British Film Award for Best Actress
Tokyo International Film Festival Award for Best Actress
2005 Magnificent 7 Maggi Jackson
2005 Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit Lady Tottington (voice) Zee Cine Award for Best Voice Actress
Nominated—Annie Award for Best Voice Acting in an Animated Feature Production
2005 Corpse Bride Emily the Corpse Bride
(voice)
2005 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory Mrs. Bucket
2006 Sixty Six Esther Reubens
2007 Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix Bellatrix Lestrange Nominated—Fantasporto Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Scream Award for Scream Queen
2007 Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street Mrs. Lovett Empire Award for Best Actress
Evening Standard British Film Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
Nominated—Italian Online Movie Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role
Nominated—London Film Critics Circle Award for British Actress of the Year
Nominated—National Movie Award for Best Performance – Female
Nominated—Saturn Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Scream Award for Best Actress in a Horror Movie or Show
2009 Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince Bellatrix Lestrange Nominated—Scream Award for Best Villain
2009 Terminator Salvation Dr. Serena Kogan Nominated—Scream Award for Best Cameo
2009 Enid Enid Blyton International Emmy Award for Best Performance by an Actress
Nominated—BAFTA TV Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Broadcasting Press Guild Award for Best Actress
2009 Gruffalo, TheThe Gruffalo Mother Squirrel (voice)
2010 Alice in Wonderland The Red Queen Nominated—Comedy Film Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated—London Film Critics' Circle Award for Actress of the Year in a Supporting Role
Nominated—MTV Movie Award for Best Villain
Nominated—National Movie Award for Performance of the Year
2010 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 Bellatrix Lestrange
2010 King's Speech, TheThe King's Speech Queen Elizabeth American Film Institute Award – A Year of Excellence Award
BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role
British Independent Film Award for Best Supporting Actress
British Independent Film Award – The Richard Harris Award
Hollywood Award for Best Supporting Actress
Italian Online Movie Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role
Santa Barbara International Film Festival Award for Best Ensemble Cast
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture
Nominated—Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated—Alliance of Women Film Journalists Award for Best Ensemble Cast
Nominated—Alliance of Women Film Journalists Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated—Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Acting Ensemble
Nominated—Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated—Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated—Dallas-Fort Worth Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated—Denver Film Critics Society Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated—Detroit Film Critics Society Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated—Empire Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture
Nominated—Houston Film Critics Society Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated—Iowa Film Critics Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated—London Film Critics Circle Award for British Actress of the Year
Nominated—National Movie Award for Performance of the Year
Nominated—North Texas Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated—Phoenix Film Critics Society Award for Best Acting Ensemble
Nominated—Phoenix Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role
Nominated—Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role
Nominated—St. Louis Gateway Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated—Washington D.C. Area Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
2010 Toast Joan Potter Nominated—Broadcasting Press Guild Award for Best Actress
2011 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 Bellatrix Lestrange, Hermione Granger Post-production
2012 Dark Shadows Dr. Julia Hoffman Filming
Television Year↓ Title↓ Role↓ Notes
1987 Miami Vice Dr. Theresa Lyons Multiple Guest Arc
- "Duty and Honor"
- "Theresa"
1987 Screen Two Jo Marriner Episode: "The Vision"
1989 Theatre Night Raina Petkoff Episode: "Arms and the Man"
1991 Jackanory Reader Multiple Guest Arc
- "The Way to Sattin Shore: Part 1"
- "The Way to Sattin Shore: Part 2"
- "The Way to Sattin Shore: Part 3"
- "The Way to Sattin Shore: Part 4"
- "The Way to Sattin Shore: Part 5"
1994 Absolutely Fabulous Dream Saffron Episode: "Hospital"
1994 Good Sex Guide, TheThe Good Sex Guide Herself Episode: "Episode #2.1"
1996 Great War and the Shaping of the 20th Century, TheThe Great War and the Shaping of the 20th Century Vera Brittain Multiple Guest Arc
- "Slaughter"
- "Explosion"
Stage and radio Year↓ Production↓ Role↓ Notes
1985 Reluctant Debutante, TheThe Reluctant Debutante Unknown Performed on BBC Radio 4
1987 Tempest, TheThe Tempest Unknown Performed at Oxford Playhouse
1988 Woman in White, TheThe Woman in White Laura Fairlie Performed at Greenwich Theatre, London
1989 Happiest of All Princesses, TheThe Happiest of All Princesses Unknown Performed on BBC Radio 4
1989 Chalk Garden, TheThe Chalk Garden Unknown Performed at Windsor/Yvonne Arnaud Theatre, Guildford
1991 House of Bernarda Alba, TheThe House of Bernarda Alba Magdalena Performed at Nottingham Playhouse
1992 Barber of Seville, TheThe Barber of Seville Rosina Performed at Palace Theatre, Watford
1992 Trelawney of the Wells Imogen Parrot Performed at Comedy Theatre, London
1993 Secret Garden, TheThe Secret Garden Narrator by Frances Burnett
1993 Whales' Song, TheThe Whales' Song Narrator by Dyan Sheldon
1994 Seagull, TheThe Seagull Nina Mikhailovna Zarechnaya Performed on BBC Radio 4
1994 Dog So Small, AA Dog So Small Narrator by Philippa Pearce
1994 Way to Sattin Shore, TheThe Way to Sattin Shore Narrator by Philippa Pearce
1995 Song of Love Unknown Performed on BBC Radio 4
1995 Remember Me Narrator
1996 Capture the Castle, II Capture the Castle Rose Performed on BBC Radio 4
1997 House by the Sea, AA House by the Sea Unknown Performed on BBC Radio 4
1997 Diary of Anne Frank, TheThe Diary of Anne Frank Narrator
1998 Lantern Slides Violet Bonham Carter Performed on BBC Radio 4
2000 As You Like It Rosalind Performed on BBC Radio 4
2004 Rubenstein Kiss, TheThe Rubenstein Kiss Unknown Postponed
2010 Private Lives Amanda Performed on BBC Radio 4
http://i300.photobucket.com/albums/nn12/scaryxairy/helena.jpg
http://i162.photobucket.com/albums/t261/NellieBlye8/Helena%20Bonham%20Carter/Helena.jpg
She was great in The King's Speech.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 05/27/11 at 5:28 am

The person of the day...Louis Gossett Jr.
Louis Cameron Gossett, Jr. (born May 27, 1936) is an American actor best known for his role as Gunnery Sergeant Emil Foley in the 1982 film An Officer and a Gentleman and Fiddler in the 1970's television miniseries Roots. Gossett has also starred in numerous film productions such as The Deep, Jaws 3-D (as SeaWorld manager Calvin Bouchard), Wolfgang Peterson's Enemy Mine, the Iron Eagle series, Toy Soldiers and The Punisher. He has won an Academy Award, an Emmy Award, and two Golden Globe Award's in an acting career that spans over five decades.
Gossett made Broadway history in 1953 when he appeared as a star in Take a Giant Step, which was selected by The New York Times drama critics as one of the 10 best shows of the year. He was 17, and still a student at Abraham Lincoln High School, with no formal drama training.

Gossett stepped into the world of cinema in the Sidney Poitier vehicle A Raisin in the Sun in 1961. His role as Gunnery Sergeant Emil Foley in the 1982 film An Officer and a Gentleman (opposite Richard Gere) showcased his talent and won him an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor. He was the first African-American male to win an Oscar in a supporting role, the second black male to win for acting, and the third African-American actor to win overall. His win ended a 19-year Oscar drought for African-Americans, the second longest in the Academy's history since Hattie McDaniel's 1939 win for her supporting role in Gone with the Wind.

In 1986, Gossett starred in another role as a military man in the film Iron Eagle. It was followed by three sequels.

Gossett's Broadway theatre credits include A Raisin in the Sun (1959), Golden Boy (1964), and Chicago (2002).

He also has performed in other media, including television productions. His Emmy Award-winning role of Fiddler in the 1977 groundbreaking television miniseries Roots first brought Gossett to the audience's attention. In 1983, he was cast in the title role in Sadat, a miniseries which chronicled the life and assassination of Anwar Sadat. While filming An Officer and a Gentleman, Gossett was also starring in the 1982–1983 science fiction series, The Powers of Matthew Star. He plays the role of fictional U.S. President Gerald Fitzhugh in the movie Left Behind: World at War.

Gossett is the voice of the Vortigaunts in the video game Half-Life 2 (but he did not reprise the role in Half-Life 2: Episode Two) and is the Free Jaffa Leader Gerak in Season 9 of the sci-fi television series Stargate SG-1. He provides the voice of Lucius Fox in The Batman animated series. He recorded several commercials for a Nashville-based diabetic company, AmMed Direct, LLC. In 2008 he filmed the "Keep It Real" series of commercials for the Namibian lager Windhoek.

In 1997, Gossett presented When Animals Attack! 4, a one hour special on Fox. Gossett also co-wrote the antiwar folk song "Handsome Johnny" with Richie Havens.

Gossett portrayed John in the Word of Promise audio bible.
Philanthropy

In 2007, Gossett, Jr., was the honored guest and keynote speaker for the alumni hall of fame gala benefiting Boys & Girls Clubs of the Suncoast, St. Petersburg, Florida. Gossett has appeared every year supporting the Boys and Girls Clubs of America. He is an alumnus himself and has continued to work for and with the organization.
Personal life

Gossett has been married three times. His first marriage was to Hattie Glascoe; it was annulled. His second, to Christina Mangosing, took place on August 21, 1973. Their son Satie was born in 1974. Gossett and Mangosing divorced in 1975. His third marriage, to Star Search champion Cyndi James-Reese, took place on December 25, 1987. They adopted a son, Sharron (born 1977). Gossett and James-Reese divorced in 1992.. Louis is cousin to TV actor Robert Gossett who stars on TNT's The Closer.

On February 9, 2010, Gossett announced that he is suffering from prostate cancer. He added the disease was caught in its early stages, and expects to make a full recovery.
Filmography
Year↓ Medium↓ Title↓ Role↓ Notes↓
2011 Film The Grace Card George Wright
2010 Film Why Did I Get Married Too? Porter
2010 Film Smitty Mr. Smith post-production
2009 Film The Least Among You Samuel Benton
2009 Film Shannon's Rainbow Max
2009 Film Dog Jack Grown up Jed
2009 Television ER Leo Malcolm Episode: The Family Man
2008 Film Delgo Zahn voice only
2008 Film The Perfect Game Cool Papa Bell awaiting release
2008 Film The B.A.M.N. Squad TBA awaiting release
2007 Film Cover Det. Hicks
2007 Film Daddy's Little Girls Willie
2007 Television The Batman Lucius Fox Voice Role
2006 Film Club Soda Doc
2006 Film All In Caps
2006 Television Family Guy Sergeant Angryman Voice Role
Episode: Saving Private Brian
2005–2006 Television Stargate SG-1 Gerak
2005 Film Left Behind: World at War President Gerald Fitzhugh
2005 Film Window Ralph Stanley
2005 Television Lackawanna Blues Ol'lem Taylor HBO TV-Movie
2005 Television Solar Attack President Ryan Gordon Direct-to-DVD Release
2004 Television Half & Half Ray Willis Episode: The Big Lover, My Brother Episode
Episode: The Big Thanks for Nothing Episode
2003 Television Momentum Raymond Addison SCI FI TV-Movie
2003 Television Jasper, Texas R.C. Horn Image Award (nominated)
Showtime TV-Movie
2003 Television The Dead Zone Pastor David Lewis Episode: Zion
2002 Film Deceived Col. David Garrett Direct-to-Video Release
2002 Television Resurrection Blvd. Ezekiel 'Zeke' Grant Episode: En Un Momento
Episode: Esperando Lagrimas
2002 Television What About Your Friends: Weekend Getaway Dr. Barnes UPN TV-Movie
2002 Television Opening Ceremony Salt Lake Paralympic Winter Games Narrator
2001 Television For Love of Olivia Daniel Stewart CBS TV-Movie
2000 Film The Highwayman Phil Bishop
2000 Television The Color of Love: Jacey's Story Lou Hastings Satellite Award (nominated)
CBS TV-Movie
2000 Television The Inspectors 2: A Shred of Evidence Inspector Frank Hughes Showtime TV-Movie
2000 Television Dr. Lucille David Mulera TV-Movie
1999 Film Y2K Morgan
1999 Television Strange Justice Vernon Jordan Showtime TV-Movie
1999 Television Love Songs Reuben Segment: A Love Song for Dad
Showtime TV-Movie
Black Reel Award (won-1) (nominated-1)
1998 Television The Inspectors Inspector Frank Hughes Showtime TV-Movie
1997 Film Legend of the Mummy Corbeck
1997 Film The Wall That Heals Narrator
1997 Television Ellen Sgt. Timko Episode: G.I. Ellen
1997 Television Early Edition Jim Matthews Episode: The Medal
1997 Television In His Father's Shoes Frank Crosby/Richard CableACE Award (nominated)
Daytime Emmy Award (won-1) (nominated-1)
Showtime TV-Movie
1997 Television To Dance with Olivia Daniel Stewart CBS TV-Movie
1997 Television Touched by an Angel Anderson Walker Episode: Amazing Grace (1)
Episode: Amazing Grace (2)
Emmy Award (nominated)
Image Award (won)
1996 Film Managua Paul
1996 Television Inside Questioner TV-Movie
1996 Television Run for the Dream: The Gail Devers Story Bob Kersee TV-Movie
1996 Television Captive Heart: The James Mink Story James Mink Image Award (nominated)
TV-Movie
1995 Film Iron Eagle on the Attack Chappy Sinclair
1995 Television Ray Alexander: A Menu for Murder Ray Alexander
1995 Television Zooman Rueben Tate
1995 Television A Father for Charlie Walter Osgood
1994 Film Curse of the Starving Class Ellis
1994 Film A Good Man in Africa Prof. Sam Adekunle
1994 Film Blue Chips Father Dawkins
1994 Television Ray Alexander: A Taste for Justice Ray Alexander NBC TV-Movie
1994 Television Picket Fences Rick Jennings Episode: Terms of Estrangement
1993 Film Flashfire Ben Durand
1993 Film Monolith Capt. MacCandless
1993 Television Return to Lonesome Dove Isom Pickett Miniseries
1993 Television Father & Son: Dangerous Relations NBC TV-Movie
1993 Television Story of a People Host Miniseries
1992 Film Diggstown 'Honey' Roy Palmer
1992 Film Aces: Iron Eagle III Chappy Sinclair
1991 Film Toy Soldiers Dean Parker
1991 Film Cover Up Lou Jackson
1991 Television Keeper of the City Det. James Dela TV-Movie
1991 Television Carolina Skeletons James Bragg NBC TV-Movie
1991 Television The Josephine Baker Story Sidney Williams Golden Globe Award (won)
HBO TV-Movie
1990 Television Sudie and Simpson Simpson TV-Movie
1990 Television Captain Planet and the Planeteers Commander Clash Voice Role
1990 Television El Diablo Van Leek HBO TV-Movie
1989 Film The Punisher Jake Berkowitz
1989 Television Gideon Oliver Gideon Oliver
1988 Film Iron Eagle II Chappy Sinclair
1988 Television Roots: The Gift Fiddler ABC TV-Movie
1988 Television Goodbye, Miss 4th of July Big John Creed Disney Channel TV-Movie
1988 Television Sam Found Out: A Triple Play ABC TV-Movie
1987 Film The Principal Jake Phillips
1987 Film A Gathering of Old Men
1987 Television The Father Clements Story Father Clements NBC TV-Movie
1987 Television A Gathering of Old Men Mathu Emmy Award (nominated)
CBS TV-Movie
1986 Film Firewalker Leo Porter
1986 Film Iron Eagle Chappy Sinclair
1985 Film Enemy Mine Jeriba 'Jerry' Shigan Saturn Award (nominated)
1984 Film Finders Keepers Century
1984 Television The Guardian John Mack CableACE Award (nominated)
HBO TV-Movie
1983 Film Jaws 3-D Calvin Bouchard Razzie Award (nominated)
1983 Television Sadat Anwar al-Sadat Emmy Award (nominated)
Golden Globe Award (nominated)
TV-Movie
1982–1983 Television The Powers of Matthew Star Walter 'Walt' Shepherd/D'Hai
1982 Film An Officer and a Gentleman Gunnery Sergeant Emil Foley Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor
Golden Globe Award
NAACP Image Award
1982 Television Saturday Night Live Host Episode: Louis Gossett Jr/George Thorogood & The Destroyers
1982 Television Benny's Place Benny Moore ABC TV-Movie
1982 Television American Playhouse Episode: Zora is My Name!
1981 Television Don't Look Back: The Story of Leroy 'Satchel' Paige Leroy 'Satchel' Paige ABC TV-Movie
1980 Film It Rained All Night the Day I Left Leo Garcia
1980 Television Palmerstown, USA Emmy Award (nominated)
1979 Television The Lazarus Syndrome Dr. MacArthur St. Clair
1979 Television Lawman Without a Gun Tom Hayward NBC TV-Movie
1979 Television Backstairs at the White House Levi Mercer Emmy Award (nominated)
NBC Miniseries
1978 Television The Critical List Lem Harper NBC TV-Movie
1978 Television To Kill a Cop Everett Walker Uncredited Role
NBC TV-Movie
1978 Television The Sentry Collection Presents Ben Vereen: His Roots Emmy Award (nominated)
1978 Television The Lazarus Syndrome Dr. MacArthur St. Clair ABC TV-Movie
1977 Film The Choirboys Calvin Motts
1977 Film The Deep Henri Cloche
1977 Television Visions Rex Episode: Freeman
1977 Television Roots Fiddler Emmy Award (won)
TV Land Awards (won)
ABC Miniseries
1977 Television Little Ladies of the Night Russ Garfield ABC TV-Movie
1976–1977 Television The Rockford Files Marcus 'Gabby' Hayes Episode: Foul on the First Play
Episode: Just Another Polish Wedding
1976 Film J. D.'s Revenge Rev. Elija Bliss
1976 Film The River Niger Dr. Dudley Stanton
1976 Television Little House on the Prairie Henry Hill Episode: The Long Road Home
1975–1976 Television Police Story Freddie
Virgil Barnes Episode: The Cut Man Caper
Episode: 50 Cents-First Half Hour, $1.75 All Day
1975 Television The Six Million Dollar Man O'Flaherty Episode: Clark Templeton O’Flaherty
1975 Television The Jeffersons Wendell Brown Episode: George's Best Friend
1975 Television Harry O Cleon Jackson Episode: Shades
1975 Television Caribe David Wallace Episode: The Assassin
1975 Television Delancey Street: The Crisis Within Otis James NBC TV-Movie
1975 Television Black Bart Black Bart CBS TV-Movie
1975 Television Lucas Tanner Bobby Koball Episode: Bonus Baby
1974–1975 Television Good Times Donald Knight
Uncle Wilbert Episode: Thelma's Young Man
Episode: Michael's Big Fall
1974–1975 Television Petrocelli D.A. Kurt Olson Episode: A Very Lonely Lady
Episode: A Fallen Idol
1974 Film The White Dawn Portagee
1974 Television McCloud Dewey Justin Episode: Shivaree on Delancy Street
1974 Television The White Dawn Portagee ABC TV-Movie
1974 Television Sidekicks Jason O'Rourke TV remake of Gossett's 1971 Skin Game
CBS TV-Movie
1974 Television It's Good to Be Alive Sam Brockington CBS TV-Movie
1973 Film The Laughing Policeman Insp. James Larrimore SFPD
1973 Film The Fuzz Brothers Francis Fuzz
1973 Television Owen Marshall: Counselor at Law Episode: An Often and Familiar Ghost
1972 Film Travels with My Aunt Zachary/'Wordsworth'
1968–1969,
1972 Television The Mod Squad Smitty
Lloyd
Charley Jameson Episode: When Smitty Comes Marching Home
Episode: The Uptight Town
Episode: Can You Hear Me Out There?
1972 Television Love, American Style Segment: Love and the Christmas Punch...
1972 Television The Rookies Toby Jones Episode: Covenant with Death
1972 Television The Living End Doug Newman CBS TV-Pilot
1972 Television Insight Episode: The Man from Inner Space
1971 Film Skin Game Jason O'Rourke
1971 Television Cade's County Episode: The Alien Land
1971 Television Alias Smith and Jones Joe Sims Episode: The Bounty Hunter
1971 Television The Bold Ones: The New Doctors Dr. Karnes Episode: One Lonely Step
1971 Television Longstreet Sergeant Cory Episode: The Way of the Intercepting Fist
1971 Television Bonanza Buck Walter Episode: The Desperado
1971 Television The Partridge Family Sam Episode: Soul Club
1971 Television Big Fish, Little Fish
1970–1971 Television The Young Rebels Isak Poole
1970 Film The Landlord Copee
1970 Film Leo the Last Roscoe
1970 Television The Bill Cosby Show Hurricane Smith Episode: The Return of Big Bad Bubba Bronson
1969 Film The Bushbaby Tembo
1968 Television The Mod Squad Sgt William Smith (Smithy) Episode: When Smitty Comes Marching Home
1968 Television Companions in Nightmare Lt. Adam McKay NBC TV-Movie
1968 Television Daktari Mkono Episode: Adam and Jenny
1968 Television The Invaders Ollie Episode: The Vise
1967, 1968 Television Cowboy in Africa Fulah
Hemera Episode: Fang and Claw
Episode: The Quiet Death
1962 Television The Nurses William Taylor Episode: The Prisoner
1961 Film A Raisin in the Sun George Murchison
1958 Television The Big Story Jamie Goodwin Episode: The Stubbornest Man
Theatre

2006 Dvorak's New World: Chamber Music Plus. Louis Gossett, Jr., narrator, with Aubrey Allicock (Baritone), Sanda Schuldmann (piano), and Harry Clark (writer).
http://i44.photobucket.com/albums/f26/kameko_w/movies%20tv/LouisGossettJr.jpg
http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y108/seremot2/New/3d93bca8.jpg

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 05/27/11 at 6:44 am


The person of the day...Louis Gossett Jr.
Louis Cameron Gossett, Jr. (born May 27, 1936) is an American actor best known for his role as Gunnery Sergeant Emil Foley in the 1982 film An Officer and a Gentleman and Fiddler in the 1970's television miniseries Roots. Gossett has also starred in numerous film productions such as The Deep, Jaws 3-D (as SeaWorld manager Calvin Bouchard), Wolfgang Peterson's Enemy Mine, the Iron Eagle series, Toy Soldiers and The Punisher. He has won an Academy Award, an Emmy Award, and two Golden Globe Award's in an acting career that spans over five decades.
Gossett made Broadway history in 1953 when he appeared as a star in Take a Giant Step, which was selected by The New York Times drama critics as one of the 10 best shows of the year. He was 17, and still a student at Abraham Lincoln High School, with no formal drama training.

Gossett stepped into the world of cinema in the Sidney Poitier vehicle A Raisin in the Sun in 1961. His role as Gunnery Sergeant Emil Foley in the 1982 film An Officer and a Gentleman (opposite Richard Gere) showcased his talent and won him an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor. He was the first African-American male to win an Oscar in a supporting role, the second black male to win for acting, and the third African-American actor to win overall. His win ended a 19-year Oscar drought for African-Americans, the second longest in the Academy's history since Hattie McDaniel's 1939 win for her supporting role in Gone with the Wind.

In 1986, Gossett starred in another role as a military man in the film Iron Eagle. It was followed by three sequels.

Gossett's Broadway theatre credits include A Raisin in the Sun (1959), Golden Boy (1964), and Chicago (2002).

He also has performed in other media, including television productions. His Emmy Award-winning role of Fiddler in the 1977 groundbreaking television miniseries Roots first brought Gossett to the audience's attention. In 1983, he was cast in the title role in Sadat, a miniseries which chronicled the life and assassination of Anwar Sadat. While filming An Officer and a Gentleman, Gossett was also starring in the 1982–1983 science fiction series, The Powers of Matthew Star. He plays the role of fictional U.S. President Gerald Fitzhugh in the movie Left Behind: World at War.

Gossett is the voice of the Vortigaunts in the video game Half-Life 2 (but he did not reprise the role in Half-Life 2: Episode Two) and is the Free Jaffa Leader Gerak in Season 9 of the sci-fi television series Stargate SG-1. He provides the voice of Lucius Fox in The Batman animated series. He recorded several commercials for a Nashville-based diabetic company, AmMed Direct, LLC. In 2008 he filmed the "Keep It Real" series of commercials for the Namibian lager Windhoek.

In 1997, Gossett presented When Animals Attack! 4, a one hour special on Fox. Gossett also co-wrote the antiwar folk song "Handsome Johnny" with Richie Havens.

Gossett portrayed John in the Word of Promise audio bible.
Philanthropy

In 2007, Gossett, Jr., was the honored guest and keynote speaker for the alumni hall of fame gala benefiting Boys & Girls Clubs of the Suncoast, St. Petersburg, Florida. Gossett has appeared every year supporting the Boys and Girls Clubs of America. He is an alumnus himself and has continued to work for and with the organization.
Personal life

Gossett has been married three times. His first marriage was to Hattie Glascoe; it was annulled. His second, to Christina Mangosing, took place on August 21, 1973. Their son Satie was born in 1974. Gossett and Mangosing divorced in 1975. His third marriage, to Star Search champion Cyndi James-Reese, took place on December 25, 1987. They adopted a son, Sharron (born 1977). Gossett and James-Reese divorced in 1992.. Louis is cousin to TV actor Robert Gossett who stars on TNT's The Closer.

On February 9, 2010, Gossett announced that he is suffering from prostate cancer. He added the disease was caught in its early stages, and expects to make a full recovery.
Filmography
Year↓ Medium↓ Title↓ Role↓ Notes↓
2011 Film The Grace Card George Wright
2010 Film Why Did I Get Married Too? Porter
2010 Film Smitty Mr. Smith post-production
2009 Film The Least Among You Samuel Benton
2009 Film Shannon's Rainbow Max
2009 Film Dog Jack Grown up Jed
2009 Television ER Leo Malcolm Episode: The Family Man
2008 Film Delgo Zahn voice only
2008 Film The Perfect Game Cool Papa Bell awaiting release
2008 Film The B.A.M.N. Squad TBA awaiting release
2007 Film Cover Det. Hicks
2007 Film Daddy's Little Girls Willie
2007 Television The Batman Lucius Fox Voice Role
2006 Film Club Soda Doc
2006 Film All In Caps
2006 Television Family Guy Sergeant Angryman Voice Role
Episode: Saving Private Brian
2005–2006 Television Stargate SG-1 Gerak
2005 Film Left Behind: World at War President Gerald Fitzhugh
2005 Film Window Ralph Stanley
2005 Television Lackawanna Blues Ol'lem Taylor HBO TV-Movie
2005 Television Solar Attack President Ryan Gordon Direct-to-DVD Release
2004 Television Half & Half Ray Willis Episode: The Big Lover, My Brother Episode
Episode: The Big Thanks for Nothing Episode
2003 Television Momentum Raymond Addison SCI FI TV-Movie
2003 Television Jasper, Texas R.C. Horn Image Award (nominated)
Showtime TV-Movie
2003 Television The Dead Zone Pastor David Lewis Episode: Zion
2002 Film Deceived Col. David Garrett Direct-to-Video Release
2002 Television Resurrection Blvd. Ezekiel 'Zeke' Grant Episode: En Un Momento
Episode: Esperando Lagrimas
2002 Television What About Your Friends: Weekend Getaway Dr. Barnes UPN TV-Movie
2002 Television Opening Ceremony Salt Lake Paralympic Winter Games Narrator
2001 Television For Love of Olivia Daniel Stewart CBS TV-Movie
2000 Film The Highwayman Phil Bishop
2000 Television The Color of Love: Jacey's Story Lou Hastings Satellite Award (nominated)
CBS TV-Movie
2000 Television The Inspectors 2: A Shred of Evidence Inspector Frank Hughes Showtime TV-Movie
2000 Television Dr. Lucille David Mulera TV-Movie
1999 Film Y2K Morgan
1999 Television Strange Justice Vernon Jordan Showtime TV-Movie
1999 Television Love Songs Reuben Segment: A Love Song for Dad
Showtime TV-Movie
Black Reel Award (won-1) (nominated-1)
1998 Television The Inspectors Inspector Frank Hughes Showtime TV-Movie
1997 Film Legend of the Mummy Corbeck
1997 Film The Wall That Heals Narrator
1997 Television Ellen Sgt. Timko Episode: G.I. Ellen
1997 Television Early Edition Jim Matthews Episode: The Medal
1997 Television In His Father's Shoes Frank Crosby/Richard CableACE Award (nominated)
Daytime Emmy Award (won-1) (nominated-1)
Showtime TV-Movie
1997 Television To Dance with Olivia Daniel Stewart CBS TV-Movie
1997 Television Touched by an Angel Anderson Walker Episode: Amazing Grace (1)
Episode: Amazing Grace (2)
Emmy Award (nominated)
Image Award (won)
1996 Film Managua Paul
1996 Television Inside Questioner TV-Movie
1996 Television Run for the Dream: The Gail Devers Story Bob Kersee TV-Movie
1996 Television Captive Heart: The James Mink Story James Mink Image Award (nominated)
TV-Movie
1995 Film Iron Eagle on the Attack Chappy Sinclair
1995 Television Ray Alexander: A Menu for Murder Ray Alexander
1995 Television Zooman Rueben Tate
1995 Television A Father for Charlie Walter Osgood
1994 Film Curse of the Starving Class Ellis
1994 Film A Good Man in Africa Prof. Sam Adekunle
1994 Film Blue Chips Father Dawkins
1994 Television Ray Alexander: A Taste for Justice Ray Alexander NBC TV-Movie
1994 Television Picket Fences Rick Jennings Episode: Terms of Estrangement
1993 Film Flashfire Ben Durand
1993 Film Monolith Capt. MacCandless
1993 Television Return to Lonesome Dove Isom Pickett Miniseries
1993 Television Father & Son: Dangerous Relations NBC TV-Movie
1993 Television Story of a People Host Miniseries
1992 Film Diggstown 'Honey' Roy Palmer
1992 Film Aces: Iron Eagle III Chappy Sinclair
1991 Film Toy Soldiers Dean Parker
1991 Film Cover Up Lou Jackson
1991 Television Keeper of the City Det. James Dela TV-Movie
1991 Television Carolina Skeletons James Bragg NBC TV-Movie
1991 Television The Josephine Baker Story Sidney Williams Golden Globe Award (won)
HBO TV-Movie
1990 Television Sudie and Simpson Simpson TV-Movie
1990 Television Captain Planet and the Planeteers Commander Clash Voice Role
1990 Television El Diablo Van Leek HBO TV-Movie
1989 Film The Punisher Jake Berkowitz
1989 Television Gideon Oliver Gideon Oliver
1988 Film Iron Eagle II Chappy Sinclair
1988 Television Roots: The Gift Fiddler ABC TV-Movie
1988 Television Goodbye, Miss 4th of July Big John Creed Disney Channel TV-Movie
1988 Television Sam Found Out: A Triple Play ABC TV-Movie
1987 Film The Principal Jake Phillips
1987 Film A Gathering of Old Men
1987 Television The Father Clements Story Father Clements NBC TV-Movie
1987 Television A Gathering of Old Men Mathu Emmy Award (nominated)
CBS TV-Movie
1986 Film Firewalker Leo Porter
1986 Film Iron Eagle Chappy Sinclair
1985 Film Enemy Mine Jeriba 'Jerry' Shigan Saturn Award (nominated)
1984 Film Finders Keepers Century
1984 Television The Guardian John Mack CableACE Award (nominated)
HBO TV-Movie
1983 Film Jaws 3-D Calvin Bouchard Razzie Award (nominated)
1983 Television Sadat Anwar al-Sadat Emmy Award (nominated)
Golden Globe Award (nominated)
TV-Movie
1982–1983 Television The Powers of Matthew Star Walter 'Walt' Shepherd/D'Hai
1982 Film An Officer and a Gentleman Gunnery Sergeant Emil Foley Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor
Golden Globe Award
NAACP Image Award
1982 Television Saturday Night Live Host Episode: Louis Gossett Jr/George Thorogood & The Destroyers
1982 Television Benny's Place Benny Moore ABC TV-Movie
1982 Television American Playhouse Episode: Zora is My Name!
1981 Television Don't Look Back: The Story of Leroy 'Satchel' Paige Leroy 'Satchel' Paige ABC TV-Movie
1980 Film It Rained All Night the Day I Left Leo Garcia
1980 Television Palmerstown, USA Emmy Award (nominated)
1979 Television The Lazarus Syndrome Dr. MacArthur St. Clair
1979 Television Lawman Without a Gun Tom Hayward NBC TV-Movie
1979 Television Backstairs at the White House Levi Mercer Emmy Award (nominated)
NBC Miniseries
1978 Television The Critical List Lem Harper NBC TV-Movie
1978 Television To Kill a Cop Everett Walker Uncredited Role
NBC TV-Movie
1978 Television The Sentry Collection Presents Ben Vereen: His Roots Emmy Award (nominated)
1978 Television The Lazarus Syndrome Dr. MacArthur St. Clair ABC TV-Movie
1977 Film The Choirboys Calvin Motts
1977 Film The Deep Henri Cloche
1977 Television Visions Rex Episode: Freeman
1977 Television Roots Fiddler Emmy Award (won)
TV Land Awards (won)
ABC Miniseries
1977 Television Little Ladies of the Night Russ Garfield ABC TV-Movie
1976–1977 Television The Rockford Files Marcus 'Gabby' Hayes Episode: Foul on the First Play
Episode: Just Another Polish Wedding
1976 Film J. D.'s Revenge Rev. Elija Bliss
1976 Film The River Niger Dr. Dudley Stanton
1976 Television Little House on the Prairie Henry Hill Episode: The Long Road Home
1975–1976 Television Police Story Freddie
Virgil Barnes Episode: The Cut Man Caper
Episode: 50 Cents-First Half Hour, $1.75 All Day
1975 Television The Six Million Dollar Man O'Flaherty Episode: Clark Templeton O’Flaherty
1975 Television The Jeffersons Wendell Brown Episode: George's Best Friend
1975 Television Harry O Cleon Jackson Episode: Shades
1975 Television Caribe David Wallace Episode: The Assassin
1975 Television Delancey Street: The Crisis Within Otis James NBC TV-Movie
1975 Television Black Bart Black Bart CBS TV-Movie
1975 Television Lucas Tanner Bobby Koball Episode: Bonus Baby
1974–1975 Television Good Times Donald Knight
Uncle Wilbert Episode: Thelma's Young Man
Episode: Michael's Big Fall
1974–1975 Television Petrocelli D.A. Kurt Olson Episode: A Very Lonely Lady
Episode: A Fallen Idol
1974 Film The White Dawn Portagee
1974 Television McCloud Dewey Justin Episode: Shivaree on Delancy Street
1974 Television The White Dawn Portagee ABC TV-Movie
1974 Television Sidekicks Jason O'Rourke TV remake of Gossett's 1971 Skin Game
CBS TV-Movie
1974 Television It's Good to Be Alive Sam Brockington CBS TV-Movie
1973 Film The Laughing Policeman Insp. James Larrimore SFPD
1973 Film The Fuzz Brothers Francis Fuzz
1973 Television Owen Marshall: Counselor at Law Episode: An Often and Familiar Ghost
1972 Film Travels with My Aunt Zachary/'Wordsworth'
1968–1969,
1972 Television The Mod Squad Smitty
Lloyd
Charley Jameson Episode: When Smitty Comes Marching Home
Episode: The Uptight Town
Episode: Can You Hear Me Out There?
1972 Television Love, American Style Segment: Love and the Christmas Punch...
1972 Television The Rookies Toby Jones Episode: Covenant with Death
1972 Television The Living End Doug Newman CBS TV-Pilot
1972 Television Insight Episode: The Man from Inner Space
1971 Film Skin Game Jason O'Rourke
1971 Television Cade's County Episode: The Alien Land
1971 Television Alias Smith and Jones Joe Sims Episode: The Bounty Hunter
1971 Television The Bold Ones: The New Doctors Dr. Karnes Episode: One Lonely Step
1971 Television Longstreet Sergeant Cory Episode: The Way of the Intercepting Fist
1971 Television Bonanza Buck Walter Episode: The Desperado
1971 Television The Partridge Family Sam Episode: Soul Club
1971 Television Big Fish, Little Fish
1970–1971 Television The Young Rebels Isak Poole
1970 Film The Landlord Copee
1970 Film Leo the Last Roscoe
1970 Television The Bill Cosby Show Hurricane Smith Episode: The Return of Big Bad Bubba Bronson
1969 Film The Bushbaby Tembo
1968 Television The Mod Squad Sgt William Smith (Smithy) Episode: When Smitty Comes Marching Home
1968 Television Companions in Nightmare Lt. Adam McKay NBC TV-Movie
1968 Television Daktari Mkono Episode: Adam and Jenny
1968 Television The Invaders Ollie Episode: The Vise
1967, 1968 Television Cowboy in Africa Fulah
Hemera Episode: Fang and Claw
Episode: The Quiet Death
1962 Television The Nurses William Taylor Episode: The Prisoner
1961 Film A Raisin in the Sun George Murchison
1958 Television The Big Story Jamie Goodwin Episode: The Stubbornest Man
Theatre

2006 Dvorak's New World: Chamber Music Plus. Louis Gossett, Jr., narrator, with Aubrey Allicock (Baritone), Sanda Schuldmann (piano), and Harry Clark (writer).
http://i44.photobucket.com/albums/f26/kameko_w/movies%20tv/LouisGossettJr.jpg
http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y108/seremot2/New/3d93bca8.jpg


a most well respected actor.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 05/28/11 at 6:28 am

The person of the day,,,Gladys Knight
Gladys Maria Knight (born May 28, 1944), known as the "Empress of Soul", is an American R&B/soul singer-songwriter, actress, businesswoman, humanitarian, and author. She is best known for the hits she recorded during the 1960s and 1970s, for both the Motown and Buddah Records labels, with her group Gladys Knight & the Pips, the most famous incarnation of which also included her brother Merald "Bubba" Knight and her cousins Edward Patten and William Guest.
Gladys Knight & the Pips joined the Motown roster in 1966, and, although regarded as a second-string act, scored several hit singles, including "I Heard It Through the Grapevine", (recorded later by Marvin Gaye), "Friendship Train" (1969), "If I Were Your Woman" (1970), "I Don't Want To Do Wrong" (1971), the Grammy Award winning "Neither One of Us (Wants to Be the First to Say Goodbye)" (1972), and "Daddy Could Swear (I Declare)" (1973). In their early Motown career Gladys Knight and the Pips toured as the opening act for Diana Ross and The Supremes. Gladys Knight stated in her memoirs that Miss Ross kicked her off the tour because the audience's reception to Knight's soulful performance overshadowed her. Berry Gordy later told Gladys that she was giving his act a hard time.
Knight and the Pips perform aboard the aircraft carrier USS Ranger on November 1, 1981.

The act left Motown for a better deal with Buddah Records in 1973, and achieved full-fledged success that year with hits such as the Grammy-winning "Midnight Train to Georgia" (#1 on the pop and R&B chart), "I've Got to Use My Imagination," and "You're the Best Thing That Ever Happened to Me". In the summer of 1974, Knight and the Pips recorded the soundtrack to the successful film Claudine with producer Curtis Mayfield. The act was particularly successful in Europe, and especially the United Kingdom. However, the Buddah hits all followed a number of years after their success in the U.S.. For example "Midnight Train to Georgia" hit the UK pop charts Top 5 in the summer of 1976, a full three years after its success in the U.S..

During this period of greater recognition, Knight made her motion picture acting debut in the film Pipe Dreams, a romantic drama set in Alaska. The film failed at the box-office, but Knight did receive a Golden Globe Best New Actress nomination.

Knight and the Pips continued to have hits until the late 1970s, when they were forced to record separately due to legal issues, resulting in Knight's first solo LP recordings--Miss Gladys Knight (1978) on Buddah and Gladys Knight (1979) on Columbia Records. Having divorced James Newman II in 1973, Knight married Barry Hankerson (future uncle of R&B singer Aaliyah), then Detroit mayor Coleman Young's executive aide. Knight and Hankerson remained married for four years, during which time they had a son, Shanga Ali. Upon their divorce, Hankerson and Knight were embroiled in a heated custody battle over Shanga Ali.

In the early 1980s, Johnny Mathis invited Gladys to record two duets – "When A Child Is Born" (previously a hit for Mathis) and "The Lord's Prayer".

"I Heard It Through the Grapevine"
Play sound
Gladys Knight & the Pips' version of the song, from their 1967 album Everybody Needs Love.
Problems listening to this file? See media help.

Signing with Columbia Records in 1980 and restored to its familiar quartet form, Gladys Knight & the Pips began releasing new material. The act enlisted former Motown producers Nickolas Ashford and Valerie Simpson for their first two LPs--About Love (1980) and Touch (1981). During this period, Knight kicked a gambling addiction to the game baccarat.

In 1987, Knight decided to pursue a solo career, and she and the Pips recorded their final LP together, All Our Love (1987), for MCA Records. Its lead single, "Love Overboard", was a successful hit and won a third Grammy for the act as well. After a successful 1988 tour, the Pips retired and Knight began her solo career. Gladys Knight & the Pips were inducted into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame in 1989 and into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1996.
Solo music career

While still with The Pips, Knight joined with Dionne Warwick, Stevie Wonder, and Elton John on the 1986 AIDS benefit single, "That's What Friends Are For" which won a Grammy for Best Pop Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal. In 1989, Gladys Knight recorded the title track for the James Bond movie Licence to Kill, a top 10 hit both in the UK, reaching #6, and Germany.

Knight's third solo LP, Good Woman, was released by MCA in 1991. It rose to #1 on the R&B album chart and featured the #2 R&B hit "Men". The album also featured "Superwoman", written by Babyface and featuring Dionne Warwick and Patti LaBelle. Knight and LaBelle would collaborate the same year on "I Don't Do Duets", a duet with Patti LaBelle from LaBelle's album Burnin'.

Her fourth solo LP, Just for You, went gold and was nominated for the 1995 Grammy Award for Best R&B Album.

In 1992 Vernon Ray Blue II, choir master of the year asked Gladys to record his first single "He Lifted Me"

Knight joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1998. She had occasionally teased LDS Church president, the late Gordon B. Hinckley, that his flock needs to inject some "pep" into their music. Knight created and now directs the Mormon-themed choir Saints Unified Voices. SUV has released a Grammy Award-winning CD titled One Voice, and occasionally performs at LDS church firesides.

In 2008, a duet between Knight and Johnny Mathis was released on Mathis' album A Night to Remember. Knight is ranked number eighteen on VH1 network's list of the 100 Greatest Women of Rock.

In the spring of 2008, Knight appeared alongside Chaka Khan, Patti Labelle and Diana Ross at the 'Divas with Heart' concert in aid of cardiac research, at New York's Radio City Hall.

In 2008 Gladys, Jack Black, Robert Downey Jr. and Ben Stiller performed on American Idol to raise money for charity. In March 2010, Randy Jackson mentioned on a new episode of the same show that he is back in the studio with Gladys Knight working on a new album.

In 2009 Knight sang "His Eye Is On The Sparrow" and "The Lord's Prayer" at the funeral service for Michael Jackson.

On December 21, 2010, Knight released her new single "Settle" on iTunes and Amazon.
UK Farewell Tour

In October 2009, Gladys started her farewell tour of the United Kingdom which featured Tito Jackson as her supporting act and special appearances by Dionne Warwick.

Speaking ahead of the Manchester show, Jackson said: "The UK was a very special place to my brother Michael and I'm so excited to be able to pay my respect to his fans here. To be able to do this whilst supporting our dear friend Gladys is a complete blessing." On the October 9 concert, his mother Katherine Jackson and his brother Randy were acknowledged in the audience.

The UK Farewell Tour featured higher production value than previous "Gladys Knight, a mic and a light" appearances by Gladys in the UK. A glossy program was available and the show featured pre-produced animation on large on-stage screens. The tour was promoted by an appearance on the TV program Later... with Jools Holland where Gladys performed "If I Were Your Woman" and "Help Me Make It Through the Night".

At select performances on the UK Farewell Tour recordings of the concerts were made available for sale on USB flash drives.
Acting and other work

Knight guest-starred on several television series throughout the 1980s and 1990s ,with roles on Benson, The Jeffersons, A Different World, Living Single, The Jamie Foxx Show and New York Undercover. In 1985, she co-starred on the CBS sitcom Charlie & Co. with comedian Flip Wilson. It lasted for one season. In April 2009, she made a special guest appearance and performed a song on Tyler Perry's House of Payne. Knight has also made a number of television cameo appearances, including Las Vegas, and 30 Rock.

Knight's son Shanga owns a chain of chicken and waffles restaurants based in Atlanta, bearing her name. Gladys Knight & Ron Winans' Chicken & Waffles currently have three locations in the Atlanta area. One location was featured on the Travel Channel original series Man v. Food.
Knight and Ron Winan's Chicken & Waffles in Atlanta.

In 2009, Gladys was featured in Tyler Perry's I Can Do Bad All By Myself and performed her song The Need To Be from the 1974 album I Feel a Song.

In 2008, she had a cameo in 30 Rock as the rest of the cast sang Midnight Train To Georgia.
Personal life

Knight has been married four times and has three children. In 1960, Knight married her high school sweetheart, Jimmy Newman. Knight became pregnant in 1962 and gave birth to a son, Jimmy III, that year. She retired from the road to raise her child while The Pips toured on their own. After giving birth in 1963 to a daughter, Kenya, Knight returned to recording with the Pips in order to support her family. Newman and Knight divorced in 1973. She lived in Detroit neighborhood (Sherwood Forest) and her children attended Gesu Catholic Grade School. She married producer and Blackground Records founder, Barry Hankerson, in 1974. They had one son, Shanga Hankerson. They later divorced in 1979. She married motivational speaker, Les Brown in 1995 but separated and divorced in 1997. Knight married current husband, William McDowell in 2001. They have fifteen grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

Knight converted to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1998.
Awards, honors and achievements
For awards won by Knight with the Pips, see Gladys Knight & the Pips.

    * Grammy Awards
          o 1986 Best Pop Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal – "That's What Friends Are For" – Dionne Warwick, Elton John, Gladys Knight & Stevie Wonder.
          o 2001 Best Traditional R&B Vocal Album – "At Last"
          o 2004 Best Gospel Performance – "Heaven Help Us All" – Ray Charles & Gladys Knight.
          o 2005 Best Gospel Choir Or Chorus Album – One Voice – Gladys Knight & The Saints Unified Voices.
          o 1996–2001 The Jamie Foxx Show- Played Jamie's Mother

    * Other awards
          o 1992 Gladys Knight was awarded an Essence Award for Career Achievement.
          o 1995 Gladys Knight was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in Los Angeles.
          o 1997: Gladys Knight received the Pinnacle Award during 5th Annual Trumpet Awards presentation in Atlanta, Georgia.
          o 2005: Gladys Knight received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the BET cable network.
          o 2006: Gladys Knight received a Legendary Award from the Las Vegas Music Awards.
          o 2007: Gladys Knight received Image Award for Outstanding Jazz Artist during The 38th NAACP Image Awards.
          o 2007: Gladys Knight was declared the "Empress of Soul" and presented with the 16th Annual Ella Award by the Society of Singers
          o 2008: Gladys Knight and Stevie Wonder were presented with the Best Living Legend Award at the 1st Annual The BET Honors.
          o 2008: Gladys Knight received the Lifetime Diva Award at the Stardust Music Awards in March.
          o 2008: Gladys Knight was honored by The National Black Arts Festival and The Coca Cola Company at the 2008 Legends Celebration.
          o 2009: Gladys Knight was inducted into the Hit Parade Hall of Fame.

She sang to President Gordon B. Hinckley of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in his birthday in a tribute at his life in 2005.
Solo discography
See also: Gladys Knight & the Pips discography
Singles

    * 1978: "I'm Coming Home Again" (#54 U.S. R&B)
    * 1979: "Am I Too Late" (#45 U.S. R&B)
    * 1981: "When a Child Is Born" (with Johnny Mathis) (#74 UK)
    * 1985: "That's What Friends Are For" (with Dionne Warwick, Elton John & Stevie Wonder) (#1 U.S. Pop, #1 U.S. R&B, #1 U.S. AC, UK #16)
    * 1986: "Loving On Borrowed Time" (w/Bill Medley) (#16 US AC)
    * 1989: "License to Kill" (#69 U.S. R&B, #18 U.S. AC, #6 UK) Wind Beneath My Wings (12# U.S. U.K. R&B #12 UK)
    * 1990: "If I Knew Then What I Know Now" (with Kenny Rogers) (#10 U.S. AC)
    * 1991: "Men" (#2 U.S. R&B)
    * 1991: "Meet Me in the Middle" (#78 U.S. R&B)
    * 1991: "Where Would I Be" (#66 U.S. R&B)
    * 1991: "Superwoman" (with Dionne Warwick & Patti LaBelle) (airplay-only)
    * 1994: "I Don't Want to Know" (#32 U.S. R&B)(#113 US POP)
    * 1994: "End of the Road" Medley: "If You Don't Know Me by Now"/"Love Don't Love Nobody" (#76 U.S. R&B)
    * 1995: "Next Time" (#30 U.S. R&B)
    * 1996: "Missing You" (with Brandy, Tamia & Chaka Khan) (#25 U.S. Pop, #10, U.S. R&B, #30 U.S. AC)

Albums

    * 1974: I feel a song (Buddah Records | Distributed by RCA)
    * 1978: Miss Gladys Knight (#57 U.S. R&B)
    * 1979: Gladys Knight (#79 U.S. R&B)
    * 1991: Good Woman (#45 U.S. Pop, #1 U.S. R&B)
    * 1994: Just for You (#53 U.S. Pop, #6 U.S. R&B)
    * 1998: Many Different Roads (#21 U.S. Gospel)
    * 2001: At Last (#98 U.S. Pop, #30 U.S. R&B)
    * 2005: One Voice (with Saints Unified Voices) (#95 U.S. R&B, #21 U.S. Gospel)
    * 2006: A Christmas Celebration (with Saints Unified Voices) (#155 U.S. Pop, #59 U.S. R&B, #1 U.S. Gospel)
    * 2006: Before Me (#93 U.S. Pop, #18 U.S. R&B, #4 U.S. Jazz)

Published works

    * Knight, Gladys. At Home With Gladys Knight, McGraw-Hill, 2001 – ISBN 1-58040-075-2
    * Knight, Gladys. Between Each Line of Pain and Glory: My Life Story, Hyperion Press, 1998 – ISBN 0-7868-8371-5
http://i295.photobucket.com/albums/mm125/DJB2607/Gladys_Knight1.jpg
http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t66/AAS151/1950/gladys.jpg

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 05/28/11 at 6:57 am


The person of the day,,,Gladys Knight
Gladys Maria Knight (born May 28, 1944), known as the "Empress of Soul", is an American R&B/soul singer-songwriter, actress, businesswoman, humanitarian, and author. She is best known for the hits she recorded during the 1960s and 1970s, for both the Motown and Buddah Records labels, with her group Gladys Knight & the Pips, the most famous incarnation of which also included her brother Merald "Bubba" Knight and her cousins Edward Patten and William Guest.
Gladys Knight & the Pips joined the Motown roster in 1966, and, although regarded as a second-string act, scored several hit singles, including "I Heard It Through the Grapevine", (recorded later by Marvin Gaye), "Friendship Train" (1969), "If I Were Your Woman" (1970), "I Don't Want To Do Wrong" (1971), the Grammy Award winning "Neither One of Us (Wants to Be the First to Say Goodbye)" (1972), and "Daddy Could Swear (I Declare)" (1973). In their early Motown career Gladys Knight and the Pips toured as the opening act for Diana Ross and The Supremes. Gladys Knight stated in her memoirs that Miss Ross kicked her off the tour because the audience's reception to Knight's soulful performance overshadowed her. Berry Gordy later told Gladys that she was giving his act a hard time.
Knight and the Pips perform aboard the aircraft carrier USS Ranger on November 1, 1981.

The act left Motown for a better deal with Buddah Records in 1973, and achieved full-fledged success that year with hits such as the Grammy-winning "Midnight Train to Georgia" (#1 on the pop and R&B chart), "I've Got to Use My Imagination," and "You're the Best Thing That Ever Happened to Me". In the summer of 1974, Knight and the Pips recorded the soundtrack to the successful film Claudine with producer Curtis Mayfield. The act was particularly successful in Europe, and especially the United Kingdom. However, the Buddah hits all followed a number of years after their success in the U.S.. For example "Midnight Train to Georgia" hit the UK pop charts Top 5 in the summer of 1976, a full three years after its success in the U.S..

During this period of greater recognition, Knight made her motion picture acting debut in the film Pipe Dreams, a romantic drama set in Alaska. The film failed at the box-office, but Knight did receive a Golden Globe Best New Actress nomination.

Knight and the Pips continued to have hits until the late 1970s, when they were forced to record separately due to legal issues, resulting in Knight's first solo LP recordings--Miss Gladys Knight (1978) on Buddah and Gladys Knight (1979) on Columbia Records. Having divorced James Newman II in 1973, Knight married Barry Hankerson (future uncle of R&B singer Aaliyah), then Detroit mayor Coleman Young's executive aide. Knight and Hankerson remained married for four years, during which time they had a son, Shanga Ali. Upon their divorce, Hankerson and Knight were embroiled in a heated custody battle over Shanga Ali.

In the early 1980s, Johnny Mathis invited Gladys to record two duets – "When A Child Is Born" (previously a hit for Mathis) and "The Lord's Prayer".

"I Heard It Through the Grapevine"
Play sound
Gladys Knight & the Pips' version of the song, from their 1967 album Everybody Needs Love.
Problems listening to this file? See media help.

Signing with Columbia Records in 1980 and restored to its familiar quartet form, Gladys Knight & the Pips began releasing new material. The act enlisted former Motown producers Nickolas Ashford and Valerie Simpson for their first two LPs--About Love (1980) and Touch (1981). During this period, Knight kicked a gambling addiction to the game baccarat.

In 1987, Knight decided to pursue a solo career, and she and the Pips recorded their final LP together, All Our Love (1987), for MCA Records. Its lead single, "Love Overboard", was a successful hit and won a third Grammy for the act as well. After a successful 1988 tour, the Pips retired and Knight began her solo career. Gladys Knight & the Pips were inducted into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame in 1989 and into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1996.
Solo music career

While still with The Pips, Knight joined with Dionne Warwick, Stevie Wonder, and Elton John on the 1986 AIDS benefit single, "That's What Friends Are For" which won a Grammy for Best Pop Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal. In 1989, Gladys Knight recorded the title track for the James Bond movie Licence to Kill, a top 10 hit both in the UK, reaching #6, and Germany.

Knight's third solo LP, Good Woman, was released by MCA in 1991. It rose to #1 on the R&B album chart and featured the #2 R&B hit "Men". The album also featured "Superwoman", written by Babyface and featuring Dionne Warwick and Patti LaBelle. Knight and LaBelle would collaborate the same year on "I Don't Do Duets", a duet with Patti LaBelle from LaBelle's album Burnin'.

Her fourth solo LP, Just for You, went gold and was nominated for the 1995 Grammy Award for Best R&B Album.

In 1992 Vernon Ray Blue II, choir master of the year asked Gladys to record his first single "He Lifted Me"

Knight joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1998. She had occasionally teased LDS Church president, the late Gordon B. Hinckley, that his flock needs to inject some "pep" into their music. Knight created and now directs the Mormon-themed choir Saints Unified Voices. SUV has released a Grammy Award-winning CD titled One Voice, and occasionally performs at LDS church firesides.

In 2008, a duet between Knight and Johnny Mathis was released on Mathis' album A Night to Remember. Knight is ranked number eighteen on VH1 network's list of the 100 Greatest Women of Rock.

In the spring of 2008, Knight appeared alongside Chaka Khan, Patti Labelle and Diana Ross at the 'Divas with Heart' concert in aid of cardiac research, at New York's Radio City Hall.

In 2008 Gladys, Jack Black, Robert Downey Jr. and Ben Stiller performed on American Idol to raise money for charity. In March 2010, Randy Jackson mentioned on a new episode of the same show that he is back in the studio with Gladys Knight working on a new album.

In 2009 Knight sang "His Eye Is On The Sparrow" and "The Lord's Prayer" at the funeral service for Michael Jackson.

On December 21, 2010, Knight released her new single "Settle" on iTunes and Amazon.
UK Farewell Tour

In October 2009, Gladys started her farewell tour of the United Kingdom which featured Tito Jackson as her supporting act and special appearances by Dionne Warwick.

Speaking ahead of the Manchester show, Jackson said: "The UK was a very special place to my brother Michael and I'm so excited to be able to pay my respect to his fans here. To be able to do this whilst supporting our dear friend Gladys is a complete blessing." On the October 9 concert, his mother Katherine Jackson and his brother Randy were acknowledged in the audience.

The UK Farewell Tour featured higher production value than previous "Gladys Knight, a mic and a light" appearances by Gladys in the UK. A glossy program was available and the show featured pre-produced animation on large on-stage screens. The tour was promoted by an appearance on the TV program Later... with Jools Holland where Gladys performed "If I Were Your Woman" and "Help Me Make It Through the Night".

At select performances on the UK Farewell Tour recordings of the concerts were made available for sale on USB flash drives.
Acting and other work

Knight guest-starred on several television series throughout the 1980s and 1990s ,with roles on Benson, The Jeffersons, A Different World, Living Single, The Jamie Foxx Show and New York Undercover. In 1985, she co-starred on the CBS sitcom Charlie & Co. with comedian Flip Wilson. It lasted for one season. In April 2009, she made a special guest appearance and performed a song on Tyler Perry's House of Payne. Knight has also made a number of television cameo appearances, including Las Vegas, and 30 Rock.

Knight's son Shanga owns a chain of chicken and waffles restaurants based in Atlanta, bearing her name. Gladys Knight & Ron Winans' Chicken & Waffles currently have three locations in the Atlanta area. One location was featured on the Travel Channel original series Man v. Food.
Knight and Ron Winan's Chicken & Waffles in Atlanta.

In 2009, Gladys was featured in Tyler Perry's I Can Do Bad All By Myself and performed her song The Need To Be from the 1974 album I Feel a Song.

In 2008, she had a cameo in 30 Rock as the rest of the cast sang Midnight Train To Georgia.
Personal life

Knight has been married four times and has three children. In 1960, Knight married her high school sweetheart, Jimmy Newman. Knight became pregnant in 1962 and gave birth to a son, Jimmy III, that year. She retired from the road to raise her child while The Pips toured on their own. After giving birth in 1963 to a daughter, Kenya, Knight returned to recording with the Pips in order to support her family. Newman and Knight divorced in 1973. She lived in Detroit neighborhood (Sherwood Forest) and her children attended Gesu Catholic Grade School. She married producer and Blackground Records founder, Barry Hankerson, in 1974. They had one son, Shanga Hankerson. They later divorced in 1979. She married motivational speaker, Les Brown in 1995 but separated and divorced in 1997. Knight married current husband, William McDowell in 2001. They have fifteen grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

Knight converted to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1998.
Awards, honors and achievements
For awards won by Knight with the Pips, see Gladys Knight & the Pips.

    * Grammy Awards
          o 1986 Best Pop Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal – "That's What Friends Are For" – Dionne Warwick, Elton John, Gladys Knight & Stevie Wonder.
          o 2001 Best Traditional R&B Vocal Album – "At Last"
          o 2004 Best Gospel Performance – "Heaven Help Us All" – Ray Charles & Gladys Knight.
          o 2005 Best Gospel Choir Or Chorus Album – One Voice – Gladys Knight & The Saints Unified Voices.
          o 1996–2001 The Jamie Foxx Show- Played Jamie's Mother

    * Other awards
          o 1992 Gladys Knight was awarded an Essence Award for Career Achievement.
          o 1995 Gladys Knight was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in Los Angeles.
          o 1997: Gladys Knight received the Pinnacle Award during 5th Annual Trumpet Awards presentation in Atlanta, Georgia.
          o 2005: Gladys Knight received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the BET cable network.
          o 2006: Gladys Knight received a Legendary Award from the Las Vegas Music Awards.
          o 2007: Gladys Knight received Image Award for Outstanding Jazz Artist during The 38th NAACP Image Awards.
          o 2007: Gladys Knight was declared the "Empress of Soul" and presented with the 16th Annual Ella Award by the Society of Singers
          o 2008: Gladys Knight and Stevie Wonder were presented with the Best Living Legend Award at the 1st Annual The BET Honors.
          o 2008: Gladys Knight received the Lifetime Diva Award at the Stardust Music Awards in March.
          o 2008: Gladys Knight was honored by The National Black Arts Festival and The Coca Cola Company at the 2008 Legends Celebration.
          o 2009: Gladys Knight was inducted into the Hit Parade Hall of Fame.

She sang to President Gordon B. Hinckley of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in his birthday in a tribute at his life in 2005.
Solo discography
See also: Gladys Knight & the Pips discography
Singles

    * 1978: "I'm Coming Home Again" (#54 U.S. R&B)
    * 1979: "Am I Too Late" (#45 U.S. R&B)
    * 1981: "When a Child Is Born" (with Johnny Mathis) (#74 UK)
    * 1985: "That's What Friends Are For" (with Dionne Warwick, Elton John & Stevie Wonder) (#1 U.S. Pop, #1 U.S. R&B, #1 U.S. AC, UK #16)
    * 1986: "Loving On Borrowed Time" (w/Bill Medley) (#16 US AC)
    * 1989: "License to Kill" (#69 U.S. R&B, #18 U.S. AC, #6 UK) Wind Beneath My Wings (12# U.S. U.K. R&B #12 UK)
    * 1990: "If I Knew Then What I Know Now" (with Kenny Rogers) (#10 U.S. AC)
    * 1991: "Men" (#2 U.S. R&B)
    * 1991: "Meet Me in the Middle" (#78 U.S. R&B)
    * 1991: "Where Would I Be" (#66 U.S. R&B)
    * 1991: "Superwoman" (with Dionne Warwick & Patti LaBelle) (airplay-only)
    * 1994: "I Don't Want to Know" (#32 U.S. R&B)(#113 US POP)
    * 1994: "End of the Road" Medley: "If You Don't Know Me by Now"/"Love Don't Love Nobody" (#76 U.S. R&B)
    * 1995: "Next Time" (#30 U.S. R&B)
    * 1996: "Missing You" (with Brandy, Tamia & Chaka Khan) (#25 U.S. Pop, #10, U.S. R&B, #30 U.S. AC)

Albums

    * 1974: I feel a song (Buddah Records | Distributed by RCA)
    * 1978: Miss Gladys Knight (#57 U.S. R&B)
    * 1979: Gladys Knight (#79 U.S. R&B)
    * 1991: Good Woman (#45 U.S. Pop, #1 U.S. R&B)
    * 1994: Just for You (#53 U.S. Pop, #6 U.S. R&B)
    * 1998: Many Different Roads (#21 U.S. Gospel)
    * 2001: At Last (#98 U.S. Pop, #30 U.S. R&B)
    * 2005: One Voice (with Saints Unified Voices) (#95 U.S. R&B, #21 U.S. Gospel)
    * 2006: A Christmas Celebration (with Saints Unified Voices) (#155 U.S. Pop, #59 U.S. R&B, #1 U.S. Gospel)
    * 2006: Before Me (#93 U.S. Pop, #18 U.S. R&B, #4 U.S. Jazz)

Published works

    * Knight, Gladys. At Home With Gladys Knight, McGraw-Hill, 2001 – ISBN 1-58040-075-2
    * Knight, Gladys. Between Each Line of Pain and Glory: My Life Story, Hyperion Press, 1998 – ISBN 0-7868-8371-5
http://i295.photobucket.com/albums/mm125/DJB2607/Gladys_Knight1.jpg
http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t66/AAS151/1950/gladys.jpg


It is always great to hear her music,there are so many songs I enjoy of hers.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: CatwomanofV on 05/28/11 at 4:08 pm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v78-ftcqpNw



Cat

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 05/29/11 at 10:11 am

The person of the day...Rupert Everett
Rupert James Hector Everett (born 29 May 1959, UK: /ˈruːpət ˈevərɪt/) is an English actor. He first came to public attention in 1981, when he was cast in Julian Mitchell's play and subsequent film Another Country as an openly gay student at an English public school, set in the 1930s. He has since appeared in many other films including My Best Friend's Wedding, An Ideal Husband, The Next Best Thing and the Shrek sequels.
Everett's break came in 1981 at the Greenwich Theatre and later West End production of Another Country, playing a gay schoolboy opposite Kenneth Branagh, followed by a film version in 1984 with Colin Firth. Following on with 1985's Dance With A Stranger, Everett began to develop a promising film career until he co-starred with Bob Dylan in the huge flop Hearts of Fire (1987). Around the same time, Everett recorded and released an album of pop songs entitled Generation Of Loneliness. Despite being managed by the largely successful pop svengali Simon Napier-Bell (who also managed Marc Bolan, launched and managed Japan, and steered Wham! to international fame), the public didn't take to his change in direction. The shift was short-lived, and he would only return to pop indirectly by providing backing vocals for his friend Madonna many years later, on her cover of "American Pie" and on the track "They Can't Take That Away from Me" on Robbie Williams' Swing When You're Winning in 2001.
1990s
Rupert Everett at the Cannes film festival.

In 1989, Everett moved to Paris, writing a novel, Hello, Darling, Are You Working? and coming out as gay, a disclosure which he has said may well have damaged his career. Returning to the public eye in The Comfort of Strangers (1990), several films of variable success followed. The Italian comics character Dylan Dog, created by Tiziano Sclavi, is graphically inspired by him. The English actor, in turn, later appeared in an adaptation of a novel based on Sclavi's novel, Dellamorte Dellamore. In 1995 he released a second novel, The Hairdressers of St. Tropez.

His career was revitalised by his award-winning performance in My Best Friend's Wedding (1997), playing Julia Roberts's friend. In 1999, he played Madonna's best friend in The Next Best Thing (he also sang backup on her cover of "American Pie", which is on the film's soundtrack). He has since appeared in a number of high-profile film roles, often playing leads. Also in 1999 he starred as the villainous Sanford Scolex/Dr. Claw in Disney's Inspector Gadget with Matthew Broderick.
2000s
Everett at a speed dating event with When The Music Stops, for Channel 4's The Friday Night Project in July 2007

In recent years, Everett has decided to write again. He has been a Vanity Fair contributing editor and wrote a film screenplay on playwright Oscar Wilde's final years, for which he seeks funding. In 2006, he published a memoir, Red Carpets and Other Banana Skins. In it he revealed he had a six-year affair with British television presenter Paula Yates. "I am mystified by my heterosexual affairs — but then I am mystified by most of my relationships," he wrote. Although he is sometimes described as bisexual as opposed to homosexual, at a radio show with Jonathan Ross, he described his heterosexual affairs as resulting from adventurousness: "I was basically adventurous, I think I wanted to try everything" and in an interview on This Morning he simply described himself as homosexual, making a joke of any suggestion he might find a woman attractive.

Since then, Everett has participated in public activities (leading the 2007 Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras), played a double role in the film St. Trinian's, and has appeared on TV several times (as a contestant in the special Comic Relief Does The Apprentice, as a presenter at Live Earth and as guest host at Channel 4 show The Friday Night Project among others), but has made much news for making shocking comments and remarks at interviews that have caused public outrage.

In May 2007, he delivered one of the eulogies at the funeral of fashionista Isabella Blow, his friend since they were in their teens. He currently lives in London.

Everett recently told British newspaper The Observer that he wished he had never come out of the closet as he feels that it hurt his career and advises younger actors not to:
“ The fact is that you could not be, and still cannot be, a 25-year-old homosexual trying to make it in the British film business or the American film business or even the Italian film business. It just doesn't work and you're going to hit a brick wall at some point. You're going to manage to make it roll for a certain amount of time, but at the first sign of failure they'll cut you right off... Honestly, I would not advise any actor necessarily, if he was really thinking of his career, to come out.
Recent projects

Everett presented the Channel 4 documentary on Romantic poet Lord Byron's travels, broadcast in July 2009 and has a part in the comedy film Wild Target, starring Bill Nighy. He recently made his Broadway debut at the Shubert Theatre to good critical review, performing in a Noël Coward play, Blithe Spirit, starring alongside Angela Lansbury, Christine Ebersole and Jayne Atkinson, directed by Michael Blakemore. He was also expected to tour several Italian cities, during the 2008–2009 winter season in another Noël Coward play, Private Lives (performed in Italian, which he speaks fluently), playing Elyot to Italian actress Asia Argento's Amanda. However, production was canceled and the play never opened. He played in a revival of Pygmalion as Professor Henry Higgins next to English actress Honeysuckle Weeks, with Stephanie Cole in the role of the Professor's mother, at the Chichester Festival Theatre during the summer of 2010. In May 2011 he revived this role in the Garrick Theatre in Londons West End. Starring along side him were Diana Rigg as Professor Higgins mother and Kara Tointon as Eliza.

In July 2010, Everett featured in the popular family history programme Who Do You Think You Are?.
Filmography
Cinema
Year Film Role Notes
1982 A Shocking Accident Jerome and Mr. Weathersby Short film
1983 Princess Daisy Ram Valenski TV mini-series
1984 Another Country Guy Bennett based on the young Guy Burgess
Nominated — BAFTA Award for Best Newcomer
1985 Dance with a Stranger David Blakeley
1986 Duet for One Constantine Kassanis
1987 Gli occhiali d'oro Davide Lattes
1987 Hearts of Fire James Colt
1987 Chronicle of a Death Foretold Bayardo San Román
1990 The Comfort of Strangers Colin
1992 And Quiet Flows the Don Grigory aka Tikhiy Don
1994 Prêt-à-Porter Jack Lowenthal
The Madness of King George Prince of Wales
Dellamorte Dellamore Francesco Dellamorte aka Cemetery Man
1996 Dunston Checks In Lord Rutledge
1997 My Best Friend's Wedding George Downes American Comedy Award for Funniest Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture
Florida Film Critics Circle Award for Best Supporting Actor
Satellite Award for Best Supporting Actor - Motion Picture
Nominated — Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor - Motion Picture
Nominated — BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Supporting Role
Nominated – MTV Movie Award for Best Comedic Performance
Nominated — MTV Movie Award for Best Breakthrough Performance
Nominated — Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Supporting Actor
1998 Shakespeare in Love Christopher Marlowe
1998 B. Monkey Paul Neville
1999 An Ideal Husband Lord Goring Nominated — Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
Nominated — European Film Award for Best Actor
Nominated — Satellite Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
Inspector Gadget Sanford Scolex/Dr. Claw
A Midsummer Night's Dream Oberon
2000 The Next Best Thing Robert Whittaker
2000 Paragraph 175 Narrator Narrator for documentary film
2001 South Kensington Nick
2002 The Importance of Being Earnest Algernon / "Ernest"
2002 The Wild Thornberrys Movie Sloan Blackburn voice role
2003 Unconditional Love Dirk S.
2003 To Kill a King King Charles I
2004 Stage Beauty King Charles II
Shrek 2 Prince Charming voice role
A Different Loyalty Leo Cauffield
2005 Separate Lies Bill Bule
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe Mr. Fox voice role
2007 Stardust Secundus
Shrek the Third Prince Charming voice role
St. Trinian's Headmistress Camilla Fritton/Carnaby Fritton
2009 St. Trinian's II: The Legend of Fritton's Gold Headmistress Camilla Fritton
2010 Wild Target Ferguson
Television (selection)

    * The Manhood of Edward Robinson (1981) — guy
    * Soft Targets (1982) — Actor
    * Princess Daisy (1983) — Ram Valenski
    * The Far Pavilions (1984) — George Garforth
    * Arthur the King (1985) — Lancelot
    * Victoria's Secret Fashion Show (2001) — Host
    * Les Liaisons dangereuses (2003) — Vicomte Sébastien de Valmont
    * Mr. Ambassador (2003) — Ambassador Ronnie Childers
    * To Kill a King (2003) — King Charles I
    * Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Silk Stocking (2004) — Sherlock Holmes
    * Boston Legal (2005) — Malcolm Holmes
    * The Friday Night Project (2006) — Guest host, himself
    * Comic Relief Does The Apprentice (2007) — Celebrity contestant (walked out during first episode)
    * The Friday Night Project (2007) — Guest host
    * Katie & Peter: Unleashed (2007) — Celebrity guest
    * The Victorian Sex Explorer (2008) — Presenter
    * The Paul O'Grady Show (2009) — Guest
    * Who Do You Think You Are? (2010) — The subject, himself
    * The Chris Moyles Show (2010) - Guest
http://i61.photobucket.com/albums/h68/stranger_carrie/Rupert%20Everett/5.jpg
http://i245.photobucket.com/albums/gg73/Nrosa/rupert_everett_4.jpg

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 05/31/11 at 6:06 am

The person of the day....Clint Eastwood
Clinton "Clint" Eastwood, Jr. (born May 31, 1930) is an American film actor, director, producer, composer and politician. Following his breakthrough role on the TV series Rawhide (1959–65), Eastwood starred as the Man with No Name in Sergio Leone's Dollars Trilogy of spaghetti westerns (A Fistful of Dollars, For a Few Dollars More, and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly) in the 1960s, and as San Francisco Police Department Inspector Harry Callahan in the Dirty Harry films (Dirty Harry, Magnum Force, The Enforcer, Sudden Impact, and The Dead Pool) during the 1970s and 1980s. These roles, along with several others in which he plays tough-talking no-nonsense police officers, have made him an enduring cultural icon of masculinity.

Eastwood won Academy Awards for Best Director and Producer of the Best Picture, as well as receiving nominations for Best Actor, for his work in the films Unforgiven (1992) and Million Dollar Baby (2004). These films in particular, as well as others including Play Misty for Me (1971), The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976), Pale Rider (1985), In the Line of Fire (1993), The Bridges of Madison County (1995), and Gran Torino (2008), have all received commercial success and critical acclaim. Eastwood's only comedies have been Every Which Way but Loose (1978) and its sequel Any Which Way You Can (1980); despite being widely panned by critics they are the two highest-grossing films of his career after adjusting for inflation.

Eastwood has directed most of his own star vehicles, but he has also directed films in which he did not appear such as Mystic River (2003) and Letters from Iwo Jima (2006), for which he received Academy Award nominations and Changeling (2008), which received Golden Globe Award nominations. He has received considerable critical praise in France in particular, including for several of his films which were panned in the United States, and was awarded two of France's highest honors: in 1994 he received the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres medal and in 2007 was awarded the Légion d'honneur medal. In 2000 he was awarded the Italian Venice Film Festival Golden Lion for lifetime achievement.

Since 1967 Eastwood has run his own production company, Malpaso, which has produced the vast majority of his films. He also served as the nonpartisan mayor of Carmel-by-the-Sea, California, from 1986 to 1988. Eastwood has seven children by five women, although he has only married twice. An audiophile, Eastwood is also associated with jazz and has composed and performed pieces in several films along with his eldest son, Kyle Eastwood.
Main articles: List of awards and nominations received by Clint Eastwood and List of awards and nominations received by Clint Eastwood by film
Academy Awards Year Award Film W/N
1992 Best Director Unforgiven Won
Best Picture Unforgiven Won
Best Actor Unforgiven Nominated
1994 Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award Won
2003 Best Director Mystic River Nominated
Best Picture Mystic River Nominated
2004 Best Director Million Dollar Baby Won
Best Picture Million Dollar Baby Won
Best Actor Million Dollar Baby Nominated
2006 Best Director Letters from Iwo Jima Nominated
Best Picture Letters from Iwo Jima Nominated

Eastwood has been recognized with multiple awards and nominations for his work in film, television, and music. His widest reception has been in film work, for which he has received Academy Awards, Directors Guild of America Awards, Golden Globe Awards, and People's Choice Awards, among others. Eastwood is one of only two people to have been twice nominated for Best Actor and Best Director for the same film (Unforgiven and Million Dollar Baby) the other being Warren Beatty (Heaven Can Wait and Reds). Along with Beatty, Robert Redford, Richard Attenborough, Kevin Costner, and Mel Gibson, he is one of the few directors best known as an actor to win an Academy Award for directing. On February 27, 2005, he became one of only three living directors (along with Miloš Forman and Francis Ford Coppola) to have directed two Best Picture winners. At age 74, he was also the oldest recipient of the Academy Award for Best Director. Eastwood has directed five actors in Academy Award–winning performances: Gene Hackman in Unforgiven, Tim Robbins and Sean Penn in Mystic River, and Morgan Freeman and Hilary Swank in Million Dollar Baby.
Clint Eastwood display in the entrance to the California Hall of Fame

On August 22, 1984, Eastwood was honored at a ceremony at Grauman's Chinese theater to record his hand and footprints in cement. Eastwood received the AFI Life Achievement Award in 1996 and received an honorary degree from AFI in 2009. On December 6, 2006, California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger and First Lady Maria Shriver inducted Eastwood into the California Hall of Fame located at The California Museum for History, Women, and the Arts. In early 2007, Eastwood was presented with the highest civilian distinction in France, Légion d'honneur, at a ceremony in Paris. French President Jacques Chirac told Eastwood that he embodied "the best of Hollywood". In October 2009, he was honored by the Lumière Award (in honor of the Lumière Brothers, inventors of the Cinematograph) during the first edition of the Lumière Film Festival in Lyon, France. This award honors his entire career and his major contribution to the 7th Art. In February 2010, Eastwood was recognized by President Barack Obama with an arts and humanities award. Obama described Eastwood's films as "essays in individuality, hard truths and the essence of what it means to be American."

Eastwood has also been awarded at least three honorary degrees from universities and colleges, including an honorary degree from University of the Pacific in 2006, an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from the University of Southern California on May 27, 2007, and an honorary Doctor of Music degree from the Berklee College of Music at the Monterey Jazz Festival on September 22, 2007.
Filmography
Main article: Clint Eastwood filmography

Eastwood has contributed to over 50 films over his career as actor, director, producer, and composer. He has acted in several television series, most notably starring in Rawhide. He started directing in 1971 and made his debut as a producer in 1982 with Firefox and Honkytonk Man. Eastwood also has contributed music to his films, either through performing, writing, or composing. He has mainly starred in western, action, and drama films. According to the box office-revenue tracking website, Box Office Mojo, films featuring Eastwood have grossed a total of more than US$1.68 billion domestically, with an average of $37 million per film.
http://i265.photobucket.com/albums/ii232/sharongross32/clint_eastwood.jpg
http://i175.photobucket.com/albums/w128/BravoFoxtrott/clint_eastwood.gif


* There is more to read in Wikipedia

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: danootaandme on 05/31/11 at 6:25 am

Clint Eastwood is one of a kind. I have appreciated him since he was Rowdy Yates.  I have been sitting home ever since, waiting for him to call  http://www.inthe00s.com/smile/01/arrow-thru-heart.gif

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: CatwomanofV on 05/31/11 at 9:48 am

Go ahead. Make my day.



Cat

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: danootaandme on 05/31/11 at 12:40 pm

In My Dreams......BUT  Sig always says I'm more Jessica Walter than Donna Mills

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ypSPbIAApuQ

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 05/31/11 at 3:53 pm

http://mychinaconnection.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/go-ahead-make-my-day1.jpg

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/01/11 at 6:52 am

The person of the day...Powers Boothe
Powers Allen Boothe (born June 1, 1948) is an American television and film actor. Some of his most notable roles include his Emmy-winning 1980 portrayal of Jim Jones and his turn as Cy Tolliver on Deadwood, as well as Vice-President Noah Daniels on 24.
After graduating from college, Boothe joined the repertory company of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, with roles in Henry IV, Part 2 (portraying Henry IV of England), Troilus and Cressida, and others. His New York stage debut was in the 1974 Lincoln Center production of Richard III. Five years later, his Broadway theater debut came in a starring role in the one-act play Lone Star, written by James McLure. Boothe first came to national attention in 1980, playing Jim Jones in the CBS-TV movie Guyana Tragedy: The Story of Jim Jones. Boothe's portrayal of the crazed cult leader received critical acclaim. In Time's story on the production, Boothe was praised: "There is one extraordinary performance. A young actor named Powers Boothe captures all the charisma and evil of 'Dad', Jim Jones."

Boothe won the Emmy Award for his role, beating out veterans Henry Fonda and Jason Robards. As the Screen Actors Guild were on strike in the fall of 1980, he was the only actor to cross picket lines to attend the ceremonies. He said at the time, "This may be either the bravest moment of my career or the dumbest."

Powers Boothe made an appearance during the 1987 Celebrity Golf Challenge for Charity where he made the current long drive record for celebrities of 490 yards. For these efforts, Boothe was awarded the Golden Pumpkin. However, due to scheduling conflicts he could not receive the award in person.

Boothe joined the ranks of Humphrey Bogart and other actors when he portrayed Philip Marlowe in a series of short films for HBO in the 1980s. He appeared in films like Southern Comfort, A Breed Apart, Red Dawn, The Emerald Forest, Oliver Stone's Nixon (where he played Chief of Staff Alexander Haig), U Turn, and Extreme Prejudice, as well as HBO films like Into The Homeland and By Dawn's Early Light. He also appeared in the 1990 CBS-TV film Family of Spies, in which he played traitor Navy Officer John Walker. Boothe also portrayed Curly Bill Brocius in Tombstone, as well as the disloyal senior Army officer in Blue Sky (opposite Jessica Lange's Oscar-winning performance).

In 2001, he starred as Flavius Aëtius, the Roman general in charge of stopping the Hun invasion in the made-for-TV mini-series Attila. Most recently, Boothe has played a featured role as brothel-owner Cy Tolliver on the HBO series Deadwood, and the seedy Senator Roark in the motion picture Sin City. He is the voice of one of the characters in the 2005 video game Area 51 and Gorilla Grodd, the hyper-intelligent telepathic supervillain in Justice League and Justice League Unlimited. He voiced the villain, Kane, in the 2008 video game entitled Turok.

He was a special guest star on 24, where he played Vice President Noah Daniels. He returned in the prequel to the seventh season, 24: Redemption. Just after taking the role as acting President, Boothe is seen exiting Air Force Two with F-15s in the background. Boothe played a downed F-15 pilot in Red Dawn. In March 2008, he narrated a television campaign ad for Senator John McCain's presidential campaign. He maintains a private art collection which includes Western paintings of his friend and fellow actor Buck Taylor.
Filmography

    * The Goodbye Girl (1977) as a member of Richard III's Court
    * The Cold Eye (My Darling, Be Careful) (1980)
    * Skag (1980 TV series) as Whalen
    * Cruising (1980) as Hanky salesman
    * The Plutonium Incident (1980 TV) as Dick Hawkins
    * Guyana Tragedy: The Story of Jim Jones (1980 TV) as Rev. Jim Jones
    * A Cry for Love (1980 TV) as Tony Bonnell
    * Southern Comfort (1981) as Cpl. Charles Hardin
    * A Breed Apart (1984) as Mike Walker
    * Red Dawn (1984) as Lt. Col. Andrew Tanner
    * The Emerald Forest (1985) as Bill Markham
    * Philip Marlowe, Private Eye (1986 TV) as Philip Marlowe
    * Extreme Prejudice (1987) as Cash Bailey
    * Into the Homeland (1987 TV) as Jackson Swallow
    * Sapphire Man (1988)
    * Stalingrad (1989) as Vasily Chuikov
    * Family of Spies (1990 TV) as John A. Walker Jr
    * By Dawn's Early Light (1990 HBO Original Movie) as Maj. Cassidy
    * Rapid Fire (1992) as Mace Ryan
    * Wild Card (1992 TV) as Preacher
    * Angely Smerti (1993)
    * Marked for Murder (1993 TV) as Mace 'Sandman' Moutron
    * Tombstone (1993) as "Curly Bill" Brocious
    * Web of Deception (1994 TV) as Dr. Philip Benesch
    * Blue Sky (1994) as Vince Johnson
    * Mutant Species (1995) as Frost
    * Sudden Death (1995) as Joshua Foss
    * Nixon (1995) as Alexander Haig
    * Dalva (1996 TV) as Sam
    * True Women (1997 TV) as Bartlett McClure
    * U Turn (1997) as Sheriff Virgil Potter
    * The Spree (1998 TV) as Det. Bram Hatcher
    * Joan of Arc (1999 TV miniseries) as Jacques D'Arc
    * A Crime of Passion (1999 TV) as Dr. Ben Pierce
    * Men of Honor (2000) as Captain Pullman
    * Attila (2001 TV miniseries) as Flavius Aetius
    * Frailty (2001) as FBI Agent Wesley Doyle
    * Justice League (2001-2004 TV series, voice) as Gorilla Grodd
    * Second Nature (2003 TV) as Kelton Reed
    * Area 51 (2005 video game, voice) as Major Bridges
    * Sin City (2005) as Senator Roark
    * Deadwood (2004-2006 HBO TV series) as Cy Tolliver
    * Justice League Unlimited (2005-2006 TV series, voice) as Gorilla Grodd and Red Tornado
    * Ottoman Empire: The War Machine (2006 History Channel voice-over)
    * Superman: Brainiac Attacks (2006, voice) as Lex Luthor
    * The Final Season (2007) as Jim Van Scoyoc
    * 24 (2007 TV) as Vice President Noah Daniels, 14 episodes
    * The Final Season (2007) Coach
    * Indianapolis 500 (2009 TV) as narrator for ABC's opening
    * Turok (2008 video game, voice) as Roland Kane
    * Ben 10: Alien Force as Sunder (Singlehanded)
    * MacGruber (2010) Col. Jim Faith
    * DC Universe Online (2010 video game, voice) as Gorilla Grodd
http://i984.photobucket.com/albums/ae326/HueyLewisandEaglesfan/Powers%20Boothe/29891778.jpg
http://i984.photobucket.com/albums/ae326/HueyLewisandEaglesfan/Powers%20Boothe/Powers14.jpg

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/02/11 at 7:31 am

The person of the day...Stacy Keach
Walter Stacy Keach, Jr. (born June 2, 1941) is an American actor and narrator. He is most famous for his dramatic roles; however, he has done narration work in educational programming on PBS and the Discovery Channel, as well as some comedy (particularly his role in the FOX sitcom Titus as Ken, the hard-drinking, chain-smoking, womanizing father of comedian Christopher Titus) and musical roles.
In 1966 Keach played the title role, (with his take on Lyndon Johnson being MacBeth) in MacBird! an Off Broadway spoof at the Village Gate. Then in 1967, he was cast, again Off Broadway, in George Tabori's The ******lovers with Morgan Freeman (in his first ever acting job). To this day, Freeman credits Keach with teaching him the most about acting. Keach first appeared on Broadway in 1969 as Buffalo Bill in Indians by Arthur Kopit. Early in his career, he was credited as Stacy Keach, Jr. to distinguish himself from his father Stacy Keach, Sr. He played the lead actor in The Nude Paper Sermon an avant-garde musical theatre piece for media presentation, commissioned by Nonesuch Records by composer Eric Salzman.

He has won numerous awards including Obie awards, Drama Desk Awards, and Vernon Rice Awards. In the early 1980s, he starred in the title role of the national touring company of the musical Barnum composed by Cy Coleman. In 2006, he performed the lead role in Shakespeare's King Lear at the Goodman Theatre in Chicago. In 2008, he played Merlin in Lerner and Loewe's "Camelot", done with the NY Philharmonic. In the summer of 2009, he starred when Shakespeare Theatre Company mounted that production again at Sidney Harman Hall in Washington D.C..

He has played the title role in three separate productions of Hamlet.

In 2008 and 2009 Keach played Richard M. Nixon in the U.S. traveling version of the play Frost/Nixon.
Films

He played a rookie cop in The New Centurions (1972), opposite George C. Scott. That year he also starred in Fat City, a boxing film directed by John Huston. He was the first choice for the role of father Damien Karras in the 1973 movie The Exorcist, but he did not accept the role. He went on to play Kane in the 1980 movie The Ninth Configuration, written and directed by Blatty; this role was itself intended for Nicol Williamson.

Stacy Keach's storytelling talent as narrator was given worldwide exposure in the 1973 Formula One racing documentary "Champions Forever, The Quick and the Dead" by Claude du Boc.

Keach played Cheech and Chong's Police Department arch-nemesis Sgt. Stedenko in Up In Smoke and Nice Dreams. He also appeared as Barabbas in Jesus of Nazareth. In 1978 he played a role of explorer and scientist in The Mountain of the Cannibal God, co-starring former Bond girl Ursula Andress. The film became a cult favorite as a "Video nasty".

One of his most convincing screen performances was as Frank James (elder brother of Jesse) in The Long Riders (1980). Keach excelled in this role, portraying a character who shows maturity and perspective during the outlaws’ doomed career, but who is ultimately imprisoned by fraternal ties.. Long Riders famously included brothers playing brothers and Stacey's Brother James Keach played Jesse James ( The Carradine and Quaid brothers also starred in the film ). In 1982 Keach starred in Butterfly with Pia Zadora.

He portrayed a white supremacist in American History X, alongside Edward Norton and Edward Furlong. In Oliver Stone's 2008 biopic W., Keach portrays a Texas preacher whose spiritual guidance begins with George W. Bush's AA experience, but extends long thereafter.

Keach also starred in the TV film, Ring of Death playing a sadistic prison warden who runs an underground fight club where prisoners compete for their lives.
Television

One of Keach's early television roles was in 1958 on the syndicated romantic comedy, How to Marry a Millionaire, with Barbara Eden and Merry Anders. He played Barabbas in the 1977 Jesus of Nazareth (miniseries), and portrayed Jonas Steele, a psychic and Scout of the United States Army in the 1982 CBS miniseries, The Blue and the Gray. He later portrayed Mike Hammer in the CBS television series Mickey Spillane's Mike Hammer and The New Mike Hammer from 1984 to 1987. He returned to the role of Hammer in Mike Hammer, Private Eye, a new syndicated series that aired from 1997 to 1998.

In 2000, he played the cantankerous father Ken Titus in the title family of Fox's sitcom Titus. Cast members of Titus have commented they enjoyed working with Keach because, even with the dryest line the writers could invent, Keach would find a way to make the line funny.

Fans of The Simpsons may also recognize Keach's voice in the recurring role of Duff Brewery President, Howard K. Duff VIII, beginning with the 12th season episode, "Hungry, Hungry Homer", wherein Homer attempts to stop Howard K. Duff from moving the Springfield Isotopes baseball team to Albuquerque by staging a hunger strike.

Keach guest starred in the sitcom Will & Grace. He also had a recurring role as Warden Henry Pope in the Fox drama Prison Break. In 1984, he was convicted of smuggling cocaine into the United Kingdom and spent six months imprisoned in Reading Prison. The governor of that prison would serve as the basis for his character.
Narrator

Stacy Keach is perhaps most familiar to younger television viewers for narrating episodes of Nova, National Geographic, and various other informational series. Beginning in 1999, he served as the narrator for the home video clip show World's Most Amazing Videos, which is now seen on Spike TV. He currently hosts The Twilight Zone radio series. Keach can also be heard narrating the CNBC series American Greed. For the PBS series American Experience, he narrated The Kennedys, among others.

Keach portrays the role of "John" in "The Truth & Life Dramatized audio New Testament Bible," a 22-hour, celebrity-voiced, fully-dramatized audio New Testament which uses the RSV-CE translation.
Personal life

Keach was born with a cleft lip and a partial cleft of the hard palate and underwent numerous operations as a child. Throughout his adult life he has often worn a mustache to hide the scars. He is now the honorary chairman of the Cleft Palate Foundation, and advocates for insurance coverage for such surgeries. In the 1971 film Doc, Keach played the title character, John "Doc" Holiday, who may have been born with a cleft palate.

In 1984, London police arrested Keach at Heathrow Airport for carrying cocaine. Keach pleaded guilty, and served a nine-month sentence at Reading Prison.

He has been married four times: to Kathryn Baker in 1964, to Marilyn Aiken in 1975, to Jill Donahue in 1981, and to Malgosia Tomassi around 1986. He has two children from his third marriage. He was also romantically linked to singer Judy Collins in the early 1970s.

He had a mild stroke in March 2009 but has made a full recovery.
Filmography
Title↓ Year↓ Role↓ Notes
Joy Ride 1958 Wechsler
Heart Is a Lonely Hunter, TheThe Heart Is a Lonely Hunter 1968 Blount
Brewster McCloud 1970 Abraham Wright
End of The Road 1970 Jacob Horner
Traveling Executioner, TheThe Traveling Executioner 1970 Jonas Candide
Doc 1971 Doc Holliday
New Centurions, TheThe New Centurions 1972 Roy Fehler
Fat City 1972 Billy Tully KCFCC Award for Best Actor (tied with Marlon Brando forThe Godfather)
Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean, TheThe Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean 1972 Original Bad Bob the Albino
Wilbur and Orville: The First to Fly 1973 Wilbur Wright
Luther 1973 Martin Luther
Dion Brothers, TheThe Dion Brothers 1974 Calvin
Watched! 1974 Mike Mandell/Sonny
Conduct Unbecoming 1975 Captain Harper
Street People 1976 Charlie Hanson
Killer Inside Me, TheThe Killer Inside Me 1976 Lou Ford
Squeeze, TheThe Squeeze 1977 Jim Naboth
Greatest Battle, TheThe Greatest Battle 1978 Major Mannfred Roland
Gray Lady Down 1978 Capt. Bennett
Up in Smoke 1978 Sergeant Stedanko
Two Solitudes 1978 Huntley McQueen
Mountain of the Cannibal God 1979 Professor Edward Foster
Ninth Configuration, TheThe Ninth Configuration 1980 Col. Vincent Kane
Long Riders, TheThe Long Riders 1980 Frank James
Roadgames 1981 Patrick Quid
Nice Dreams 1981 Sergeant Stedanko
Butterfly 1982 Jess Tyler
That Championship Season 1982 James Daley
False Identity 1990 Ben Driscoll/Harlan Errickson
Class of 1999 1990 Dr. Bob Forest
Milena 1991 Jesenski
Sunset Grill 1993 Harrison Shelgrove
Batman: Mask of the Phantasm 1993 Carl Beaumont / Voice of Phantasm Voice only
New Crime City 1994 Wynorski
Raw Justice 1994 Deputy Mayor Bob Jenkins
Escape From L.A. 1996 Commander Malloy
Prey of the Jaguar 1996 The Commander
Sea Wolf, TheThe Sea Wolf 1997 Captain Wolf
American History X 1998 Cameron Alexander
Future Fear 1998 General Wallace
Fear Runs Silent 1999 Mr. Hill
Children of the Corn 666: Isaac's Return 1999 Dr. Michaels
Unshackled 2000 Warden Kelso
Icebreaker 2000 Bill Foster
Militia 2000 George Armstrong Montgomery
Mercy Streets 2000 Tom
Sunstorm 2001 General John Parker
Birds of Passage 2001 Captain Savienko
When Eagles Strike 2003 General Thurmond
Hollow, TheThe Hollow 2004 Claus Van Ripper
Caught in the Headlights 2004 Mr. Jones
Galaxy Hunter 2004 3V3
El Padrino: The Latin Godfather 2004 Governor Lancaster
Man with the Screaming Brain 2005 Dr. Ivanov
Keep Your Distance 2005 Brooks Voight
Come Early Morning 2006 Owen Allen
Jesus, Mary and Joey 2006 Jack O'Callahan
Honeydripper 2007 Sheriff
W. 2008 Earle Hudd
Chicago Overcoat 2009 Ray Berkowski
Boxer, TheThe Boxer 2009 Joe
Title↓ Year↓ Role↓ Notes
All the Kind Strangers 1974 Jimmy Wheeler Television film
Dynasty 1976 Matt Blackwood Mini series
Jesus of Nazareth 1977 Barabbas Mini series
Rumor of War, AA Rumor of War 1980 Maj. Ball Mini series
Blue and the Gray, TheThe Blue and the Gray 1982 Jonas Steele Mini series
Princess Daisy 1983 Prince Alexander "Stash" Valensky Mini series
Murder Me, Murder You 1983 Mike Hammer Television film
Mistral's Daughter 1984 Julien Mistral Mini series
More Than Murder 1984 Mike Hammer Television film
Mickey Spillane's Mike Hammer 1984–1985 Mike Hammer Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series - Drama
Return of Mickey Spillane's Mike Hammer, TheThe Return of Mickey Spillane's Mike Hammer 1986 Mike Hammer Television film
Intimate Strangers 1986 Dr. Jeff Bierston Television film
New Mike Hammer, TheThe New Mike Hammer 1986–1987 Mike Hammer Television series
Hemingway 1988 Ernest Hemingway Mini series
Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Miniseries or Television Film (tied with Michael Caine for Jack the Ripper)
Nominated—Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor - Miniseries or a Movie
Forgotten, TheThe Forgotten 1989 Adam Roth Television film
Mike Hammer: Murder Takes All 1989 Mike Hammer Television film
Mysteries of the Dark Jungle, TheThe Mysteries of the Dark Jungle 1991 Colonel Edward Corishant Mini series
Mission of the Shark: The Saga of the U.S.S. Indianapolis 1991 Capt. Charles Butler McVay Television film
Lincoln 1992 George McClellan (voice only) Television film
Rio Diablo 1993 Kansas Television film
Body Bags 1993 Richard Coberts Television film
Against Their Will: Women in Prison 1994 Jack Devlin Television film
Texas 1994 Sam Houston ABC Television film
Young Ivanhoe 1995 Pembrooke Television film
Amanda & the Alien 1995 Emmitt Mallory Television film
Pathfinder, TheThe Pathfinder 1996 Compte du Leon Television film
Legend of the Lost Tomb 1997 Dr. William Bent Television film
Murder in My Mind 1997 Cargill Television film
Mike Hammer, Private Eye 1997–1998 Mike Hammer Television series
Courage to Love, TheThe Courage to Love 2000 Jean Baptiste Television film
Titus 2000–2002 Ken Titus Television series
Lightning: Fire from the Sky 2001 Bart Pointdexter Television film
Simpsons, TheThe Simpsons 2001, 2003, 2006 Howard Duff (voice only) Television series
Santa Trap, TheThe Santa Trap 2002 Max Hurst Television film
Miracle Dogs 2003 C.W. Aldrich Television film
Frozen Impact 2003 Pete Crane Television film
Prison Break 2005–2007 Henry Pope Television series
Desolation Canyon 2006 Samuel Kendrick Television film
Fatal Contact: Bird Flu in America 2006 Secretary Collin Reed Television film
Blackbeard 2006 Capt. Benjamin Hornigold Television film
Death Row (a.k.a. Haunted Prison) 2006 John Elias Television film
Lone Rider 2008 Robert Hattaway Television film
Ring of Death 2008 Warden Golan Television film
Nanny Express, TheThe Nanny Express 2009 Rev. McGuiness Television film
Two and a Half Men 2009 Chelsea's father Television Series
Lights Out 2011 Pops Leary Television Series
http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f159/RaulMonkey/stacykeach1.jpg
http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b298/Stonergrunge/Varios/Stacy_Keach.jpg

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: gibbo on 06/02/11 at 7:36 am


In My Dreams......BUT   Sig always says I'm more Jessica Walter than Donna Mills

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ypSPbIAApuQ


Both are rather dishy in that film.  ::)

Clint is one of 3 actors that I can name 15 or more of their films. (With John Wayne and Elvis being the other two... ;D)

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/03/11 at 6:02 am

The person of the day... Suzi Quatro
Susan Kay "Suzi" Quatro (born June 3, 1950) is an American singer-songwriter, musician, and actress.

She scored a string of hit singles in the 1970s that found greater success in Europe than in her homeland, and had a recurring role on the popular American sitcom Happy Days.
Quatro was born into a Catholic musical family, in Detroit, Michigan. Her father, Art, a part-time jazz musician, was of Italian descent, while her mother, Helen Sanislay, was Hungarian. Quatro stated in her autobiography that her paternal grandfather, whose last name was Quattrocchi, shortened the family name to "Quatro" before she was born. She is the aunt of actress Sherilyn Fenn, whose mother is Quatro's sister Arlene. Quatro began her musical career at the age of fourteen. She played the bass guitar in the all-female band Pleasure Seekers and Cradle with her sisters Patti, Nancy, and Arlene. Also, according to her autobiography, her first bass guitar was a 1957 Fender Precision, given to her by her father. Patti Quatro later joined the band Fanny, one of the earliest all-female rock bands to gain national attention. She has a brother, Michael Quatro, who is also a musician.

Quatro moved to the United Kingdom in 1971 after being discovered in Detroit by the record producer Mickie Most, who produced The Animals, Jeff Beck, Lulu, and Donovan. By this time he had started his own label RAK Records, which made stars of Hot Chocolate and Mud.
Career
Music

Quatro's first single "Rolling Stone" did not achieve popularity except in Portugal, where it hit number one on the charts. Most introduced Quatro to the songwriting and production team Nicky Chinn and Mike Chapman. Following a support slot on a UK tour with Thin Lizzy and headliners Slade, her second single "Can the Can" (1973) was a number one hit throughout Europe and in Australia. It was followed up by three further hits: "48 Crash" (1973), "Daytona Demon" (1973), and "Devil Gate Drive" (1974) on RAK Records. "Can the Can", "48 Crash" and "Devil Gate Drive" each sold over one million copies, and were each awarded gold discs.

These recordings, a hybrid of glam rock and bubblegum pop, met little success in her native United States, despite tours in the mid-1970s supporting Alice Cooper. With the exception of Australia, from 1975 onwards, glam rock's popularity declined. In the interim, she did enjoy some success as a session player.

Quatro's fortunes did not change until 1978, when "If You Can't Give Me Love" became a hit in the United Kingdom and Australia. This did nothing to prompt Stateside success, but "Stumblin' In", a duet recorded that same year for RSO Records with Chris Norman of the band Smokie reached a #4 peak in the U.S. Both tracks featured on the If You Knew Suzi album. A year later, Quatro released Suzi... And Other Four Letter Words, which she called her favourite album. This featured singles, such as "She's In Love With You", which made number 11 in Britain, "Mama's Boy" (34), and "I've Never Been In Love" (56). In 1980, her song "Rock Hard" was featured on the soundtrack of the cult film Times Square, along with some punk and new wave bands like Talking Heads, Ramones, XTC, and The Pretenders. 1980 also saw the release of Suzi Quatro's Greatest Hits. This record was promoted with TV and radio promotions from the record label. This was her highest charting album in the UK, peaking at #4 in the UK Albums Chart. This success period proved brief however, and her last UK hit was "Heart of Stone" in late 1982. In 1985, Quatro collaborated with Bronski Beat and members of The Kinks, Eddie and the Hot Rods, and Dr. Feelgood on the Mark Cunningham produced version of David Bowie's "Heroes", released the following year as the 1986 BBC "Children In Need" single.

In December 2005, a documentary chronicling Quatro's life, Naked Under Leather, directed by former member of The Runaways Victory Tischler Blue, appeared. In February 2006, Quatro released "Back To the Drive", produced by Sweet guitarist Andy Scott. The album's title track was written by her former collaborator Mike Chapman.

In March 2007, Quatro released a version of the Eagles song "Desperado", followed by the publication of her autobiography, Unzipped.

Quatro has sold nearly 50 million records.
Acting and radio hosting

She is known in the United States for her role as Leather Tuscadero on the TV show Happy Days. Show producer Garry Marshall offered the role without an audition after seeing her on his daughter's bedroom wall. Leather was the younger sister of Fonzie's girlfriend, hot-rod driver Pinky Tuscadero. Leather fronted an all-girl rock band joined by principal character Joanie Cunningham. The character returned in other cameo roles, including once for a date to a fraternity formal with Ralph Malph. Marshall offered Quatro a Leather Tuscadero spin-off, but she refused, saying she did not want to be typecast. The indie rock band, Tuscadero, was named after her character.

Other acting roles include a 1982 episode of British comedy-drama series Minder called "Dead Men Do Tell Tales", as the singer girlfriend of Terry's (Dennis Waterman). In 1985, she starred as a mentally disturbed ex-MI5 operative in Dempsey and Makepeace - "Love you to Death". In 1986, Quatro appeared as Annie Oakley in a London production of Annie Get Your Gun.

In 1991, Quatro wrote and performed in a musical about the life of actress Tallulah Bankhead. Entitled "Tallulah who?" it was adapted from a book by Willie Rushton and ran from 15 February – 19 March at the Queen's Theatre, Hornchurch (Greater London - Essex). Suzi co-wrote the music and adapted the book with Shirlie Roden.

In 1994, she made a cameo appearance in an episode of the comedy Absolutely Fabulous. She also was filmed in the 1990 Clive Barker horror film Nightbreed, but the studio cut out her character.

In 2006, Quatro performed the voice of Rio in the Bob the Builder film Built To Be Wild, and appeared in an episode of the second season of Rock School, in Lowestoft. She also appeared in the episode "The Axeman Cometh" of Midsomer Murders alongside Phil Grainger in the role of Mimi Clifton.

In October 2006, Quatro was a contestant on the British reality television show Trust Me – I'm a Beauty Therapist'.

In addition to touring, Quatro has hosted weekly rock and roll programmes on BBC Radio 2. The first one was Rockin' with Suzi Q. Her second programme called "Wake Up Little Suzi". It aired on Thursdays.
Personal life

Quatro married her longtime guitarist Len Tuckey in 1976. They had two children together (Laura in 1982 and Richard Leonard in 1984) and divorced in 1992. Before 1993, Quatro lived in a manor house in Essex that she and Tuckey bought in 1980, with her two children and grandchild. She married German concert promoter Rainer Haas in 1993. Toward the end of 2008, Quatro's children moved out of the house, and she put it up for sale, but later she decided to remain in England. She explained that she had empty nest syndrome. Quatro continues to live in Essex, England. She continues to perform live around the world, doing an average of about 60 concerts per year.
Legacy

Quatro proved it was possible for a woman of small stature to proudly and raunchily wear leather, sing and play bass. She had a direct influence on The Runaways and Joan Jett. A number of music history revisionists have credited her with being a precursor to the 1990s riot grrrl movement. This has been disputed by Allmusic who noted her "innocuous" lyrics and that many of her songs were written for her by professional writers.

A Spanish rock band called Suzy & los Quattro released two albums on No Tomorrow in 2006 and 2008; in the tradition of Ramones and the Donnas, all of the bandmembers except for Suzy Chain list their last name as Quattro.
Discography
Studio albums

    * Suzi Quatro (1973, Can the Can in Australia)
    * Quatro (1974)
    * Your Mamma Won't Like Me (1975)
    * Aggro-Phobia (1976)
    * If You Knew Suzi (1978)
    * Suzi... And Other Four Letter Words (1979)
    * Rock Hard (1980)
    * Main Attraction (1982)
    * Oh Suzi Q. (1990)
    * What Goes Around (1996)
    * Unreleased Emotion (1998)
    * Back to the Drive (2006)
    * In The Spotlight (2011)

Live albums

    * Live and Kickin' (1977, Japan & Australia only live album; re-released as double CD in 1990 in Australia)

Compilation albums

    * Suzi Quatro's Greatest Hits' (1980)
    * The Best of... (1984, limited to RSO years)
    * The Wild One - The Greatest Hits (1990)
    * The Gold Collection (1996)

Singles
Year↓ Title↓ B-Side↓ UK Singles Chart↓ U.S.↓ Australia↓
1972 "Rolling Stone" "Brain Confusion" - - -
1973 "Can the Can" "Ain't Ya Something Honey" / "Don't Mess Around" (US) 1 56 1
1973 "48 Crash" "Little Bitch Blue" 3 - 1
1973 "Daytona Demon" "Roman Fingers" 14 - 4
1974 "All Shook Up" "Glycerine Queen" - 85 -
1974 "Devil Gate Drive" "In The Morning" 1 - 1
1974 "Too Big" "I Wanna Be Free" 14 - 13
1974 "The Wild One" "Shake My Sugar" 7 - 2
1975 "Your Mamma Won't Like Me" "Peter, Peter" 31 - 14
1975 "I Bit Off More Than I Could Chew" "Red Hot Rosie" - - -
1975 "Michael" "Savage Silk" - - 100
1975 "I May Be Too Young" "Don't Mess Around" - - 50
1977 "Tear Me Apart" "Close Enough For Rock 'n' Roll" 27 - 25
1977 "Make Me Smile" "Same As I Do" - - -
1977 "Roxy Roller" "I'll Grow on You" - - -
1978 "If You Can't Give Me Love" "Cream Dream" / "Non-Citizen" (US) 4 45 10
1978 "She's In Love With You" "Space Cadets" / "Starlight Lady" (US) 11 41 30
1979 "Stumblin' In" † "Stranger With You" 41 4 2
1979 "The Race Is On" "Non-Citizen" 43 - 28
1979 "Don't Change My Luck" "Wiser Than You" - - 72
1980 "Mama's Boy" "Mind Demons" 34 - -
1980 "I've Never Been In Love" "Starlight Lady" / "Space Cadets" (US) 56 44 -
1980 "Rock Hard" "State Of Mind" 68 - 9
1981 "Glad All Over" "Ego In The Night" - - -
1981 "Lipstick" "Woman Cry" - 51 46
1982 "Heart Of Stone" "Remote Control" 60 - 99
1983 "Down At The Superstore" "Half Day Closing (Down At The Superstore) " - - -
1983 "Main Attraction" "Transparent" - - -
1984 "I Go Wild" "I'm A Rocker" - - -
1985 "Tonight I Could Fall In Love" "Good Girl (Looking For A Bad Time)" - - -
1986 "Heroes" "A Long Way To Go"/"The County Line" - - -
1986 "I Got Lost In His Arms" "You Can't Get A Man With A Gun" - - -
1986 "Wild Thing" "I Don't Want You" - - -
1987 "Let It Be" "Let It Be (Gospel Jam Mix)" - - -
1988 "We Found Love" "We Found Love" (Instrumental) - - -
1989 "Baby You're A Star" "Baby You're A Star" (Instrumental) - - -
1991 "Kiss Me Goodbye" "Kiss Me Goodbye" (Instrumental) - - -
1991 "The Great Midnight Rock 'n' Roll House Party" "Intimate Strangers" - - -
1992 "Love Touch"
"Love Touch" (Single Version) "We Found Love" - - -
1992 "Hey Charley" - - - -
1992 "I Need Your Love" "The Growing Years" - - -
1993 "Fear Of The Unknown" (Radio Version) "And So To Bed" - - -
1994 "If I Get Lucky" (Radio Version) "If I Get Lucky" (Long version) - - -
1994 "Peace On Earth" (Radio edit)
"Peace On Earth" (Album Version) "Frosty The Snowman" - - -
1995 "What Goes Round" (Radio Edit)
"What Goes Round" (Album Version) "Four Letter Words" (Remix version) - - -
2006 "I'll Walk Through The Fire With You" - - - -
2009 "Singing with Angels" (Australian September tour limited edition) - - - -



† Suzi Quatro and Chris Norman
Filmography
Television

    * Disco (eleven episodes plus one retrospection, 1973–1980)
    * Happy Days (seven episodes, 1977–1979)
    * Minder (one episode, 1982)
    * Rod and Emu's Saturday Special (one episode, 1983)
    * The Krankies Klub (one episode, 1983)
    * Dempsey & Makepeace (one episode, 1985)
    * Absolutely Fabulous (one episode, 1994)
    * Countdown (six episodes, 1997)
    * Gene Simmons' Rock School (one episode on series two, 2006)
    * Bob the Builder - Built to be wild (voice of Rio, 2006)
    * Midsomer Murders (one episode, 2007)
    * Australian Idol (one episode as guest judge, 2009)

See also

    * Pleasure Seekers
http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh75/Nigelvonshaft/suzi-leather.jpg
http://i439.photobucket.com/albums/qq117/parko61/Music/Suzi.jpg

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: gibbo on 06/03/11 at 6:42 am

"With the exception of Australia, from 1975 onwards, glam rock's popularity declined."

Yep...I thought Suzi Q was just fantastic. What a big voice for a little girl.... her bass guitar was almost bigger than she was!  :o  Her music was a big part of my early teens... :)

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 06/03/11 at 6:48 am


The person of the day... Suzi Quatro
Susan Kay "Suzi" Quatro (born June 3, 1950) is an American singer-songwriter, musician, and actress.

She scored a string of hit singles in the 1970s that found greater success in Europe than in her homeland, and had a recurring role on the popular American sitcom Happy Days.
Quatro was born into a Catholic musical family, in Detroit, Michigan. Her father, Art, a part-time jazz musician, was of Italian descent, while her mother, Helen Sanislay, was Hungarian. Quatro stated in her autobiography that her paternal grandfather, whose last name was Quattrocchi, shortened the family name to "Quatro" before she was born. She is the aunt of actress Sherilyn Fenn, whose mother is Quatro's sister Arlene. Quatro began her musical career at the age of fourteen. She played the bass guitar in the all-female band Pleasure Seekers and Cradle with her sisters Patti, Nancy, and Arlene. Also, according to her autobiography, her first bass guitar was a 1957 Fender Precision, given to her by her father. Patti Quatro later joined the band Fanny, one of the earliest all-female rock bands to gain national attention. She has a brother, Michael Quatro, who is also a musician.

Quatro moved to the United Kingdom in 1971 after being discovered in Detroit by the record producer Mickie Most, who produced The Animals, Jeff Beck, Lulu, and Donovan. By this time he had started his own label RAK Records, which made stars of Hot Chocolate and Mud.
Career
Music

Quatro's first single "Rolling Stone" did not achieve popularity except in Portugal, where it hit number one on the charts. Most introduced Quatro to the songwriting and production team Nicky Chinn and Mike Chapman. Following a support slot on a UK tour with Thin Lizzy and headliners Slade, her second single "Can the Can" (1973) was a number one hit throughout Europe and in Australia. It was followed up by three further hits: "48 Crash" (1973), "Daytona Demon" (1973), and "Devil Gate Drive" (1974) on RAK Records. "Can the Can", "48 Crash" and "Devil Gate Drive" each sold over one million copies, and were each awarded gold discs.

These recordings, a hybrid of glam rock and bubblegum pop, met little success in her native United States, despite tours in the mid-1970s supporting Alice Cooper. With the exception of Australia, from 1975 onwards, glam rock's popularity declined. In the interim, she did enjoy some success as a session player.

Quatro's fortunes did not change until 1978, when "If You Can't Give Me Love" became a hit in the United Kingdom and Australia. This did nothing to prompt Stateside success, but "Stumblin' In", a duet recorded that same year for RSO Records with Chris Norman of the band Smokie reached a #4 peak in the U.S. Both tracks featured on the If You Knew Suzi album. A year later, Quatro released Suzi... And Other Four Letter Words, which she called her favourite album. This featured singles, such as "She's In Love With You", which made number 11 in Britain, "Mama's Boy" (34), and "I've Never Been In Love" (56). In 1980, her song "Rock Hard" was featured on the soundtrack of the cult film Times Square, along with some punk and new wave bands like Talking Heads, Ramones, XTC, and The Pretenders. 1980 also saw the release of Suzi Quatro's Greatest Hits. This record was promoted with TV and radio promotions from the record label. This was her highest charting album in the UK, peaking at #4 in the UK Albums Chart. This success period proved brief however, and her last UK hit was "Heart of Stone" in late 1982. In 1985, Quatro collaborated with Bronski Beat and members of The Kinks, Eddie and the Hot Rods, and Dr. Feelgood on the Mark Cunningham produced version of David Bowie's "Heroes", released the following year as the 1986 BBC "Children In Need" single.

In December 2005, a documentary chronicling Quatro's life, Naked Under Leather, directed by former member of The Runaways Victory Tischler Blue, appeared. In February 2006, Quatro released "Back To the Drive", produced by Sweet guitarist Andy Scott. The album's title track was written by her former collaborator Mike Chapman.

In March 2007, Quatro released a version of the Eagles song "Desperado", followed by the publication of her autobiography, Unzipped.

Quatro has sold nearly 50 million records.
Acting and radio hosting

She is known in the United States for her role as Leather Tuscadero on the TV show Happy Days. Show producer Garry Marshall offered the role without an audition after seeing her on his daughter's bedroom wall. Leather was the younger sister of Fonzie's girlfriend, hot-rod driver Pinky Tuscadero. Leather fronted an all-girl rock band joined by principal character Joanie Cunningham. The character returned in other cameo roles, including once for a date to a fraternity formal with Ralph Malph. Marshall offered Quatro a Leather Tuscadero spin-off, but she refused, saying she did not want to be typecast. The indie rock band, Tuscadero, was named after her character.

Other acting roles include a 1982 episode of British comedy-drama series Minder called "Dead Men Do Tell Tales", as the singer girlfriend of Terry's (Dennis Waterman). In 1985, she starred as a mentally disturbed ex-MI5 operative in Dempsey and Makepeace - "Love you to Death". In 1986, Quatro appeared as Annie Oakley in a London production of Annie Get Your Gun.

In 1991, Quatro wrote and performed in a musical about the life of actress Tallulah Bankhead. Entitled "Tallulah who?" it was adapted from a book by Willie Rushton and ran from 15 February – 19 March at the Queen's Theatre, Hornchurch (Greater London - Essex). Suzi co-wrote the music and adapted the book with Shirlie Roden.

In 1994, she made a cameo appearance in an episode of the comedy Absolutely Fabulous. She also was filmed in the 1990 Clive Barker horror film Nightbreed, but the studio cut out her character.

In 2006, Quatro performed the voice of Rio in the Bob the Builder film Built To Be Wild, and appeared in an episode of the second season of Rock School, in Lowestoft. She also appeared in the episode "The Axeman Cometh" of Midsomer Murders alongside Phil Grainger in the role of Mimi Clifton.

In October 2006, Quatro was a contestant on the British reality television show Trust Me – I'm a Beauty Therapist'.

In addition to touring, Quatro has hosted weekly rock and roll programmes on BBC Radio 2. The first one was Rockin' with Suzi Q. Her second programme called "Wake Up Little Suzi". It aired on Thursdays.
Personal life

Quatro married her longtime guitarist Len Tuckey in 1976. They had two children together (Laura in 1982 and Richard Leonard in 1984) and divorced in 1992. Before 1993, Quatro lived in a manor house in Essex that she and Tuckey bought in 1980, with her two children and grandchild. She married German concert promoter Rainer Haas in 1993. Toward the end of 2008, Quatro's children moved out of the house, and she put it up for sale, but later she decided to remain in England. She explained that she had empty nest syndrome. Quatro continues to live in Essex, England. She continues to perform live around the world, doing an average of about 60 concerts per year.
Legacy

Quatro proved it was possible for a woman of small stature to proudly and raunchily wear leather, sing and play bass. She had a direct influence on The Runaways and Joan Jett. A number of music history revisionists have credited her with being a precursor to the 1990s riot grrrl movement. This has been disputed by Allmusic who noted her "innocuous" lyrics and that many of her songs were written for her by professional writers.

A Spanish rock band called Suzy & los Quattro released two albums on No Tomorrow in 2006 and 2008; in the tradition of Ramones and the Donnas, all of the bandmembers except for Suzy Chain list their last name as Quattro.
Discography
Studio albums

   * Suzi Quatro (1973, Can the Can in Australia)
   * Quatro (1974)
   * Your Mamma Won't Like Me (1975)
   * Aggro-Phobia (1976)
   * If You Knew Suzi (1978)
   * Suzi... And Other Four Letter Words (1979)
   * Rock Hard (1980)
   * Main Attraction (1982)
   * Oh Suzi Q. (1990)
   * What Goes Around (1996)
   * Unreleased Emotion (1998)
   * Back to the Drive (2006)
   * In The Spotlight (2011)

Live albums

   * Live and Kickin' (1977, Japan & Australia only live album; re-released as double CD in 1990 in Australia)

Compilation albums

   * Suzi Quatro's Greatest Hits' (1980)
   * The Best of... (1984, limited to RSO years)
   * The Wild One - The Greatest Hits (1990)
   * The Gold Collection (1996)

Singles
Year↓ Title↓ B-Side↓ UK Singles Chart↓ U.S.↓ Australia↓
1972 "Rolling Stone" "Brain Confusion" - - -
1973 "Can the Can" "Ain't Ya Something Honey" / "Don't Mess Around" (US) 1 56 1
1973 "48 Crash" "Little Bitch Blue" 3 - 1
1973 "Daytona Demon" "Roman Fingers" 14 - 4
1974 "All Shook Up" "Glycerine Queen" - 85 -
1974 "Devil Gate Drive" "In The Morning" 1 - 1
1974 "Too Big" "I Wanna Be Free" 14 - 13
1974 "The Wild One" "Shake My Sugar" 7 - 2
1975 "Your Mamma Won't Like Me" "Peter, Peter" 31 - 14
1975 "I Bit Off More Than I Could Chew" "Red Hot Rosie" - - -
1975 "Michael" "Savage Silk" - - 100
1975 "I May Be Too Young" "Don't Mess Around" - - 50
1977 "Tear Me Apart" "Close Enough For Rock 'n' Roll" 27 - 25
1977 "Make Me Smile" "Same As I Do" - - -
1977 "Roxy Roller" "I'll Grow on You" - - -
1978 "If You Can't Give Me Love" "Cream Dream" / "Non-Citizen" (US) 4 45 10
1978 "She's In Love With You" "Space Cadets" / "Starlight Lady" (US) 11 41 30
1979 "Stumblin' In" † "Stranger With You" 41 4 2
1979 "The Race Is On" "Non-Citizen" 43 - 28
1979 "Don't Change My Luck" "Wiser Than You" - - 72
1980 "Mama's Boy" "Mind Demons" 34 - -
1980 "I've Never Been In Love" "Starlight Lady" / "Space Cadets" (US) 56 44 -
1980 "Rock Hard" "State Of Mind" 68 - 9
1981 "Glad All Over" "Ego In The Night" - - -
1981 "Lipstick" "Woman Cry" - 51 46
1982 "Heart Of Stone" "Remote Control" 60 - 99
1983 "Down At The Superstore" "Half Day Closing (Down At The Superstore) " - - -
1983 "Main Attraction" "Transparent" - - -
1984 "I Go Wild" "I'm A Rocker" - - -
1985 "Tonight I Could Fall In Love" "Good Girl (Looking For A Bad Time)" - - -
1986 "Heroes" "A Long Way To Go"/"The County Line" - - -
1986 "I Got Lost In His Arms" "You Can't Get A Man With A Gun" - - -
1986 "Wild Thing" "I Don't Want You" - - -
1987 "Let It Be" "Let It Be (Gospel Jam Mix)" - - -
1988 "We Found Love" "We Found Love" (Instrumental) - - -
1989 "Baby You're A Star" "Baby You're A Star" (Instrumental) - - -
1991 "Kiss Me Goodbye" "Kiss Me Goodbye" (Instrumental) - - -
1991 "The Great Midnight Rock 'n' Roll House Party" "Intimate Strangers" - - -
1992 "Love Touch"
"Love Touch" (Single Version) "We Found Love" - - -
1992 "Hey Charley" - - - -
1992 "I Need Your Love" "The Growing Years" - - -
1993 "Fear Of The Unknown" (Radio Version) "And So To Bed" - - -
1994 "If I Get Lucky" (Radio Version) "If I Get Lucky" (Long version) - - -
1994 "Peace On Earth" (Radio edit)
"Peace On Earth" (Album Version) "Frosty The Snowman" - - -
1995 "What Goes Round" (Radio Edit)
"What Goes Round" (Album Version) "Four Letter Words" (Remix version) - - -
2006 "I'll Walk Through The Fire With You" - - - -
2009 "Singing with Angels" (Australian September tour limited edition) - - - -



† Suzi Quatro and Chris Norman
Filmography
Television

   * Disco (eleven episodes plus one retrospection, 1973–1980)
   * Happy Days (seven episodes, 1977–1979)
   * Minder (one episode, 1982)
   * Rod and Emu's Saturday Special (one episode, 1983)
   * The Krankies Klub (one episode, 1983)
   * Dempsey & Makepeace (one episode, 1985)
   * Absolutely Fabulous (one episode, 1994)
   * Countdown (six episodes, 1997)
   * Gene Simmons' Rock School (one episode on series two, 2006)
   * Bob the Builder - Built to be wild (voice of Rio, 2006)
   * Midsomer Murders (one episode, 2007)
   * Australian Idol (one episode as guest judge, 2009)

See also

   * Pleasure Seekers
http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh75/Nigelvonshaft/suzi-leather.jpg
http://i439.photobucket.com/albums/qq117/parko61/Music/Suzi.jpg


Was she the one who sang Two Hearts in 1988?  ???

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/04/11 at 6:09 am


Was she the one who sang Two Hearts in 1988?  ???

I think that was Stacey Q :-\\

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/04/11 at 6:35 am

The person of the day...Angelina Jolie
Angelina Jolie (pronounced /dʒoʊˈliː/ joh-lee, born Angelina Jolie Voight; June 4, 1975) is an American actress. She has received an Academy Award, two Screen Actors Guild Awards, and three Golden Globe Awards. Jolie promotes humanitarian causes, and is noted for her work with refugees as a Goodwill Ambassador for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). She has been cited as one of the world's most attractive people, as well as the world's "sexiest" and "most beautiful" woman, titles for which she has received substantial media attention.

Although she made her screen debut as a child with her father Jon Voight in the 1982 film Lookin' to Get Out, Jolie's acting career began in earnest a decade later with the low-budget production Cyborg 2 (1993). Her first leading role in a major film was in the cyber-thriller Hackers (1995). She starred in the critically acclaimed biographical television films George Wallace (1997) and Gia (1998), and won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her performance in the drama Girl, Interrupted (1999). Jolie achieved wider fame after her portrayal of video game heroine Lara Croft in Lara Croft: Tomb Raider (2001), and since then has established herself as one of the best-known and highest-paid actresses in Hollywood. She received further critical acclaim for her performances in the dramas A Mighty Heart (2007) and Changeling (2008), which earned her a nomination for an Academy Award for Best Actress, and reinforced her reputation as a leading action star with the comic book adaptation Wanted (2008) and the action-thriller Salt (2010). Jolie has had her biggest commercial successes with the action-comedy Mr. & Mrs. Smith (2005) and the animated film Kung Fu Panda (2008).

Divorced from actors Jonny Lee Miller and Billy Bob Thornton, Jolie currently lives with actor Brad Pitt, in a relationship that has attracted worldwide media attention. Jolie and Pitt have three adopted children, Maddox, Pax, and Zahara, and three biological children, Shiloh, Knox, and Vivienne.
Breakthrough: 1998–2000

Jolie's career prospects began to improve after she won a Golden Globe Award for her performance in the biographical television film George Wallace (1997). She portrayed Cornelia Wallace, the second wife of Alabama Governor George Wallace, played by Gary Sinise. The film was very well-received by critics and won, among other awards, the Golden Globe Award for Best Miniseries or Television Film. Jolie also received an Emmy Award nomination for her performance.

In 1998, Jolie starred in HBO's Gia, portraying supermodel Gia Carangi. The film chronicled the destruction of Carangi's life and career as a result of her addiction to heroin, and her decline and death from AIDS. Vanessa Vance from Reel.com noted, "Angelina Jolie gained wide recognition for her role as the titular Gia, and it's easy to see why. Jolie is fierce in her portrayal—filling the part with nerve, charm, and desperation—and her role in this film is quite possibly the most beautiful train wreck ever filmed." For the second consecutive year, Jolie won a Golden Globe Award and was nominated for an Emmy Award. She also won her first Screen Actors Guild Award.

In accordance with Lee Strasberg's method acting, Jolie reportedly preferred to stay in character in between scenes during many of her early films, and as a result she had gained a reputation for being difficult to deal with. While shooting Gia, she told her then-husband Jonny Lee Miller that she would not be able to phone him: "I'd tell him: 'I'm alone; I'm dying; I'm gay; I'm not going to see you for weeks.'" After Gia wrapped, in 1997, Jolie announced that she had given up acting for good, because she felt that she had "nothing else to give". She separated from Miller and moved to New York, where she enrolled at New York University to study filmmaking and attended writing classes; she later described it as "just good for me to collect myself". After a period of being badly depressed, Jolie was pulled out of the depression when she won her Golden Globe Award for George Wallace. Encouraged further by the positive critical reception that met Gia, she resumed her career.

Jolie returned to film as Gloria McNeary in the 1998 gangster movie Hell's Kitchen, and later that year appeared in Playing by Heart, part of an ensemble cast that included Sean Connery, Gillian Anderson, Ryan Phillippe, and Jon Stewart. The film received predominantly positive reviews, and Jolie was praised in particular. The San Francisco Chronicle wrote, "Jolie, working through an overwritten part, is a sensation as the desperate club crawler learning truths about what she's willing to gamble." Jolie won the Breakthrough Performance Award from the National Board of Review.

In 1999, she starred in Mike Newell's comedy-drama Pushing Tin, alongside John Cusack, Billy Bob Thornton, and Cate Blanchett. The film received a mixed reception from critics and Jolie's character—Thornton's seductive wife—was particularly criticized. The Washington Post wrote, "Mary (Angelina Jolie), a completely ludicrous writer's creation of a free-spirited woman who weeps over hibiscus plants that die, wears lots of turquoise rings and gets real lonely when Russell spends entire nights away from home." She then co-starred with Denzel Washington in The Bone Collector (1999), an adaptation of a crime novel by Jeffery Deaver. Jolie played Amelia Donaghy, a police officer haunted by her cop father's suicide, who reluctantly helps Washington track down a serial killer. The movie grossed $151 million worldwide, but was a critical failure. The Detroit Free Press concluded, "Jolie, while always delicious to look at, is simply and woefully miscast."

"Jolie is emerging as one of the great wild spirits of current movies, a loose cannon who somehow has deadly aim."
Roger Ebert on Jolie's performance in Girl, Interrupted (1999)

Jolie next took the supporting role of the sociopathic Lisa Rowe in Girl, Interrupted (1999), a film that tells the story of mental patient Susanna Kaysen, and which was adapted from Kaysen's memoir of the same name. While Winona Ryder played the main character in what was hoped to be a comeback for her, the film instead marked Jolie's final breakthrough in Hollywood. She won her third Golden Globe Award, her second Screen Actors Guild Award and an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. Variety noted, "Jolie is excellent as the flamboyant, irresponsible girl who turns out to be far more instrumental than the doctors in Susanna's rehabilitation".

In 2000, Jolie appeared in her first summer blockbuster, Gone In 60 Seconds, in which she played Sarah "Sway" Wayland, ex-girlfriend of car-thief Nicolas Cage. The role was small, and the Washington Post criticized that "all she does in this movie is stand around, cooling down, modeling those fleshy, pulsating muscle-tubes that nest so provocatively around her teeth." She later explained that the film was a welcome relief after the emotionally heavy role of Lisa Rowe, and it became her highest grossing movie up until then, earning $237 million internationally.
International success: 2001–present

Although highly regarded for her acting abilities, Jolie's films to date had often not appealed to a wide audience, but Lara Croft: Tomb Raider (2001) made her an international superstar. An adaptation of the popular Tomb Raider videogame, Jolie was required to learn a British accent and undergo extensive martial arts training to play the title role of Lara Croft. She was generally praised for her physical performance, but the movie generated mostly negative reviews. Slant Magazine commented, "Angelina Jolie was born to play Lara Croft but Simon West makes her journey into a game of Frogger." The movie was an international success nonetheless, earning $275 million worldwide, and launched her global reputation as a female action star.

Jolie then starred opposite Antonio Banderas as his mail-order bride in Original Sin (2001), a thriller based on the novel Waltz into Darkness by Cornell Woolrich. The film was a major critical failure, with The New York Times noting, "The story plunges more precipitously than Ms. Jolie's neckline." In 2002, she starred in Life or Something Like It as an ambitious television reporter who is told that she will die in a week. The film was poorly received by critics, though Jolie's performance received positive reviews. CNN's Paul Clinton wrote, "Jolie is excellent in her role. Despite some of the ludicrous plot points in the middle of the film, this Academy Award-winning actress is exceedingly believable in her journey towards self-discovery and the true meaning of fulfilling life."
Jolie at the Cologne premiere of Alexander in 2004

Jolie reprised her role as Lara Croft in Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life in 2003. The sequel, while not as lucrative as the original, earned $156 million at the international box-office. Jolie appeared in the music video for Korn's "Did My Time", which was used to promote the film. Later that year, Jolie starred in Beyond Borders, a film about aid workers in Africa. Although reflecting Jolie's real-life interest in promoting humanitarian relief, the film was critically and financially unsuccessful. The Los Angeles Times wrote, "Jolie, as she did in her Oscar-winning role in Girl, Interrupted, can bring electricity and believability to roles that have a reality she can understand. She can also, witness the Lara Croft films, do acknowledged cartoons. But the limbo of a hybrid character, a badly written cardboard person in a fly-infested, blood-and-guts world, completely defeats her."

In 2004, Jolie starred alongside Ethan Hawke in the thriller Taking Lives. She portrayed Illeana Scott, an FBI profiler summoned to help Montreal law enforcement hunt down a serial killer. The movie received mixed reviews and The Hollywood Reporter concluded, "Angelina Jolie plays a role that definitely feels like something she has already done, but she does add an unmistakable dash of excitement and glamour." She also provided the voice of an angelfish named Lola in the animated DreamWorks movie Shark Tale (2004), and she had a brief appearance in Kerry Conran's Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow (2004), a science fiction adventure film shot entirely with actors in front of a bluescreen. Also in 2004, Jolie played Olympias in Alexander, Oliver Stone's biographical film about the life of Alexander the Great. The film failed domestically, with Stone attributing its poor reception to disapproval of the depiction of Alexander's bisexuality, but it succeeded internationally, with revenue of $139 million outside the United States.

Jolie's next movie was the 2005 action-comedy Mr. & Mrs. Smith. The film, directed by Doug Liman, tells the story of a bored married couple, John and Jane Smith, who find out that they are both secret assassins. Jolie starred opposite Brad Pitt. The film received mixed reviews, but was generally lauded for the chemistry between the two leads. The Star Tribune noted, "While the story feels haphazard, the movie gets by on gregarious charm, galloping energy and the stars' thermonuclear screen chemistry." The movie earned $478 million worldwide, making it one of the biggest hits of 2005.
Jolie and Brad Pitt at the Cannes Film Festival in 2007

She next appeared in Robert De Niro's The Good Shepherd (2006), a film about the early history of the CIA, as seen through the eyes of Edward Wilson, played by Matt Damon. Jolie played the supporting role of Margaret Russell, Wilson's neglected wife. According to the Chicago Tribune, "Jolie ages convincingly throughout, and is blithely unconcerned with how her brittle character is coming off in terms of audience sympathy."

In 2007, Jolie made her directorial debut with the documentary A Place in Time, which captures the life in 27 locations around the globe during a single week. The film was screened at the Tribeca Film Festival and was intended to be distributed through the National Education Association, mainly in high schools. Jolie starred as Mariane Pearl in Michael Winterbottom's documentary-style drama A Mighty Heart (2007), about the kidnapping and murder of Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl in Pakistan. Filmed in Pune, India, the film is based on Mariane Pearl's memoir of the same name and had its premiere at the Cannes Film Festival. The Hollywood Reporter described Jolie's performance as "well-measured and moving", played "with respect and a firm grasp on a difficult accent." The film earned her a fourth Golden Globe Award and a third Screen Actors Guild Award nomination. Jolie also played Grendel's mother in Robert Zemeckis' animated epic Beowulf (2007), which was created through the motion capture technique.
Jolie as Christine Collins on the set of Changeling in 2007

Jolie co-starred alongside James McAvoy and Morgan Freeman in the 2008 action movie Wanted, an adaptation of a graphic novel by Mark Millar. The film received predominately favorable reviews and proved to be an international success, earning $342 million worldwide. She also provided the voice of Master Tigress in the DreamWorks animated movie Kung Fu Panda (2008). With revenue of $632 million internationally, it became her highest grossing film to date. That same year, Jolie portrayed Christine Collins in Clint Eastwood's drama Changeling (2008), which had its premiere at the Cannes Film Festival. It is based on the true story of a woman in 1928 Los Angeles who is reunited with her kidnapped son—only to realize he is an impostor. The Chicago Tribune noted, "Jolie really shines in the calm before the storm, the scenes when one patronizing male authority figure after another belittles her at their peril." Jolie received her second Academy Award nomination, and also was nominated for a BAFTA Award, a Golden Globe Award, and a Screen Actors Guild Award.

Jolie next appeared as the eponymous character in the 2010 thriller Salt, her first film in two years. She starred alongside Liev Schreiber as CIA agent Evelyn Salt, who goes on the run after she is accused of being a KGB sleeper agent. Originally written as male, the character Salt underwent a gender change after a Colombia Pictures executive suggested Jolie for the role to director Phillip Noyce. Salt grossed $293 million worldwide and received generally favorable reviews, with Empire remarking that "when it comes to selling incredible, crazy, death-defying antics, Jolie has few peers in the action business." Later that year, she co-starred with Johnny Depp in The Tourist, directed by Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck. Despite a mostly negative critical reception, the film grossed $268 million worldwide, and garnered Jolie a controversial nomination for the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy.
Humanitarian work

Jolie first became personally aware of worldwide humanitarian crises while filming Tomb Raider in Cambodia. She eventually turned to UNHCR for more information on international trouble spots. In order to learn more about the situation and the conditions in these areas, she began visiting refugee camps around the world. In February 2001, Jolie went on her first field visit, an 18-day mission to Sierra Leone and Tanzania; she later expressed her shock at what she had witnessed. In the following months, she returned to Cambodia for two weeks and later met with Afghan refugees in Pakistan, where she donated $1 million for Afghan refugees in response to an international UNHCR emergency appeal. She insisted on covering all costs related to her missions and shared the same rudimentary working and living conditions as UNHCR field staff on all of her visits. Jolie was named a UNHCR Goodwill Ambassador on August 27, 2001 at UNHCR headquarters in Geneva.

"We cannot close ourselves off to information and ignore the fact that millions of people are out there suffering. I honestly want to help. I don't believe I feel differently from other people. I think we all want justice and equality, a chance for a life with meaning. All of us would like to believe that if we were in a bad situation someone would help us."
Jolie on her motives for joining UNHCR in 2001

Jolie has been on field missions around the world and met with refugees and internally displaced persons in more than 20 countries.



Filmography
Actor Title↓ Year↓ Role↓ Notes
Lookin' to Get Out 1982 Tosh
Angela & Viril Angela & Viril 1993 Angela Short film
Angela & Viril Alice & Viril 1993 Alice Short film
Cyborg 2 1993 Casella "Cash" Reese
Without Evidence 1995 Jodie Swearingen
Hackers 1995 Kate "Acid Burn" Libby
Love Is All There Is 1996 Gina Malacici
Mojave Moon 1996 Eleanor "Elie" Rigby
Foxfire 1996 Margret "Legs" Sadovsky
True Women 1997 Georgia Virginia Lawshe Woods TV film
George Wallace 1997 Cornelia Wallace TV film
Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Nominated—CableACE Award for Best Supporting Actress in a Movie or Miniseries
Nominated—Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie
Playing God 1997 Claire
Gia 1998 Gia Marie Carangi TV film
Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Mini-series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Outfest Grand Jury Award for Outstanding Actress in a Feature Film
Satellite Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Miniseries or Television Movie
Nominated—Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie
Hell's Kitchen 1998 Gloria McNeary
Playing by Heart 1998 Joan National Board of Review Award for Breakthrough Performance – Female
Pushing Tin 1998 Mary Bell
Bone Collector, TheThe Bone Collector 1999 Amelia Donaghy Nominated—Blockbuster Entertainment Award for Favorite Actress – Suspense
Girl, Interrupted 1999 Lisa Rowe Academy Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role
Blockbuster Entertainment Award for Favorite Supporting Actress – Drama
Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture
Hollywood Film Festival Award for Actress of the Year
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role
ShoWest Award for Supporting Actress of the Year
Nominated—Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated—Empire Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Actress
Nominated—Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Hissy Fit
Gone in 60 Seconds 2000 Sara "Sway" Wayland Blockbuster Entertainment Award for Favorite Actress – Action
Lara Croft: Tomb Raider 2001 Lara Croft Nominated—Kids' Choice Award for Favorite Female Action Hero
Nominated—MTV Movie Award for Best Female Performance
Nominated—MTV Movie Award for Best Fight
Nominated—Saturn Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Actress
Original Sin 2001 Julia Russell
Life or Something Like It 2002 Lanie Kerrigan
Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life 2003 Lara Croft
Beyond Borders 2003 Sarah Jordan
Taking Lives 2004 Illeana Scott Nominated—Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Scary Scene
Shark Tale 2004 Lola Voice
Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow 2004 Francesca "Franky" Cook People's Choice Award for Favorite Female Action Movie Star
Nominated—Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actress
Fever, TheThe Fever 2004 Revolutionary TV film
Cameo
Alexander 2004 Olympias
Mr. & Mrs. Smith 2005 Jane Smith MTV Movie Award for Best Fight
NRJ Ciné Award for Best Kiss
Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Actress – Action Adventure/Thriller
Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Liar
Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Rumble
Nominated—MTV Movie Award for Best Kiss
Nominated—People's Choice Award for Favorite Female Action Star
Nominated—People's Choice Award for Favorite Female Movie Star
Nominated—People's Choice Award for Favorite On-Screen Match-Up
Nominated—Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Chemistry
Nominated—Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Dance Scene
Nominated—Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Liplock
Good Shepherd, TheThe Good Shepherd 2006 Margaret Russell
Mighty Heart, AA Mighty Heart 2007 Mariane Pearl Santa Barbara International Film Festival Outstanding Performance Award
Nominated—Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Empire Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama
Nominated—Independent Spirit Award for Best Female Lead
Nominated—London Film Critics Circle Award for Actress of the Year
Nominated—NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actress in a Motion Picture
Nominated—Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Satellite Award for Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama
Nominated—Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role
Nominated—Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Actress – Drama
Beowulf 2007 Grendel's mother Nominated—MTV Movie Award for Best Villain
Kung Fu Panda 2008 Master Tigress Voice
Wanted 2008 Fox People's Choice Award for Favorite Female Action Star
Nominated—MTV Movie Award for Best Female Performance
Nominated—MTV Movie Award for Best Kiss
Nominated—MTV Movie Award for Best WTF Moment
Nominated—National Movie Award for Best Performance – Female
Nominated—People's Choice Award for Favorite Female Movie Star
Changeling 2008 Christine Collins Satellite Award for Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama
Saturn Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role
Nominated—BAFTA Award for Best Leading Actress
Nominated—Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Empire Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama
Nominated—Irish Film and Television Award for Best International Actress
Nominated—London Film Critics Circle Award for Actress of the Year
Nominated—Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role
Nominated—Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Actress – Drama
Salt 2010 Evelyn Salt Nominated—People's Choice Award for Favorite Action Star
Nominated—People's Choice Award for Favorite Female Movie Star
Nominated—Teen Choice Award for Choice Summer Movie Star – Female
Tourist, TheThe Tourist 2010 Elise Ward Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
Kung Fu Panda 2 2011 Master Tigress Voice (post-production)
Director Title↓ Year↓ Notes
A Place in Time 2007 Documentary
In the Land of Blood and Honey 2011
Selected awards
Year↓ Award↓ Category↓ Film↓ Result↓
1998 Emmy Award Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie George Wallace Nominated
1998 Golden Globe Award Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television George Wallace Won
1998 National Board of Review Award Breakthrough Performance – Female Playing by Heart Won
1998 Emmy Award Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie Gia Nominated
1999 Golden Globe Award Best Performance by an Actress in a Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television Gia Won
1999 Screen Actors Guild Award Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Miniseries or Television Movie Gia Won
2000 Academy Award Best Actress in a Supporting Role Girl, Interrupted Won
2000 Golden Globe Award Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture Girl, Interrupted Won
2000 Screen Actors Guild Award Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role Girl, Interrupted Won
2008 Golden Globe Award Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama Mighty Heart, AA Mighty Heart Nominated
2008 Screen Actors Guild Award Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role Mighty Heart, AA Mighty Heart Nominated
2009 Academy Award Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role Changeling Nominated
2009 BAFTA Award Best Leading Actress Changeling Nominated
2009 Golden Globe Award Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama Changeling Nominated
2009 Screen Actors Guild Award Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role Changeling Nominated
2011 Golden Globe Award Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy The Tourist Nominated
http://i171.photobucket.com/albums/u289/Angelina72806/angelina-jolie.jpg
http://i297.photobucket.com/albums/mm236/troge07/angelina-jolie.jpg

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 06/04/11 at 6:49 am


I think that was Stacey Q :-\\


It was Stacey Q, Ninny.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 06/04/11 at 6:50 am


The person of the day...Angelina Jolie
Angelina Jolie (pronounced /dʒoʊˈliː/ joh-lee, born Angelina Jolie Voight; June 4, 1975) is an American actress. She has received an Academy Award, two Screen Actors Guild Awards, and three Golden Globe Awards. Jolie promotes humanitarian causes, and is noted for her work with refugees as a Goodwill Ambassador for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). She has been cited as one of the world's most attractive people, as well as the world's "sexiest" and "most beautiful" woman, titles for which she has received substantial media attention.

Although she made her screen debut as a child with her father Jon Voight in the 1982 film Lookin' to Get Out, Jolie's acting career began in earnest a decade later with the low-budget production Cyborg 2 (1993). Her first leading role in a major film was in the cyber-thriller Hackers (1995). She starred in the critically acclaimed biographical television films George Wallace (1997) and Gia (1998), and won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her performance in the drama Girl, Interrupted (1999). Jolie achieved wider fame after her portrayal of video game heroine Lara Croft in Lara Croft: Tomb Raider (2001), and since then has established herself as one of the best-known and highest-paid actresses in Hollywood. She received further critical acclaim for her performances in the dramas A Mighty Heart (2007) and Changeling (2008), which earned her a nomination for an Academy Award for Best Actress, and reinforced her reputation as a leading action star with the comic book adaptation Wanted (2008) and the action-thriller Salt (2010). Jolie has had her biggest commercial successes with the action-comedy Mr. & Mrs. Smith (2005) and the animated film Kung Fu Panda (2008).

Divorced from actors Jonny Lee Miller and Billy Bob Thornton, Jolie currently lives with actor Brad Pitt, in a relationship that has attracted worldwide media attention. Jolie and Pitt have three adopted children, Maddox, Pax, and Zahara, and three biological children, Shiloh, Knox, and Vivienne.
Breakthrough: 1998–2000

Jolie's career prospects began to improve after she won a Golden Globe Award for her performance in the biographical television film George Wallace (1997). She portrayed Cornelia Wallace, the second wife of Alabama Governor George Wallace, played by Gary Sinise. The film was very well-received by critics and won, among other awards, the Golden Globe Award for Best Miniseries or Television Film. Jolie also received an Emmy Award nomination for her performance.

In 1998, Jolie starred in HBO's Gia, portraying supermodel Gia Carangi. The film chronicled the destruction of Carangi's life and career as a result of her addiction to heroin, and her decline and death from AIDS. Vanessa Vance from Reel.com noted, "Angelina Jolie gained wide recognition for her role as the titular Gia, and it's easy to see why. Jolie is fierce in her portrayal—filling the part with nerve, charm, and desperation—and her role in this film is quite possibly the most beautiful train wreck ever filmed." For the second consecutive year, Jolie won a Golden Globe Award and was nominated for an Emmy Award. She also won her first Screen Actors Guild Award.

In accordance with Lee Strasberg's method acting, Jolie reportedly preferred to stay in character in between scenes during many of her early films, and as a result she had gained a reputation for being difficult to deal with. While shooting Gia, she told her then-husband Jonny Lee Miller that she would not be able to phone him: "I'd tell him: 'I'm alone; I'm dying; I'm gay; I'm not going to see you for weeks.'" After Gia wrapped, in 1997, Jolie announced that she had given up acting for good, because she felt that she had "nothing else to give". She separated from Miller and moved to New York, where she enrolled at New York University to study filmmaking and attended writing classes; she later described it as "just good for me to collect myself". After a period of being badly depressed, Jolie was pulled out of the depression when she won her Golden Globe Award for George Wallace. Encouraged further by the positive critical reception that met Gia, she resumed her career.

Jolie returned to film as Gloria McNeary in the 1998 gangster movie Hell's Kitchen, and later that year appeared in Playing by Heart, part of an ensemble cast that included Sean Connery, Gillian Anderson, Ryan Phillippe, and Jon Stewart. The film received predominantly positive reviews, and Jolie was praised in particular. The San Francisco Chronicle wrote, "Jolie, working through an overwritten part, is a sensation as the desperate club crawler learning truths about what she's willing to gamble." Jolie won the Breakthrough Performance Award from the National Board of Review.

In 1999, she starred in Mike Newell's comedy-drama Pushing Tin, alongside John Cusack, Billy Bob Thornton, and Cate Blanchett. The film received a mixed reception from critics and Jolie's character—Thornton's seductive wife—was particularly criticized. The Washington Post wrote, "Mary (Angelina Jolie), a completely ludicrous writer's creation of a free-spirited woman who weeps over hibiscus plants that die, wears lots of turquoise rings and gets real lonely when Russell spends entire nights away from home." She then co-starred with Denzel Washington in The Bone Collector (1999), an adaptation of a crime novel by Jeffery Deaver. Jolie played Amelia Donaghy, a police officer haunted by her cop father's suicide, who reluctantly helps Washington track down a serial killer. The movie grossed $151 million worldwide, but was a critical failure. The Detroit Free Press concluded, "Jolie, while always delicious to look at, is simply and woefully miscast."

"Jolie is emerging as one of the great wild spirits of current movies, a loose cannon who somehow has deadly aim."
Roger Ebert on Jolie's performance in Girl, Interrupted (1999)

Jolie next took the supporting role of the sociopathic Lisa Rowe in Girl, Interrupted (1999), a film that tells the story of mental patient Susanna Kaysen, and which was adapted from Kaysen's memoir of the same name. While Winona Ryder played the main character in what was hoped to be a comeback for her, the film instead marked Jolie's final breakthrough in Hollywood. She won her third Golden Globe Award, her second Screen Actors Guild Award and an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. Variety noted, "Jolie is excellent as the flamboyant, irresponsible girl who turns out to be far more instrumental than the doctors in Susanna's rehabilitation".

In 2000, Jolie appeared in her first summer blockbuster, Gone In 60 Seconds, in which she played Sarah "Sway" Wayland, ex-girlfriend of car-thief Nicolas Cage. The role was small, and the Washington Post criticized that "all she does in this movie is stand around, cooling down, modeling those fleshy, pulsating muscle-tubes that nest so provocatively around her teeth." She later explained that the film was a welcome relief after the emotionally heavy role of Lisa Rowe, and it became her highest grossing movie up until then, earning $237 million internationally.
International success: 2001–present

Although highly regarded for her acting abilities, Jolie's films to date had often not appealed to a wide audience, but Lara Croft: Tomb Raider (2001) made her an international superstar. An adaptation of the popular Tomb Raider videogame, Jolie was required to learn a British accent and undergo extensive martial arts training to play the title role of Lara Croft. She was generally praised for her physical performance, but the movie generated mostly negative reviews. Slant Magazine commented, "Angelina Jolie was born to play Lara Croft but Simon West makes her journey into a game of Frogger." The movie was an international success nonetheless, earning $275 million worldwide, and launched her global reputation as a female action star.

Jolie then starred opposite Antonio Banderas as his mail-order bride in Original Sin (2001), a thriller based on the novel Waltz into Darkness by Cornell Woolrich. The film was a major critical failure, with The New York Times noting, "The story plunges more precipitously than Ms. Jolie's neckline." In 2002, she starred in Life or Something Like It as an ambitious television reporter who is told that she will die in a week. The film was poorly received by critics, though Jolie's performance received positive reviews. CNN's Paul Clinton wrote, "Jolie is excellent in her role. Despite some of the ludicrous plot points in the middle of the film, this Academy Award-winning actress is exceedingly believable in her journey towards self-discovery and the true meaning of fulfilling life."
Jolie at the Cologne premiere of Alexander in 2004

Jolie reprised her role as Lara Croft in Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life in 2003. The sequel, while not as lucrative as the original, earned $156 million at the international box-office. Jolie appeared in the music video for Korn's "Did My Time", which was used to promote the film. Later that year, Jolie starred in Beyond Borders, a film about aid workers in Africa. Although reflecting Jolie's real-life interest in promoting humanitarian relief, the film was critically and financially unsuccessful. The Los Angeles Times wrote, "Jolie, as she did in her Oscar-winning role in Girl, Interrupted, can bring electricity and believability to roles that have a reality she can understand. She can also, witness the Lara Croft films, do acknowledged cartoons. But the limbo of a hybrid character, a badly written cardboard person in a fly-infested, blood-and-guts world, completely defeats her."

In 2004, Jolie starred alongside Ethan Hawke in the thriller Taking Lives. She portrayed Illeana Scott, an FBI profiler summoned to help Montreal law enforcement hunt down a serial killer. The movie received mixed reviews and The Hollywood Reporter concluded, "Angelina Jolie plays a role that definitely feels like something she has already done, but she does add an unmistakable dash of excitement and glamour." She also provided the voice of an angelfish named Lola in the animated DreamWorks movie Shark Tale (2004), and she had a brief appearance in Kerry Conran's Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow (2004), a science fiction adventure film shot entirely with actors in front of a bluescreen. Also in 2004, Jolie played Olympias in Alexander, Oliver Stone's biographical film about the life of Alexander the Great. The film failed domestically, with Stone attributing its poor reception to disapproval of the depiction of Alexander's bisexuality, but it succeeded internationally, with revenue of $139 million outside the United States.

Jolie's next movie was the 2005 action-comedy Mr. & Mrs. Smith. The film, directed by Doug Liman, tells the story of a bored married couple, John and Jane Smith, who find out that they are both secret assassins. Jolie starred opposite Brad Pitt. The film received mixed reviews, but was generally lauded for the chemistry between the two leads. The Star Tribune noted, "While the story feels haphazard, the movie gets by on gregarious charm, galloping energy and the stars' thermonuclear screen chemistry." The movie earned $478 million worldwide, making it one of the biggest hits of 2005.
Jolie and Brad Pitt at the Cannes Film Festival in 2007

She next appeared in Robert De Niro's The Good Shepherd (2006), a film about the early history of the CIA, as seen through the eyes of Edward Wilson, played by Matt Damon. Jolie played the supporting role of Margaret Russell, Wilson's neglected wife. According to the Chicago Tribune, "Jolie ages convincingly throughout, and is blithely unconcerned with how her brittle character is coming off in terms of audience sympathy."

In 2007, Jolie made her directorial debut with the documentary A Place in Time, which captures the life in 27 locations around the globe during a single week. The film was screened at the Tribeca Film Festival and was intended to be distributed through the National Education Association, mainly in high schools. Jolie starred as Mariane Pearl in Michael Winterbottom's documentary-style drama A Mighty Heart (2007), about the kidnapping and murder of Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl in Pakistan. Filmed in Pune, India, the film is based on Mariane Pearl's memoir of the same name and had its premiere at the Cannes Film Festival. The Hollywood Reporter described Jolie's performance as "well-measured and moving", played "with respect and a firm grasp on a difficult accent." The film earned her a fourth Golden Globe Award and a third Screen Actors Guild Award nomination. Jolie also played Grendel's mother in Robert Zemeckis' animated epic Beowulf (2007), which was created through the motion capture technique.
Jolie as Christine Collins on the set of Changeling in 2007

Jolie co-starred alongside James McAvoy and Morgan Freeman in the 2008 action movie Wanted, an adaptation of a graphic novel by Mark Millar. The film received predominately favorable reviews and proved to be an international success, earning $342 million worldwide. She also provided the voice of Master Tigress in the DreamWorks animated movie Kung Fu Panda (2008). With revenue of $632 million internationally, it became her highest grossing film to date. That same year, Jolie portrayed Christine Collins in Clint Eastwood's drama Changeling (2008), which had its premiere at the Cannes Film Festival. It is based on the true story of a woman in 1928 Los Angeles who is reunited with her kidnapped son—only to realize he is an impostor. The Chicago Tribune noted, "Jolie really shines in the calm before the storm, the scenes when one patronizing male authority figure after another belittles her at their peril." Jolie received her second Academy Award nomination, and also was nominated for a BAFTA Award, a Golden Globe Award, and a Screen Actors Guild Award.

Jolie next appeared as the eponymous character in the 2010 thriller Salt, her first film in two years. She starred alongside Liev Schreiber as CIA agent Evelyn Salt, who goes on the run after she is accused of being a KGB sleeper agent. Originally written as male, the character Salt underwent a gender change after a Colombia Pictures executive suggested Jolie for the role to director Phillip Noyce. Salt grossed $293 million worldwide and received generally favorable reviews, with Empire remarking that "when it comes to selling incredible, crazy, death-defying antics, Jolie has few peers in the action business." Later that year, she co-starred with Johnny Depp in The Tourist, directed by Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck. Despite a mostly negative critical reception, the film grossed $268 million worldwide, and garnered Jolie a controversial nomination for the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy.
Humanitarian work

Jolie first became personally aware of worldwide humanitarian crises while filming Tomb Raider in Cambodia. She eventually turned to UNHCR for more information on international trouble spots. In order to learn more about the situation and the conditions in these areas, she began visiting refugee camps around the world. In February 2001, Jolie went on her first field visit, an 18-day mission to Sierra Leone and Tanzania; she later expressed her shock at what she had witnessed. In the following months, she returned to Cambodia for two weeks and later met with Afghan refugees in Pakistan, where she donated $1 million for Afghan refugees in response to an international UNHCR emergency appeal. She insisted on covering all costs related to her missions and shared the same rudimentary working and living conditions as UNHCR field staff on all of her visits. Jolie was named a UNHCR Goodwill Ambassador on August 27, 2001 at UNHCR headquarters in Geneva.

"We cannot close ourselves off to information and ignore the fact that millions of people are out there suffering. I honestly want to help. I don't believe I feel differently from other people. I think we all want justice and equality, a chance for a life with meaning. All of us would like to believe that if we were in a bad situation someone would help us."
Jolie on her motives for joining UNHCR in 2001

Jolie has been on field missions around the world and met with refugees and internally displaced persons in more than 20 countries.



Filmography
Actor Title↓ Year↓ Role↓ Notes
Lookin' to Get Out 1982 Tosh
Angela & Viril Angela & Viril 1993 Angela Short film
Angela & Viril Alice & Viril 1993 Alice Short film
Cyborg 2 1993 Casella "Cash" Reese
Without Evidence 1995 Jodie Swearingen
Hackers 1995 Kate "Acid Burn" Libby
Love Is All There Is 1996 Gina Malacici
Mojave Moon 1996 Eleanor "Elie" Rigby
Foxfire 1996 Margret "Legs" Sadovsky
True Women 1997 Georgia Virginia Lawshe Woods TV film
George Wallace 1997 Cornelia Wallace TV film
Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Nominated—CableACE Award for Best Supporting Actress in a Movie or Miniseries
Nominated—Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie
Playing God 1997 Claire
Gia 1998 Gia Marie Carangi TV film
Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Mini-series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Outfest Grand Jury Award for Outstanding Actress in a Feature Film
Satellite Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Miniseries or Television Movie
Nominated—Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie
Hell's Kitchen 1998 Gloria McNeary
Playing by Heart 1998 Joan National Board of Review Award for Breakthrough Performance – Female
Pushing Tin 1998 Mary Bell
Bone Collector, TheThe Bone Collector 1999 Amelia Donaghy Nominated—Blockbuster Entertainment Award for Favorite Actress – Suspense
Girl, Interrupted 1999 Lisa Rowe Academy Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role
Blockbuster Entertainment Award for Favorite Supporting Actress – Drama
Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture
Hollywood Film Festival Award for Actress of the Year
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role
ShoWest Award for Supporting Actress of the Year
Nominated—Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated—Empire Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Actress
Nominated—Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Hissy Fit
Gone in 60 Seconds 2000 Sara "Sway" Wayland Blockbuster Entertainment Award for Favorite Actress – Action
Lara Croft: Tomb Raider 2001 Lara Croft Nominated—Kids' Choice Award for Favorite Female Action Hero
Nominated—MTV Movie Award for Best Female Performance
Nominated—MTV Movie Award for Best Fight
Nominated—Saturn Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Actress
Original Sin 2001 Julia Russell
Life or Something Like It 2002 Lanie Kerrigan
Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life 2003 Lara Croft
Beyond Borders 2003 Sarah Jordan
Taking Lives 2004 Illeana Scott Nominated—Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Scary Scene
Shark Tale 2004 Lola Voice
Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow 2004 Francesca "Franky" Cook People's Choice Award for Favorite Female Action Movie Star
Nominated—Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actress
Fever, TheThe Fever 2004 Revolutionary TV film
Cameo
Alexander 2004 Olympias
Mr. & Mrs. Smith 2005 Jane Smith MTV Movie Award for Best Fight
NRJ Ciné Award for Best Kiss
Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Actress – Action Adventure/Thriller
Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Liar
Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Rumble
Nominated—MTV Movie Award for Best Kiss
Nominated—People's Choice Award for Favorite Female Action Star
Nominated—People's Choice Award for Favorite Female Movie Star
Nominated—People's Choice Award for Favorite On-Screen Match-Up
Nominated—Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Chemistry
Nominated—Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Dance Scene
Nominated—Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Liplock
Good Shepherd, TheThe Good Shepherd 2006 Margaret Russell
Mighty Heart, AA Mighty Heart 2007 Mariane Pearl Santa Barbara International Film Festival Outstanding Performance Award
Nominated—Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Empire Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama
Nominated—Independent Spirit Award for Best Female Lead
Nominated—London Film Critics Circle Award for Actress of the Year
Nominated—NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actress in a Motion Picture
Nominated—Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Satellite Award for Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama
Nominated—Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role
Nominated—Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Actress – Drama
Beowulf 2007 Grendel's mother Nominated—MTV Movie Award for Best Villain
Kung Fu Panda 2008 Master Tigress Voice
Wanted 2008 Fox People's Choice Award for Favorite Female Action Star
Nominated—MTV Movie Award for Best Female Performance
Nominated—MTV Movie Award for Best Kiss
Nominated—MTV Movie Award for Best WTF Moment
Nominated—National Movie Award for Best Performance – Female
Nominated—People's Choice Award for Favorite Female Movie Star
Changeling 2008 Christine Collins Satellite Award for Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama
Saturn Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role
Nominated—BAFTA Award for Best Leading Actress
Nominated—Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Empire Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama
Nominated—Irish Film and Television Award for Best International Actress
Nominated—London Film Critics Circle Award for Actress of the Year
Nominated—Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role
Nominated—Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Actress – Drama
Salt 2010 Evelyn Salt Nominated—People's Choice Award for Favorite Action Star
Nominated—People's Choice Award for Favorite Female Movie Star
Nominated—Teen Choice Award for Choice Summer Movie Star – Female
Tourist, TheThe Tourist 2010 Elise Ward Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
Kung Fu Panda 2 2011 Master Tigress Voice (post-production)
Director Title↓ Year↓ Notes
A Place in Time 2007 Documentary
In the Land of Blood and Honey 2011
Selected awards
Year↓ Award↓ Category↓ Film↓ Result↓
1998 Emmy Award Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie George Wallace Nominated
1998 Golden Globe Award Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television George Wallace Won
1998 National Board of Review Award Breakthrough Performance – Female Playing by Heart Won
1998 Emmy Award Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie Gia Nominated
1999 Golden Globe Award Best Performance by an Actress in a Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television Gia Won
1999 Screen Actors Guild Award Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Miniseries or Television Movie Gia Won
2000 Academy Award Best Actress in a Supporting Role Girl, Interrupted Won
2000 Golden Globe Award Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture Girl, Interrupted Won
2000 Screen Actors Guild Award Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role Girl, Interrupted Won
2008 Golden Globe Award Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama Mighty Heart, AA Mighty Heart Nominated
2008 Screen Actors Guild Award Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role Mighty Heart, AA Mighty Heart Nominated
2009 Academy Award Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role Changeling Nominated
2009 BAFTA Award Best Leading Actress Changeling Nominated
2009 Golden Globe Award Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama Changeling Nominated
2009 Screen Actors Guild Award Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role Changeling Nominated
2011 Golden Globe Award Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy The Tourist Nominated
http://i171.photobucket.com/albums/u289/Angelina72806/angelina-jolie.jpg
http://i297.photobucket.com/albums/mm236/troge07/angelina-jolie.jpg


loved her in Gia.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/05/11 at 6:52 am

The person of the day...Brian McKnight
Brian McKnight (born June 5, 1969) is an American singer-songwriter, arranger, producer, and R&B musician, hosting his own evening short-lived talk show. He is a multi-instrumentalist who plays nine instruments: piano, guitar, bass guitar, drums, percussions, trombone, tuba, flugelhorn and trumpet.
McKnight was born in Buffalo, New York. His musical career began in childhood when he became a member of his church, NY choir and a band leader for his high school, Sweet Home High School. In 1987, McKnight's older brother, Claude McKnight III, and his band, Take 6, signed a record deal with Warner Brothers. This encouraged McKnight to shop his own demo tapes and by the age of 19, he'd signed his first recording deal with Mercury Records subsidiary, Wing Records. (He ended up recording his albums for Mercury.) In 1992, Brian McKnight was released and was followed by two more albums for Mercury, 1995's I Remember You and 1997's Anytime. Anytime sold over two million copies and was nominated for a Grammy. It was also his last album with Mercury Records; by 1998, McKnight had moved on to Motown Records.

In 1997, McKnight recorded "Remember the Magic" for Disney World's 25th anniversary.

In 1999, McKnight released Back at One (his second release from Motown; after the Christmas album Bethlehem), which sold over three million copies. Throughout his career he has collaborated with a variety of musicians including Mariah Carey, Sin Bandera, Mase, Sean "Puffy" Combs, Mary J. Blige, Justin Timberlake, Nelly, Vanessa Williams, Ivete Sangalo, Kirk Franklin, For Real, Canibus, Quincy Jones, Boyz II Men, Christina Aguilera, Regine Velasquez, Shoshana Bean, Gordon Goodwin's Big Phat Band, Rascal Flatts, Talib Kweli, MJG (of the Southern Rap duo Eightball & MJG), Josh Groban (on his 2007 #1 Christmas album Noel Schajris), Justin Bieber, Ashley "Awesome" Speelman and CeCe Peniston.

McKnight in 2004, co-wrote with Australian Soul artist Guy Sebastian the song Wait which is a track off the Beautiful Life.

McKnight's vocal style draws from Stevie Wonder (particularly in his use of melisma), Michael Sembello, Michael McDonald, Kenny Loggins, and his own brother, Take 6 co-founder Claude V. McKnight. Soul singer James Ingram also strongly influenced McKnight. His music production sensibilities especially his penchant for piano based pop ballads, method of background vocal recording and melismatic voice inflections all draw heavily from Ingram. Brian McKnight also has the uncanny ability to mimic the timbre and style of other singers such as Nat King Cole, Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye and Prince.

McKnight is divorced and has four sons and 2 daughters (Brian Jr. 21, Cole Nikolas 19, Clyde Lee 18, Evan 10, Brianna 9 and Braylinn 3). On February 11, 2010, Brian proposed to his girlfriend Annalisa Mungcal during one of his performances. No wedding date has been set at this time.

McKnight currently lives in Los Angeles, California. From 2006 to 2010 he hosted a radio show, The Brian McKnight Morning Show with Pat Prescott on KTWV The Wave in Los Angeles, CA. The show was at one time simulcasted on KHJZ-FM, Smooth Jazz 95.7 The Wave in Houston, TX from 6am-9am CST, but this station has changed its format. On January 26, 2009, Brian McKnight hosted "The Brian McKnight show" from 7PM-Midnight on 98.7 KISS FM in New York City.

In October 2007, McKnight made his Broadway debut in the show Chicago.

In 2009, he appeared in the second season of Celebrity Apprentice. Each celebrity played to raise money for the charity of his or her choice; McKnight elected to play for Youthville USA.

From September 2009 to May 2010, The Brian McKnight Show, a late night talk show premiered in syndication. The show is a combination of talk and variety. The show was cancelled on May 29, 2010 due to low ratings and will not return for a second season. Although he promised to pay employees and staff in full, no one who worked on the show has received any payment. As of April 2011, employees and staff are still waiting for payment.

On March 31, 2011 McKnight sang the National Anthem for MLB Opening Day in Cincinnati, Ohio with his sons Brian, Jr. and Niko.
Religion

Brian McKnight is a Seventh-day Adventist. He grew up attending Emmanuel Temple Seventh-day Adventist Church in Buffalo. He also attended Oakwood University, a Seventh-day Adventist university, in Huntsville, Alabama from 1987-1989. McKnight explains, concerning his musical beginnings in the church:

"I'm the fifth generation of Seventh Day Adventists and the youngest of four brothers. When I was still very small, we formed a gospel quartet. Our models were the great gospel groups, the Swan Silvertones and Mighty Clouds of Joy. The McKnight brothers were serious singers. The reputation went out: these boys could shout. My big brothers—Claude (a part of the gospel group Take 6), Freddie and Michael—man, they were my heroes. Each was a leader in his own right. Outside church, they listened to jazz. Church music thrilled me, but jazz stimulated me."
Discography

    * Brian McKnight discography

    *
          o Brian McKnight (1992)
          o I Remember You (1995)
          o Anytime (1997)
          o Back at One (1999)
          o Superhero (2001)
          o U-Turn (2003)
          o Gemini (2005)
          o Ten (2006)
          o Evolution of a Man (2009)
          o Just Me (2011)

Awards and nominations

    * American Music Awards

    *
          o 1999, Favorite R&B/Soul Album: Anytime (Nominated)

2010

    * BET Awards
          o 2007, BET J Cool Like Dat: (Nominated)

    * Grammy Awards
          o 2005, Best R&B Male Vocal Performance: "What We Do Here" (Nominated)
          o 2004, Best R&B Male Vocal Performance: "Shoulda, Coulda, Woulda" (Nominated)
          o 2003, Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group: "All the Way" w/ Kenny G (Nominated)
          o 2002, Outstanding Song Written for a Motion Picture of Television Series: "Win" from Men of Honor (Nominated)
          o 2002, Best Male Pop Vocal Performance: "Still" (Nominated)
          o 2002, Best Pop Collaboration w/ Vocals: "My Kind of Girl" w/ Justin Timberlake (Nominated)
          o 2002, Best R&B Song: "Love of My Life" (Nominated)
          o 2002, Best R&B Male Vocal Performance: "Love of My Life" (Nominated)
          o 2001, Best Male Pop Vocal Performance: "6, 8, 12" (Nominated)
          o 2001, Best R&B Male Vocal Performance: "Stay or Let It Go" (Nominated)
          o 2001, Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group: "Coming Back Home" w/ Bebe Winans & Joe (singer) (Nominated)
          o 2000, Best R&B Album: Back at One (Nominated)
          o 2000, Best Short-Form Music Video: "Back at One" (Nominated)
          o 1999, Best R&B Male Vocal Performance: "The Only One For Me" (Nominated)
          o 1999, Best Male Pop Vocal Performance: "Anytime" (Nominated)
          o 1994, Best Pop Collaboration w/ Vocals: "Love Is" w/ Vanessa L. Williams (Nominated)

McKnight holds a record, having received 16 nominations without a win.

    * Image Awards
          o 2002, Outstanding Male Artist: Superhero (Nominated)
          o 2001, Outstanding Male Artist: "Stay or Let It Go" (Nominated)
          o 2000, Outstanding Male Artist: "Back at One" (Winner)

    * MTV Video Music Awards
          o 2000, Best R&B Video: "Back at One" (Nominated)
          o 1998, Best R&B Video: "Anytime" (Nominated)

    * Soul Train Awards
          o 2002, Best R&B/Soul Male Single: "Love of My Life" (Nominated)
          o 2000, Best R&B/Soul Single Male: "Back at One" (Nominated)
          o 2000, Best R&B/Soul Male Album: Back at One (Nominated)
          o 1999, Best R&B/Soul Male Album: "Anytime" (Winner)
http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y118/LadyMac2005/Brian_McKnight_umvd006.jpg
http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e64/SmithSha0486/brian-mcknight-008.jpg

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 06/05/11 at 7:01 am


The person of the day...Brian McKnight
Brian McKnight (born June 5, 1969) is an American singer-songwriter, arranger, producer, and R&B musician, hosting his own evening short-lived talk show. He is a multi-instrumentalist who plays nine instruments: piano, guitar, bass guitar, drums, percussions, trombone, tuba, flugelhorn and trumpet.
McKnight was born in Buffalo, New York. His musical career began in childhood when he became a member of his church, NY choir and a band leader for his high school, Sweet Home High School. In 1987, McKnight's older brother, Claude McKnight III, and his band, Take 6, signed a record deal with Warner Brothers. This encouraged McKnight to shop his own demo tapes and by the age of 19, he'd signed his first recording deal with Mercury Records subsidiary, Wing Records. (He ended up recording his albums for Mercury.) In 1992, Brian McKnight was released and was followed by two more albums for Mercury, 1995's I Remember You and 1997's Anytime. Anytime sold over two million copies and was nominated for a Grammy. It was also his last album with Mercury Records; by 1998, McKnight had moved on to Motown Records.

In 1997, McKnight recorded "Remember the Magic" for Disney World's 25th anniversary.

In 1999, McKnight released Back at One (his second release from Motown; after the Christmas album Bethlehem), which sold over three million copies. Throughout his career he has collaborated with a variety of musicians including Mariah Carey, Sin Bandera, Mase, Sean "Puffy" Combs, Mary J. Blige, Justin Timberlake, Nelly, Vanessa Williams, Ivete Sangalo, Kirk Franklin, For Real, Canibus, Quincy Jones, Boyz II Men, Christina Aguilera, Regine Velasquez, Shoshana Bean, Gordon Goodwin's Big Phat Band, Rascal Flatts, Talib Kweli, MJG (of the Southern Rap duo Eightball & MJG), Josh Groban (on his 2007 #1 Christmas album Noel Schajris), Justin Bieber, Ashley "Awesome" Speelman and CeCe Peniston.

McKnight in 2004, co-wrote with Australian Soul artist Guy Sebastian the song Wait which is a track off the Beautiful Life.

McKnight's vocal style draws from Stevie Wonder (particularly in his use of melisma), Michael Sembello, Michael McDonald, Kenny Loggins, and his own brother, Take 6 co-founder Claude V. McKnight. Soul singer James Ingram also strongly influenced McKnight. His music production sensibilities especially his penchant for piano based pop ballads, method of background vocal recording and melismatic voice inflections all draw heavily from Ingram. Brian McKnight also has the uncanny ability to mimic the timbre and style of other singers such as Nat King Cole, Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye and Prince.

McKnight is divorced and has four sons and 2 daughters (Brian Jr. 21, Cole Nikolas 19, Clyde Lee 18, Evan 10, Brianna 9 and Braylinn 3). On February 11, 2010, Brian proposed to his girlfriend Annalisa Mungcal during one of his performances. No wedding date has been set at this time.

McKnight currently lives in Los Angeles, California. From 2006 to 2010 he hosted a radio show, The Brian McKnight Morning Show with Pat Prescott on KTWV The Wave in Los Angeles, CA. The show was at one time simulcasted on KHJZ-FM, Smooth Jazz 95.7 The Wave in Houston, TX from 6am-9am CST, but this station has changed its format. On January 26, 2009, Brian McKnight hosted "The Brian McKnight show" from 7PM-Midnight on 98.7 KISS FM in New York City.

In October 2007, McKnight made his Broadway debut in the show Chicago.

In 2009, he appeared in the second season of Celebrity Apprentice. Each celebrity played to raise money for the charity of his or her choice; McKnight elected to play for Youthville USA.

From September 2009 to May 2010, The Brian McKnight Show, a late night talk show premiered in syndication. The show is a combination of talk and variety. The show was cancelled on May 29, 2010 due to low ratings and will not return for a second season. Although he promised to pay employees and staff in full, no one who worked on the show has received any payment. As of April 2011, employees and staff are still waiting for payment.

On March 31, 2011 McKnight sang the National Anthem for MLB Opening Day in Cincinnati, Ohio with his sons Brian, Jr. and Niko.
Religion

Brian McKnight is a Seventh-day Adventist. He grew up attending Emmanuel Temple Seventh-day Adventist Church in Buffalo. He also attended Oakwood University, a Seventh-day Adventist university, in Huntsville, Alabama from 1987-1989. McKnight explains, concerning his musical beginnings in the church:

"I'm the fifth generation of Seventh Day Adventists and the youngest of four brothers. When I was still very small, we formed a gospel quartet. Our models were the great gospel groups, the Swan Silvertones and Mighty Clouds of Joy. The McKnight brothers were serious singers. The reputation went out: these boys could shout. My big brothers—Claude (a part of the gospel group Take 6), Freddie and Michael—man, they were my heroes. Each was a leader in his own right. Outside church, they listened to jazz. Church music thrilled me, but jazz stimulated me."
Discography

    * Brian McKnight discography

    *
          o Brian McKnight (1992)
          o I Remember You (1995)
          o Anytime (1997)
          o Back at One (1999)
          o Superhero (2001)
          o U-Turn (2003)
          o Gemini (2005)
          o Ten (2006)
          o Evolution of a Man (2009)
          o Just Me (2011)

Awards and nominations

    * American Music Awards

    *
          o 1999, Favorite R&B/Soul Album: Anytime (Nominated)

2010

    * BET Awards
          o 2007, BET J Cool Like Dat: (Nominated)

    * Grammy Awards
          o 2005, Best R&B Male Vocal Performance: "What We Do Here" (Nominated)
          o 2004, Best R&B Male Vocal Performance: "Shoulda, Coulda, Woulda" (Nominated)
          o 2003, Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group: "All the Way" w/ Kenny G (Nominated)
          o 2002, Outstanding Song Written for a Motion Picture of Television Series: "Win" from Men of Honor (Nominated)
          o 2002, Best Male Pop Vocal Performance: "Still" (Nominated)
          o 2002, Best Pop Collaboration w/ Vocals: "My Kind of Girl" w/ Justin Timberlake (Nominated)
          o 2002, Best R&B Song: "Love of My Life" (Nominated)
          o 2002, Best R&B Male Vocal Performance: "Love of My Life" (Nominated)
          o 2001, Best Male Pop Vocal Performance: "6, 8, 12" (Nominated)
          o 2001, Best R&B Male Vocal Performance: "Stay or Let It Go" (Nominated)
          o 2001, Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group: "Coming Back Home" w/ Bebe Winans & Joe (singer) (Nominated)
          o 2000, Best R&B Album: Back at One (Nominated)
          o 2000, Best Short-Form Music Video: "Back at One" (Nominated)
          o 1999, Best R&B Male Vocal Performance: "The Only One For Me" (Nominated)
          o 1999, Best Male Pop Vocal Performance: "Anytime" (Nominated)
          o 1994, Best Pop Collaboration w/ Vocals: "Love Is" w/ Vanessa L. Williams (Nominated)

McKnight holds a record, having received 16 nominations without a win.

    * Image Awards
          o 2002, Outstanding Male Artist: Superhero (Nominated)
          o 2001, Outstanding Male Artist: "Stay or Let It Go" (Nominated)
          o 2000, Outstanding Male Artist: "Back at One" (Winner)

    * MTV Video Music Awards
          o 2000, Best R&B Video: "Back at One" (Nominated)
          o 1998, Best R&B Video: "Anytime" (Nominated)

    * Soul Train Awards
          o 2002, Best R&B/Soul Male Single: "Love of My Life" (Nominated)
          o 2000, Best R&B/Soul Single Male: "Back at One" (Nominated)
          o 2000, Best R&B/Soul Male Album: Back at One (Nominated)
          o 1999, Best R&B/Soul Male Album: "Anytime" (Winner)
http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y118/LadyMac2005/Brian_McKnight_umvd006.jpg
http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e64/SmithSha0486/brian-mcknight-008.jpg


Back At One is my favorite.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/06/11 at 7:38 am

The person of the day...Paul Giamatti
Paul Edward Valentine Giamatti (pronounced /dʒiəˈmɑːti/; born June 6, 1967) is an American actor. Giamatti began his career as a supporting actor in several commercially successful and critically acclaimed films produced during the 1990s including Private Parts, The Truman Show, Saving Private Ryan, The Negotiator, and Man on the Moon, before earning lead roles in several projects in the 2000s including American Splendor, Sideways, Cinderella Man, The Illusionist, John Adams, Cold Souls, and Barney's Version.
Giamatti was born in New Haven, Connecticut. His father, Angelo Bartlett Giamatti, was a Yale University professor who later became president of the university and commissioner of Major League Baseball. His mother, Toni Marilyn (née Smith), was a homemaker and English teacher who taught at Hopkins School and had also previously acted. Giamatti's mother was of Irish descent; his paternal grandfather, Valentine Giamatti, was the son of Italian immigrants from Telese, and his paternal grandmother, Mary Claybaugh Walton, was from a New England family.

Giamatti is the youngest of three children. His brother, Marcus, is also an actor, and his sister, Elena, is a jewelry designer. He was educated at The Foote School and graduated from Choate Rosemary Hall in 1985. He attended Yale University, where he was elected to the Skull and Bones secret society.

He was active in the undergraduate theater scene, working alongside actors Ron Livingston and Edward Norton, who were also Yale students. He graduated from Yale in 1989 with a bachelor's degree in English. He went on to earn a Master of Fine Arts degree from the Yale School of Drama where he studied with Earle R. Gister. He performed in numerous theatrical productions (including Broadway) before appearing in some small television and film roles in the early 1990s.
Career

Giamatti's first high profile role was in the film adaptation of Howard Stern's Private Parts (1997) as Kenny "Pig Vomit" Rushton, Stern's antagonistic program director at WNBC. Stern praised Giamatti's performance often on his radio program, calling for him to be nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor. He appeared in a number of supporting roles in big-budget movies such as The Truman Show, Saving Private Ryan, and The Negotiator (all 1998). In 1999, he played Bob Zmuda (and Tony Clifton) in the Andy Kaufman biopic, Man on the Moon. Giamatti continued to be featured in major studio releases such as Big Momma's House (2000) with Martin Lawrence, the Planet of the Apes remake (2001), and in Big Fat Liar (2002) opposite Frankie Muniz and Amanda Bynes.

Giamatti began to earn critical acclaim after his lead role in the 2003 film American Splendor. He gained mainstream recognition and fame with the 2004 independent romantic comedy Sideways. His portrayal of a depressed writer vacationing in the Santa Barbara wine country garnered him a Golden Globe nomination and an Independent Spirit Award. Following the commercial success of Sideways, Giamatti appeared in Cinderella Man, for which he earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor. He was also nominated for a Golden Globe and won the Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Supporting Actor - Motion Picture.

In 2006, he was the lead in M. Night Shyamalan's Lady in the Water, a supernatural thriller, followed by the animated film The Ant Bully, and Neil Burger's drama The Illusionist co-starring Edward Norton. He also played Mr. Hertz in the action movie Shoot 'Em Up and Santa Claus in the comedy Fred Claus. In 2008, he received his first Emmy Award for "Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie" for his title performance in the HBO miniseries John Adams, a role that also led to a Screen Actors Guild award. That same year, he starred in the independent film Pretty Bird which is a fictionalized retelling about the drama behind the invention of a rocketbelt.

He was nominated for 45 separate awards between 2001 and 2008, and won 26 of them, including both an Emmy and a Golden Globe for John Adams. All of his nominations except one were for American Splendor, Sideways, Cinderella Man, or John Adams; the exception was a Blockbuster Entertainment Award nomination for Big Momma's House. In 2011 he won a second Golden globe for his portrayal of the titular character in the Canadian film Barney's Version. The Brooklyn Academy of Music asked Giamatti, its "2007 BAM Cinema Club Chair", to pick films for an eight-movie series called "Paul Giamatti Selects" and shown at the Academy in August and September 2007. His selections indicated a taste for paranoia and "the darkest of dark comedy," according to a writer for The New York Times, and included Frenzy, Dr. Strangelove, Brewster McCloud, The Big Clock, The Seventh Victim, Dawn of the Dead (1978 version), Seconds, and Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978 version).

Giamatti will play noted science fiction author Philip K. Dick in the semi-biopic The Owl in Daylight, which he is producing through his production company, Touchy Feely Productions. He is set for the lead role as Colonel Tom Parker in Bubba Nosferatu: Curse of the She-Vampires, which co-stars Ron Perlman, who recently replaced Bruce Campbell.
Personal life

A resident of the Brooklyn Heights neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York, Giamatti has been married to Elizabeth Giamatti (née Cohen) since 1997. They have a son, Samuel Paul, known as Sam, (born 2001), who is raised in Elizabeth's Jewish religion. Giamatti is an atheist.
In culture

Comedian James Adomian performs an impression of Giamatti on the Comedy Death-Ray Radio podcast. The AV Club describes Adomian's caricature of Giamatti as "a fantastically broken-down sad-sack."
Filmography
Year↓ Title↓ Role↓ Notes
1991 Past Midnight Larry Canipe
1992 Singles Kissing Man
1994 NYPD Blue Man In Sleeping Bag Television series; Episode: "You Bet Your Life"
1995 Mighty Aphrodite Extras Guild Researcher
1995 New York News Dr. Wargner Television series; Episode: "Past Imperfect"
1995 Sabrina Scott
1996 Show, TheThe Show Jeffrey Roffman Television series; Pilot
1996 Breathing Room George
1996 Ripper Doctor Bud Cable Video game
1997 Arresting Gena Detective Wilson
1997 Donnie Brasco FBI Technician
1997 Private Parts Kenny "Pig Vomit" Rushton
1997 My Best Friend's Wedding Richard the Bellman
1997 Deconstructing Harry Professor Abbot
1997 Further Gesture, AA Further Gesture Hotel Clerk
1998 Homicide: Life on the Street Harry Tjarks Television series; Episode: "Pit Bull Sessions"
1998 Truman Show, TheThe Truman Show Control Room Director
1998 Dr. Dolittle Blaine
1998 Saving Private Ryan Sergeant Hill
1998 Negotiator, TheThe Negotiator Rudy Timmons
1998 Safe Men Veal Chop
1999 Cradle Will Rock Carlo
1999 Man on the Moon Bob Zmuda/Tony Clifton
2000 If These Walls Could Talk 2 Ted Hedley Television series; Segment: "1961"
2000 Big Momma's House John Maxwell Nominated – Blockbuster Entertainment Award for Favorite Supporting Actor – Comedy
2000 Duets Todd Woods
2001 King of the Hill Mr. McKay Television series; Episode: "It's Not Easy Being Green"
2001 Storytelling Toby Oxman
2001 Planet of the Apes Limbo
2002 Big Fat Liar Marty Wolf
2002 Thunderpants Johnson J. Johnson
2003 American Splendor Harvey Pekar

    * National Board of Review Award for Best Breakthrough Performance by an Actor
    * Sant Jordi Award for Best Foreign Actor (Also for Sideways and Cinderella Man
    * Nominated – Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Actor
    * Nominated – Dallas-Fort Worth Film Critics Association Award for Best Actor
    * Nominated – Chlotrudis Award for Best Actor
    * Nominated – Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Actor
    * Nominated – Phoenix Film Critics Society Award for Best Actor
    * Nominated – Satellite Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy

2003 Paycheck Shorty
2003 Confidence Gordo
2003 Pentagon Papers, TheThe Pentagon Papers Anthony Russo Television series
2004 Sideways Miles Raymond

    * Boston Society of Film Critics Award for Best Cast
    * Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Cast
    * Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Actor
    * Comedy Film Honor for Best Actor
    * Dallas-Fort Worth Film Critics Association Award for Best Actor
    * Independent Spirit Award for Best Lead Male
    * New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor
    * Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Actor
    * Phoenix Film Critics Society Award for Best Cast
    * San Francisco Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor
    * Sant Jordi Award for Best Foreign Actor (Also for American Splendor and Cinderella Man
    * Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture
    * Toronto Film Critics Association Award for Best Performance, Male
    * Nominated – Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Actor
    * Nominated – Chlotrudis Award for Best Actor
    * Nominated – Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
    * Nominated – London Film Critics' Circle Award for Actor of the Year
    * Nominated – Satellite Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
    * Nominated – Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role

2005 Saturday Night Live Host Television series; Episode: 30x10
2005 Robots Tim the Gate Guard
2005 Fan and the Flower, TheThe Fan and the Flower Narrator
2005 Cinderella Man Joe Gould

    * Boston Society of Film Critics Award for Best Supporting Actor
    * Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actor
    * Kansas City Film Critics Circle Award for Best Supporting Actor
    * Florida Film Critics Circle Award for Best Supporting Actor
    * Sant Jordi Award for Best Foreign Actor Also for Sideways and American Splendor
    * Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role
    * Southeastern Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actor
    * Toronto Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Performance, Male
    * Washington D.C. Area Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actor
    * Nominated – Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor
    * Nominated – Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actor
    * Nominated – Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture
    * Nominated – Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Supporting Actor

2006 Asterix and the Vikings Asterix English Dub
2006 Hawk Is Dying, TheThe Hawk Is Dying George Gattling
2006 Illusionist, TheThe Illusionist Chief Inspector Uhl
2006 Lady in the Water Cleveland Heep
2006 Ant Bully, TheThe Ant Bully Stan Beals
2006 Amazing Screw-On Head, TheThe Amazing Screw-On Head Screw-On Head Television series
2007 Nanny Diaries, TheThe Nanny Diaries Mr. X
2007 Shoot 'Em Up Karl Hertz
2007 Fred Claus Nicholas "Nick" Claus
2008 John Adams John Adams

    * Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor – Miniseries or a Movie
    * Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Miniseries or Television Film
    * Golden Nymph Award for Outstanding Actor – Mini Series
    * Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Miniseries or Television Movie
    * Satellite Award for Best Actor – Miniseries or Television Film
    * Television Critics Association Award for Individual Achievement in Drama

2008 Pretty Bird Rick
2009 Duplicity Richard "Dick" Garsik
2009 Cold Souls Paul

    * Karlovy Vary International Film Festival Award for Best Actor
    * Nominated – Gotham Award for Best Ensemble Cast

2009 Haunted World of El Superbeasto, TheThe Haunted World of El Superbeasto Dr. Satan
2009 Last Station, TheThe Last Station Vladimir Chertkov
2010 Barney's Version Barney Panofsky Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
2011 Win Win Mike Flaherty
2011 Ironclad King John
2011 The Hangover Part II Kingsley
2011 Too Big to Fail Ben Bernanke
2012 Cosmopolis TBA filming
2012 John Dies at the End Arnie Blondestone Also producer
http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p279/apatamwa/untitledersdf.jpg
http://i592.photobucket.com/albums/tt8/GayWired/ugly%20hot%20actors/Paul.jpg

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/07/11 at 6:35 am

The person of the day...Tom Jones
Sir Thomas John Woodward, OBE (born 7 June 1940), known by his stage name Tom Jones, is a Welsh singer, particularly noted for his powerful voice. Since the mid 1960s, Jones has sung many styles of popular music – pop, rock, R&B, show tunes, country, dance, techno, soul and gospel – and sold over 100 million records.
Jones became the frontman for Tommy Scott and the Senators, a Welsh beat group, in 1963. They soon gained a local following and reputation in South Wales.

In 1964, Jones recorded several solo tracks with producer Joe Meek, who took them to various labels, but had little success. Later that year, Decca producer Peter Sullivan saw Tommy Scott and The Senators performing in a club and directed them to manager Phil Solomon, but their partnership was short-lived.

The group continued to play gigs at dance halls and working men's clubs in South Wales. One night, at the Top Hat in Cwmtillery, Wales, Jones was spotted by Gordon Mills, a London-based manager originally from South Wales. Mills became Jones' manager, and took the young singer to London. He contrived the stage name, "Tom Jones," which not only linked the singer to the image of the title character in Tony Richardson's hit film, but also emphasised Jones' Welsh nationality.

Many record companies found Jones' stage presence, act, and vocal delivery too raucous and raunchy. Eventually, Mills got Jones a recording contract with Decca. His first single, "Chills and Fever," was released in late 1964. It didn't chart, but the follow-up, "It's Not Unusual" became an international hit. The BBC initially refused to play it, but the offshore pirate radio station Radio Caroline promoted it. The heavily orchestrated pop arrangement perfectly meshed with Jones' swinging, sexy image, and in early 1965, "It's Not Unusual" reached number one in the United Kingdom and the top ten in the United States.

During 1965, Mills secured a number of movie themes for Jones to record, including the themes for the film What's New Pussycat? (written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David) and for the James Bond film Thunderball. Jones was also awarded the Grammy Award for Best New Artist for 1965.

In 1966, Jones' popularity began to slip somewhat, causing Mills to redesign the singer's image into a more respectable and mature crooner. Jones also began to sing material that appealed to a wider audience, such as the big country hit "Green, Green Grass of Home". The strategy worked and Jones returned to the top of the charts in the UK and began hitting the Top 40 again in the USA. For the remainder of the decade, he scored a consistent string of hits on both sides of the Atlantic.
Las Vegas

In 1967, Jones performed for the first time in Las Vegas at the Flamingo. His charismatic performances and style of dress (increasingly featuring his open half unbuttoned shirts and tight pants) became part of his stage act. Women would swoon and scream, and some would throw their knickers on stage. Soon after he began to play Las Vegas, he chose to record less, instead concentrating on his lucrative club performances. At Caesars Palace, his shows were traditionally a knicker-hurling frenzy of raw sexual tension and good-time entertainment. It was there that women started throwing hotel room keys on stage. Jones and his idol Elvis Presley met in 1965 at the Paramount film stage, when Elvis was filming Paradise, Hawaiian Style. Afterward, they became good friends, spending more and more time together in Las Vegas and even duetting until the early hours at Presley's private Las Vegas suite. Their friendship endured until Presley's death in 1977.
Television and lawsuits

Jones had an internationally successful television variety show from 1969 to 1971, titled This Is Tom Jones. The show, which was worth a reported $9m to Jones over three years, was broadcast by ITV in the UK and by ABC in America. From 1980 to 1981, he had a second television variety show, The Tom Jones Show, which lasted for a series of 24 episodes. In recent years, both television shows have been the subject of litigation in relation to the original license holder, C/F International.

As of December 2004, C/F International was a secured judgment creditor of Classic World Productions and its principal, Darryl Payne, for approximately one million US dollars, and was the principal secured creditor at the time of the subsequent bankruptcy filing by the company. C/F International's action against Classic World Productions and owner Darryl Payne was based on unpaid royalties in relation to This Is Tom Jones, and related recordings. This Is Tom Jones is currently sold on DVD by Time-Life, rather than by Classic World Productions or C/F International.

C/F International's rights to later Tom Jones material were also subject to dispute. In March 2007, Tom Jones and Tom Jones Enterprises sued C/F International to stop the company from licensing sound recordings made from The Tom Jones Show, recorded in Vancouver, Canada. It was contended that any rights that C/F International had to license The Tom Jones Show did not include the right to make and license separate recordings of the performances on the show. In addition, it was contended that any rights that C/F International had in The Tom Jones Show no longer existed, due to numerous breaches of contract. Examples of contentious CDs include "Live on the Tom Jones Show", released in 2006.

Jones appeared on 1 January 1970, on the BBC's review of the sixties music scene, Pop Go The Sixties, performing "Delilah" (in a telerecording of an earlier appearance on Top of the Pops).

Later in 1970, Jones teamed up with Raquel Welch and Producer/Choreographer David Winters of Winters-Rosen Productions for the TV special Raquel!. The multimillion dollar TV song & dance extravaganza was filmed around the world. It included lavish production numbers of classic songs from the era, lavish costumes, and guest performances from Jones, John Wayne and Bob Hope.
Decline and resurgence

In the early 1970s, Jones had a number of hit singles, including "She's A Lady", "Till", and "The Young New Mexican Puppeteer", but in the mid 1970s his popularity declined, although he did have a big hit in 1976 with "Say You'll Stay Until Tomorrow", which went to #1 on the US country chart and #15 on the Billboard Hot 100.

In the early 1980s, Jones started to record country music. From 1980 to 1986, Jones had nine songs hit the top 40 on the US country chart, yet he failed to crack the top 100 in the UK or chart on the Billboard Hot 100.

After Jones' long-time manager Gordon Mills died of cancer on 29 July 1986, Jones' son Mark became his new manager. Mark recognised that Jones was incorporating modern music in his live shows and suggested that he should start to record songs from a fresh genre and leave country music behind.

In 1987, Jones re-entered the singles chart with "A Boy From Nowhere", which went to #2 in the United Kingdom. The following year, he covered Prince's "Kiss" with The Art of Noise. The song was a hit on both sides of the Atlantic, reaching #5 in the UK and #31 in the US. The video for "Kiss" was seen in heavy rotation on both MTV and VH1, and it won the MTV Video Music Award for Breakthrough Video."

Jones received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1989. His star is located at 6608 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles, California, in front of Frederick's of Hollywood.

In 1992, he made his first appearance at the UK's Glastonbury Festival, and in 1993, he appeared as himself on The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, a television sitcom, and in animated form for an episode of The Simpsons.

Jones signed with Interscope Records in 1993 and released the album The Lead And How To Swing It. The first single, "If I Only Knew," went to #11 in the UK.

In 1999, Jones released the album Reload, a collection of cover duets with artists such as The Cardigans, Natalie Imbruglia, Cerys Matthews, Van Morrison, Mousse T, Portishead, The Stereophonics, and Robbie Williams. The album went to #1 in the UK and sold over 4 million copies worldwide. Five singles from Reload hit the UK top 40.
Into the 21st century

To ring in the year 2000, United States President Bill Clinton invited Jones to perform on New Year's Eve at the Millennium celebrations in Washington, D.C.. Throughout 2000, Jones garnered a number of honours for his work, including a BRIT Award for Best Male. He was also hired as the new voice of Australia's National Rugby League, singing in an advertisement to market the 2000 season.

In 2002, Jones released the album Mr. Jones, which was produced by Wyclef Jean. The album and the first single, "Tom Jones International", were top 40 hits in the UK.

Jones received the Brit Award for Outstanding Contribution to Music in 2003. The following year, he teamed up with pianist Jools Holland and released Tom Jones & Jools Holland, a roots rock 'n' roll album. It peaked at #5 in the UK.

On 28 May 2005, in celebration of his upcoming 65th birthday, Jones returned to his homeland to perform a concert in Ynysangharad Park, Pontypridd before a crowd of about 20,000. This was his first performance in Pontypridd since 1964. That same year, the BBC reported that Jones was Wales' wealthiest entertainer, having amassed a fortune of £175 million. Jones collaborated with English-born Australian pop singer John Farnham in 2005 and released the live album John Farnham & Tom Jones - Together In Concert. The following year, Jones worked with Chicane and released the single "Stoned in Love", which went to #7 in the UK.

Jones, who was awarded an OBE in 1999, was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 2006 at Buckingham Palace for his services to music. "When you first come into show business and get a hit record, it is the start of something," Jones said. "As time goes by, it just gets better. This is the best thing I have had. It's a wonderful feeling, a heady feeling."
Recent work

On 1 July 2007, Jones was among the invited artists who performed at Wembley Stadium at the Concert for Diana, joined on stage by guitarist Joe Perry of Aerosmith and British soul singer Joss Stone. In addition to performing some of his own songs, the group covered Arctic Monkeys' "I Bet You Look Good on the Dancefloor". Jones, a big boxing fan, has performed national anthems before a number of boxing matches. He sang "God Save the Queen", the United Kingdom's national anthem, before the Floyd Mayweather Jr.-Ricky Hatton fight in 2007, he sang "Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau", the Welsh national anthem, at the fight between fellow Welshman Joe Calzaghe and Bernard Hopkins in 2008, and he sang "God Save the Queen" before the Manny Pacquiao-Ricky Hatton fight in 2009.

In 2008, he released 24 Hours on S-Curve Records, his first album of new material to be issued in the US for over 15 years. Jones, who was still performing over 200 dates a year as he approached his 70th birthday, set out on a world tour to promote the album. "The fire is still in me. Not to be an oldie, but a goodie. I want to be a contender," Jones said. In 2008 also Tom Jones was inducted into the Hit Parade Hall of Fame. On 16 November 2008, Jones was invited to perform on BBC's Strictly Come Dancing. He performed the debut single from 24 Hours, "If He Should Ever Leave You", which was named the 9th best song of 2008 by Spinner. One of the songs from 24 Hours, "Give a Little Love", would later be featured in the first trailer for Little Fockers.

In February 2009, he did an exclusive Take-Away Show with Vincent Moon, performing three songs live in front of a camera in a New York hotel room. In 2009 Jones was voted "Sexiest Man In The World" in the Hungarian magazine Periodika.

Jones went to the top of the UK Music Charts for the third time in his career thanks to a cover of "Islands in the Stream", sung with Ruth Jones, Rob Brydon and Robin Gibb, who co-wrote the original with his brothers Barry and Maurice. The song, inspired by BBC's hit sitcom Gavin and Stacey, was released in aid of Comic Relief and reached #1 in March 2009.

On 5 June 2010, Jones had been due to perform at Norwich City Football Club's Carrow Road stadium, two days before he celebrated his 70th birthday. Unfortunately the show was cancelled due to uncompleted improvements to the stadium and the work falling behind schedule meaning the stadium wouldn't be ready in time. Jones announced that his new album Praise & Blame would be released on 26 July 2010. The album, produced by Ethan Johns (who has previously worked with Kings Of Leon, Rufus Wainwright and Laura Marling), would include covers of songs by such artists as Bob Dylan, John Lee Hooker and Billy Joe Shaver and feature such guest musicians as Booker T.

On Jones' 70th birthday, 7 June 2010, the single "Burning Hell", a cover of the John Lee Hooker classic, from the forthcoming Praise & Blame album, was released. In July 2010 it was reported, however, that David Sharpe, vice-president of Island Records (to whom Jones had moved, from EMI, for £1.5m in October 2009), had emailed colleagues demanding that they "pull back this project immediately or get my money back" and asking if the record had been "a sick joke". Jones later attacked Sharpe and revealed that he was furious about the leaked email.

In July 2010, Jones appeared on the penultimate episode of Friday Night with Jonathan Ross and performed "Burning Hell". In August 2010, Praise & Blame debuted at number 2 on the UK album chart.

On 11 September 2010 Jones performed for an audience of 50,000 at the Help for Heroes charity concert at Twickenham Stadium performing "Strange Things Are Happening Every Day" and his classic hit "Green Green Grass of Home". On 22 September, Jones appeared on "The Late Show with David Letterman" at the Ed Sullivan Theatre in New York. Last year he ditched his hair dye and declared he’d moved onto a new stage in his life: "Over Christmas, I always take a month off and let my hair go and don’t even shave. ‘Normally it comes out like salt and pepper which I hated. But this year it grew out a silver colour, so I kept it because it’s more distinguished," he said.

In May 2011 Jones appeared as guest vocalist on the debut album Let Them Talk by Hugh Laurie. On 15 May 2011 he appeared alongside Laurie in the UK ITV series Perspectives, singing music from the album in New Orleans. On May 25, 2011, he appeared on American Idol after a medley of his hits performed by the American Idol "Top 13."
Personal life

Jones has remained married to his Linda since 1957, despite his many well publicised infidelities. His philandering once led her to beat him black and blue. She snapped after reading about one infidelity in a newspaper. She punched and kicked him, but Jones did not fight back: "I took it," Jones said.

Jones has had affairs with such well-known women as Mary Wilson of The Supremes, former Miss World Marjorie Wallace and Cassandra Peterson, better known as Elvira, Mistress of the Dark. Peterson claims that she lost her virginity to Jones.

One affair resulted in the birth of a son. In October 1987, while on tour in America, Jones had a brief relationship with model Katherine Berkery. Three months later, Berkery discovered that she was pregnant. After a lengthy fight and DNA testing, an American court ruled in 1989 that Jones is the boy's father. He flatly denied paternity for 20 years, but finally admitted it in 2008. However, he made no suggestion that he wanted to meet his son, Jonathan Berkery.

Jones moved to the United States in 1974, buying Dean Martin's former mansion in the East Gate Old Bel Air in Los Angeles. In 2009, after 35 years in America, he revealed that he and Linda were planning to move back to the United Kingdom. "I've had a great time living in Los Angeles," Jones said, "but after all these years, we think now is the time to move home." However, on The Chris Moyles Show on 27 July 2009, he said he still lives in Los Angeles and will remain there for the foreseeable future as he still frequently stays at his home in London.
Discography
Main article: Tom Jones discography
Filmography

    * The Special London Bridge Special, TV special, UK/USA (1972)
          o A fantasy story about London Bridge being brought to America
    * On Happiness Island, BBC TV special, UK (1974)
    * Pleasure Cove, feature film, USA (1979)
    * Fantasy Island, TV series, USA (ABC, 7 April 1984)
    * The Ghosts Of Oxford Street, TV special, UK (1991)
          o A TV musical celebrating the 200th anniversary of London's most renowned Oxford Street
    * Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, TV series (Guest: As Himself) (1991)
    * The Simpsons, TV series, Season 4 Episode 7 ("Marge Gets a Job") (1992)
    * Silk n' Sabotage, feature film, USA (1994)
    * Jerky Boys: The Movie, feature film, USA (1995)
    * Mars Attacks!, feature film, USA (1996)
    * Agnes Browne (a.k.a. The Mammy), feature film (1999)
    * The Emperor's New Groove, animated film (As the Theme Song Guy) (2000)
    * Duck Dodgers, opening theme and a guest appearance in episode "Talent Show A Go-Go"

In popular culture

Space and Cerys Matthews released "The Ballad of Tom Jones", a song about a fighting couple who are calmed down by listening to Jones' music on the radio. The song reached #4 in the UK. in 1998.
Compositions

Tom Jones wrote or co-wrote the following songs: "And I Tell The Sea", "Looking Out My Window", "Feel The Rain", "Jezebel", "The Letter", "Younger Days", "Tom Jones International", "Holiday", "The Road", "24 Hours", "Seasons", "We Got Love", "Seen That Face", "Give A Little Love", "If He Should Ever Leave You", "Whatever It Takes" and "Didn't It Rain".
http://i457.photobucket.com/albums/qq294/otrekojom/Tom-Jones.jpg
http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y297/TheXenaScrolls/miscellaneous/tom-jones.jpg

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 06/07/11 at 6:45 am


The person of the day...Tom Jones
Sir Thomas John Woodward, OBE (born 7 June 1940), known by his stage name Tom Jones, is a Welsh singer, particularly noted for his powerful voice. Since the mid 1960s, Jones has sung many styles of popular music – pop, rock, R&B, show tunes, country, dance, techno, soul and gospel – and sold over 100 million records.
Jones became the frontman for Tommy Scott and the Senators, a Welsh beat group, in 1963. They soon gained a local following and reputation in South Wales.

In 1964, Jones recorded several solo tracks with producer Joe Meek, who took them to various labels, but had little success. Later that year, Decca producer Peter Sullivan saw Tommy Scott and The Senators performing in a club and directed them to manager Phil Solomon, but their partnership was short-lived.

The group continued to play gigs at dance halls and working men's clubs in South Wales. One night, at the Top Hat in Cwmtillery, Wales, Jones was spotted by Gordon Mills, a London-based manager originally from South Wales. Mills became Jones' manager, and took the young singer to London. He contrived the stage name, "Tom Jones," which not only linked the singer to the image of the title character in Tony Richardson's hit film, but also emphasised Jones' Welsh nationality.

Many record companies found Jones' stage presence, act, and vocal delivery too raucous and raunchy. Eventually, Mills got Jones a recording contract with Decca. His first single, "Chills and Fever," was released in late 1964. It didn't chart, but the follow-up, "It's Not Unusual" became an international hit. The BBC initially refused to play it, but the offshore pirate radio station Radio Caroline promoted it. The heavily orchestrated pop arrangement perfectly meshed with Jones' swinging, sexy image, and in early 1965, "It's Not Unusual" reached number one in the United Kingdom and the top ten in the United States.

During 1965, Mills secured a number of movie themes for Jones to record, including the themes for the film What's New Pussycat? (written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David) and for the James Bond film Thunderball. Jones was also awarded the Grammy Award for Best New Artist for 1965.

In 1966, Jones' popularity began to slip somewhat, causing Mills to redesign the singer's image into a more respectable and mature crooner. Jones also began to sing material that appealed to a wider audience, such as the big country hit "Green, Green Grass of Home". The strategy worked and Jones returned to the top of the charts in the UK and began hitting the Top 40 again in the USA. For the remainder of the decade, he scored a consistent string of hits on both sides of the Atlantic.
Las Vegas

In 1967, Jones performed for the first time in Las Vegas at the Flamingo. His charismatic performances and style of dress (increasingly featuring his open half unbuttoned shirts and tight pants) became part of his stage act. Women would swoon and scream, and some would throw their knickers on stage. Soon after he began to play Las Vegas, he chose to record less, instead concentrating on his lucrative club performances. At Caesars Palace, his shows were traditionally a knicker-hurling frenzy of raw sexual tension and good-time entertainment. It was there that women started throwing hotel room keys on stage. Jones and his idol Elvis Presley met in 1965 at the Paramount film stage, when Elvis was filming Paradise, Hawaiian Style. Afterward, they became good friends, spending more and more time together in Las Vegas and even duetting until the early hours at Presley's private Las Vegas suite. Their friendship endured until Presley's death in 1977.
Television and lawsuits

Jones had an internationally successful television variety show from 1969 to 1971, titled This Is Tom Jones. The show, which was worth a reported $9m to Jones over three years, was broadcast by ITV in the UK and by ABC in America. From 1980 to 1981, he had a second television variety show, The Tom Jones Show, which lasted for a series of 24 episodes. In recent years, both television shows have been the subject of litigation in relation to the original license holder, C/F International.

As of December 2004, C/F International was a secured judgment creditor of Classic World Productions and its principal, Darryl Payne, for approximately one million US dollars, and was the principal secured creditor at the time of the subsequent bankruptcy filing by the company. C/F International's action against Classic World Productions and owner Darryl Payne was based on unpaid royalties in relation to This Is Tom Jones, and related recordings. This Is Tom Jones is currently sold on DVD by Time-Life, rather than by Classic World Productions or C/F International.

C/F International's rights to later Tom Jones material were also subject to dispute. In March 2007, Tom Jones and Tom Jones Enterprises sued C/F International to stop the company from licensing sound recordings made from The Tom Jones Show, recorded in Vancouver, Canada. It was contended that any rights that C/F International had to license The Tom Jones Show did not include the right to make and license separate recordings of the performances on the show. In addition, it was contended that any rights that C/F International had in The Tom Jones Show no longer existed, due to numerous breaches of contract. Examples of contentious CDs include "Live on the Tom Jones Show", released in 2006.

Jones appeared on 1 January 1970, on the BBC's review of the sixties music scene, Pop Go The Sixties, performing "Delilah" (in a telerecording of an earlier appearance on Top of the Pops).

Later in 1970, Jones teamed up with Raquel Welch and Producer/Choreographer David Winters of Winters-Rosen Productions for the TV special Raquel!. The multimillion dollar TV song & dance extravaganza was filmed around the world. It included lavish production numbers of classic songs from the era, lavish costumes, and guest performances from Jones, John Wayne and Bob Hope.
Decline and resurgence

In the early 1970s, Jones had a number of hit singles, including "She's A Lady", "Till", and "The Young New Mexican Puppeteer", but in the mid 1970s his popularity declined, although he did have a big hit in 1976 with "Say You'll Stay Until Tomorrow", which went to #1 on the US country chart and #15 on the Billboard Hot 100.

In the early 1980s, Jones started to record country music. From 1980 to 1986, Jones had nine songs hit the top 40 on the US country chart, yet he failed to crack the top 100 in the UK or chart on the Billboard Hot 100.

After Jones' long-time manager Gordon Mills died of cancer on 29 July 1986, Jones' son Mark became his new manager. Mark recognised that Jones was incorporating modern music in his live shows and suggested that he should start to record songs from a fresh genre and leave country music behind.

In 1987, Jones re-entered the singles chart with "A Boy From Nowhere", which went to #2 in the United Kingdom. The following year, he covered Prince's "Kiss" with The Art of Noise. The song was a hit on both sides of the Atlantic, reaching #5 in the UK and #31 in the US. The video for "Kiss" was seen in heavy rotation on both MTV and VH1, and it won the MTV Video Music Award for Breakthrough Video."

Jones received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1989. His star is located at 6608 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles, California, in front of Frederick's of Hollywood.

In 1992, he made his first appearance at the UK's Glastonbury Festival, and in 1993, he appeared as himself on The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, a television sitcom, and in animated form for an episode of The Simpsons.

Jones signed with Interscope Records in 1993 and released the album The Lead And How To Swing It. The first single, "If I Only Knew," went to #11 in the UK.

In 1999, Jones released the album Reload, a collection of cover duets with artists such as The Cardigans, Natalie Imbruglia, Cerys Matthews, Van Morrison, Mousse T, Portishead, The Stereophonics, and Robbie Williams. The album went to #1 in the UK and sold over 4 million copies worldwide. Five singles from Reload hit the UK top 40.
Into the 21st century

To ring in the year 2000, United States President Bill Clinton invited Jones to perform on New Year's Eve at the Millennium celebrations in Washington, D.C.. Throughout 2000, Jones garnered a number of honours for his work, including a BRIT Award for Best Male. He was also hired as the new voice of Australia's National Rugby League, singing in an advertisement to market the 2000 season.

In 2002, Jones released the album Mr. Jones, which was produced by Wyclef Jean. The album and the first single, "Tom Jones International", were top 40 hits in the UK.

Jones received the Brit Award for Outstanding Contribution to Music in 2003. The following year, he teamed up with pianist Jools Holland and released Tom Jones & Jools Holland, a roots rock 'n' roll album. It peaked at #5 in the UK.

On 28 May 2005, in celebration of his upcoming 65th birthday, Jones returned to his homeland to perform a concert in Ynysangharad Park, Pontypridd before a crowd of about 20,000. This was his first performance in Pontypridd since 1964. That same year, the BBC reported that Jones was Wales' wealthiest entertainer, having amassed a fortune of £175 million. Jones collaborated with English-born Australian pop singer John Farnham in 2005 and released the live album John Farnham & Tom Jones - Together In Concert. The following year, Jones worked with Chicane and released the single "Stoned in Love", which went to #7 in the UK.

Jones, who was awarded an OBE in 1999, was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 2006 at Buckingham Palace for his services to music. "When you first come into show business and get a hit record, it is the start of something," Jones said. "As time goes by, it just gets better. This is the best thing I have had. It's a wonderful feeling, a heady feeling."
Recent work

On 1 July 2007, Jones was among the invited artists who performed at Wembley Stadium at the Concert for Diana, joined on stage by guitarist Joe Perry of Aerosmith and British soul singer Joss Stone. In addition to performing some of his own songs, the group covered Arctic Monkeys' "I Bet You Look Good on the Dancefloor". Jones, a big boxing fan, has performed national anthems before a number of boxing matches. He sang "God Save the Queen", the United Kingdom's national anthem, before the Floyd Mayweather Jr.-Ricky Hatton fight in 2007, he sang "Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau", the Welsh national anthem, at the fight between fellow Welshman Joe Calzaghe and Bernard Hopkins in 2008, and he sang "God Save the Queen" before the Manny Pacquiao-Ricky Hatton fight in 2009.

In 2008, he released 24 Hours on S-Curve Records, his first album of new material to be issued in the US for over 15 years. Jones, who was still performing over 200 dates a year as he approached his 70th birthday, set out on a world tour to promote the album. "The fire is still in me. Not to be an oldie, but a goodie. I want to be a contender," Jones said. In 2008 also Tom Jones was inducted into the Hit Parade Hall of Fame. On 16 November 2008, Jones was invited to perform on BBC's Strictly Come Dancing. He performed the debut single from 24 Hours, "If He Should Ever Leave You", which was named the 9th best song of 2008 by Spinner. One of the songs from 24 Hours, "Give a Little Love", would later be featured in the first trailer for Little Fockers.

In February 2009, he did an exclusive Take-Away Show with Vincent Moon, performing three songs live in front of a camera in a New York hotel room. In 2009 Jones was voted "Sexiest Man In The World" in the Hungarian magazine Periodika.

Jones went to the top of the UK Music Charts for the third time in his career thanks to a cover of "Islands in the Stream", sung with Ruth Jones, Rob Brydon and Robin Gibb, who co-wrote the original with his brothers Barry and Maurice. The song, inspired by BBC's hit sitcom Gavin and Stacey, was released in aid of Comic Relief and reached #1 in March 2009.

On 5 June 2010, Jones had been due to perform at Norwich City Football Club's Carrow Road stadium, two days before he celebrated his 70th birthday. Unfortunately the show was cancelled due to uncompleted improvements to the stadium and the work falling behind schedule meaning the stadium wouldn't be ready in time. Jones announced that his new album Praise & Blame would be released on 26 July 2010. The album, produced by Ethan Johns (who has previously worked with Kings Of Leon, Rufus Wainwright and Laura Marling), would include covers of songs by such artists as Bob Dylan, John Lee Hooker and Billy Joe Shaver and feature such guest musicians as Booker T.

On Jones' 70th birthday, 7 June 2010, the single "Burning Hell", a cover of the John Lee Hooker classic, from the forthcoming Praise & Blame album, was released. In July 2010 it was reported, however, that David Sharpe, vice-president of Island Records (to whom Jones had moved, from EMI, for £1.5m in October 2009), had emailed colleagues demanding that they "pull back this project immediately or get my money back" and asking if the record had been "a sick joke". Jones later attacked Sharpe and revealed that he was furious about the leaked email.

In July 2010, Jones appeared on the penultimate episode of Friday Night with Jonathan Ross and performed "Burning Hell". In August 2010, Praise & Blame debuted at number 2 on the UK album chart.

On 11 September 2010 Jones performed for an audience of 50,000 at the Help for Heroes charity concert at Twickenham Stadium performing "Strange Things Are Happening Every Day" and his classic hit "Green Green Grass of Home". On 22 September, Jones appeared on "The Late Show with David Letterman" at the Ed Sullivan Theatre in New York. Last year he ditched his hair dye and declared he’d moved onto a new stage in his life: "Over Christmas, I always take a month off and let my hair go and don’t even shave. ‘Normally it comes out like salt and pepper which I hated. But this year it grew out a silver colour, so I kept it because it’s more distinguished," he said.

In May 2011 Jones appeared as guest vocalist on the debut album Let Them Talk by Hugh Laurie. On 15 May 2011 he appeared alongside Laurie in the UK ITV series Perspectives, singing music from the album in New Orleans. On May 25, 2011, he appeared on American Idol after a medley of his hits performed by the American Idol "Top 13."
Personal life

Jones has remained married to his Linda since 1957, despite his many well publicised infidelities. His philandering once led her to beat him black and blue. She snapped after reading about one infidelity in a newspaper. She punched and kicked him, but Jones did not fight back: "I took it," Jones said.

Jones has had affairs with such well-known women as Mary Wilson of The Supremes, former Miss World Marjorie Wallace and Cassandra Peterson, better known as Elvira, Mistress of the Dark. Peterson claims that she lost her virginity to Jones.

One affair resulted in the birth of a son. In October 1987, while on tour in America, Jones had a brief relationship with model Katherine Berkery. Three months later, Berkery discovered that she was pregnant. After a lengthy fight and DNA testing, an American court ruled in 1989 that Jones is the boy's father. He flatly denied paternity for 20 years, but finally admitted it in 2008. However, he made no suggestion that he wanted to meet his son, Jonathan Berkery.

Jones moved to the United States in 1974, buying Dean Martin's former mansion in the East Gate Old Bel Air in Los Angeles. In 2009, after 35 years in America, he revealed that he and Linda were planning to move back to the United Kingdom. "I've had a great time living in Los Angeles," Jones said, "but after all these years, we think now is the time to move home." However, on The Chris Moyles Show on 27 July 2009, he said he still lives in Los Angeles and will remain there for the foreseeable future as he still frequently stays at his home in London.
Discography
Main article: Tom Jones discography
Filmography

   * The Special London Bridge Special, TV special, UK/USA (1972)
         o A fantasy story about London Bridge being brought to America
   * On Happiness Island, BBC TV special, UK (1974)
   * Pleasure Cove, feature film, USA (1979)
   * Fantasy Island, TV series, USA (ABC, 7 April 1984)
   * The Ghosts Of Oxford Street, TV special, UK (1991)
         o A TV musical celebrating the 200th anniversary of London's most renowned Oxford Street
   * Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, TV series (Guest: As Himself) (1991)
   * The Simpsons, TV series, Season 4 Episode 7 ("Marge Gets a Job") (1992)
   * Silk n' Sabotage, feature film, USA (1994)
   * Jerky Boys: The Movie, feature film, USA (1995)
   * Mars Attacks!, feature film, USA (1996)
   * Agnes Browne (a.k.a. The Mammy), feature film (1999)
   * The Emperor's New Groove, animated film (As the Theme Song Guy) (2000)
   * Duck Dodgers, opening theme and a guest appearance in episode "Talent Show A Go-Go"

In popular culture

Space and Cerys Matthews released "The Ballad of Tom Jones", a song about a fighting couple who are calmed down by listening to Jones' music on the radio. The song reached #4 in the UK. in 1998.
Compositions

Tom Jones wrote or co-wrote the following songs: "And I Tell The Sea", "Looking Out My Window", "Feel The Rain", "Jezebel", "The Letter", "Younger Days", "Tom Jones International", "Holiday", "The Road", "24 Hours", "Seasons", "We Got Love", "Seen That Face", "Give A Little Love", "If He Should Ever Leave You", "Whatever It Takes" and "Didn't It Rain".
http://i457.photobucket.com/albums/qq294/otrekojom/Tom-Jones.jpg
http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y297/TheXenaScrolls/miscellaneous/tom-jones.jpg


My favorite is "She's A Lady.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: CatwomanofV on 06/07/11 at 8:17 am

I don't know why but I used to hate Tom Jones. Now as I am older, I do admit to liking some of his songs-and I can understand the appeal (when I couldn't in my younger days).



Cat

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/07/11 at 2:24 pm


I don't know why but I used to hate Tom Jones. Now as I am older, I do admit to liking some of his songs-and I can understand the appeal (when I couldn't in my younger days).



Cat

I'm not a big fan, but do like some of his songs. My dad use to be jealous of him and Engelbert Humperdinck because my mom thought they were hot lol.
My mom sang Engelbert's song "Please Release Me" and my father got so mad that he flung open are front door and the handle made a hole in the wall.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Paul on 06/07/11 at 2:30 pm


My mom sang Engelbert's song "Please Release Me" and my father got so mad that he flung open are front door and the handle made a hole in the wall.


My mother still thinks the world of the 'Dinck'...so much so, that I'm packing her off to visit him on his British tour later this year...

The voice may have difficulty in knocking holes in walls, but he can still belt out a tune...

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Philip Eno on 06/07/11 at 2:43 pm


The person of the day...Tom Jones
Sir Thomas John Woodward, OBE (born 7 June 1940), known by his stage name Tom Jones, is a Welsh singer, particularly noted for his powerful voice. Since the mid 1960s, Jones has sung many styles of popular music – pop, rock, R&B, show tunes, country, dance, techno, soul and gospel – and sold over 100 million records.
Jones became the frontman for Tommy Scott and the Senators, a Welsh beat group, in 1963. They soon gained a local following and reputation in South Wales.

In 1964, Jones recorded several solo tracks with producer Joe Meek, who took them to various labels, but had little success. Later that year, Decca producer Peter Sullivan saw Tommy Scott and The Senators performing in a club and directed them to manager Phil Solomon, but their partnership was short-lived.

The group continued to play gigs at dance halls and working men's clubs in South Wales. One night, at the Top Hat in Cwmtillery, Wales, Jones was spotted by Gordon Mills, a London-based manager originally from South Wales. Mills became Jones' manager, and took the young singer to London. He contrived the stage name, "Tom Jones," which not only linked the singer to the image of the title character in Tony Richardson's hit film, but also emphasised Jones' Welsh nationality.

Many record companies found Jones' stage presence, act, and vocal delivery too raucous and raunchy. Eventually, Mills got Jones a recording contract with Decca. His first single, "Chills and Fever," was released in late 1964. It didn't chart, but the follow-up, "It's Not Unusual" became an international hit. The BBC initially refused to play it, but the offshore pirate radio station Radio Caroline promoted it. The heavily orchestrated pop arrangement perfectly meshed with Jones' swinging, sexy image, and in early 1965, "It's Not Unusual" reached number one in the United Kingdom and the top ten in the United States.

During 1965, Mills secured a number of movie themes for Jones to record, including the themes for the film What's New Pussycat? (written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David) and for the James Bond film Thunderball. Jones was also awarded the Grammy Award for Best New Artist for 1965.

In 1966, Jones' popularity began to slip somewhat, causing Mills to redesign the singer's image into a more respectable and mature crooner. Jones also began to sing material that appealed to a wider audience, such as the big country hit "Green, Green Grass of Home". The strategy worked and Jones returned to the top of the charts in the UK and began hitting the Top 40 again in the USA. For the remainder of the decade, he scored a consistent string of hits on both sides of the Atlantic.
Las Vegas

In 1967, Jones performed for the first time in Las Vegas at the Flamingo. His charismatic performances and style of dress (increasingly featuring his open half unbuttoned shirts and tight pants) became part of his stage act. Women would swoon and scream, and some would throw their knickers on stage. Soon after he began to play Las Vegas, he chose to record less, instead concentrating on his lucrative club performances. At Caesars Palace, his shows were traditionally a knicker-hurling frenzy of raw sexual tension and good-time entertainment. It was there that women started throwing hotel room keys on stage. Jones and his idol Elvis Presley met in 1965 at the Paramount film stage, when Elvis was filming Paradise, Hawaiian Style. Afterward, they became good friends, spending more and more time together in Las Vegas and even duetting until the early hours at Presley's private Las Vegas suite. Their friendship endured until Presley's death in 1977.
Television and lawsuits

Jones had an internationally successful television variety show from 1969 to 1971, titled This Is Tom Jones. The show, which was worth a reported $9m to Jones over three years, was broadcast by ITV in the UK and by ABC in America. From 1980 to 1981, he had a second television variety show, The Tom Jones Show, which lasted for a series of 24 episodes. In recent years, both television shows have been the subject of litigation in relation to the original license holder, C/F International.

As of December 2004, C/F International was a secured judgment creditor of Classic World Productions and its principal, Darryl Payne, for approximately one million US dollars, and was the principal secured creditor at the time of the subsequent bankruptcy filing by the company. C/F International's action against Classic World Productions and owner Darryl Payne was based on unpaid royalties in relation to This Is Tom Jones, and related recordings. This Is Tom Jones is currently sold on DVD by Time-Life, rather than by Classic World Productions or C/F International.

C/F International's rights to later Tom Jones material were also subject to dispute. In March 2007, Tom Jones and Tom Jones Enterprises sued C/F International to stop the company from licensing sound recordings made from The Tom Jones Show, recorded in Vancouver, Canada. It was contended that any rights that C/F International had to license The Tom Jones Show did not include the right to make and license separate recordings of the performances on the show. In addition, it was contended that any rights that C/F International had in The Tom Jones Show no longer existed, due to numerous breaches of contract. Examples of contentious CDs include "Live on the Tom Jones Show", released in 2006.

Jones appeared on 1 January 1970, on the BBC's review of the sixties music scene, Pop Go The Sixties, performing "Delilah" (in a telerecording of an earlier appearance on Top of the Pops).

Later in 1970, Jones teamed up with Raquel Welch and Producer/Choreographer David Winters of Winters-Rosen Productions for the TV special Raquel!. The multimillion dollar TV song & dance extravaganza was filmed around the world. It included lavish production numbers of classic songs from the era, lavish costumes, and guest performances from Jones, John Wayne and Bob Hope.
Decline and resurgence

In the early 1970s, Jones had a number of hit singles, including "She's A Lady", "Till", and "The Young New Mexican Puppeteer", but in the mid 1970s his popularity declined, although he did have a big hit in 1976 with "Say You'll Stay Until Tomorrow", which went to #1 on the US country chart and #15 on the Billboard Hot 100.

In the early 1980s, Jones started to record country music. From 1980 to 1986, Jones had nine songs hit the top 40 on the US country chart, yet he failed to crack the top 100 in the UK or chart on the Billboard Hot 100.

After Jones' long-time manager Gordon Mills died of cancer on 29 July 1986, Jones' son Mark became his new manager. Mark recognised that Jones was incorporating modern music in his live shows and suggested that he should start to record songs from a fresh genre and leave country music behind.

In 1987, Jones re-entered the singles chart with "A Boy From Nowhere", which went to #2 in the United Kingdom. The following year, he covered Prince's "Kiss" with The Art of Noise. The song was a hit on both sides of the Atlantic, reaching #5 in the UK and #31 in the US. The video for "Kiss" was seen in heavy rotation on both MTV and VH1, and it won the MTV Video Music Award for Breakthrough Video."

Jones received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1989. His star is located at 6608 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles, California, in front of Frederick's of Hollywood.

In 1992, he made his first appearance at the UK's Glastonbury Festival, and in 1993, he appeared as himself on The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, a television sitcom, and in animated form for an episode of The Simpsons.

Jones signed with Interscope Records in 1993 and released the album The Lead And How To Swing It. The first single, "If I Only Knew," went to #11 in the UK.

In 1999, Jones released the album Reload, a collection of cover duets with artists such as The Cardigans, Natalie Imbruglia, Cerys Matthews, Van Morrison, Mousse T, Portishead, The Stereophonics, and Robbie Williams. The album went to #1 in the UK and sold over 4 million copies worldwide. Five singles from Reload hit the UK top 40.
Into the 21st century

To ring in the year 2000, United States President Bill Clinton invited Jones to perform on New Year's Eve at the Millennium celebrations in Washington, D.C.. Throughout 2000, Jones garnered a number of honours for his work, including a BRIT Award for Best Male. He was also hired as the new voice of Australia's National Rugby League, singing in an advertisement to market the 2000 season.

In 2002, Jones released the album Mr. Jones, which was produced by Wyclef Jean. The album and the first single, "Tom Jones International", were top 40 hits in the UK.

Jones received the Brit Award for Outstanding Contribution to Music in 2003. The following year, he teamed up with pianist Jools Holland and released Tom Jones & Jools Holland, a roots rock 'n' roll album. It peaked at #5 in the UK.

On 28 May 2005, in celebration of his upcoming 65th birthday, Jones returned to his homeland to perform a concert in Ynysangharad Park, Pontypridd before a crowd of about 20,000. This was his first performance in Pontypridd since 1964. That same year, the BBC reported that Jones was Wales' wealthiest entertainer, having amassed a fortune of £175 million. Jones collaborated with English-born Australian pop singer John Farnham in 2005 and released the live album John Farnham & Tom Jones - Together In Concert. The following year, Jones worked with Chicane and released the single "Stoned in Love", which went to #7 in the UK.

Jones, who was awarded an OBE in 1999, was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 2006 at Buckingham Palace for his services to music. "When you first come into show business and get a hit record, it is the start of something," Jones said. "As time goes by, it just gets better. This is the best thing I have had. It's a wonderful feeling, a heady feeling."
Recent work

On 1 July 2007, Jones was among the invited artists who performed at Wembley Stadium at the Concert for Diana, joined on stage by guitarist Joe Perry of Aerosmith and British soul singer Joss Stone. In addition to performing some of his own songs, the group covered Arctic Monkeys' "I Bet You Look Good on the Dancefloor". Jones, a big boxing fan, has performed national anthems before a number of boxing matches. He sang "God Save the Queen", the United Kingdom's national anthem, before the Floyd Mayweather Jr.-Ricky Hatton fight in 2007, he sang "Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau", the Welsh national anthem, at the fight between fellow Welshman Joe Calzaghe and Bernard Hopkins in 2008, and he sang "God Save the Queen" before the Manny Pacquiao-Ricky Hatton fight in 2009.

In 2008, he released 24 Hours on S-Curve Records, his first album of new material to be issued in the US for over 15 years. Jones, who was still performing over 200 dates a year as he approached his 70th birthday, set out on a world tour to promote the album. "The fire is still in me. Not to be an oldie, but a goodie. I want to be a contender," Jones said. In 2008 also Tom Jones was inducted into the Hit Parade Hall of Fame. On 16 November 2008, Jones was invited to perform on BBC's Strictly Come Dancing. He performed the debut single from 24 Hours, "If He Should Ever Leave You", which was named the 9th best song of 2008 by Spinner. One of the songs from 24 Hours, "Give a Little Love", would later be featured in the first trailer for Little Fockers.

In February 2009, he did an exclusive Take-Away Show with Vincent Moon, performing three songs live in front of a camera in a New York hotel room. In 2009 Jones was voted "Sexiest Man In The World" in the Hungarian magazine Periodika.

Jones went to the top of the UK Music Charts for the third time in his career thanks to a cover of "Islands in the Stream", sung with Ruth Jones, Rob Brydon and Robin Gibb, who co-wrote the original with his brothers Barry and Maurice. The song, inspired by BBC's hit sitcom Gavin and Stacey, was released in aid of Comic Relief and reached #1 in March 2009.

On 5 June 2010, Jones had been due to perform at Norwich City Football Club's Carrow Road stadium, two days before he celebrated his 70th birthday. Unfortunately the show was cancelled due to uncompleted improvements to the stadium and the work falling behind schedule meaning the stadium wouldn't be ready in time. Jones announced that his new album Praise & Blame would be released on 26 July 2010. The album, produced by Ethan Johns (who has previously worked with Kings Of Leon, Rufus Wainwright and Laura Marling), would include covers of songs by such artists as Bob Dylan, John Lee Hooker and Billy Joe Shaver and feature such guest musicians as Booker T.

On Jones' 70th birthday, 7 June 2010, the single "Burning Hell", a cover of the John Lee Hooker classic, from the forthcoming Praise & Blame album, was released. In July 2010 it was reported, however, that David Sharpe, vice-president of Island Records (to whom Jones had moved, from EMI, for £1.5m in October 2009), had emailed colleagues demanding that they "pull back this project immediately or get my money back" and asking if the record had been "a sick joke". Jones later attacked Sharpe and revealed that he was furious about the leaked email.

In July 2010, Jones appeared on the penultimate episode of Friday Night with Jonathan Ross and performed "Burning Hell". In August 2010, Praise & Blame debuted at number 2 on the UK album chart.

On 11 September 2010 Jones performed for an audience of 50,000 at the Help for Heroes charity concert at Twickenham Stadium performing "Strange Things Are Happening Every Day" and his classic hit "Green Green Grass of Home". On 22 September, Jones appeared on "The Late Show with David Letterman" at the Ed Sullivan Theatre in New York. Last year he ditched his hair dye and declared he’d moved onto a new stage in his life: "Over Christmas, I always take a month off and let my hair go and don’t even shave. ‘Normally it comes out like salt and pepper which I hated. But this year it grew out a silver colour, so I kept it because it’s more distinguished," he said.

In May 2011 Jones appeared as guest vocalist on the debut album Let Them Talk by Hugh Laurie. On 15 May 2011 he appeared alongside Laurie in the UK ITV series Perspectives, singing music from the album in New Orleans. On May 25, 2011, he appeared on American Idol after a medley of his hits performed by the American Idol "Top 13."
Personal life

Jones has remained married to his Linda since 1957, despite his many well publicised infidelities. His philandering once led her to beat him black and blue. She snapped after reading about one infidelity in a newspaper. She punched and kicked him, but Jones did not fight back: "I took it," Jones said.

Jones has had affairs with such well-known women as Mary Wilson of The Supremes, former Miss World Marjorie Wallace and Cassandra Peterson, better known as Elvira, Mistress of the Dark. Peterson claims that she lost her virginity to Jones.

One affair resulted in the birth of a son. In October 1987, while on tour in America, Jones had a brief relationship with model Katherine Berkery. Three months later, Berkery discovered that she was pregnant. After a lengthy fight and DNA testing, an American court ruled in 1989 that Jones is the boy's father. He flatly denied paternity for 20 years, but finally admitted it in 2008. However, he made no suggestion that he wanted to meet his son, Jonathan Berkery.

Jones moved to the United States in 1974, buying Dean Martin's former mansion in the East Gate Old Bel Air in Los Angeles. In 2009, after 35 years in America, he revealed that he and Linda were planning to move back to the United Kingdom. "I've had a great time living in Los Angeles," Jones said, "but after all these years, we think now is the time to move home." However, on The Chris Moyles Show on 27 July 2009, he said he still lives in Los Angeles and will remain there for the foreseeable future as he still frequently stays at his home in London.
Discography
Main article: Tom Jones discography
Filmography

    * The Special London Bridge Special, TV special, UK/USA (1972)
          o A fantasy story about London Bridge being brought to America
    * On Happiness Island, BBC TV special, UK (1974)
    * Pleasure Cove, feature film, USA (1979)
    * Fantasy Island, TV series, USA (ABC, 7 April 1984)
    * The Ghosts Of Oxford Street, TV special, UK (1991)
          o A TV musical celebrating the 200th anniversary of London's most renowned Oxford Street
    * Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, TV series (Guest: As Himself) (1991)
    * The Simpsons, TV series, Season 4 Episode 7 ("Marge Gets a Job") (1992)
    * Silk n' Sabotage, feature film, USA (1994)
    * Jerky Boys: The Movie, feature film, USA (1995)
    * Mars Attacks!, feature film, USA (1996)
    * Agnes Browne (a.k.a. The Mammy), feature film (1999)
    * The Emperor's New Groove, animated film (As the Theme Song Guy) (2000)
    * Duck Dodgers, opening theme and a guest appearance in episode "Talent Show A Go-Go"

In popular culture

Space and Cerys Matthews released "The Ballad of Tom Jones", a song about a fighting couple who are calmed down by listening to Jones' music on the radio. The song reached #4 in the UK. in 1998.
Compositions

Tom Jones wrote or co-wrote the following songs: "And I Tell The Sea", "Looking Out My Window", "Feel The Rain", "Jezebel", "The Letter", "Younger Days", "Tom Jones International", "Holiday", "The Road", "24 Hours", "Seasons", "We Got Love", "Seen That Face", "Give A Little Love", "If He Should Ever Leave You", "Whatever It Takes" and "Didn't It Rain".
http://i457.photobucket.com/albums/qq294/otrekojom/Tom-Jones.jpg
http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y297/TheXenaScrolls/miscellaneous/tom-jones.jpg
My favourite is Delilah.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/07/11 at 2:55 pm


My mother still thinks the world of the 'Dinck'...so much so, that I'm packing her off to visit him on his British tour later this year...

The voice may have difficulty in knocking holes in walls, but he can still belt out a tune...

That's very nice of you to do that. :)

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/07/11 at 2:57 pm


My favourite is Delilah.

That's a good song I also like Green Green Grass of Home and It's Not Unusual.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Philip Eno on 06/07/11 at 3:01 pm


That's a good song I also like Green Green Grass of Home and It's Not Unusual.
Delilah is good song for singing Karaoke

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 06/07/11 at 7:28 pm


My favourite is Delilah.


It's Not Unusual is my favorite as well.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Philip Eno on 06/09/11 at 1:30 am


It's Not Unusual is my favorite as well.
Green Green Grass Of Home brings back childhood memories for me.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/09/11 at 8:40 am


Green Green Grass Of Home brings back childhood memories for me.

Are they good memories?

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/09/11 at 8:43 am

The person of the day...Michael J. Fox
Michael J. Fox, OC (born Michael Andrew Fox; June 9, 1961) is a Canadian–American actor, author, comedian, producer, activist and voice-over artist. With a film and television career spanning from the late 1970s, Fox's roles have included Marty McFly from the Back to the Future trilogy (1985–1990); Alex P. Keaton from Family Ties (1982-1989) for which he won three Emmy Awards and a Golden Globe Award; and Mike Flaherty from Spin City (1996–2000), for which he won an Emmy, three Golden Globes, and two Screen Actors Guild Awards.

Fox was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease in 1991, and disclosed his condition to the public in 1998. Fox semi-retired from acting in 2000 as the symptoms of his disease worsened. He has since become an activist for research toward finding a cure. This led him to create The Michael J. Fox Foundation, and on March 5, 2010, Sweden's Karolinska Institutet gave him a honoris causa doctorate for his work in advocating a cure for Parkinson's disease.

Since 2000 Fox has mainly worked as a voice over actor in films such as Stuart Little and Atlantis: The Lost Empire, and taken minor TV roles such as in Boston Legal, The Good Wife and Scrubs. He has also released three books, Lucky Man: A Memoir (2002), Always Looking Up: The Adventures of an Incurable Optimist (2009) and A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Future: Twists and Turns and Lessons Learned (2010). He was inducted as an Officer of the Order of Canada on May 27, 2011 for his outreach and fundraising work.
Fox's first feature film roles were in Midnight Madness (1980) and Class of 1984 (1982), credited in both as Michael Fox. Shortly afterward, he began playing "Young Republican" Alex P. Keaton in the show Family Ties which aired on NBC for seven seasons, from 1982 to 1989. Fox only received the role after Matthew Broderick was unavailable. Family Ties had been sold to the television network using the pitch "hip parents, square kids," with the parents originally intended to be the main characters. However, the positive reaction to Fox's performance led to his character becoming the focus of the show following the fourth episode. At its peak, the audience for Family Ties drew one-third of America's households every week. Fox won three Emmy awards for Family Ties in 1986, 1987 and 1988 respectively. He also won a Golden Globe Award in 1989.

Brandon Tartikoff, one of the show's producers, felt that Fox was too short in relation to the actors playing his parents, and tried to have him replaced. Tartikoff reportedly said that "this is not the kind of face you'll ever find on a lunch-box". After his later successes, Fox presented Tartikoff with a custom-made lunch-box with the inscription "To Brandon, this is for you to put your crow in. Love and Kisses, Michael J. Fox". Tartikoff kept the lunch-box in his office for the rest of his NBC career.

While filming Family Ties, Fox met his future wife, Tracy Pollan, when she portrayed his girlfriend, Ellen. When Fox left the TV series Spin City, his final episodes made numerous allusions to Family Ties: Michael Gross (who played Alex's father Steven) portrays Mike Flaherty's (Fox's) therapist, and there is a reference to an off-screen character named "Mallory". Also, when Flaherty becomes an environmental lobbyist in Washington D.C., he meets a conservative senator from Ohio named Alex P. Keaton, and in one episode Meredith Baxter played Mike's mother.
Back to the Future trilogy

Back to the Future tells the story of Marty McFly (Fox), a teenager who is accidentally sent back in time from 1985 to 1955. He meets his parents in high school, accidentally attracting his mother's romantic interest. Marty must repair the damage to history by causing his parents to fall in love, while finding a way to return to 1985. Robert Zemeckis, the director, originally wanted Fox to play Marty but Gary David Goldberg the creator of Family Ties, which Fox was working on at the time refused to allow Zemeckis to even approach Fox as he felt that as Meredith Baxter was on maternity leave at the time that Fox's character Alex Keaton was needed to carry the show in her absence. Eric Stoltz was cast and he was already filming Back to the Future when Robert Zemeckis, felt that Stoltz was not giving the right type of performance for the humor involved. Zemeckis quickly replaced Stoltz with Fox whose schedule was now more open with the return of Meredith Baxter. During filming, Fox would rehearse for Family Ties from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m, then rush to the Back to the Future set where he would rehearse and shoot until 2:30 a.m. This schedule lasted for two full months. Back to the Future was both a commercial and critical success. The film spent 8 consecutive weekends as the number one grossing movie at the US box office in 1985, and eventually earned a worldwide total of $381.11 million. Variety applauded the performances, arguing Fox and Lloyd imbued Marty and Doc Brown's friendship with a quality reminiscent of King Arthur and Merlin. Two sequels, Back to the Future Part II and Back to the Future Part III, were released in 1989 and 1990, respectively.
Mid-career
Fox in September 1987

During and immediately after the Back to the Future trilogy, Fox starred in Teen Wolf (1985), Light of Day (1987), The Secret of My Success (1987), Bright Lights, Big City (1988) and Casualties of War (1989).

In The Secret of My Success, Fox played a graduate student from Kansas State University who moves to New York City where he has landed a job as a financier. The film was successful at the box office, taking $110 million worldwide. Roger Ebert in The Chicago Sun Times wrote; "Fox provides a fairly desperate center for the film. It could not have been much fun for him to follow the movie's arbitrary shifts of mood, from sitcom to slapstick, from sex farce to boardroom brawls."

In Bright Lights, Big City Fox played a fact-checker for a New York magazine, who spends his nights partying with alcohol and drugs. The film received mixed reviews, with Hal Hinson in The Washington post criticizing Fox by claiming that "he was the wrong actor for the job". Meanwhile Roger Ebert praised the actor's performance: "Fox is very good in the central role (he has a long drunken monologue that is the best thing he has ever done in a movie)". During the shooting of Bright Lights, Big City, Michael was reunited with his on-screen girlfriend Tracy Pollan from Family Ties.

Fox then starred in Casualties of War, a war drama about the Vietnam War, alongside Sean Penn. Casualties of War was not a box office hit, but Fox, playing a Private serving in Vietnam, received good reviews for his performance. Don Willmott on film critic’s website wrote; "Fox, only one year beyond his Family Ties sitcom silliness, rises to the challenges of acting as the film's moral voice and sharing scenes with the always intimidating Penn."

In 1991, he starred in Doc Hollywood, a romantic comedy about a talented medical doctor who decides to become a plastic surgeon. While relocating from Washington D.C. to Los Angeles, California, he winds up as a doctor in a small southern town. Michael Caton-Jones, from Time Out, described Fox in the film as "at his frenetic best". The Hard Way was also released in 1991, with Fox playing an undercover actor learning from police officer James Woods. Between 1992 and 1996, he continued making several films, such as For Love or Money (1993), Life With Mikey (1993) and Greedy (1994). Fox then played small supporting roles in political drama The American President (1995) and comedy Mars Attacks! (1996).

His last major film role was in The Frighteners (1996). The Frighteners tells the story of Frank Bannister (Fox), an architect who develops psychic abilities allowing him to see, hear, and communicate with ghosts. After losing his wife, he uses his new abilities by cheating money out of customers for his "ghosthunting" business. However, a mass murderer comes back from Hell, prompting Frank to investigate the supernatural presence. Fox's performance received critical praise, Kenneth Turan in The Los Angeles Times wrote; "The film's actors are equally pleasing. Both Fox, in his most successful starring role in some time, and Alvarado, who looks rather like Andie MacDowell here, have no difficulty getting into the manic spirit of things."

Fox has also done voice-over work providing the voice of Stuart Little in the Stuart Little movie and its sequel, both of which were based on the popular book by E. B. White. He also voiced the American Bulldog Chance in Homeward Bound: The Incredible Journey and its sequel Homeward Bound II: Lost in San Francisco, as well as Milo Thatch in Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
Spin City and later career
The hand prints of Michael J. Fox in front of The Great Movie Ride at Walt Disney World's Disney's Hollywood Studios theme park.

Spin City ran from 1996 to 2002 on American television network channel ABC. The show was based on a fictional local government running New York City, originally starring Fox as Mike Flaherty, a Fordham Law graduate serving as the Deputy Mayor of New York. Fox won an Emmy award for Spin City in 2000, three Golden Globe Awards in 1998, 1999 and 2000 and two Screen Actors Guild Awards in 1999 and 2000. During the third season of Spin City, Fox made the announcement to the cast and crew of the show that he had Parkinson's Disease. During the fourth season, he announced his retirement from the show to focus on spending more time with his family. He announced that he planned to continue to act and would make guest appearances on Spin City (he made three more appearances on the show during the final season). After leaving the show, he was replaced by Charlie Sheen, who portrayed the character Charlie Crawford. Altogether, 145 episodes were made. Fox also served as an executive producer during his time on the show, alongside co-creators Bill Lawrence and Gary David Goldberg.

In 2004, Fox guest starred in two episodes of the comedy-drama Scrubs as Dr. Kevin Casey, a surgeon with severe obsessive-compulsive disorder. The series was created by Spin City creator Bill Lawrence. In 2006, he appeared in four episodes of Boston Legal as a lung cancer patient. The producers brought him back in a recurring role for Season three, beginning with the season premiere. Fox was nominated for an Emmy Award for best guest appearance. In 2009, he appeared in five episodes of the television series Rescue Me which earned him an Emmy for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series. Since 2000 Fox has released three books, Lucky Man: A Memoir (2002), Always Looking Up: The Adventures of an Incurable Optimist (2009) and A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Future: Twists and Turns and Lessons Learned (2010). In 2010, Fox returned to television as a guest star in US drama The Good Wife. Fox will make another guest-star appearance on The Good Wife in episode 13.

He made an appearance at the 2010 Winter Olympics closing ceremony in Vancouver, Canada and delivered comedic monologues, along with William Shatner and Catherine O'Hara, in the "I am Canadian" part of the show.

Along with Tatjana Patitz, Fox appears in the 2011 Carl Zeiss AG calendar, photographed by Bryan Adams in New York City in the summer of 2010.

Despite a soundalike voicing his character of Marty McFly in the 2011 Back to the Future episodic adventure game, Fox lent his likeness to the in-game version of McFly alongside Christopher Lloyd. Developers Telltale Games have confirmed that Fox will make a special guest appearance in the final episode of the series.
Personal life
The Michael J. Fox Theatre in Burnaby

Fox married actress Tracy Pollan on July 16, 1988, at West Mountain Inn in Arlington, Vermont. The couple have four children: Sam Michael (born May 30, 1989), twins Aquinnah Kathleen and Schuyler Frances (born February 15, 1995), and Esmé Annabelle (born November 3, 2001). Fox holds dual Canadian-U.S. citizenship. On February 28, 2010, Fox provided a light-hearted segment during the 2010 Winter Olympics' closing ceremony which took place in Vancouver, Canada wherein he expressed how proud he is to be Canadian. On June 4, 2010, the City of Burnaby, British Columbia honoured Fox by granting him the Freedom of the City.
Illness and activism

Fox started displaying symptoms of early-onset Parkinson's disease in 1990 while shooting the movie Doc Hollywood, although he was not properly diagnosed until the next year. After his diagnosis, Fox began drinking more heavily than in the past; however, he sought help and stopped drinking altogether. In 1998, he decided to go public with his condition, and since then he has been a strong advocate of Parkinson's disease research. His foundation, The Michael J. Fox Foundation, was created to help advance every promising research path to curing Parkinson's disease, through embryonic stem cell studies.

Fox manages the symptoms of his Parkinson's disease with the drug Sinemet, and he also had a thalamotomy in 1998.

In his memoir, Lucky Man, Fox wrote that he did not take his medication prior to his testimony before the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee in 1998; "I had made a deliberate choice to appear before the subcommittee without medication. It seemed to me that this occasion demanded that my testimony about the effects of the disease, and the urgency we as a community were feeling, be seen as well as heard. For people who had never observed me in this kind of shape, the transformation must have been startling". His first book, Lucky Man focused on how after seven years of unacceptance of the disease he set up the Michael J Fox Foundation, stopped drinking and began to be an advocate of PD sufferers.

In an April 2002 NPR interview, Fox explained what he does when he becomes symptomatic during an interview: "Well, actually, I've been erring on the side of caution — I think 'erring' is actually the right word — in that I've been medicating perhaps too much, in the sense times the symptoms that people see in some of these interviews that have been on are actually dyskinesia, which is a reaction to the medication. Because if I were purely symptomatic with Parkinson's symptoms, a lot of times speaking is difficult. There's a kind of a cluttering of speech and it's very difficult to sit still, to sit in one place. You know, the symptoms are different, so I'd rather kind of suffer the symptoms of dyskinesia... this kind of weaving and this kind of continuous thing is much preferable, actually, than pure Parkinson's symptoms. So that's what I generally do...I haven't had any, you know, problems with pure Parkinson's symptoms in any of these interviews, because I'll tend to just make sure that I have enough Sinemet in my system and, in some cases, too much. But to me, it's preferable. It's not representative of what I'm like in my everyday life. I get a lot of people with Parkinson's coming up to me saying, 'You take too much medication.' I say, Well, you sit across from Larry King and see if you want to tempt it."

In 2006, Fox starred in a campaign ad for Claire McCaskill expressing her support for stem cell research. In the ad, he visibly showed the effects of his Parkinson's medication. "As you might know, I care deeply about stem cell research. In Missouri, you can elect Claire McCaskill, who shares my hope for cures. Unfortunately, Senator Jim Talent opposes expanding stem cell research. Senator Talent even wanted to criminalize the science that gives us the chance for hope. They say all politics is local, but that's not always the case. What you do in Missouri matters to millions of Americans, Americans like me." The New York Times called it "one of the most powerful and talked about political advertisements in years" and polls indicated that the commercial had a statistical impact on the way voters voted. His second book Always Looking Up: The Adventures Of An Incurable Optimist describes his life between 1999 and 2009, with much of the book centered on how Fox got into campaigning for stem cell research. On March 31, 2009, Fox appeared on The Oprah Winfrey Show with Dr. Oz to publicly discuss his condition as well as his book, his family and his prime time special which aired May 7, 2009 (Michael J. Fox: Adventures of an Incurable Optimist).

His work led him to be named one of the 100 people "whose power, talent or moral example is transforming the world" in 2007 by Time magazine. On March 5, 2010, Fox received an honorary doctorate in medicine from Karolinska Institutet for his contributions to research in Parkinson's disease. He also has received an honorary doctor of laws from the University of British Columbia.
Filmography
Actor
Film
Year Film Role Notes
1980 Midnight Madness Scott Larson
1982 Class of 1984 Arthur
1985 Back to the Future Marty McFly
Teen Wolf Scott Howard
1987 Light of Day Joe Rasnick
The Secret of My Success Brantley Foster/Carlton Whitfield
1988 Bright Lights, Big City Jamie Conway
1989 Casualties of War PFC. Eriksson
Back to the Future Part II Marty McFly, Marty McFly Jr, Marlene McFly
1990 Back to the Future Part III Marty McFly, Seamus McFly
1991 The Hard Way Nick Lang/Ray Casanov
Doc Hollywood Dr. Benjamin Stone
1993 Homeward Bound: The Incredible Journey Chance Voice
Life with Mikey Michael "Mikey" Chapman
For Love or Money Doug Ireland
1994 Where the Rivers Flow North Clayton Farnsworth
Greedy Daniel McTeague
1995 Blue in the Face Pete Maloney
Coldblooded Tim Alexander Also Producer
The American President Lewis Rothschild
1996 Homeward Bound II: Lost in San Francisco Chance Voice
The Frighteners Frank Bannister
Mars Attacks! Jason Stone
1999 Stuart Little Stuart Little Voice
2001 Atlantis: The Lost Empire Milo James Thatch Voice
2002 Interstate 60 Mr. Baker
Stuart Little 2 Stuart Little Voice
2005 Stuart Little 3: Call of the Wild Stuart Little Voice
Television
Year Title Role Notes
1977 The Magic Lie Episode: "The Master"
1979 Letters from Frank Ricky CBS TV-Movie
Lou Grant Paul Stone Episode: "Kids"
1980 Palmerstown, U.S.A. Willy-Joe Hall
Family Richard Topol Episode: "Such a Fine Line"
Trouble in High Timber Country Thomas Elston ABC TV-Movie
1981 Trapper John, M.D. Elliot Schweitzer Episode: Brain Child
Leo and Me Jamie Produced in 1976; was not televised on CBC until 1981
credited as "Mike Fox"
1982–1989 Family Ties Alex P. Keaton
1983 The Love Boat Episode: "I Like to Be in America..."
High School U.S.A. Jay-Jay Manners NBC TV-Movie/TV-Pilot
1984 Night Court Eddie Simms Episode: "Santa Goes Downtown"
The Homemade Comedy Special Host NBC TV-Special
1985 Poison Ivy Dennis Baxter NBC TV-Movie
1986 David Letterman's 2nd Annual Holiday Film Festival NBC TV-Special
Segment: The Iceman Hummeth
1988 Mickey's 60th Birthday Alex P. Keaton (a flashback clip) TV-Special
1990 Sex, Buys & Advertising TV-Special
1991 Saturday Night Live Host Episode: "Michael J. Fox/The Black Crowes"
Tales from the Crypt Prosecutor Episode: "The Trap"
1994 Don't Drink the Water Axel Magee ABC TV-Movie
1996–2001 Spin City Mike Flaherty Seasons 1 – 4
2002 Clone High Gandhi's Remaining Kidney Voice Role
"Escape to Beer Mountain: A Rope of Sand"
2004 Scrubs Dr. Kevin Casey Episode: "My Catalyst"
Episode: "My Porcelain God"
2006 Boston Legal Daniel Post
2009 Rescue Me Dwight
2010 The Colbert Report Himself
The Good Wife Louis Canning Recurring role
2011 Ace of Cakes Himself
2011 Curb Your Enthusiasm Himself Season 8
2011 Back to the Future: The Game TBA Videogame Voice, Episode 5: "Outatime"
Producer
Year(s) Film or television show Notes
1995 Coldblooded Producer
1996–2000 Spin City Executive producer
1999 Anna Says Executive producer
2002 Otherwise Engaged Executive producer
2003 Hench at Home Executive producer
Awards and nominations

Canada's Walk of Fame

    * 2000: Inducted, Canada's Walk of Fame

Hollywood Walk of Fame

    * 2002: Star on the Walk of Fame – 7021 Hollywood Blvd.

Emmy Awards

    * 1985: Nominated, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series – Family Ties
    * 1986: Won, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series – Family Ties
    * 1987: Won, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series – Family Ties
    * 1988: Won, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series – Family Ties
    * 1989: Nominated, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series – Family Ties
    * 1997: Nominated, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series – Spin City
    * 1998: Nominated, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series – Spin City
    * 1999: Nominated, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series – Spin City
    * 2000: Won, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series – Spin City
    * 2006: Nominated, Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series – Boston Legal
    * 2009: Won, Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series – Rescue Me

Golden Globe Awards

    * 1986: Nominated, Best Performance by an Actor in a TV-Series — Comedy/Musical – Family Ties
    * 1986: Nominated, Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture — Comedy/Musical – Back to the Future
    * 1987: Nominated, Best Performance by an Actor in a TV-Series — Comedy/Musical – Family Ties
    * 1989: Won, Best Performance by an Actor in a TV-Series — Comedy/Musical – Family Ties
    * 1997: Nominated, Best Performance by an Actor in a TV-Series — Comedy/Musical – Spin City
    * 1998: Won, Best Performance by an Actor in a TV-Series — Comedy/Musical – Spin City
    * 1999: Won, Best Performance by an Actor in a TV-Series — Comedy/Musical – Spin City
    * 2000: Won, Best Performance by an Actor in a TV-Series — Comedy/Musical – Spin City

Screen Actors Guild Awards

    * 1999: Won, Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Comedy Series – Spin City
    * 2000: Won, Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Comedy Series – Spin City

Saturn Awards

    * 1985: Won, Best Actor – Back to the Future

People's Choice Awards

    * 1997: Won, Favorite Male Performer in a New Television Series

Satellite Awards

    * 1997: Nominated, Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series — Comedy or Musical – Spin City
    * 1998: Nominated, Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series — Comedy or Musical – Spin City
    * 1999: Nominated, Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series — Comedy or Musical – Spin City

Honorary Degrees

    * 2008: Doctor of Fine Arts, honoris causa, New York University
    * 2008: Doctor of Laws, honoris causa, University of British Columbia
    * 2010: Honoris causa doctorate, Karolinska Institutet

Grammy Awards

    * 2010: Won, Best Spoken Word Album – Always Looking Up: Adventures of An Incurable Optimist

Influential Canadian Expat Award

    * 2009: Awarded "Most Influential Canadian Expat", Canadian Expat Association

Goldene Kamera

    * 2011: Goldene Kamera für Lebenswerk (Lifetime Achievement Award), German film and TV award.
http://i247.photobucket.com/albums/gg124/martina100_2008/michael_j_fox.jpg
http://i136.photobucket.com/albums/q179/lawin_daniel/michael_j_fox_220.jpg

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: CatwomanofV on 06/09/11 at 8:45 am

^ used to have a place in Vermont.


Cat

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/09/11 at 8:46 am

And yes I know it's Johnny Depp's birthday also so a couple of pics.

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y192/Selizabeth/johnnydepp.jpg
http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y208/mocin/johnnydepp.png

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/09/11 at 8:47 am


^ used to have a place in Vermont.


Cat

Any where near you?

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: CatwomanofV on 06/09/11 at 9:41 am


Any where near you?


About an hour & a half away. I think he sold his farm.

Dom Deluise used to own a place about an hour away and I was told that he used to go to the restaurant that my best friend & I used to go to for lunch all the time. Our waitress told us that she has served him a few times. But, he never came in while we were there.  :\'( Now, both the restaurant & Dom Deluise is no longer.  :\'( :\'( :\'( :\'( :\'(

I used to live in one town over from Ron Howard. People I knew said they would see him all the time but I never did. Didn't live there long enough to see him.  :\'( :\'(



Cat


Cat

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Philip Eno on 06/09/11 at 12:24 pm


Are they good memories?
Oh yes, family and schooldays.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 06/09/11 at 12:37 pm


The person of the day...Michael J. Fox
Michael J. Fox, OC (born Michael Andrew Fox; June 9, 1961) is a Canadian–American actor, author, comedian, producer, activist and voice-over artist. With a film and television career spanning from the late 1970s, Fox's roles have included Marty McFly from the Back to the Future trilogy (1985–1990); Alex P. Keaton from Family Ties (1982-1989) for which he won three Emmy Awards and a Golden Globe Award; and Mike Flaherty from Spin City (1996–2000), for which he won an Emmy, three Golden Globes, and two Screen Actors Guild Awards.

Fox was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease in 1991, and disclosed his condition to the public in 1998. Fox semi-retired from acting in 2000 as the symptoms of his disease worsened. He has since become an activist for research toward finding a cure. This led him to create The Michael J. Fox Foundation, and on March 5, 2010, Sweden's Karolinska Institutet gave him a honoris causa doctorate for his work in advocating a cure for Parkinson's disease.

Since 2000 Fox has mainly worked as a voice over actor in films such as Stuart Little and Atlantis: The Lost Empire, and taken minor TV roles such as in Boston Legal, The Good Wife and Scrubs. He has also released three books, Lucky Man: A Memoir (2002), Always Looking Up: The Adventures of an Incurable Optimist (2009) and A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Future: Twists and Turns and Lessons Learned (2010). He was inducted as an Officer of the Order of Canada on May 27, 2011 for his outreach and fundraising work.
Fox's first feature film roles were in Midnight Madness (1980) and Class of 1984 (1982), credited in both as Michael Fox. Shortly afterward, he began playing "Young Republican" Alex P. Keaton in the show Family Ties which aired on NBC for seven seasons, from 1982 to 1989. Fox only received the role after Matthew Broderick was unavailable. Family Ties had been sold to the television network using the pitch "hip parents, square kids," with the parents originally intended to be the main characters. However, the positive reaction to Fox's performance led to his character becoming the focus of the show following the fourth episode. At its peak, the audience for Family Ties drew one-third of America's households every week. Fox won three Emmy awards for Family Ties in 1986, 1987 and 1988 respectively. He also won a Golden Globe Award in 1989.

Brandon Tartikoff, one of the show's producers, felt that Fox was too short in relation to the actors playing his parents, and tried to have him replaced. Tartikoff reportedly said that "this is not the kind of face you'll ever find on a lunch-box". After his later successes, Fox presented Tartikoff with a custom-made lunch-box with the inscription "To Brandon, this is for you to put your crow in. Love and Kisses, Michael J. Fox". Tartikoff kept the lunch-box in his office for the rest of his NBC career.

While filming Family Ties, Fox met his future wife, Tracy Pollan, when she portrayed his girlfriend, Ellen. When Fox left the TV series Spin City, his final episodes made numerous allusions to Family Ties: Michael Gross (who played Alex's father Steven) portrays Mike Flaherty's (Fox's) therapist, and there is a reference to an off-screen character named "Mallory". Also, when Flaherty becomes an environmental lobbyist in Washington D.C., he meets a conservative senator from Ohio named Alex P. Keaton, and in one episode Meredith Baxter played Mike's mother.
Back to the Future trilogy

Back to the Future tells the story of Marty McFly (Fox), a teenager who is accidentally sent back in time from 1985 to 1955. He meets his parents in high school, accidentally attracting his mother's romantic interest. Marty must repair the damage to history by causing his parents to fall in love, while finding a way to return to 1985. Robert Zemeckis, the director, originally wanted Fox to play Marty but Gary David Goldberg the creator of Family Ties, which Fox was working on at the time refused to allow Zemeckis to even approach Fox as he felt that as Meredith Baxter was on maternity leave at the time that Fox's character Alex Keaton was needed to carry the show in her absence. Eric Stoltz was cast and he was already filming Back to the Future when Robert Zemeckis, felt that Stoltz was not giving the right type of performance for the humor involved. Zemeckis quickly replaced Stoltz with Fox whose schedule was now more open with the return of Meredith Baxter. During filming, Fox would rehearse for Family Ties from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m, then rush to the Back to the Future set where he would rehearse and shoot until 2:30 a.m. This schedule lasted for two full months. Back to the Future was both a commercial and critical success. The film spent 8 consecutive weekends as the number one grossing movie at the US box office in 1985, and eventually earned a worldwide total of $381.11 million. Variety applauded the performances, arguing Fox and Lloyd imbued Marty and Doc Brown's friendship with a quality reminiscent of King Arthur and Merlin. Two sequels, Back to the Future Part II and Back to the Future Part III, were released in 1989 and 1990, respectively.
Mid-career
Fox in September 1987

During and immediately after the Back to the Future trilogy, Fox starred in Teen Wolf (1985), Light of Day (1987), The Secret of My Success (1987), Bright Lights, Big City (1988) and Casualties of War (1989).

In The Secret of My Success, Fox played a graduate student from Kansas State University who moves to New York City where he has landed a job as a financier. The film was successful at the box office, taking $110 million worldwide. Roger Ebert in The Chicago Sun Times wrote; "Fox provides a fairly desperate center for the film. It could not have been much fun for him to follow the movie's arbitrary shifts of mood, from sitcom to slapstick, from sex farce to boardroom brawls."

In Bright Lights, Big City Fox played a fact-checker for a New York magazine, who spends his nights partying with alcohol and drugs. The film received mixed reviews, with Hal Hinson in The Washington post criticizing Fox by claiming that "he was the wrong actor for the job". Meanwhile Roger Ebert praised the actor's performance: "Fox is very good in the central role (he has a long drunken monologue that is the best thing he has ever done in a movie)". During the shooting of Bright Lights, Big City, Michael was reunited with his on-screen girlfriend Tracy Pollan from Family Ties.

Fox then starred in Casualties of War, a war drama about the Vietnam War, alongside Sean Penn. Casualties of War was not a box office hit, but Fox, playing a Private serving in Vietnam, received good reviews for his performance. Don Willmott on film critic’s website wrote; "Fox, only one year beyond his Family Ties sitcom silliness, rises to the challenges of acting as the film's moral voice and sharing scenes with the always intimidating Penn."

In 1991, he starred in Doc Hollywood, a romantic comedy about a talented medical doctor who decides to become a plastic surgeon. While relocating from Washington D.C. to Los Angeles, California, he winds up as a doctor in a small southern town. Michael Caton-Jones, from Time Out, described Fox in the film as "at his frenetic best". The Hard Way was also released in 1991, with Fox playing an undercover actor learning from police officer James Woods. Between 1992 and 1996, he continued making several films, such as For Love or Money (1993), Life With Mikey (1993) and Greedy (1994). Fox then played small supporting roles in political drama The American President (1995) and comedy Mars Attacks! (1996).

His last major film role was in The Frighteners (1996). The Frighteners tells the story of Frank Bannister (Fox), an architect who develops psychic abilities allowing him to see, hear, and communicate with ghosts. After losing his wife, he uses his new abilities by cheating money out of customers for his "ghosthunting" business. However, a mass murderer comes back from Hell, prompting Frank to investigate the supernatural presence. Fox's performance received critical praise, Kenneth Turan in The Los Angeles Times wrote; "The film's actors are equally pleasing. Both Fox, in his most successful starring role in some time, and Alvarado, who looks rather like Andie MacDowell here, have no difficulty getting into the manic spirit of things."

Fox has also done voice-over work providing the voice of Stuart Little in the Stuart Little movie and its sequel, both of which were based on the popular book by E. B. White. He also voiced the American Bulldog Chance in Homeward Bound: The Incredible Journey and its sequel Homeward Bound II: Lost in San Francisco, as well as Milo Thatch in Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
Spin City and later career
The hand prints of Michael J. Fox in front of The Great Movie Ride at Walt Disney World's Disney's Hollywood Studios theme park.

Spin City ran from 1996 to 2002 on American television network channel ABC. The show was based on a fictional local government running New York City, originally starring Fox as Mike Flaherty, a Fordham Law graduate serving as the Deputy Mayor of New York. Fox won an Emmy award for Spin City in 2000, three Golden Globe Awards in 1998, 1999 and 2000 and two Screen Actors Guild Awards in 1999 and 2000. During the third season of Spin City, Fox made the announcement to the cast and crew of the show that he had Parkinson's Disease. During the fourth season, he announced his retirement from the show to focus on spending more time with his family. He announced that he planned to continue to act and would make guest appearances on Spin City (he made three more appearances on the show during the final season). After leaving the show, he was replaced by Charlie Sheen, who portrayed the character Charlie Crawford. Altogether, 145 episodes were made. Fox also served as an executive producer during his time on the show, alongside co-creators Bill Lawrence and Gary David Goldberg.

In 2004, Fox guest starred in two episodes of the comedy-drama Scrubs as Dr. Kevin Casey, a surgeon with severe obsessive-compulsive disorder. The series was created by Spin City creator Bill Lawrence. In 2006, he appeared in four episodes of Boston Legal as a lung cancer patient. The producers brought him back in a recurring role for Season three, beginning with the season premiere. Fox was nominated for an Emmy Award for best guest appearance. In 2009, he appeared in five episodes of the television series Rescue Me which earned him an Emmy for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series. Since 2000 Fox has released three books, Lucky Man: A Memoir (2002), Always Looking Up: The Adventures of an Incurable Optimist (2009) and A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Future: Twists and Turns and Lessons Learned (2010). In 2010, Fox returned to television as a guest star in US drama The Good Wife. Fox will make another guest-star appearance on The Good Wife in episode 13.

He made an appearance at the 2010 Winter Olympics closing ceremony in Vancouver, Canada and delivered comedic monologues, along with William Shatner and Catherine O'Hara, in the "I am Canadian" part of the show.

Along with Tatjana Patitz, Fox appears in the 2011 Carl Zeiss AG calendar, photographed by Bryan Adams in New York City in the summer of 2010.

Despite a soundalike voicing his character of Marty McFly in the 2011 Back to the Future episodic adventure game, Fox lent his likeness to the in-game version of McFly alongside Christopher Lloyd. Developers Telltale Games have confirmed that Fox will make a special guest appearance in the final episode of the series.
Personal life
The Michael J. Fox Theatre in Burnaby

Fox married actress Tracy Pollan on July 16, 1988, at West Mountain Inn in Arlington, Vermont. The couple have four children: Sam Michael (born May 30, 1989), twins Aquinnah Kathleen and Schuyler Frances (born February 15, 1995), and Esmé Annabelle (born November 3, 2001). Fox holds dual Canadian-U.S. citizenship. On February 28, 2010, Fox provided a light-hearted segment during the 2010 Winter Olympics' closing ceremony which took place in Vancouver, Canada wherein he expressed how proud he is to be Canadian. On June 4, 2010, the City of Burnaby, British Columbia honoured Fox by granting him the Freedom of the City.
Illness and activism

Fox started displaying symptoms of early-onset Parkinson's disease in 1990 while shooting the movie Doc Hollywood, although he was not properly diagnosed until the next year. After his diagnosis, Fox began drinking more heavily than in the past; however, he sought help and stopped drinking altogether. In 1998, he decided to go public with his condition, and since then he has been a strong advocate of Parkinson's disease research. His foundation, The Michael J. Fox Foundation, was created to help advance every promising research path to curing Parkinson's disease, through embryonic stem cell studies.

Fox manages the symptoms of his Parkinson's disease with the drug Sinemet, and he also had a thalamotomy in 1998.

In his memoir, Lucky Man, Fox wrote that he did not take his medication prior to his testimony before the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee in 1998; "I had made a deliberate choice to appear before the subcommittee without medication. It seemed to me that this occasion demanded that my testimony about the effects of the disease, and the urgency we as a community were feeling, be seen as well as heard. For people who had never observed me in this kind of shape, the transformation must have been startling". His first book, Lucky Man focused on how after seven years of unacceptance of the disease he set up the Michael J Fox Foundation, stopped drinking and began to be an advocate of PD sufferers.

In an April 2002 NPR interview, Fox explained what he does when he becomes symptomatic during an interview: "Well, actually, I've been erring on the side of caution — I think 'erring' is actually the right word — in that I've been medicating perhaps too much, in the sense times the symptoms that people see in some of these interviews that have been on are actually dyskinesia, which is a reaction to the medication. Because if I were purely symptomatic with Parkinson's symptoms, a lot of times speaking is difficult. There's a kind of a cluttering of speech and it's very difficult to sit still, to sit in one place. You know, the symptoms are different, so I'd rather kind of suffer the symptoms of dyskinesia... this kind of weaving and this kind of continuous thing is much preferable, actually, than pure Parkinson's symptoms. So that's what I generally do...I haven't had any, you know, problems with pure Parkinson's symptoms in any of these interviews, because I'll tend to just make sure that I have enough Sinemet in my system and, in some cases, too much. But to me, it's preferable. It's not representative of what I'm like in my everyday life. I get a lot of people with Parkinson's coming up to me saying, 'You take too much medication.' I say, Well, you sit across from Larry King and see if you want to tempt it."

In 2006, Fox starred in a campaign ad for Claire McCaskill expressing her support for stem cell research. In the ad, he visibly showed the effects of his Parkinson's medication. "As you might know, I care deeply about stem cell research. In Missouri, you can elect Claire McCaskill, who shares my hope for cures. Unfortunately, Senator Jim Talent opposes expanding stem cell research. Senator Talent even wanted to criminalize the science that gives us the chance for hope. They say all politics is local, but that's not always the case. What you do in Missouri matters to millions of Americans, Americans like me." The New York Times called it "one of the most powerful and talked about political advertisements in years" and polls indicated that the commercial had a statistical impact on the way voters voted. His second book Always Looking Up: The Adventures Of An Incurable Optimist describes his life between 1999 and 2009, with much of the book centered on how Fox got into campaigning for stem cell research. On March 31, 2009, Fox appeared on The Oprah Winfrey Show with Dr. Oz to publicly discuss his condition as well as his book, his family and his prime time special which aired May 7, 2009 (Michael J. Fox: Adventures of an Incurable Optimist).

His work led him to be named one of the 100 people "whose power, talent or moral example is transforming the world" in 2007 by Time magazine. On March 5, 2010, Fox received an honorary doctorate in medicine from Karolinska Institutet for his contributions to research in Parkinson's disease. He also has received an honorary doctor of laws from the University of British Columbia.
Filmography
Actor
Film
Year Film Role Notes
1980 Midnight Madness Scott Larson
1982 Class of 1984 Arthur
1985 Back to the Future Marty McFly
Teen Wolf Scott Howard
1987 Light of Day Joe Rasnick
The Secret of My Success Brantley Foster/Carlton Whitfield
1988 Bright Lights, Big City Jamie Conway
1989 Casualties of War PFC. Eriksson
Back to the Future Part II Marty McFly, Marty McFly Jr, Marlene McFly
1990 Back to the Future Part III Marty McFly, Seamus McFly
1991 The Hard Way Nick Lang/Ray Casanov
Doc Hollywood Dr. Benjamin Stone
1993 Homeward Bound: The Incredible Journey Chance Voice
Life with Mikey Michael "Mikey" Chapman
For Love or Money Doug Ireland
1994 Where the Rivers Flow North Clayton Farnsworth
Greedy Daniel McTeague
1995 Blue in the Face Pete Maloney
Coldblooded Tim Alexander Also Producer
The American President Lewis Rothschild
1996 Homeward Bound II: Lost in San Francisco Chance Voice
The Frighteners Frank Bannister
Mars Attacks! Jason Stone
1999 Stuart Little Stuart Little Voice
2001 Atlantis: The Lost Empire Milo James Thatch Voice
2002 Interstate 60 Mr. Baker
Stuart Little 2 Stuart Little Voice
2005 Stuart Little 3: Call of the Wild Stuart Little Voice
Television
Year Title Role Notes
1977 The Magic Lie Episode: "The Master"
1979 Letters from Frank Ricky CBS TV-Movie
Lou Grant Paul Stone Episode: "Kids"
1980 Palmerstown, U.S.A. Willy-Joe Hall
Family Richard Topol Episode: "Such a Fine Line"
Trouble in High Timber Country Thomas Elston ABC TV-Movie
1981 Trapper John, M.D. Elliot Schweitzer Episode: Brain Child
Leo and Me Jamie Produced in 1976; was not televised on CBC until 1981
credited as "Mike Fox"
1982–1989 Family Ties Alex P. Keaton
1983 The Love Boat Episode: "I Like to Be in America..."
High School U.S.A. Jay-Jay Manners NBC TV-Movie/TV-Pilot
1984 Night Court Eddie Simms Episode: "Santa Goes Downtown"
The Homemade Comedy Special Host NBC TV-Special
1985 Poison Ivy Dennis Baxter NBC TV-Movie
1986 David Letterman's 2nd Annual Holiday Film Festival NBC TV-Special
Segment: The Iceman Hummeth
1988 Mickey's 60th Birthday Alex P. Keaton (a flashback clip) TV-Special
1990 Sex, Buys & Advertising TV-Special
1991 Saturday Night Live Host Episode: "Michael J. Fox/The Black Crowes"
Tales from the Crypt Prosecutor Episode: "The Trap"
1994 Don't Drink the Water Axel Magee ABC TV-Movie
1996–2001 Spin City Mike Flaherty Seasons 1 – 4
2002 Clone High Gandhi's Remaining Kidney Voice Role
"Escape to Beer Mountain: A Rope of Sand"
2004 Scrubs Dr. Kevin Casey Episode: "My Catalyst"
Episode: "My Porcelain God"
2006 Boston Legal Daniel Post
2009 Rescue Me Dwight
2010 The Colbert Report Himself
The Good Wife Louis Canning Recurring role
2011 Ace of Cakes Himself
2011 Curb Your Enthusiasm Himself Season 8
2011 Back to the Future: The Game TBA Videogame Voice, Episode 5: "Outatime"
Producer
Year(s) Film or television show Notes
1995 Coldblooded Producer
1996–2000 Spin City Executive producer
1999 Anna Says Executive producer
2002 Otherwise Engaged Executive producer
2003 Hench at Home Executive producer
Awards and nominations

Canada's Walk of Fame

    * 2000: Inducted, Canada's Walk of Fame

Hollywood Walk of Fame

    * 2002: Star on the Walk of Fame – 7021 Hollywood Blvd.

Emmy Awards

    * 1985: Nominated, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series – Family Ties
    * 1986: Won, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series – Family Ties
    * 1987: Won, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series – Family Ties
    * 1988: Won, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series – Family Ties
    * 1989: Nominated, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series – Family Ties
    * 1997: Nominated, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series – Spin City
    * 1998: Nominated, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series – Spin City
    * 1999: Nominated, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series – Spin City
    * 2000: Won, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series – Spin City
    * 2006: Nominated, Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series – Boston Legal
    * 2009: Won, Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series – Rescue Me

Golden Globe Awards

    * 1986: Nominated, Best Performance by an Actor in a TV-Series — Comedy/Musical – Family Ties
    * 1986: Nominated, Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture — Comedy/Musical – Back to the Future
    * 1987: Nominated, Best Performance by an Actor in a TV-Series — Comedy/Musical – Family Ties
    * 1989: Won, Best Performance by an Actor in a TV-Series — Comedy/Musical – Family Ties
    * 1997: Nominated, Best Performance by an Actor in a TV-Series — Comedy/Musical – Spin City
    * 1998: Won, Best Performance by an Actor in a TV-Series — Comedy/Musical – Spin City
    * 1999: Won, Best Performance by an Actor in a TV-Series — Comedy/Musical – Spin City
    * 2000: Won, Best Performance by an Actor in a TV-Series — Comedy/Musical – Spin City

Screen Actors Guild Awards

    * 1999: Won, Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Comedy Series – Spin City
    * 2000: Won, Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Comedy Series – Spin City

Saturn Awards

    * 1985: Won, Best Actor – Back to the Future

People's Choice Awards

    * 1997: Won, Favorite Male Performer in a New Television Series

Satellite Awards

    * 1997: Nominated, Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series — Comedy or Musical – Spin City
    * 1998: Nominated, Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series — Comedy or Musical – Spin City
    * 1999: Nominated, Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series — Comedy or Musical – Spin City

Honorary Degrees

    * 2008: Doctor of Fine Arts, honoris causa, New York University
    * 2008: Doctor of Laws, honoris causa, University of British Columbia
    * 2010: Honoris causa doctorate, Karolinska Institutet

Grammy Awards

    * 2010: Won, Best Spoken Word Album – Always Looking Up: Adventures of An Incurable Optimist

Influential Canadian Expat Award

    * 2009: Awarded "Most Influential Canadian Expat", Canadian Expat Association

Goldene Kamera

    * 2011: Goldene Kamera für Lebenswerk (Lifetime Achievement Award), German film and TV award.
http://i247.photobucket.com/albums/gg124/martina100_2008/michael_j_fox.jpg
http://i136.photobucket.com/albums/q179/lawin_daniel/michael_j_fox_220.jpg


I saw all The Back To The future films. I kinda wish they would continue Back To The Future from where they left off.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: CatwomanofV on 06/09/11 at 6:59 pm


And yes I know it's Johnny Depp's birthday also so a couple of pics.

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y192/Selizabeth/johnnydepp.jpg
http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y208/mocin/johnnydepp.png



Yum!


Cat

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/10/11 at 7:36 am

The person of the day...Judy Garland
Judy Garland (June 10, 1922 – June 22, 1969) was an American actress and singer. Through a career that spanned 45 of her 47 years, Garland attained international stardom as an actress in musical and dramatic roles, as a recording artist and on the concert stage. Respected for her versatility, she received a juvenile Academy Award, won a Golden Globe Award, as well as Grammy Awards and a Special Tony Award. She was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress for her role in A Star is Born and for Best Supporting Actress for her performance in the 1961 film, Judgement at Nuremberg.

At 40 years of age, she was the youngest recipient of the Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievement in the motion picture industry.

After appearing in vaudeville with her sisters, Garland was signed to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer as a teenager. There she made more than two dozen films, including nine with Mickey Rooney and the 1939 film with which she would be most identified, The Wizard of Oz. After 15 years, Garland was released from the studio but gained renewed success through record-breaking concert appearances, including a return to acting beginning with critically acclaimed performances.

Despite her professional triumphs, Garland battled personal problems throughout her life. Insecure about her appearance, her feelings were compounded by film executives who told her she was unattractive and manipulated her on-screen physical appearance. Garland was plagued by financial instability, often owing hundreds of thousands of dollars in back taxes. She married five times, with her first four marriages ending in divorce. Garland died of an accidental drug overdose at the age of 47, leaving children Liza Minnelli, Lorna Luft and Joey Luft.

In 1997, Garland was posthumously awarded a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. Several of her recordings have been inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. In 1999, the American Film Institute placed her among the ten greatest female stars in the history of American cinema.
In 1935, Garland was signed to a contract with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, supposedly without a screen test, though she had made a test for the studio several months earlier. The studio did not know what to do with Garland, as at age 13 she was older than the traditional child star but too young for adult roles. Garland's physical appearance created a dilemma for MGM. At only 4 feet 11.5 inches (151.1 cm), Garland's "cute" or "girl next door" looks did not exemplify the more glamorous persona required of leading ladies of the time. She was self-conscious and anxious about her appearance. "Judy went to school at Metro with Ava Gardner, Lana Turner, Elizabeth Taylor, real beauties," said Charles Walters, who directed Garland in a number of films. "Judy was the big money-maker at the time, a big success, but she was the ugly duckling ... I think it had a very damaging effect on her emotionally for a long time. I think it lasted forever, really." Her insecurity was exacerbated by the attitude of studio chief Louis B. Mayer, who referred to her as his "little hunchback". During her early years at the studio, she was photographed and dressed in plain garments or frilly juvenile gowns and costumes to match the "girl-next-door" image that was created for her. She was made to wear removable caps on her teeth and rubberized disks to reshape her nose. She performed at various studio functions and was eventually cast opposite Deanna Durbin in the musical short Every Sunday. The film contrasted Garland's contralto vocal range and swing style with Durbin's operatic soprano and served as an extended screen test for the pair, as studio executives were questioning the wisdom of having two girl singers on the roster. Mayer finally decided to keep both girls, but by that time Durbin's option had lapsed and she was signed by Universal Studios.

On November 16, 1935, in the midst of preparing for a radio performance on the Shell Chateau Hour, Garland learned that her father—who had been hospitalized with meningitis—had taken a turn for the worse. Frank Gumm died the following morning, on November 17, leaving Garland devastated. Garland's song for the Shell Chateau Hour was her first professional rendition of "Zing! Went the Strings of My Heart", a song which would become a standard in many of her concerts.
Garland with Mickey Rooney in Love Finds Andy Hardy (1938)

Garland next came to the attention of studio executives by singing a special arrangement of "You Made Me Love You" to Clark Gable at a birthday party held by the studio for the actor; her rendition was so well regarded that Garland performed the song in the all-star extravaganza Broadway Melody of 1938 (1937), in which she sang the song to a photograph of Gable.

MGM hit on a winning formula when it paired Garland with Mickey Rooney in a string of "backyard musicals". The duo first appeared together in the 1937 B movie Thoroughbreds Don't Cry. They became a sensation, and teamed up again in Love Finds Andy Hardy. Garland would eventually star with Rooney in nine films.

To keep up with the frantic pace of making one film after another, Garland, Rooney, and other young performers were constantly given amphetamines, as well as barbiturates to take before bed. For Garland, this regular dose of drugs led to addiction and a lifelong struggle, and contributed to her eventual demise. She later resented the hectic schedule and felt that her youth had been stolen from her by MGM. Despite successful film and recording careers, several awards, critical praise, and her ability to fill concert halls worldwide, Garland was plagued throughout her life with self-doubt and required constant reassurance that she was talented and attractive.
The Wizard of Oz
Garland as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939)

In 1938, at the age of 16, Garland was cast as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939), a film based on the children's book by L. Frank Baum. In this film, Garland sang the song for which she would forever be identified, "Over the Rainbow". Although producers Arthur Freed and Mervyn LeRoy had wanted Garland from the start, studio chief Mayer tried first to borrow Shirley Temple from 20th Century Fox. Temple's services were denied and Garland was cast. Garland was initially outfitted in a blonde wig for the part, but Freed and LeRoy decided against it shortly into filming. Her breasts were bound with tape and she was made to wear a special corset to flatten out her curves and make her appear younger; her blue gingham dress was also chosen for its blurring effect on her figure.

Shooting commenced on October 13, 1938, and was completed on March 16, 1939, with a final cost of more than US$2 million. From the conclusion of filming, MGM kept Garland busy with promotional tours and the shooting of Babes in Arms. Garland and Mickey Rooney were sent on a cross-country promotional tour, culminating in the August 17 New York City premiere at the Capitol Theater, which included a five-show-a-day appearance schedule for the two stars.

On November 17, 1939, Garland's mother, Ethel, married William P. Gillmore in Yuma, Arizona. It was the fourth anniversary of her first husband's death.

The Wizard of Oz was a tremendous critical success, though its high budget and promotions costs of an estimated $4 million coupled with the lower revenue generated by children's tickets meant that the film did not make a profit until it was re-released in the 1940s. At the 1940 Academy Awards ceremony, Garland received an Academy Juvenile Award for her performances in 1939, including The Wizard of Oz and Babes in Arms. Following this recognition, Garland became one of MGM's most bankable stars.
Stardom as an adult

In 1940, she starred in three films: Andy Hardy Meets Debutante, Strike Up the Band, and Little Nellie Kelly. In the latter, Garland played her first adult role, a dual role of both mother and daughter. Little Nellie Kelly was purchased from George M. Cohan as a vehicle for Garland to display both her audience appeal and her physical appearance. The role was a challenge for her, requiring the use of an accent, her first adult kiss, and the only death scene of her career. The success of these three films, and a further three films in 1941, secured her position at MGM as a major property.
Garland performing "The Trolley Song" in Meet Me in St. Louis (1944)

During this time Garland experienced her first serious adult romances. The first was with the band leader Artie Shaw. Garland was deeply devoted to Shaw and was devastated in early 1940 when Shaw eloped with Lana Turner. She was noticeably thinner in her next film, For Me and My Gal, alongside Gene Kelly in his first screen appearance. Garland was top billed over the credits for the first time, and effectively made the transition from teenage star to adult actress.

At the age of 21, she was given the "glamour treatment" in Presenting Lily Mars, in which she was dressed in "grown-up" gowns. Her lightened hair was also pulled up in a stylish fashion. However, no matter how glamorous or beautiful she appeared on screen or in photographs, she was never confident in her appearance and never escaped the "girl next door" image that had been created for her.

One of Garland's most successful films for MGM was Meet Me in St. Louis (1944), in which she introduced three standards: "The Trolley Song", "The Boy Next Door", and "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas". Vincente Minnelli was assigned to direct this movie, and he requested that make-up artist Dorothy Ponedel be assigned to Garland for the picture. Ponedel refined Garland's appearance in several ways, including extending and reshaping her eyebrows, changing her hairline, modifying her lip line, and removing her nose discs. Garland appreciated the results so much that Ponedel was written into her contract for all her remaining pictures at MGM.

The Clock (1945) was her first straight dramatic film, opposite Robert Walker. Though the film was critically praised and earned a profit, most movie fans expected her to sing. It would be many years before she acted again in a non-singing dramatic role.

Garland's other famous films of the 1940s include The Harvey Girls (1946), in which she introduced the Academy Award-winning song "On the Atchison, Topeka and the Santa Fe", and The Pirate (1948).
Beginning in 1955, Garland appeared in a number of television specials. The first, the 1955 debut episode of Ford Star Jubilee, was the first full-scale color broadcast ever on CBS and was a ratings triumph, scoring a 34.8 Nielsen rating. Garland signed a three-year, $300,000 contract with the network. Only one additional special, a live concert edition of General Electric Theater, was broadcast in 1956 before the relationship between the Lufts and CBS broke down in a dispute over the planned format of upcoming specials. In 1956, Garland performed four weeks at the New Frontier Hotel on the Las Vegas Strip for a salary of $55,000 per week, making her the highest-paid entertainer to work in Las Vegas. Despite a brief bout of laryngitis, her performances there were so successful that her run was extended an extra week. Later that year she returned to the Palace Theatre, site of her two-a-day triumph. She opened in September, once again to rave reviews and popular acclaim.
Garland before a concert, 1957

In November 1959 Garland was hospitalized, diagnosed with acute hepatitis. Over the next few weeks several quarts of fluid were drained from her body until, still weak, she was released from the hospital in January 1960. She was told by doctors that she likely had five years or less to live, and that even if she did survive she would be a semi-invalid and would never sing again. She initially felt "greatly relieved" at the diagnosis. "The pressure was off me for the first time in my life." However, Garland successfully recovered over the next several months and, in August of that year, returned to the stage of the Palladium. She felt so warmly embraced by the British that she announced her intention to move permanently to England.

Her concert appearance at Carnegie Hall on April 23, 1961, was a considerable highlight, called by many "the greatest night in show business history". The two-record Judy at Carnegie Hall was certified gold, charting for 95 weeks on Billboard, including 13 weeks at number one. The album won four Grammy Awards including Album of the Year and Best Female Vocal of the Year. The album has never been out of print.

In 1961, Garland and CBS settled their contract disputes with the help of her new agent, Freddie Fields, and negotiated a new round of specials. The first, entitled The Judy Garland Show, aired in 1962 and featured guests Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin. Following this success, CBS made a $24 million offer to Garland for a weekly television series of her own, also to be called The Judy Garland Show, which was deemed at the time in the press to be "the biggest talent deal in TV history". Although Garland had said as early as 1955 that she would never do a weekly television series, in the early 1960s she was in a financially precarious situation. Garland was several hundred thousand dollars in debt to the Internal Revenue Service, having failed to pay taxes in 1951 and 1952, and the financial failure of A Star is Born meant that she received nothing from that investment. A successful run on television was intended to secure Garland's financial future.

Following a third special, Judy Garland and Her Guests Phil Silvers and Robert Goulet, Garland's weekly series debuted September 29, 1963. The Judy Garland Show was critically praised, but for a variety of reasons (including being placed in the time slot opposite Bonanza on NBC) the show lasted only one season and was cancelled in 1964 after 26 episodes. Despite its short run, the series was nominated for four Emmy Awards. The demise of the series was personally and financially devastating for Garland, who never fully recovered from its failure.
Final years
Garland and Mickey Deans, at their wedding, March 1969, three months before her death

With the demise of her television series, Garland returned to the stage. Most notably, she performed at the London Palladium with her then 18-year-old daughter Liza Minnelli in November 1964. The concert, which was also filmed for British television network ITV, was one of Garland's final appearances at the venue. She made guest appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show, The Tonight Show, The Hollywood Palace, and The Merv Griffin Show, guest-hosting an episode of the last one.

A 1964 tour of Australia was largely disastrous. Garland's first concert in Sydney, held in the Sydney Stadium because no concert hall could accommodate the crowds who wanted to see her, went well and received positive reviews. Her second performance, in Melbourne, started an hour late. The crowd of 7,000, angered by her tardiness—and believing Garland to be drunk—booed and heckled her, and she fled the stage after just 45 minutes. She later characterized the Melbourne crowd as "brutish". A second concert in Sydney was uneventful but the Melbourne appearance garnered her significant bad press. Some of that bad press was deflected by the announcement of a near fatal episode of pleurisy.

In February 1967, Garland had been cast as Helen Lawson in Valley of the Dolls for 20th Century Fox. The character of Neely O'Hara in the book by Jacqueline Susann was rumored to have been based on Garland. The role of O'Hara in the film was played by Patty Duke. During the filming, Garland missed rehearsals and was fired in April. She was replaced by Susan Hayward. Garland's prerecording of the song "I'll Plant My Own Tree" survived, along with her wardrobe tests.

Returning to the stage, Garland made her last appearances at New York's Palace Theatre in July, a 16-show tour, performing with her children Lorna and Joey Luft. Garland wore a sequined pantsuit on stage for this tour, which was part of the original wardrobe for her character in Valley of the Dolls.
Personal life

Garland began a relationship with musician David Rose, and, on her 18th birthday, Rose gave her an engagement ring. The studio intervened because Rose was still married at the time to the actress and singer Martha Raye. The couple agreed to wait a year to allow for Rose's divorce from Raye to become final, and were wed on July 27, 1941. Garland, who had aborted her pregnancy by Rose in 1942, agreed to a trial separation in January 1943, and they divorced in 1944.

During the filming of Meet Me in St. Louis, after some initial conflict between them, Garland and Vincent Minnelli entered a relationship together. They were married June 15, 1945, and on March 12, 1946, daughter Liza Minnelli was born. In 1951, Garland divorced Vincente Minnelli.

She engaged Sid Luft as her manager the same year. Luft arranged a four-month concert tour of the United Kingdom, where she played to sold-out audiences throughout England, Scotland, and Ireland. The tour included Garland's first appearances at the renowned London Palladium, for a four-week stand in April. Although some in the British press chided her before her opening for being "too plump", she received rave reviews and the ovation was described by the Palladium manager as the loudest he had ever heard.

Garland and Luft were married on June 8, 1952, in Hollister, California, and Garland gave birth to the couple's first child, Lorna Luft, on November 21 that year.

Garland sued Sid Luft for divorce in 1963, claiming "cruelty" as the grounds. She also asserted that Luft had repeatedly struck her while he was drinking and that he had attempted to take their children from her by force. She had filed for divorce more than once previously, including as early as 1956.

Garland's fourth marriage was to tour promoter Mark Herron. They announced that their marriage had taken place aboard a freighter off the coast of Hong Kong; however, Garland was not legally divorced from Luft at the time the ceremony was performed. Her divorce from Luft became final on May 19, 1965, but Herron and Garland did not legally marry until November 14.

By early 1969, Garland's health had deteriorated. She performed in London at the Talk of the Town nightclub for a five-week run and made her last concert appearance in Copenhagen during March 1969. She married her fifth and final husband, Mickey Deans, at Chelsea Register Office, London, on March 15, 1969, her divorce from Herron having been finalized on February 11 of that year.
Death

On June 22, 1969, Garland was found dead by Deans in the bathroom of their rented Chelsea, London house. The coroner, Gavin Thursdon, stated at the inquest that the cause of death was "an incautious self-overdosage" of barbiturates; her blood contained the equivalent of ten 1.5-grain (97 mg) Seconal capsules. Thursdon stressed that the overdose had been unintentional and that there was no evidence to suggest she had committed suicide. Garland's autopsy showed that there was no inflammation of her stomach lining and no drug residue in her stomach, which indicated that the drug had been ingested over a long period of time, rather than in one dose. Her death certificate stated that her death had been "accidental." Even so, a British specialist who had attended Garland said she had been living on borrowed time due to cirrhosis of the liver. Garland had turned 47 just 12 days prior to her death. Her Wizard of Oz co-star Ray Bolger commented at Garland's funeral, "She just plain wore out." An estimated 20,000 people lined up for hours at the Frank E. Campbell Funeral Chapel to view her body. James Mason gave a eulogy at the funeral, which was an Episcopalian service led by the Rev. Peter A. Delaney of Marylebone Church, London, who had officiated at Garland's marriage to Deans. Garland was interred in a crypt in the community mausoleum at Ferncliff Cemetery, in Hartsdale, New York.
Legacy
Star for recognition of film work at 1715 Vine Street on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. She has another for recording at 6764 Hollywood Blvd.

Judy Garland's legacy as a performer and a personality has endured long after her death. The American Film Institute named Garland eighth among the Greatest Female Stars of All Time. She has been the subject of over two dozen biographies since her death, including the well-received Me and My Shadows: A Family Memoir by her daughter, Lorna Luft. Luft's memoir was later adapted into the multiple award-winning television miniseries, Life with Judy Garland: Me and My Shadows, which won Emmy Awards for two actresses portraying Garland (Tammy Blanchard and Judy Davis). English actress Tracie Bennett portrayed Garland to critical acclaim in a dramatization of her eventual decline and months preceding her death in a play titled End of the Rainbow at London's Trafalgar Studios. Both the play and Bennett received Laurence Olivier Award nominations.

Garland was posthumously awarded the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1997. Several of her recordings have been inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. These include "Over the Rainbow", which was ranked as the number one movie song of all time in the American Film Institute's "100 Years...100 Songs" list. Four more Garland songs are featured on the list: "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" (#76), "Get Happy" (#61), "The Trolley Song" (#26), and "The Man That Got Away" (#11). Garland has twice been honored on U.S. postage stamps, in 1989 (as Dorothy) and again in 2006 (as Vicki Lester from A Star Is Born).. Garland is mentioned in the 1998 horror film I Still Know What You Did Last Summer when the hotel clerk is explaining the history of the hotel in the Bahamas where the film takes place.
Gay icon
Main article: Judy Garland as gay icon

Garland always had a large base of fans in the gay community and has become a gay icon. Reasons often given for her standing, especially among gay men, are admiration of her ability as a performer, the way her personal struggles mirrored those of gay men in America during the height of her fame and her value as a camp figure. When asked about how she felt about being a gay icon, she responded, "I couldn't care less. I sing to people."

Some have also suggested a connection between the date of Garland's death and funeral on June 27, 1969 and the Stonewall riots, the flashpoint of the modern Gay Liberation movement, which started in the early hours of June 28.
Filmography and performances
Main article: List of Judy Garland performances
Discography
Main article: Judy Garland discography
Awards
Main article: List of awards and honors received by Judy Garland
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Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: gibbo on 06/10/11 at 7:51 am

A Wonderful singer and a handy actress...  I really enjoyed those Andy Hardy movies.... :)

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 06/10/11 at 7:50 pm


The person of the day...Judy Garland
Judy Garland (June 10, 1922 – June 22, 1969) was an American actress and singer. Through a career that spanned 45 of her 47 years, Garland attained international stardom as an actress in musical and dramatic roles, as a recording artist and on the concert stage. Respected for her versatility, she received a juvenile Academy Award, won a Golden Globe Award, as well as Grammy Awards and a Special Tony Award. She was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress for her role in A Star is Born and for Best Supporting Actress for her performance in the 1961 film, Judgement at Nuremberg.

At 40 years of age, she was the youngest recipient of the Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievement in the motion picture industry.

After appearing in vaudeville with her sisters, Garland was signed to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer as a teenager. There she made more than two dozen films, including nine with Mickey Rooney and the 1939 film with which she would be most identified, The Wizard of Oz. After 15 years, Garland was released from the studio but gained renewed success through record-breaking concert appearances, including a return to acting beginning with critically acclaimed performances.

Despite her professional triumphs, Garland battled personal problems throughout her life. Insecure about her appearance, her feelings were compounded by film executives who told her she was unattractive and manipulated her on-screen physical appearance. Garland was plagued by financial instability, often owing hundreds of thousands of dollars in back taxes. She married five times, with her first four marriages ending in divorce. Garland died of an accidental drug overdose at the age of 47, leaving children Liza Minnelli, Lorna Luft and Joey Luft.

In 1997, Garland was posthumously awarded a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. Several of her recordings have been inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. In 1999, the American Film Institute placed her among the ten greatest female stars in the history of American cinema.
In 1935, Garland was signed to a contract with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, supposedly without a screen test, though she had made a test for the studio several months earlier. The studio did not know what to do with Garland, as at age 13 she was older than the traditional child star but too young for adult roles. Garland's physical appearance created a dilemma for MGM. At only 4 feet 11.5 inches (151.1 cm), Garland's "cute" or "girl next door" looks did not exemplify the more glamorous persona required of leading ladies of the time. She was self-conscious and anxious about her appearance. "Judy went to school at Metro with Ava Gardner, Lana Turner, Elizabeth Taylor, real beauties," said Charles Walters, who directed Garland in a number of films. "Judy was the big money-maker at the time, a big success, but she was the ugly duckling ... I think it had a very damaging effect on her emotionally for a long time. I think it lasted forever, really." Her insecurity was exacerbated by the attitude of studio chief Louis B. Mayer, who referred to her as his "little hunchback". During her early years at the studio, she was photographed and dressed in plain garments or frilly juvenile gowns and costumes to match the "girl-next-door" image that was created for her. She was made to wear removable caps on her teeth and rubberized disks to reshape her nose. She performed at various studio functions and was eventually cast opposite Deanna Durbin in the musical short Every Sunday. The film contrasted Garland's contralto vocal range and swing style with Durbin's operatic soprano and served as an extended screen test for the pair, as studio executives were questioning the wisdom of having two girl singers on the roster. Mayer finally decided to keep both girls, but by that time Durbin's option had lapsed and she was signed by Universal Studios.

On November 16, 1935, in the midst of preparing for a radio performance on the Shell Chateau Hour, Garland learned that her father—who had been hospitalized with meningitis—had taken a turn for the worse. Frank Gumm died the following morning, on November 17, leaving Garland devastated. Garland's song for the Shell Chateau Hour was her first professional rendition of "Zing! Went the Strings of My Heart", a song which would become a standard in many of her concerts.
Garland with Mickey Rooney in Love Finds Andy Hardy (1938)

Garland next came to the attention of studio executives by singing a special arrangement of "You Made Me Love You" to Clark Gable at a birthday party held by the studio for the actor; her rendition was so well regarded that Garland performed the song in the all-star extravaganza Broadway Melody of 1938 (1937), in which she sang the song to a photograph of Gable.

MGM hit on a winning formula when it paired Garland with Mickey Rooney in a string of "backyard musicals". The duo first appeared together in the 1937 B movie Thoroughbreds Don't Cry. They became a sensation, and teamed up again in Love Finds Andy Hardy. Garland would eventually star with Rooney in nine films.

To keep up with the frantic pace of making one film after another, Garland, Rooney, and other young performers were constantly given amphetamines, as well as barbiturates to take before bed. For Garland, this regular dose of drugs led to addiction and a lifelong struggle, and contributed to her eventual demise. She later resented the hectic schedule and felt that her youth had been stolen from her by MGM. Despite successful film and recording careers, several awards, critical praise, and her ability to fill concert halls worldwide, Garland was plagued throughout her life with self-doubt and required constant reassurance that she was talented and attractive.
The Wizard of Oz
Garland as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939)

In 1938, at the age of 16, Garland was cast as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939), a film based on the children's book by L. Frank Baum. In this film, Garland sang the song for which she would forever be identified, "Over the Rainbow". Although producers Arthur Freed and Mervyn LeRoy had wanted Garland from the start, studio chief Mayer tried first to borrow Shirley Temple from 20th Century Fox. Temple's services were denied and Garland was cast. Garland was initially outfitted in a blonde wig for the part, but Freed and LeRoy decided against it shortly into filming. Her breasts were bound with tape and she was made to wear a special corset to flatten out her curves and make her appear younger; her blue gingham dress was also chosen for its blurring effect on her figure.

Shooting commenced on October 13, 1938, and was completed on March 16, 1939, with a final cost of more than US$2 million. From the conclusion of filming, MGM kept Garland busy with promotional tours and the shooting of Babes in Arms. Garland and Mickey Rooney were sent on a cross-country promotional tour, culminating in the August 17 New York City premiere at the Capitol Theater, which included a five-show-a-day appearance schedule for the two stars.

On November 17, 1939, Garland's mother, Ethel, married William P. Gillmore in Yuma, Arizona. It was the fourth anniversary of her first husband's death.

The Wizard of Oz was a tremendous critical success, though its high budget and promotions costs of an estimated $4 million coupled with the lower revenue generated by children's tickets meant that the film did not make a profit until it was re-released in the 1940s. At the 1940 Academy Awards ceremony, Garland received an Academy Juvenile Award for her performances in 1939, including The Wizard of Oz and Babes in Arms. Following this recognition, Garland became one of MGM's most bankable stars.
Stardom as an adult

In 1940, she starred in three films: Andy Hardy Meets Debutante, Strike Up the Band, and Little Nellie Kelly. In the latter, Garland played her first adult role, a dual role of both mother and daughter. Little Nellie Kelly was purchased from George M. Cohan as a vehicle for Garland to display both her audience appeal and her physical appearance. The role was a challenge for her, requiring the use of an accent, her first adult kiss, and the only death scene of her career. The success of these three films, and a further three films in 1941, secured her position at MGM as a major property.
Garland performing "The Trolley Song" in Meet Me in St. Louis (1944)

During this time Garland experienced her first serious adult romances. The first was with the band leader Artie Shaw. Garland was deeply devoted to Shaw and was devastated in early 1940 when Shaw eloped with Lana Turner. She was noticeably thinner in her next film, For Me and My Gal, alongside Gene Kelly in his first screen appearance. Garland was top billed over the credits for the first time, and effectively made the transition from teenage star to adult actress.

At the age of 21, she was given the "glamour treatment" in Presenting Lily Mars, in which she was dressed in "grown-up" gowns. Her lightened hair was also pulled up in a stylish fashion. However, no matter how glamorous or beautiful she appeared on screen or in photographs, she was never confident in her appearance and never escaped the "girl next door" image that had been created for her.

One of Garland's most successful films for MGM was Meet Me in St. Louis (1944), in which she introduced three standards: "The Trolley Song", "The Boy Next Door", and "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas". Vincente Minnelli was assigned to direct this movie, and he requested that make-up artist Dorothy Ponedel be assigned to Garland for the picture. Ponedel refined Garland's appearance in several ways, including extending and reshaping her eyebrows, changing her hairline, modifying her lip line, and removing her nose discs. Garland appreciated the results so much that Ponedel was written into her contract for all her remaining pictures at MGM.

The Clock (1945) was her first straight dramatic film, opposite Robert Walker. Though the film was critically praised and earned a profit, most movie fans expected her to sing. It would be many years before she acted again in a non-singing dramatic role.

Garland's other famous films of the 1940s include The Harvey Girls (1946), in which she introduced the Academy Award-winning song "On the Atchison, Topeka and the Santa Fe", and The Pirate (1948).
Beginning in 1955, Garland appeared in a number of television specials. The first, the 1955 debut episode of Ford Star Jubilee, was the first full-scale color broadcast ever on CBS and was a ratings triumph, scoring a 34.8 Nielsen rating. Garland signed a three-year, $300,000 contract with the network. Only one additional special, a live concert edition of General Electric Theater, was broadcast in 1956 before the relationship between the Lufts and CBS broke down in a dispute over the planned format of upcoming specials. In 1956, Garland performed four weeks at the New Frontier Hotel on the Las Vegas Strip for a salary of $55,000 per week, making her the highest-paid entertainer to work in Las Vegas. Despite a brief bout of laryngitis, her performances there were so successful that her run was extended an extra week. Later that year she returned to the Palace Theatre, site of her two-a-day triumph. She opened in September, once again to rave reviews and popular acclaim.
Garland before a concert, 1957

In November 1959 Garland was hospitalized, diagnosed with acute hepatitis. Over the next few weeks several quarts of fluid were drained from her body until, still weak, she was released from the hospital in January 1960. She was told by doctors that she likely had five years or less to live, and that even if she did survive she would be a semi-invalid and would never sing again. She initially felt "greatly relieved" at the diagnosis. "The pressure was off me for the first time in my life." However, Garland successfully recovered over the next several months and, in August of that year, returned to the stage of the Palladium. She felt so warmly embraced by the British that she announced her intention to move permanently to England.

Her concert appearance at Carnegie Hall on April 23, 1961, was a considerable highlight, called by many "the greatest night in show business history". The two-record Judy at Carnegie Hall was certified gold, charting for 95 weeks on Billboard, including 13 weeks at number one. The album won four Grammy Awards including Album of the Year and Best Female Vocal of the Year. The album has never been out of print.

In 1961, Garland and CBS settled their contract disputes with the help of her new agent, Freddie Fields, and negotiated a new round of specials. The first, entitled The Judy Garland Show, aired in 1962 and featured guests Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin. Following this success, CBS made a $24 million offer to Garland for a weekly television series of her own, also to be called The Judy Garland Show, which was deemed at the time in the press to be "the biggest talent deal in TV history". Although Garland had said as early as 1955 that she would never do a weekly television series, in the early 1960s she was in a financially precarious situation. Garland was several hundred thousand dollars in debt to the Internal Revenue Service, having failed to pay taxes in 1951 and 1952, and the financial failure of A Star is Born meant that she received nothing from that investment. A successful run on television was intended to secure Garland's financial future.

Following a third special, Judy Garland and Her Guests Phil Silvers and Robert Goulet, Garland's weekly series debuted September 29, 1963. The Judy Garland Show was critically praised, but for a variety of reasons (including being placed in the time slot opposite Bonanza on NBC) the show lasted only one season and was cancelled in 1964 after 26 episodes. Despite its short run, the series was nominated for four Emmy Awards. The demise of the series was personally and financially devastating for Garland, who never fully recovered from its failure.
Final years
Garland and Mickey Deans, at their wedding, March 1969, three months before her death

With the demise of her television series, Garland returned to the stage. Most notably, she performed at the London Palladium with her then 18-year-old daughter Liza Minnelli in November 1964. The concert, which was also filmed for British television network ITV, was one of Garland's final appearances at the venue. She made guest appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show, The Tonight Show, The Hollywood Palace, and The Merv Griffin Show, guest-hosting an episode of the last one.

A 1964 tour of Australia was largely disastrous. Garland's first concert in Sydney, held in the Sydney Stadium because no concert hall could accommodate the crowds who wanted to see her, went well and received positive reviews. Her second performance, in Melbourne, started an hour late. The crowd of 7,000, angered by her tardiness—and believing Garland to be drunk—booed and heckled her, and she fled the stage after just 45 minutes. She later characterized the Melbourne crowd as "brutish". A second concert in Sydney was uneventful but the Melbourne appearance garnered her significant bad press. Some of that bad press was deflected by the announcement of a near fatal episode of pleurisy.

In February 1967, Garland had been cast as Helen Lawson in Valley of the Dolls for 20th Century Fox. The character of Neely O'Hara in the book by Jacqueline Susann was rumored to have been based on Garland. The role of O'Hara in the film was played by Patty Duke. During the filming, Garland missed rehearsals and was fired in April. She was replaced by Susan Hayward. Garland's prerecording of the song "I'll Plant My Own Tree" survived, along with her wardrobe tests.

Returning to the stage, Garland made her last appearances at New York's Palace Theatre in July, a 16-show tour, performing with her children Lorna and Joey Luft. Garland wore a sequined pantsuit on stage for this tour, which was part of the original wardrobe for her character in Valley of the Dolls.
Personal life

Garland began a relationship with musician David Rose, and, on her 18th birthday, Rose gave her an engagement ring. The studio intervened because Rose was still married at the time to the actress and singer Martha Raye. The couple agreed to wait a year to allow for Rose's divorce from Raye to become final, and were wed on July 27, 1941. Garland, who had aborted her pregnancy by Rose in 1942, agreed to a trial separation in January 1943, and they divorced in 1944.

During the filming of Meet Me in St. Louis, after some initial conflict between them, Garland and Vincent Minnelli entered a relationship together. They were married June 15, 1945, and on March 12, 1946, daughter Liza Minnelli was born. In 1951, Garland divorced Vincente Minnelli.

She engaged Sid Luft as her manager the same year. Luft arranged a four-month concert tour of the United Kingdom, where she played to sold-out audiences throughout England, Scotland, and Ireland. The tour included Garland's first appearances at the renowned London Palladium, for a four-week stand in April. Although some in the British press chided her before her opening for being "too plump", she received rave reviews and the ovation was described by the Palladium manager as the loudest he had ever heard.

Garland and Luft were married on June 8, 1952, in Hollister, California, and Garland gave birth to the couple's first child, Lorna Luft, on November 21 that year.

Garland sued Sid Luft for divorce in 1963, claiming "cruelty" as the grounds. She also asserted that Luft had repeatedly struck her while he was drinking and that he had attempted to take their children from her by force. She had filed for divorce more than once previously, including as early as 1956.

Garland's fourth marriage was to tour promoter Mark Herron. They announced that their marriage had taken place aboard a freighter off the coast of Hong Kong; however, Garland was not legally divorced from Luft at the time the ceremony was performed. Her divorce from Luft became final on May 19, 1965, but Herron and Garland did not legally marry until November 14.

By early 1969, Garland's health had deteriorated. She performed in London at the Talk of the Town nightclub for a five-week run and made her last concert appearance in Copenhagen during March 1969. She married her fifth and final husband, Mickey Deans, at Chelsea Register Office, London, on March 15, 1969, her divorce from Herron having been finalized on February 11 of that year.
Death

On June 22, 1969, Garland was found dead by Deans in the bathroom of their rented Chelsea, London house. The coroner, Gavin Thursdon, stated at the inquest that the cause of death was "an incautious self-overdosage" of barbiturates; her blood contained the equivalent of ten 1.5-grain (97 mg) Seconal capsules. Thursdon stressed that the overdose had been unintentional and that there was no evidence to suggest she had committed suicide. Garland's autopsy showed that there was no inflammation of her stomach lining and no drug residue in her stomach, which indicated that the drug had been ingested over a long period of time, rather than in one dose. Her death certificate stated that her death had been "accidental." Even so, a British specialist who had attended Garland said she had been living on borrowed time due to cirrhosis of the liver. Garland had turned 47 just 12 days prior to her death. Her Wizard of Oz co-star Ray Bolger commented at Garland's funeral, "She just plain wore out." An estimated 20,000 people lined up for hours at the Frank E. Campbell Funeral Chapel to view her body. James Mason gave a eulogy at the funeral, which was an Episcopalian service led by the Rev. Peter A. Delaney of Marylebone Church, London, who had officiated at Garland's marriage to Deans. Garland was interred in a crypt in the community mausoleum at Ferncliff Cemetery, in Hartsdale, New York.
Legacy
Star for recognition of film work at 1715 Vine Street on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. She has another for recording at 6764 Hollywood Blvd.

Judy Garland's legacy as a performer and a personality has endured long after her death. The American Film Institute named Garland eighth among the Greatest Female Stars of All Time. She has been the subject of over two dozen biographies since her death, including the well-received Me and My Shadows: A Family Memoir by her daughter, Lorna Luft. Luft's memoir was later adapted into the multiple award-winning television miniseries, Life with Judy Garland: Me and My Shadows, which won Emmy Awards for two actresses portraying Garland (Tammy Blanchard and Judy Davis). English actress Tracie Bennett portrayed Garland to critical acclaim in a dramatization of her eventual decline and months preceding her death in a play titled End of the Rainbow at London's Trafalgar Studios. Both the play and Bennett received Laurence Olivier Award nominations.

Garland was posthumously awarded the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1997. Several of her recordings have been inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. These include "Over the Rainbow", which was ranked as the number one movie song of all time in the American Film Institute's "100 Years...100 Songs" list. Four more Garland songs are featured on the list: "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" (#76), "Get Happy" (#61), "The Trolley Song" (#26), and "The Man That Got Away" (#11). Garland has twice been honored on U.S. postage stamps, in 1989 (as Dorothy) and again in 2006 (as Vicki Lester from A Star Is Born).. Garland is mentioned in the 1998 horror film I Still Know What You Did Last Summer when the hotel clerk is explaining the history of the hotel in the Bahamas where the film takes place.
Gay icon
Main article: Judy Garland as gay icon

Garland always had a large base of fans in the gay community and has become a gay icon. Reasons often given for her standing, especially among gay men, are admiration of her ability as a performer, the way her personal struggles mirrored those of gay men in America during the height of her fame and her value as a camp figure. When asked about how she felt about being a gay icon, she responded, "I couldn't care less. I sing to people."

Some have also suggested a connection between the date of Garland's death and funeral on June 27, 1969 and the Stonewall riots, the flashpoint of the modern Gay Liberation movement, which started in the early hours of June 28.
Filmography and performances
Main article: List of Judy Garland performances
Discography
Main article: Judy Garland discography
Awards
Main article: List of awards and honors received by Judy Garland
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l295/klasix/Judy_Garland.jpg
http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e251/elruch/Judy_Garland_55.jpg


Wizard of Oz is still my favorite. :)

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Philip Eno on 06/11/11 at 3:15 am


The person of the day...Judy Garland
Judy Garland (June 10, 1922 – June 22, 1969) was an American actress and singer. Through a career that spanned 45 of her 47 years, Garland attained international stardom as an actress in musical and dramatic roles, as a recording artist and on the concert stage. Respected for her versatility, she received a juvenile Academy Award, won a Golden Globe Award, as well as Grammy Awards and a Special Tony Award. She was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress for her role in A Star is Born and for Best Supporting Actress for her performance in the 1961 film, Judgement at Nuremberg.

At 40 years of age, she was the youngest recipient of the Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievement in the motion picture industry.

After appearing in vaudeville with her sisters, Garland was signed to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer as a teenager. There she made more than two dozen films, including nine with Mickey Rooney and the 1939 film with which she would be most identified, The Wizard of Oz. After 15 years, Garland was released from the studio but gained renewed success through record-breaking concert appearances, including a return to acting beginning with critically acclaimed performances.

Despite her professional triumphs, Garland battled personal problems throughout her life. Insecure about her appearance, her feelings were compounded by film executives who told her she was unattractive and manipulated her on-screen physical appearance. Garland was plagued by financial instability, often owing hundreds of thousands of dollars in back taxes. She married five times, with her first four marriages ending in divorce. Garland died of an accidental drug overdose at the age of 47, leaving children Liza Minnelli, Lorna Luft and Joey Luft.

In 1997, Garland was posthumously awarded a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. Several of her recordings have been inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. In 1999, the American Film Institute placed her among the ten greatest female stars in the history of American cinema.
In 1935, Garland was signed to a contract with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, supposedly without a screen test, though she had made a test for the studio several months earlier. The studio did not know what to do with Garland, as at age 13 she was older than the traditional child star but too young for adult roles. Garland's physical appearance created a dilemma for MGM. At only 4 feet 11.5 inches (151.1 cm), Garland's "cute" or "girl next door" looks did not exemplify the more glamorous persona required of leading ladies of the time. She was self-conscious and anxious about her appearance. "Judy went to school at Metro with Ava Gardner, Lana Turner, Elizabeth Taylor, real beauties," said Charles Walters, who directed Garland in a number of films. "Judy was the big money-maker at the time, a big success, but she was the ugly duckling ... I think it had a very damaging effect on her emotionally for a long time. I think it lasted forever, really." Her insecurity was exacerbated by the attitude of studio chief Louis B. Mayer, who referred to her as his "little hunchback". During her early years at the studio, she was photographed and dressed in plain garments or frilly juvenile gowns and costumes to match the "girl-next-door" image that was created for her. She was made to wear removable caps on her teeth and rubberized disks to reshape her nose. She performed at various studio functions and was eventually cast opposite Deanna Durbin in the musical short Every Sunday. The film contrasted Garland's contralto vocal range and swing style with Durbin's operatic soprano and served as an extended screen test for the pair, as studio executives were questioning the wisdom of having two girl singers on the roster. Mayer finally decided to keep both girls, but by that time Durbin's option had lapsed and she was signed by Universal Studios.

On November 16, 1935, in the midst of preparing for a radio performance on the Shell Chateau Hour, Garland learned that her father—who had been hospitalized with meningitis—had taken a turn for the worse. Frank Gumm died the following morning, on November 17, leaving Garland devastated. Garland's song for the Shell Chateau Hour was her first professional rendition of "Zing! Went the Strings of My Heart", a song which would become a standard in many of her concerts.
Garland with Mickey Rooney in Love Finds Andy Hardy (1938)

Garland next came to the attention of studio executives by singing a special arrangement of "You Made Me Love You" to Clark Gable at a birthday party held by the studio for the actor; her rendition was so well regarded that Garland performed the song in the all-star extravaganza Broadway Melody of 1938 (1937), in which she sang the song to a photograph of Gable.

MGM hit on a winning formula when it paired Garland with Mickey Rooney in a string of "backyard musicals". The duo first appeared together in the 1937 B movie Thoroughbreds Don't Cry. They became a sensation, and teamed up again in Love Finds Andy Hardy. Garland would eventually star with Rooney in nine films.

To keep up with the frantic pace of making one film after another, Garland, Rooney, and other young performers were constantly given amphetamines, as well as barbiturates to take before bed. For Garland, this regular dose of drugs led to addiction and a lifelong struggle, and contributed to her eventual demise. She later resented the hectic schedule and felt that her youth had been stolen from her by MGM. Despite successful film and recording careers, several awards, critical praise, and her ability to fill concert halls worldwide, Garland was plagued throughout her life with self-doubt and required constant reassurance that she was talented and attractive.
The Wizard of Oz
Garland as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939)

In 1938, at the age of 16, Garland was cast as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939), a film based on the children's book by L. Frank Baum. In this film, Garland sang the song for which she would forever be identified, "Over the Rainbow". Although producers Arthur Freed and Mervyn LeRoy had wanted Garland from the start, studio chief Mayer tried first to borrow Shirley Temple from 20th Century Fox. Temple's services were denied and Garland was cast. Garland was initially outfitted in a blonde wig for the part, but Freed and LeRoy decided against it shortly into filming. Her breasts were bound with tape and she was made to wear a special corset to flatten out her curves and make her appear younger; her blue gingham dress was also chosen for its blurring effect on her figure.

Shooting commenced on October 13, 1938, and was completed on March 16, 1939, with a final cost of more than US$2 million. From the conclusion of filming, MGM kept Garland busy with promotional tours and the shooting of Babes in Arms. Garland and Mickey Rooney were sent on a cross-country promotional tour, culminating in the August 17 New York City premiere at the Capitol Theater, which included a five-show-a-day appearance schedule for the two stars.

On November 17, 1939, Garland's mother, Ethel, married William P. Gillmore in Yuma, Arizona. It was the fourth anniversary of her first husband's death.

The Wizard of Oz was a tremendous critical success, though its high budget and promotions costs of an estimated $4 million coupled with the lower revenue generated by children's tickets meant that the film did not make a profit until it was re-released in the 1940s. At the 1940 Academy Awards ceremony, Garland received an Academy Juvenile Award for her performances in 1939, including The Wizard of Oz and Babes in Arms. Following this recognition, Garland became one of MGM's most bankable stars.
Stardom as an adult

In 1940, she starred in three films: Andy Hardy Meets Debutante, Strike Up the Band, and Little Nellie Kelly. In the latter, Garland played her first adult role, a dual role of both mother and daughter. Little Nellie Kelly was purchased from George M. Cohan as a vehicle for Garland to display both her audience appeal and her physical appearance. The role was a challenge for her, requiring the use of an accent, her first adult kiss, and the only death scene of her career. The success of these three films, and a further three films in 1941, secured her position at MGM as a major property.
Garland performing "The Trolley Song" in Meet Me in St. Louis (1944)

During this time Garland experienced her first serious adult romances. The first was with the band leader Artie Shaw. Garland was deeply devoted to Shaw and was devastated in early 1940 when Shaw eloped with Lana Turner. She was noticeably thinner in her next film, For Me and My Gal, alongside Gene Kelly in his first screen appearance. Garland was top billed over the credits for the first time, and effectively made the transition from teenage star to adult actress.

At the age of 21, she was given the "glamour treatment" in Presenting Lily Mars, in which she was dressed in "grown-up" gowns. Her lightened hair was also pulled up in a stylish fashion. However, no matter how glamorous or beautiful she appeared on screen or in photographs, she was never confident in her appearance and never escaped the "girl next door" image that had been created for her.

One of Garland's most successful films for MGM was Meet Me in St. Louis (1944), in which she introduced three standards: "The Trolley Song", "The Boy Next Door", and "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas". Vincente Minnelli was assigned to direct this movie, and he requested that make-up artist Dorothy Ponedel be assigned to Garland for the picture. Ponedel refined Garland's appearance in several ways, including extending and reshaping her eyebrows, changing her hairline, modifying her lip line, and removing her nose discs. Garland appreciated the results so much that Ponedel was written into her contract for all her remaining pictures at MGM.

The Clock (1945) was her first straight dramatic film, opposite Robert Walker. Though the film was critically praised and earned a profit, most movie fans expected her to sing. It would be many years before she acted again in a non-singing dramatic role.

Garland's other famous films of the 1940s include The Harvey Girls (1946), in which she introduced the Academy Award-winning song "On the Atchison, Topeka and the Santa Fe", and The Pirate (1948).
Beginning in 1955, Garland appeared in a number of television specials. The first, the 1955 debut episode of Ford Star Jubilee, was the first full-scale color broadcast ever on CBS and was a ratings triumph, scoring a 34.8 Nielsen rating. Garland signed a three-year, $300,000 contract with the network. Only one additional special, a live concert edition of General Electric Theater, was broadcast in 1956 before the relationship between the Lufts and CBS broke down in a dispute over the planned format of upcoming specials. In 1956, Garland performed four weeks at the New Frontier Hotel on the Las Vegas Strip for a salary of $55,000 per week, making her the highest-paid entertainer to work in Las Vegas. Despite a brief bout of laryngitis, her performances there were so successful that her run was extended an extra week. Later that year she returned to the Palace Theatre, site of her two-a-day triumph. She opened in September, once again to rave reviews and popular acclaim.
Garland before a concert, 1957

In November 1959 Garland was hospitalized, diagnosed with acute hepatitis. Over the next few weeks several quarts of fluid were drained from her body until, still weak, she was released from the hospital in January 1960. She was told by doctors that she likely had five years or less to live, and that even if she did survive she would be a semi-invalid and would never sing again. She initially felt "greatly relieved" at the diagnosis. "The pressure was off me for the first time in my life." However, Garland successfully recovered over the next several months and, in August of that year, returned to the stage of the Palladium. She felt so warmly embraced by the British that she announced her intention to move permanently to England.

Her concert appearance at Carnegie Hall on April 23, 1961, was a considerable highlight, called by many "the greatest night in show business history". The two-record Judy at Carnegie Hall was certified gold, charting for 95 weeks on Billboard, including 13 weeks at number one. The album won four Grammy Awards including Album of the Year and Best Female Vocal of the Year. The album has never been out of print.

In 1961, Garland and CBS settled their contract disputes with the help of her new agent, Freddie Fields, and negotiated a new round of specials. The first, entitled The Judy Garland Show, aired in 1962 and featured guests Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin. Following this success, CBS made a $24 million offer to Garland for a weekly television series of her own, also to be called The Judy Garland Show, which was deemed at the time in the press to be "the biggest talent deal in TV history". Although Garland had said as early as 1955 that she would never do a weekly television series, in the early 1960s she was in a financially precarious situation. Garland was several hundred thousand dollars in debt to the Internal Revenue Service, having failed to pay taxes in 1951 and 1952, and the financial failure of A Star is Born meant that she received nothing from that investment. A successful run on television was intended to secure Garland's financial future.

Following a third special, Judy Garland and Her Guests Phil Silvers and Robert Goulet, Garland's weekly series debuted September 29, 1963. The Judy Garland Show was critically praised, but for a variety of reasons (including being placed in the time slot opposite Bonanza on NBC) the show lasted only one season and was cancelled in 1964 after 26 episodes. Despite its short run, the series was nominated for four Emmy Awards. The demise of the series was personally and financially devastating for Garland, who never fully recovered from its failure.
Final years
Garland and Mickey Deans, at their wedding, March 1969, three months before her death

With the demise of her television series, Garland returned to the stage. Most notably, she performed at the London Palladium with her then 18-year-old daughter Liza Minnelli in November 1964. The concert, which was also filmed for British television network ITV, was one of Garland's final appearances at the venue. She made guest appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show, The Tonight Show, The Hollywood Palace, and The Merv Griffin Show, guest-hosting an episode of the last one.

A 1964 tour of Australia was largely disastrous. Garland's first concert in Sydney, held in the Sydney Stadium because no concert hall could accommodate the crowds who wanted to see her, went well and received positive reviews. Her second performance, in Melbourne, started an hour late. The crowd of 7,000, angered by her tardiness—and believing Garland to be drunk—booed and heckled her, and she fled the stage after just 45 minutes. She later characterized the Melbourne crowd as "brutish". A second concert in Sydney was uneventful but the Melbourne appearance garnered her significant bad press. Some of that bad press was deflected by the announcement of a near fatal episode of pleurisy.

In February 1967, Garland had been cast as Helen Lawson in Valley of the Dolls for 20th Century Fox. The character of Neely O'Hara in the book by Jacqueline Susann was rumored to have been based on Garland. The role of O'Hara in the film was played by Patty Duke. During the filming, Garland missed rehearsals and was fired in April. She was replaced by Susan Hayward. Garland's prerecording of the song "I'll Plant My Own Tree" survived, along with her wardrobe tests.

Returning to the stage, Garland made her last appearances at New York's Palace Theatre in July, a 16-show tour, performing with her children Lorna and Joey Luft. Garland wore a sequined pantsuit on stage for this tour, which was part of the original wardrobe for her character in Valley of the Dolls.
Personal life

Garland began a relationship with musician David Rose, and, on her 18th birthday, Rose gave her an engagement ring. The studio intervened because Rose was still married at the time to the actress and singer Martha Raye. The couple agreed to wait a year to allow for Rose's divorce from Raye to become final, and were wed on July 27, 1941. Garland, who had aborted her pregnancy by Rose in 1942, agreed to a trial separation in January 1943, and they divorced in 1944.

During the filming of Meet Me in St. Louis, after some initial conflict between them, Garland and Vincent Minnelli entered a relationship together. They were married June 15, 1945, and on March 12, 1946, daughter Liza Minnelli was born. In 1951, Garland divorced Vincente Minnelli.

She engaged Sid Luft as her manager the same year. Luft arranged a four-month concert tour of the United Kingdom, where she played to sold-out audiences throughout England, Scotland, and Ireland. The tour included Garland's first appearances at the renowned London Palladium, for a four-week stand in April. Although some in the British press chided her before her opening for being "too plump", she received rave reviews and the ovation was described by the Palladium manager as the loudest he had ever heard.

Garland and Luft were married on June 8, 1952, in Hollister, California, and Garland gave birth to the couple's first child, Lorna Luft, on November 21 that year.

Garland sued Sid Luft for divorce in 1963, claiming "cruelty" as the grounds. She also asserted that Luft had repeatedly struck her while he was drinking and that he had attempted to take their children from her by force. She had filed for divorce more than once previously, including as early as 1956.

Garland's fourth marriage was to tour promoter Mark Herron. They announced that their marriage had taken place aboard a freighter off the coast of Hong Kong; however, Garland was not legally divorced from Luft at the time the ceremony was performed. Her divorce from Luft became final on May 19, 1965, but Herron and Garland did not legally marry until November 14.

By early 1969, Garland's health had deteriorated. She performed in London at the Talk of the Town nightclub for a five-week run and made her last concert appearance in Copenhagen during March 1969. She married her fifth and final husband, Mickey Deans, at Chelsea Register Office, London, on March 15, 1969, her divorce from Herron having been finalized on February 11 of that year.
Death

On June 22, 1969, Garland was found dead by Deans in the bathroom of their rented Chelsea, London house. The coroner, Gavin Thursdon, stated at the inquest that the cause of death was "an incautious self-overdosage" of barbiturates; her blood contained the equivalent of ten 1.5-grain (97 mg) Seconal capsules. Thursdon stressed that the overdose had been unintentional and that there was no evidence to suggest she had committed suicide. Garland's autopsy showed that there was no inflammation of her stomach lining and no drug residue in her stomach, which indicated that the drug had been ingested over a long period of time, rather than in one dose. Her death certificate stated that her death had been "accidental." Even so, a British specialist who had attended Garland said she had been living on borrowed time due to cirrhosis of the liver. Garland had turned 47 just 12 days prior to her death. Her Wizard of Oz co-star Ray Bolger commented at Garland's funeral, "She just plain wore out." An estimated 20,000 people lined up for hours at the Frank E. Campbell Funeral Chapel to view her body. James Mason gave a eulogy at the funeral, which was an Episcopalian service led by the Rev. Peter A. Delaney of Marylebone Church, London, who had officiated at Garland's marriage to Deans. Garland was interred in a crypt in the community mausoleum at Ferncliff Cemetery, in Hartsdale, New York.
Legacy
Star for recognition of film work at 1715 Vine Street on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. She has another for recording at 6764 Hollywood Blvd.

Judy Garland's legacy as a performer and a personality has endured long after her death. The American Film Institute named Garland eighth among the Greatest Female Stars of All Time. She has been the subject of over two dozen biographies since her death, including the well-received Me and My Shadows: A Family Memoir by her daughter, Lorna Luft. Luft's memoir was later adapted into the multiple award-winning television miniseries, Life with Judy Garland: Me and My Shadows, which won Emmy Awards for two actresses portraying Garland (Tammy Blanchard and Judy Davis). English actress Tracie Bennett portrayed Garland to critical acclaim in a dramatization of her eventual decline and months preceding her death in a play titled End of the Rainbow at London's Trafalgar Studios. Both the play and Bennett received Laurence Olivier Award nominations.

Garland was posthumously awarded the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1997. Several of her recordings have been inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. These include "Over the Rainbow", which was ranked as the number one movie song of all time in the American Film Institute's "100 Years...100 Songs" list. Four more Garland songs are featured on the list: "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" (#76), "Get Happy" (#61), "The Trolley Song" (#26), and "The Man That Got Away" (#11). Garland has twice been honored on U.S. postage stamps, in 1989 (as Dorothy) and again in 2006 (as Vicki Lester from A Star Is Born).. Garland is mentioned in the 1998 horror film I Still Know What You Did Last Summer when the hotel clerk is explaining the history of the hotel in the Bahamas where the film takes place.
Gay icon
Main article: Judy Garland as gay icon

Garland always had a large base of fans in the gay community and has become a gay icon. Reasons often given for her standing, especially among gay men, are admiration of her ability as a performer, the way her personal struggles mirrored those of gay men in America during the height of her fame and her value as a camp figure. When asked about how she felt about being a gay icon, she responded, "I couldn't care less. I sing to people."

Some have also suggested a connection between the date of Garland's death and funeral on June 27, 1969 and the Stonewall riots, the flashpoint of the modern Gay Liberation movement, which started in the early hours of June 28.
Filmography and performances
Main article: List of Judy Garland performances
Discography
Main article: Judy Garland discography
Awards
Main article: List of awards and honors received by Judy Garland
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l295/klasix/Judy_Garland.jpg
http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e251/elruch/Judy_Garland_55.jpg
Her daughter Liza Minnelli is going on tour soon.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/11/11 at 6:26 am

The person of the day....Vic Damone
Vic Damone (born June 12, 1928) is an American singer and entertainer.
Damone entered the talent search on Arthur Godfrey's Talent Scouts and won in April 1947. This led to his becoming a regular on Godfrey's show. He met Milton Berle at the studio and Berle got him work at two night clubs. By mid 1947, Damone had signed a contract with Mercury Records.

His first release, "I Have But One Heart", reached #7 on the Billboard chart. "You Do" (released November 1) reached the same peak. These were followed by a number of other hits. In 1948 he got his own weekly radio show, Saturday Night Serenade.

In 1951, Damone appeared in two movies: The Strip and Rich, Young and Pretty. From 1951 to 1953 he served in the United States Army, but before going into the service he recorded a number of songs which were released during that time. He served with future Northwest Indiana radio personality Al Evans, and also country music star Johnny Cash. After leaving the service, he married the Italian actress Pier Angeli (Anna Maria Pierangeli), and in 1954 made two more movies: Deep in My Heart and Athena. He also made some guest appearances on Milton Berle's television show in 1954.

In 1955, Damone had only one song on the charts, "Por Favor," which did not make it above #73. However, he did have major roles in two movie musicals, Hit the Deck and Kismet. In early 1956, he moved from Mercury to Columbia Records and had some success on that label with hits like "On the Street Where You Live" (from My Fair Lady, his final pop top ten) and "An Affair to Remember" (from the movie of the same name). His six original, long-playing albums on Columbia between 1957 and 1961 were That Towering Feeling, Angela Mia, Closer Than a Kiss, This Game of Love, On the Swingin' Side and Young and Lively.

In 1961, he was released by Columbia, moving over to Capitol Records, where he filled in the gap left by Frank Sinatra's leaving to help found Reprise Records. He lasted at Capitol only until 1965; however, he recorded some of his most highly-regarded albums there, including two which made the Billboard chart, Linger Awhile with Vic Damone and The Lively Ones, the latter with arrangements by Billy May, who also arranged another of Damone's Capitol albums, Strange Enchantment. Other original Capitol albums included My Baby Loves to Swing, The Liveliest, and On the Street Where You Live.

In the summers of 1962 and 1963 Damone hosted a television variety series on NBC called The Lively Ones, which showcased current jazz, pop and folk performers as well as comedians. His distinguished group of musical guests over two seasons included Count Basie, Louie Bellson, Dave Brubeck, Chris Connor, Matt Dennis, Frances Faye, Ella Fitzgerald, Dizzy Gillespie, Buddy Greco, Woody Herman, Jack Jones, Stan Kenton, Gene Krupa, Peggy Lee, Nellie Lutcher, Shelly Manne, Anita O'Day, Ruth Olay, Oscar Peterson, Andre Previn, Della Reese, Shorty Rogers, Cal Tjader, and Joe Williams.

Other notable television work during this time included Damone's three guest appearances on Judy Garland's CBS variety series The Judy Garland Show (1963–64). In addition to his solo performances on these three episodes, Damone and Garland sang duet medleys of songs from Porgy and Bess, West Side Story, and Kismet.

In 1964, he sang Back Home Again in Indiana, before the Indianapolis 500 car race.

In 1965 Damone moved next to Warner Bros. Records, releasing the albums You Were Only Fooling and Country Love Songs. On Warners he had one chart hit: "You Were Only Fooling (While I Was Falling In Love)." The next year he moved again, to RCA Victor Records, releasing the albums Stay with Me, Why Can't I Walk Away, On the South Side of Chicago and The Damone Type of Thing. In 1969 he released his last US chart record, a cover of the 1966 song "To Make A Big Man Cry", which made the Billboard Easy Listening chart.
Later career

In 1971, Damone started touring Las Vegas casinos as a performer, and although he had to declare bankruptcy in the early 1970s, he earned enough as a casino performer to clear up his financial difficulties. He extended his geographical range, touring through the United States and the United Kingdom, and as a result of his popularity decided to record some albums again, releasing them on the RCA label.

His final album was issued in 2002, with other albums being re-packaged and re-released. He has recorded over 2,000 songs over his entire career.

He has garnered new fans following the launch of the Vic Damone website in 2002 www.vicdamone.com, managed by his son-in-law William "Bill" Karant.

One of his final public performances was on January 19, 2002 at the Raymond F. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts in Palm Beach, Florida. Damone did however step out of retirement on January 22, 2011, when he performed at the Kravis Performing Arts Center in Palm Beach, Florida to a sold out crowd. Damone dedicated this performance to his six grandchildren who had never seen him perform.

In Brett Ratner's movie Money Talks, Chris Tucker's character sees a commercial about Vic Damone and then pretends to be Damone's son.

On June 12, 2009, Vic Damone released his autobiography titled Singing Was the Easy Part from St. Martin's Press.
Personal life

Damone has married five times and divorced four:

    * 1) The Italian actress Anna Maria Pierangeli (Pier Angeli) (1954–1958) (one son - Perry Damone)
    * 2) Judith Rawlins (1963–1971) (three daughters)
    * 3) Becky Ann Jones (1974–1982), the American entertainer
    * 4) Diahann Carroll (1987–1996) (This relationship is referenced in the 1997 film Money Talks, in which Chris Tucker's character claims to be Vic Damone Jr., the son of Damone and Carroll)
    * 5) Rena Rowan-Damone (1998 to present), the fashion designer and co-creator of Jones New York (Jones Apparel Group).

Damone has 6 grandchildren from his daughters (Tate, Page, Sloan, Rocco, Daniella Grace, Grant).

In the late 1950s, Damone was introduced to the Bahá'í Faith by a drummer in his band. Damone relates his rendition of "On the Street Where You Live" incorporates gestures meant to summon a sustaining vitality from `Abdu'l-Bahá. He officially joined the religion in the early 1960s.
Awards

In 1997, Damone received his high school diploma from Lafayette High School in Brooklyn when officials with the school granted credits for life experience and asked him to give the commencement address - advising students to "Have spiritual guidance. Don't lose God. There is a God. Trust me."

In 1997, Damone received the "Sammy Cahn Lifetime Achievement Award" from the Songwriters Hall of Fame.

Frank Sinatra said that Damone had "the best set of pipes in the business".

For his contribution to the recording industry, Vic Damone has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1731 Vine Street in Los Angeles, California.
Hit records
Year Single Chart positions
U.S. U.S.
AC UK
1947 "I Have But One Heart" 7
"You Do" 7
1948 "Thoughtless" 22
"My Fair Lady" 27
"It's Magic" 24
"Say Something Sweet To Your Sweetheart"(with Patti Page) 23
1949 "Again"(gold record) 6
"You're Breaking My Heart"(gold record) 1
"The Four Winds and the Seven Seas" 16
"My Bolero" 10
"Why Was I Born?" 20
1950 "Sitting By the Window" 29
"God's Country" 27
"Vagabond Shoes" 17
"Tzena Tzena Tzena" 6
"Just Say I Love Her" 13
"Can Anyone Explain" 25
"Cincinnati Dancing Pig" 11
"My Heart Cries For You" 4
"Music By the Angels" 18
1951 "Tell Me You Love Me" 21
"If" 28
"My Truly Truly Fair" 4
"Longing For You" 12
"Calla Calla" 13
1952 "Jump Through the Ring" 22
"Here In My Heart" 8
"Take My Heart" 30
"Rosanne" 23
1953 "Sugar" 13
"April In Portugal" 10
"Eternally" 12
"Ebb Tide" 10
"A Village In Peru" 30
1954 "The Breeze and I" 21
"The Sparrow Sings" 27
1955 "Por Favor" 73
1956 "On the Street Where You Live" 4 1
"War and Peace" 59
1957 "Do I Love You" 62
"An Affair To Remember" 16 29
1958 "Gigi" 88
"The Only Man On the Island" 24
1962 "What Kind of Fool Am I" 131
1965 "You Were Only Fooling" 30 8
"Why Don't You Believe Me" 127 25
"Tears (For Souvenirs)" 35
1967 "On the South Side of Chicago" 22
"It Makes No Difference" 12
"The Glory of Love" 15
1968 "Nothing To Lose" 40
"Why Can't I Walk Away" 21
1969 "To Make a Big Man Cry" 31
Songs

The following songs recorded by Damone made the Billboard charts:

    * "An Affair to Remember" (#16) (1957)
    * "Again" (#6) (1949) (arguably a bigger hit for Doris Day and Gordon Jenkins, but a gold record for Damone)
    * "April in Portugal" (#10) (1953)
    * "Calla Calla" (#13) (1951)
    * "Can Anyone Explain? (No! No! No!)" (#25) (1950) (bigger hit for The Ames Brothers)
    * "Cincinnati Dancing Pig" (#11) (1950)
    * "Do I Love You (Because You’re Beautiful)" (#62) (1957)
    * "Ebb Tide" (#10) (1953)
    * "Eternally (The Song From Limelight)" (#12) (1953)
    * "Four Winds and Seven Seas" (#16) (1949)
    * "Gigi" (#88) (1958)
    * "God’s Country" (#27) (1950)
    * "Here in My Heart" (#8) (1952) (bigger hit for Al Martino)
    * "If" (#28) (1951) (bigger hit for Perry Como)
    * "I Have But One Heart" (#7) (1947)
    * "It’s Magic" (#24) (1948) (bigger hit for Doris Day)
    * "Jump Through the Ring" (#22) (1952)
    * "Just Say I Love Her" (#13) (1950)
    * "Longing for You" (#12) (1951)
    * "Music By the Angels" (#18) (1950)
    * "My Bolero" (#10) (1949)
    * "My Heart Cries for You" (#4) (1950) (bigger hit for Guy Mitchell)
    * "My Truly, Truly Fair" (#4) (1951) (bigger hit for Guy Mitchell)
    * "On the Street Where You Live" (#4) (1956)
    * "Por Favor" (#73) (1955)
    * "Rosanne" (#23) (1952)
    * "Say Something Sweet to Your Sweetheart" (#23) (1948) (duet with Patti Page)
    * "Sugar" (#13) (1953)
    * "Sitting By the Window" (#29) (1950)
    * "Take My Heart" (#30) (1952)
    * "Tell Me You Love Me" (#21) (1951)
    * "Tomorrow Never Comes" 1952
    * "Tzena, Tzena, Tzena" (#7) (1950) (bigger hit for The Weavers)
    * "Vagabond Shoes" (#17) (1950)
    * "War and Peace" (#59) (1956)
    * "Why Was I Born?" (#20) (1949)
    * "Wonder Why" (#21) (1951)
    * "You Do" (#7) (1947)
    * "You're Breaking My Heart" (#1) (1949) (Damone's 2nd gold record and his biggest hit)
    * "You Were Only Fooling (While I Was Falling in Love)" (#30) (1965)
http://i293.photobucket.com/albums/mm45/incolel/fav%20singers/VicDamone.jpg
http://i195.photobucket.com/albums/z157/nadir01/Picture675.jpg

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 06/11/11 at 6:30 am


Her daughter Liza Minnelli is going on tour soon.


When will that take place?

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Philip Eno on 06/11/11 at 11:09 am


When will that take place?
This year.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Philip Eno on 06/11/11 at 11:10 am


When will that take place?

This year.
June and July.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/12/11 at 7:25 am

I see my person of the day for yesterday was actually born today :-[

I will look at yesterday's birthday.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Philip Eno on 06/12/11 at 7:31 am


I see my person of the day for yesterday was actually born today :-[

I will look at yesterday's birthday.
Oops!

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/12/11 at 7:50 am

The person of the day for June 11th......Hugh Laurie
James Hugh Calum Laurie, OBE (born 11 June 1959) better known as Hugh Laurie (play /hjuː ˈlɒri/), is a British actor, voice artist, comedian, writer, musician, recording artist, and director. He first became well known in the media as one half of the Fry and Laurie double act, along with his friend and comedy partner Stephen Fry, whom he joined in the cast of Blackadder and Jeeves and Wooster from 1987 until 1999. Since 2004, he has played the lead as Dr. Gregory House, the protagonist of House, for which he received two Golden Globe awards, two Screen Actors Guild awards and several Emmy nominations.

As of August 2010, Laurie is the highest paid actor in a drama series on US television. His debut album, Let Them Talk, was released in May 2011.
Laurie was born in Oxford, England. The youngest of four children, Laurie has an older brother named Charles and two older sisters named Susan and Janet. He had a somewhat strained relationship with his mother, Patricia (née Laidlaw). His father, Ran Laurie, was a medical doctor who also won an Olympic gold medal in the coxless pairs (rowing) at the 1948 London Games.

Although Laurie was raised in the Presbyterian church as a child, he has declared: "I don't believe in God, but I have this idea that if there were a God, or destiny of some kind looking down on us, that if he saw you taking anything for granted he'd take it away." He was brought up in Oxford and attended the Dragon School. He later went on to Eton and then to Selwyn College, Cambridge, where he studied for a degree in archaeology and social anthropology. While at Cambridge he was a member of Footlights, the university dramatic club that has produced many well known actors and comedians, and he was club president in 1981. He was also a member of the Hermes Club and the Hawks' Club.

Like his father, Laurie was an oarsman at school and university; in 1977, he was a member of the junior coxed pair that won the British national title before representing Britain's Youth Team at the 1977 Junior World Rowing Championships. In 1980, Laurie and his rowing partner, J. S. Palmer, were runners-up in the Silver Goblets coxless pairs for Eton Vikings rowing club. Later, he also achieved a Blue while taking part in the 1980 Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race. Cambridge lost that year by 5 feet. Laurie is a member of Leander Club, one of the oldest rowing clubs in the world.

Forced to abandon rowing during a bout of glandular fever (mononucleosis), he joined the Cambridge Footlights, which has been the starting point for many successful British comedians. There he met Emma Thompson, with whom he had a romantic relationship; the two remain good friends. She introduced him to his future comedy partner, Stephen Fry. Laurie, Fry and Thompson later parodied themselves as the University Challenge representatives of "Footlights College, Oxbridge" in "Bambi", an episode of The Young Ones, with the series' co-writer Ben Elton completing their team. In 1980–81, his final year at university, besides rowing, Laurie was also president of the Footlights, with Thompson as vice-president. They took their annual revue, The Cellar Tapes, to the Edinburgh Festival Fringe and won the first Perrier Comedy Award. The revue was written principally by Laurie and Fry, and the cast also included Thompson, Tony Slattery, Paul Shearer and Penny Dwyer.
Career

The Perrier Award led to a West End transfer for The Cellar Tapes and a television version of the revue, broadcast in May 1982. It resulted in Laurie, Fry and Thompson being selected, along with Ben Elton, Robbie Coltrane and Siobhan Redmond to write and appear in a new sketch comedy show for Granada Television, Alfresco, which ran for two series.

Fry and Laurie went on to work together on various projects throughout the 1980s and 1990s. Among them were the Blackadder series, written by Ben Elton and Richard Curtis, starring Rowan Atkinson, with Laurie in various roles, but most notably Prince George and Lieutenant George. Other projects followed, of which one was their BBC sketch comedy series A Bit of Fry & Laurie; another project was Jeeves and Wooster, an adaptation of P. G. Wodehouse’s stories, in which Laurie played Jeeves’s employer, the amiable twit Bertie Wooster. He and Fry worked together at various charity stage events, such as Hysteria! 1, 2 & 3 and Amnesty International’s The Secret Policeman’s Third Ball, Comic Relief TV shows and the variety show Fry and Laurie Host a Christmas Night with the Stars. They collaborated again on the film Peter's Friends and came together for a retrospective show in 2010 titled Fry and Laurie Reunited.

Laurie starred in the Thames Television film "Letters from a Bomber Pilot" (1985) directed by David Hodgson. This was a serious acting role, the film being dramatised from the letters home of Pilot Officer J.R.A. "Bob" Hodgson, a pilot in RAF Bomber Command, who was killed in action in 1943.

Laurie appeared in the music videos for the 1986 single "Experiment IV" by Kate Bush and the 1992 single "Walking on Broken Glass" by Annie Lennox, in full Regency-period costume, a toned-down version of his Prince George character from Blackadder the Third, opposite John Malkovich, similarly reprising his role of the Vicomte Valmont from Dangerous Liaisons.

Laurie’s later film appearances include Sense and Sensibility (1995), adapted by and starring Emma Thompson; the Disney live-action film 101 Dalmatians (1996), where he played Jasper, one of the bumbling criminals hired to kidnap the puppies; Elton’s adaptation of his novel Inconceivable, Maybe Baby (2000); Girl From Rio; the 2004 remake of The Flight of the Phoenix; and the three Stuart Little films.

In 1996, Laurie’s first novel, The Gun Seller, an intricate thriller laced with Wodehouseian humour, was published and became a bestseller. He has since been working on the screenplay for a movie version and on a second novel, The Paper Soldier. In 1998, Laurie had a brief guest-starring role on Friends in "The One with Ross's Wedding, Part Two".

Since 2002, Laurie has appeared in a range of British television dramas, guest-starring that year in two episodes of the first season of the spy thriller series Spooks on BBC One. In 2003, he starred in and also directed ITV's comedy-drama series fortysomething (in one episode of which Stephen Fry appears). In 2001, he voiced the character of a bar patron in the Family Guy episode "One If by Clam, Two If by Sea". Laurie voiced the character of Mr. Wolf in the cartoon Preston Pig. He was a panellist on the first episode of QI, alongside Fry as host. In 2004, Laurie guest-starred as a professor in charge of a space probe called Beagle, on The Lenny Henry Show.

Laurie's fame expanded to the American public in 2004, when he first starred as the acerbic physician specialising in diagnostic medicine, Dr Gregory House in the popular Fox medical drama House. For his portrayal, Laurie assumes an American accent. Laurie was in Namibia filming Flight of the Phoenix and recorded the audition tape for the show in the bathroom of the hotel, the only place he could get enough light. His US accent was so convincing that executive producer Bryan Singer, who was unaware at the time that Laurie is English, pointed to him as an example of just the kind of compelling American actor he had been looking for. Laurie also adopts the accent between takes on the set of House, as well as during script read-throughs, although he used his native accent when directing the House episode "Lockdown".

Laurie was nominated for an Emmy Award for his role in House in 2005. Although he did not win, he did receive a Golden Globe in both 2006 and 2007 for his work on the series and the Screen Actors Guild award in 2007 and 2009. Laurie was also awarded a large increase in salary, from what was rumoured to be a mid-range five-figure sum to $350,000 per episode. Laurie was not nominated for the 2006 Emmys, apparently to the outrage of Fox executives, but he still appeared in a scripted, pre-taped intro, where he parodied his House character by rapidly diagnosing host Conan O'Brien and then proceeded to grope him as the latter asked him for help to get to the Emmys on time. He would later go on to speak in French while presenting an Emmy with Dame Helen Mirren, and has since been nominated in 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2010. Laurie's success on the show extends to the financial: in August 2010, TV Guide identified him as the highest-paid actor in a drama, saying he's paid over $400,000 per episode.

Laurie was initially cast as Perry White, the editor of the Daily Planet, in Singer's film Superman Returns but had to bow out of the project because of his involvement in House. In July 2006, Laurie appeared on Bravo!'s Inside the Actors Studio, where he also performed one of his own comic songs, "Mystery", accompanying himself on the piano. He hosted NBC's Saturday Night Live, in which he appeared in drag in a sketch about a man (Kenan Thompson) with a broken leg who accuses his doctor of being dishonest. Laurie played the man’s wife.

In August 2007, Laurie appeared on BBC Four's documentary Stephen Fry: 50 Not Out, filmed in celebration of Fry’s 50th birthday.

In 2008, Laurie appeared as Captain James Biggs in Street Kings, opposite Keanu Reeves and Forest Whitaker, and then in 2009 as the eccentric Dr. Cockroach, PhD in DreamWorks' Monsters vs. Aliens. He also hosted Saturday Night Live for the second time on the Christmas show in which he sang a medley of three-second Christmas songs to close his monologue.

In 2009, Laurie returned to guest star in another Family Guy episode, "Business Guy", parodying Gregory House and himself assuming an American accent.

In 2010, Laurie filmed an independent feature called The Oranges and played piano on a track of Meat Loaf's CD Hang Cool Teddy Bear.

In 2010, Laurie guest starred in The Simpsons "Treehouse of Horror XXI" as Roger, a castaway who is planning a murder scheme on a ship during Homer and Marge's second honeymoon.
Music
Musical ability

From the age of six Laurie took piano lessons with a Mrs Hare. He plays the piano, guitar, drums, harmonica and saxophone. He has displayed his musical talents in episodes of several series, most notably A Bit of Fry & Laurie, Jeeves and Wooster, House and when he hosted Saturday Night Live in October 2006. He is a vocalist and keyboard player for the Los Angeles charity rock group Band From TV. Additionally, following Meat Loaf's appearance in the House episode "Simple Explanation," Laurie played piano as a special guest on the song "If I Can't Have You" from Meat Loaf's 2010 album Hang Cool Teddy Bear.

On episodes of House he has played several classic rock 'n roll instruments including Gibson Flying V and Les Paul guitars. His character has a Hammond B-3 organ in his home and on one episode performed the introduction to Procol Harum's classic "Whiter Shade of Pale". Laurie appears as a scientist/doctor in the pop video to accompany Kate Bush's song Experiment IV. On 1 May 2011, Laurie and a jazz quintet closed the 2011 Cheltenham Jazz Festival to great acclaim.

On 15 May 2011 Laurie appeared in the UK ITV series Perspectives, explaining his love for the Music of New Orleans and playing music, from his album Let Them Talk, at studios and live venues in the city itself.
Discography
Albums

On 26 July 2010 it was announced that Laurie would be releasing a blues album, after signing a contract with Warner Bros. The album, called Let Them Talk, was released in France on 18 April 2011 and in Germany on 29 April.
Year Album details Peak chart positions Certifications
(sales thresholds)
UK AUS
AUT
BEL (FLA)
BEL (WAL)
FRA
GER
IRE
NL
SWI

2011 Let Them Talk

    * Released: 18 April 2011
    * Label: Warner Bros.
    * Formats: CD, digital download

2 37 1 22 5 2 8 14 25 4

    * UK: Gold

Singles
Year Single Peak chart
positions Album
UK
AUT

2011 "You Don't Know My Mind" 164 47 Let Them Talk
Other charting songs
Year Single Charts Album
FRA

2011 "St James' Infirmary" 92 Let Them Talk
Appearances
Year Song Album
2010 "If I Can't Have You" (Meat Loaf featuring Kara DioGuardi & Hugh Laurie) Hang Cool Teddy Bear
Personal life

Laurie's mother, Patricia (née Laidlaw), died from motor neurone disease in Oxfordshire at aged 73 in 1989, when Laurie was 30. According to Laurie, it took her two years to die, and she suffered "painful, plodding paralysis" while being cared for by Laurie's father, whom he called "the sweetest man in the whole world".

Laurie married theatre administrator Jo Green in June 1989 in Camden, London. They live in Belsize Park, London with sons Charles Archibald "Charlie" (born November 1988, Camden), William Albert "Bill" (born January 1991, Camden) and daughter Rebecca Augusta (born 10 September 1993, Westminster, London). They had planned to move the whole family to Los Angeles in 2008 due to the strain of being mostly separated for 9 months each year, but ultimately decided against it. Charlie had a cameo in A Bit of Fry & Laurie in the last sketch of the episode entitled Special Squad, as baby William (whom Stephen and Hugh begin to "interrogate" about "what he's done with the stuff", calling him a scumbag and telling him that he's been a very naughty boy) during his infancy, while Rebecca had a role in the film Wit as five-year-old Vivian Bearing.

Laurie is good friends with his House co-star Robert Sean Leonard and continues his friendship with actress Emma Thompson. His best friend is long time comedy partner Stephen Fry.

Laurie was made an Officer of the Order of the British Empire in the 2007 New Year Honours List for his services to drama on 23 May 2007 by Queen Elizabeth II.

Laurie has periodically struggled with severe clinical depression, and continues to receive regular treatment from a psychotherapist. He stated in an interview that he first concluded he had a problem while driving in a charity demolition derby in 1996, and realised that driving around explosive crashes caused him to be neither excited nor frightened (he said that he felt bored). "Boredom," he commented in an interview on Inside the Actors Studio, "is not an appropriate response to exploding cars."

Laurie admires the writings of P.G. Wodehouse, explaining in a 27 May 1999 article in The Daily Telegraph how reading Wodehouse novels had saved his life.

Laurie is an avid motorcycle enthusiast. He has two motorcycles, one at his Los Angeles home and one at his London home. His bike in the United States is a Triumph Bonneville, his "feeble attempt to fly the British flag".
Awards

All of the following are nominations or wins for Laurie's role on House:

Emmy Awards

    * 2005 – Nominated – Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series
    * 2007 – Nominated – Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series
    * 2008 – Nominated – Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series
    * 2009 – Nominated – Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series
    * 2010 – Nominated – Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series

Golden Globe Awards

    * 2005 – Winner – Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama
    * 2006 – Winner – Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama
    * 2007 – Nominated – Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama
    * 2008 – Nominated – Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama
    * 2009 – Nominated – Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama
    * 2010 – Nominated – Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama

Satellite Awards

    * 2005 – Winner – Outstanding Actor in a Series, Drama
    * 2006 – Winner – Outstanding Actor in a Series, Drama
    * 2007 – Nominated – Outstanding Actor in a Series, Drama

Screen Actors Guild Awards

    * 2006 – Nominated – Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series
    * 2007 – Winner – Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series
    * 2008 – Nominated – Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series
    * 2009 – Winner – Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series
    * 2010 – Nominated – Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series
    * 2011 – Nominated – Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series

Television Critics Association

    * 2005 – Winner – Individual Achievement in Drama
    * 2006 – Winner – Individual Achievement in Drama
    * 2007 – Nominated – Individual Achievement in Drama

Teen Choice Award

    * 2006 – Nominated – TV Actor: Drama
    * 2007 – Winner – TV Actor: Drama

People's Choice Awards

    * 2008 – Winner – Favorite Male TV Star
    * 2009 – Winner – Favorite Male TV Star
    * 2010 – Winner – Favorite TV Drama Actor
    * 2011 – Winner – Favorite TV Drama Actor
    * 2011 – Winner – Favorite TV Doctor

Filmography
Year↓ Title↓ Role↓ Notes
1981 Cellar Tapes, TheThe Cellar Tapes various characters also writer
1983 Alfresco various characters also writer
1983 Crystal Cube, TheThe Crystal Cube Max Belhaven
various characters
1984 Young Ones, TheThe Young Ones Lord Monty episode: "Bambi"
1985 From a Bomber Pilot, LettersLetters From a Bomber Pilot Pilot Officer Bob Hodgson Thames Television film
1985 Plenty Michael
1985 Mrs. Capper's Birthday Bobby
1985 Happy Families Jim
1986 Blackadder II Simon Partridge (also known as Mr Ostrich & Farters Parters)
Prince Ludwig the Indestructible
1986 Platoon Pte Trevor
1987 Filthy Rich & Catflap N'Bend
1987 Blackadder the Third George, Prince of Wales, The Prince Regent
1988 Blackadder's Christmas Carol Prince George
Lord Pigmot (future)
1989–1995 Bit of Fry & Laurie, AA Bit of Fry & Laurie various characters also writer
1989 Blackadder Goes Forth Lt. the Honourable George Colhurst St. Barleigh
1989 Strapless Colin
1989 New Statesman, TheThe New Statesman Waiter
1990–1993 Jeeves and Wooster Bertie Wooster
1992 Peter's Friends Roger Charleston
1993 All or Nothing at All Leo Hopkins television film
1993–1995 Legends of Treasure Island, TheThe Legends of Treasure Island Squire Trelawney voice
1994 Pin for the Butterfly, AA Pin for the Butterfly Uncle television film
1995 Sense and Sensibility Mr. Palmer
1996 Tracey Takes On... Timothy Bugge season 1
1996 101 Dalmatians Jasper
1997 Spiceworld Poirot
1997 Borrowers, TheThe Borrowers Police Officer Oliver Steady
1997 Ugly Duckling, TheThe Ugly Duckling Tarquin voice
1998 Friends Gentleman on the Plane episode: "The One with Ross's Wedding"
1998 Bill, TheThe Bill Harrap, a Barrister
1998 Man in the Iron Mask, TheThe Man in the Iron Mask Pierre, The King's Advisor
1998 Cousin Bette Baron Hector Hulot
1999 Blackadder: Back & Forth Viscount George Bufton-Tufton/Georgius
1999 Stuart Little Mr. Frederick Little
2000 Randall & Hopkirk (Deceased) Dr. Lawyer episode: "Mental Apparition Disorder"
2000 Maybe Baby Sam Bell
2001 Chica de Río Raymond Woods alternate title: Girl from Rio
2001 Life with Judy Garland: Me and My Shadows Vincente Minnelli
2001 Family Guy Bar patron voice
episode: "One If by Clam, Two If by Sea"
2001 Discovering the Real World of Harry Potter Narrator voice
2002 Stuart Little 2 Mr. Frederick Little
2002 Spooks Jools Siviter
2003 The Young Visiters Lord Bernard Clark
2003 Fortysomething Paul Slippery
2003 Stuart Little: The Animated Series' Mr. Frederick Little (Voice) episode: "The Meatloaf Bandit"
2004–present House Dr. Gregory House lead actor
also directed episode: Lockdown
2004 Fire Engine Fred
2004 Flight of the Phoenix Ian
2005 Valiant Wing Commander Gutsy voice
2005 Big Empty, TheThe Big Empty Doctor #5
2006 Stuart Little 3: Call of the Wild Mr. Frederick Little voice
2006, 2008 Saturday Night Live Host
various characters season 32, episode 4
season 34, episode 11
2008 Street Kings Captain Biggs
2009 Monsters vs. Aliens Dr. Cockroach, PhD voice
2009 Monsters vs. Aliens: Mutant Pumpkins from Outer Space Dr. Cockroach, PhD voice
2010 Family Guy Gregory House/himself voice
episode: "Business Guy"
2010 Simpsons, TheThe Simpsons Roger voice
episode: "Treehouse of Horror XXI"
2010 Fry and Laurie Reunited himself
2011 Hop Mr Bunny voice
2011 The Oranges
2011 Later... with Jools Holland himself Performed "You Don't Know My Mind" and "Swanee River"

(both from his forthcoming album Let Them Talk )
Writing

Hugh Laurie has written one full-length novel, The Gun Seller, which has undergone multiple printings from several publishers. His second novel, Paper Soldiers (US: The Paper Soldier), was scheduled for September 2009, but has yet to appear.

    * The Gun Seller UK (HB) (William Heinemann Ltd (May 1996)) ISBN 0-434-00297-6 (PB) (William Heinemann Ltd (May 1996)) ISBN 0-434-00375-1
          o (PB) (Arrow Books Ltd (November 2000); New Ed (October 2004)) ISBN 0-09-941927-0 & ISBN 0-09-946939-1
    * The Gun Seller US (HB) (Soho Press (May 1997)) ISBN 1-56947-087-1 (PB) (Mandarin (March 1997)) ISBN 0-7493-2385-X
          o (PB) (Washington Square Press (November 1998)) ISBN 0-671-02082-X
    * Paper Soldiers UK (PB) (Michael Joseph (24 September 2009)) ISBN 0-7181-4391-4
    * The Paper Soldier US (HB) (Michael Joseph (27 September 2009)) ISBN 0-7181-4390-6
          o (PB) (Penguin Books (28 September 2009)) ISBN 0-14-028210-6
http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d102/blueapplejack/hugh_laurie.jpg
http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y20/w_cowart/hugh_laurie.jpg

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Philip Eno on 06/12/11 at 7:55 am


The person of the day for June 11th......Hugh Laurie
James Hugh Calum Laurie, OBE (born 11 June 1959) better known as Hugh Laurie (play /hjuː ˈlɒri/), is a British actor, voice artist, comedian, writer, musician, recording artist, and director. He first became well known in the media as one half of the Fry and Laurie double act, along with his friend and comedy partner Stephen Fry, whom he joined in the cast of Blackadder and Jeeves and Wooster from 1987 until 1999. Since 2004, he has played the lead as Dr. Gregory House, the protagonist of House, for which he received two Golden Globe awards, two Screen Actors Guild awards and several Emmy nominations.

As of August 2010, Laurie is the highest paid actor in a drama series on US television. His debut album, Let Them Talk, was released in May 2011.
Laurie was born in Oxford, England. The youngest of four children, Laurie has an older brother named Charles and two older sisters named Susan and Janet. He had a somewhat strained relationship with his mother, Patricia (née Laidlaw). His father, Ran Laurie, was a medical doctor who also won an Olympic gold medal in the coxless pairs (rowing) at the 1948 London Games.

Although Laurie was raised in the Presbyterian church as a child, he has declared: "I don't believe in God, but I have this idea that if there were a God, or destiny of some kind looking down on us, that if he saw you taking anything for granted he'd take it away." He was brought up in Oxford and attended the Dragon School. He later went on to Eton and then to Selwyn College, Cambridge, where he studied for a degree in archaeology and social anthropology. While at Cambridge he was a member of Footlights, the university dramatic club that has produced many well known actors and comedians, and he was club president in 1981. He was also a member of the Hermes Club and the Hawks' Club.

Like his father, Laurie was an oarsman at school and university; in 1977, he was a member of the junior coxed pair that won the British national title before representing Britain's Youth Team at the 1977 Junior World Rowing Championships. In 1980, Laurie and his rowing partner, J. S. Palmer, were runners-up in the Silver Goblets coxless pairs for Eton Vikings rowing club. Later, he also achieved a Blue while taking part in the 1980 Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race. Cambridge lost that year by 5 feet. Laurie is a member of Leander Club, one of the oldest rowing clubs in the world.

Forced to abandon rowing during a bout of glandular fever (mononucleosis), he joined the Cambridge Footlights, which has been the starting point for many successful British comedians. There he met Emma Thompson, with whom he had a romantic relationship; the two remain good friends. She introduced him to his future comedy partner, Stephen Fry. Laurie, Fry and Thompson later parodied themselves as the University Challenge representatives of "Footlights College, Oxbridge" in "Bambi", an episode of The Young Ones, with the series' co-writer Ben Elton completing their team. In 1980–81, his final year at university, besides rowing, Laurie was also president of the Footlights, with Thompson as vice-president. They took their annual revue, The Cellar Tapes, to the Edinburgh Festival Fringe and won the first Perrier Comedy Award. The revue was written principally by Laurie and Fry, and the cast also included Thompson, Tony Slattery, Paul Shearer and Penny Dwyer.
Career

The Perrier Award led to a West End transfer for The Cellar Tapes and a television version of the revue, broadcast in May 1982. It resulted in Laurie, Fry and Thompson being selected, along with Ben Elton, Robbie Coltrane and Siobhan Redmond to write and appear in a new sketch comedy show for Granada Television, Alfresco, which ran for two series.

Fry and Laurie went on to work together on various projects throughout the 1980s and 1990s. Among them were the Blackadder series, written by Ben Elton and Richard Curtis, starring Rowan Atkinson, with Laurie in various roles, but most notably Prince George and Lieutenant George. Other projects followed, of which one was their BBC sketch comedy series A Bit of Fry & Laurie; another project was Jeeves and Wooster, an adaptation of P. G. Wodehouse’s stories, in which Laurie played Jeeves’s employer, the amiable twit Bertie Wooster. He and Fry worked together at various charity stage events, such as Hysteria! 1, 2 & 3 and Amnesty International’s The Secret Policeman’s Third Ball, Comic Relief TV shows and the variety show Fry and Laurie Host a Christmas Night with the Stars. They collaborated again on the film Peter's Friends and came together for a retrospective show in 2010 titled Fry and Laurie Reunited.

Laurie starred in the Thames Television film "Letters from a Bomber Pilot" (1985) directed by David Hodgson. This was a serious acting role, the film being dramatised from the letters home of Pilot Officer J.R.A. "Bob" Hodgson, a pilot in RAF Bomber Command, who was killed in action in 1943.

Laurie appeared in the music videos for the 1986 single "Experiment IV" by Kate Bush and the 1992 single "Walking on Broken Glass" by Annie Lennox, in full Regency-period costume, a toned-down version of his Prince George character from Blackadder the Third, opposite John Malkovich, similarly reprising his role of the Vicomte Valmont from Dangerous Liaisons.

Laurie’s later film appearances include Sense and Sensibility (1995), adapted by and starring Emma Thompson; the Disney live-action film 101 Dalmatians (1996), where he played Jasper, one of the bumbling criminals hired to kidnap the puppies; Elton’s adaptation of his novel Inconceivable, Maybe Baby (2000); Girl From Rio; the 2004 remake of The Flight of the Phoenix; and the three Stuart Little films.

In 1996, Laurie’s first novel, The Gun Seller, an intricate thriller laced with Wodehouseian humour, was published and became a bestseller. He has since been working on the screenplay for a movie version and on a second novel, The Paper Soldier. In 1998, Laurie had a brief guest-starring role on Friends in "The One with Ross's Wedding, Part Two".

Since 2002, Laurie has appeared in a range of British television dramas, guest-starring that year in two episodes of the first season of the spy thriller series Spooks on BBC One. In 2003, he starred in and also directed ITV's comedy-drama series fortysomething (in one episode of which Stephen Fry appears). In 2001, he voiced the character of a bar patron in the Family Guy episode "One If by Clam, Two If by Sea". Laurie voiced the character of Mr. Wolf in the cartoon Preston Pig. He was a panellist on the first episode of QI, alongside Fry as host. In 2004, Laurie guest-starred as a professor in charge of a space probe called Beagle, on The Lenny Henry Show.

Laurie's fame expanded to the American public in 2004, when he first starred as the acerbic physician specialising in diagnostic medicine, Dr Gregory House in the popular Fox medical drama House. For his portrayal, Laurie assumes an American accent. Laurie was in Namibia filming Flight of the Phoenix and recorded the audition tape for the show in the bathroom of the hotel, the only place he could get enough light. His US accent was so convincing that executive producer Bryan Singer, who was unaware at the time that Laurie is English, pointed to him as an example of just the kind of compelling American actor he had been looking for. Laurie also adopts the accent between takes on the set of House, as well as during script read-throughs, although he used his native accent when directing the House episode "Lockdown".

Laurie was nominated for an Emmy Award for his role in House in 2005. Although he did not win, he did receive a Golden Globe in both 2006 and 2007 for his work on the series and the Screen Actors Guild award in 2007 and 2009. Laurie was also awarded a large increase in salary, from what was rumoured to be a mid-range five-figure sum to $350,000 per episode. Laurie was not nominated for the 2006 Emmys, apparently to the outrage of Fox executives, but he still appeared in a scripted, pre-taped intro, where he parodied his House character by rapidly diagnosing host Conan O'Brien and then proceeded to grope him as the latter asked him for help to get to the Emmys on time. He would later go on to speak in French while presenting an Emmy with Dame Helen Mirren, and has since been nominated in 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2010. Laurie's success on the show extends to the financial: in August 2010, TV Guide identified him as the highest-paid actor in a drama, saying he's paid over $400,000 per episode.

Laurie was initially cast as Perry White, the editor of the Daily Planet, in Singer's film Superman Returns but had to bow out of the project because of his involvement in House. In July 2006, Laurie appeared on Bravo!'s Inside the Actors Studio, where he also performed one of his own comic songs, "Mystery", accompanying himself on the piano. He hosted NBC's Saturday Night Live, in which he appeared in drag in a sketch about a man (Kenan Thompson) with a broken leg who accuses his doctor of being dishonest. Laurie played the man’s wife.

In August 2007, Laurie appeared on BBC Four's documentary Stephen Fry: 50 Not Out, filmed in celebration of Fry’s 50th birthday.

In 2008, Laurie appeared as Captain James Biggs in Street Kings, opposite Keanu Reeves and Forest Whitaker, and then in 2009 as the eccentric Dr. Cockroach, PhD in DreamWorks' Monsters vs. Aliens. He also hosted Saturday Night Live for the second time on the Christmas show in which he sang a medley of three-second Christmas songs to close his monologue.

In 2009, Laurie returned to guest star in another Family Guy episode, "Business Guy", parodying Gregory House and himself assuming an American accent.

In 2010, Laurie filmed an independent feature called The Oranges and played piano on a track of Meat Loaf's CD Hang Cool Teddy Bear.

In 2010, Laurie guest starred in The Simpsons "Treehouse of Horror XXI" as Roger, a castaway who is planning a murder scheme on a ship during Homer and Marge's second honeymoon.
Music
Musical ability

From the age of six Laurie took piano lessons with a Mrs Hare. He plays the piano, guitar, drums, harmonica and saxophone. He has displayed his musical talents in episodes of several series, most notably A Bit of Fry & Laurie, Jeeves and Wooster, House and when he hosted Saturday Night Live in October 2006. He is a vocalist and keyboard player for the Los Angeles charity rock group Band From TV. Additionally, following Meat Loaf's appearance in the House episode "Simple Explanation," Laurie played piano as a special guest on the song "If I Can't Have You" from Meat Loaf's 2010 album Hang Cool Teddy Bear.

On episodes of House he has played several classic rock 'n roll instruments including Gibson Flying V and Les Paul guitars. His character has a Hammond B-3 organ in his home and on one episode performed the introduction to Procol Harum's classic "Whiter Shade of Pale". Laurie appears as a scientist/doctor in the pop video to accompany Kate Bush's song Experiment IV. On 1 May 2011, Laurie and a jazz quintet closed the 2011 Cheltenham Jazz Festival to great acclaim.

On 15 May 2011 Laurie appeared in the UK ITV series Perspectives, explaining his love for the Music of New Orleans and playing music, from his album Let Them Talk, at studios and live venues in the city itself.
Discography
Albums

On 26 July 2010 it was announced that Laurie would be releasing a blues album, after signing a contract with Warner Bros. The album, called Let Them Talk, was released in France on 18 April 2011 and in Germany on 29 April.
Year Album details Peak chart positions Certifications
(sales thresholds)
UK AUS
AUT
BEL (FLA)
BEL (WAL)
FRA
GER
IRE
NL
SWI

2011 Let Them Talk

    * Released: 18 April 2011
    * Label: Warner Bros.
    * Formats: CD, digital download

2 37 1 22 5 2 8 14 25 4

    * UK: Gold

Singles
Year Single Peak chart
positions Album
UK
AUT

2011 "You Don't Know My Mind" 164 47 Let Them Talk
Other charting songs
Year Single Charts Album
FRA

2011 "St James' Infirmary" 92 Let Them Talk
Appearances
Year Song Album
2010 "If I Can't Have You" (Meat Loaf featuring Kara DioGuardi & Hugh Laurie) Hang Cool Teddy Bear
Personal life

Laurie's mother, Patricia (née Laidlaw), died from motor neurone disease in Oxfordshire at aged 73 in 1989, when Laurie was 30. According to Laurie, it took her two years to die, and she suffered "painful, plodding paralysis" while being cared for by Laurie's father, whom he called "the sweetest man in the whole world".

Laurie married theatre administrator Jo Green in June 1989 in Camden, London. They live in Belsize Park, London with sons Charles Archibald "Charlie" (born November 1988, Camden), William Albert "Bill" (born January 1991, Camden) and daughter Rebecca Augusta (born 10 September 1993, Westminster, London). They had planned to move the whole family to Los Angeles in 2008 due to the strain of being mostly separated for 9 months each year, but ultimately decided against it. Charlie had a cameo in A Bit of Fry & Laurie in the last sketch of the episode entitled Special Squad, as baby William (whom Stephen and Hugh begin to "interrogate" about "what he's done with the stuff", calling him a scumbag and telling him that he's been a very naughty boy) during his infancy, while Rebecca had a role in the film Wit as five-year-old Vivian Bearing.

Laurie is good friends with his House co-star Robert Sean Leonard and continues his friendship with actress Emma Thompson. His best friend is long time comedy partner Stephen Fry.

Laurie was made an Officer of the Order of the British Empire in the 2007 New Year Honours List for his services to drama on 23 May 2007 by Queen Elizabeth II.

Laurie has periodically struggled with severe clinical depression, and continues to receive regular treatment from a psychotherapist. He stated in an interview that he first concluded he had a problem while driving in a charity demolition derby in 1996, and realised that driving around explosive crashes caused him to be neither excited nor frightened (he said that he felt bored). "Boredom," he commented in an interview on Inside the Actors Studio, "is not an appropriate response to exploding cars."

Laurie admires the writings of P.G. Wodehouse, explaining in a 27 May 1999 article in The Daily Telegraph how reading Wodehouse novels had saved his life.

Laurie is an avid motorcycle enthusiast. He has two motorcycles, one at his Los Angeles home and one at his London home. His bike in the United States is a Triumph Bonneville, his "feeble attempt to fly the British flag".
Awards

All of the following are nominations or wins for Laurie's role on House:

Emmy Awards

    * 2005 – Nominated – Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series
    * 2007 – Nominated – Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series
    * 2008 – Nominated – Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series
    * 2009 – Nominated – Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series
    * 2010 – Nominated – Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series

Golden Globe Awards

    * 2005 – Winner – Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama
    * 2006 – Winner – Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama
    * 2007 – Nominated – Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama
    * 2008 – Nominated – Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama
    * 2009 – Nominated – Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama
    * 2010 – Nominated – Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama

Satellite Awards

    * 2005 – Winner – Outstanding Actor in a Series, Drama
    * 2006 – Winner – Outstanding Actor in a Series, Drama
    * 2007 – Nominated – Outstanding Actor in a Series, Drama

Screen Actors Guild Awards

    * 2006 – Nominated – Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series
    * 2007 – Winner – Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series
    * 2008 – Nominated – Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series
    * 2009 – Winner – Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series
    * 2010 – Nominated – Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series
    * 2011 – Nominated – Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series

Television Critics Association

    * 2005 – Winner – Individual Achievement in Drama
    * 2006 – Winner – Individual Achievement in Drama
    * 2007 – Nominated – Individual Achievement in Drama

Teen Choice Award

    * 2006 – Nominated – TV Actor: Drama
    * 2007 – Winner – TV Actor: Drama

People's Choice Awards

    * 2008 – Winner – Favorite Male TV Star
    * 2009 – Winner – Favorite Male TV Star
    * 2010 – Winner – Favorite TV Drama Actor
    * 2011 – Winner – Favorite TV Drama Actor
    * 2011 – Winner – Favorite TV Doctor

Filmography
Year↓ Title↓ Role↓ Notes
1981 Cellar Tapes, TheThe Cellar Tapes various characters also writer
1983 Alfresco various characters also writer
1983 Crystal Cube, TheThe Crystal Cube Max Belhaven
various characters
1984 Young Ones, TheThe Young Ones Lord Monty episode: "Bambi"
1985 From a Bomber Pilot, LettersLetters From a Bomber Pilot Pilot Officer Bob Hodgson Thames Television film
1985 Plenty Michael
1985 Mrs. Capper's Birthday Bobby
1985 Happy Families Jim
1986 Blackadder II Simon Partridge (also known as Mr Ostrich & Farters Parters)
Prince Ludwig the Indestructible
1986 Platoon Pte Trevor
1987 Filthy Rich & Catflap N'Bend
1987 Blackadder the Third George, Prince of Wales, The Prince Regent
1988 Blackadder's Christmas Carol Prince George
Lord Pigmot (future)
1989–1995 Bit of Fry & Laurie, AA Bit of Fry & Laurie various characters also writer
1989 Blackadder Goes Forth Lt. the Honourable George Colhurst St. Barleigh
1989 Strapless Colin
1989 New Statesman, TheThe New Statesman Waiter
1990–1993 Jeeves and Wooster Bertie Wooster
1992 Peter's Friends Roger Charleston
1993 All or Nothing at All Leo Hopkins television film
1993–1995 Legends of Treasure Island, TheThe Legends of Treasure Island Squire Trelawney voice
1994 Pin for the Butterfly, AA Pin for the Butterfly Uncle television film
1995 Sense and Sensibility Mr. Palmer
1996 Tracey Takes On... Timothy Bugge season 1
1996 101 Dalmatians Jasper
1997 Spiceworld Poirot
1997 Borrowers, TheThe Borrowers Police Officer Oliver Steady
1997 Ugly Duckling, TheThe Ugly Duckling Tarquin voice
1998 Friends Gentleman on the Plane episode: "The One with Ross's Wedding"
1998 Bill, TheThe Bill Harrap, a Barrister
1998 Man in the Iron Mask, TheThe Man in the Iron Mask Pierre, The King's Advisor
1998 Cousin Bette Baron Hector Hulot
1999 Blackadder: Back & Forth Viscount George Bufton-Tufton/Georgius
1999 Stuart Little Mr. Frederick Little
2000 Randall & Hopkirk (Deceased) Dr. Lawyer episode: "Mental Apparition Disorder"
2000 Maybe Baby Sam Bell
2001 Chica de Río Raymond Woods alternate title: Girl from Rio
2001 Life with Judy Garland: Me and My Shadows Vincente Minnelli
2001 Family Guy Bar patron voice
episode: "One If by Clam, Two If by Sea"
2001 Discovering the Real World of Harry Potter Narrator voice
2002 Stuart Little 2 Mr. Frederick Little
2002 Spooks Jools Siviter
2003 The Young Visiters Lord Bernard Clark
2003 Fortysomething Paul Slippery
2003 Stuart Little: The Animated Series' Mr. Frederick Little (Voice) episode: "The Meatloaf Bandit"
2004–present House Dr. Gregory House lead actor
also directed episode: Lockdown
2004 Fire Engine Fred
2004 Flight of the Phoenix Ian
2005 Valiant Wing Commander Gutsy voice
2005 Big Empty, TheThe Big Empty Doctor #5
2006 Stuart Little 3: Call of the Wild Mr. Frederick Little voice
2006, 2008 Saturday Night Live Host
various characters season 32, episode 4
season 34, episode 11
2008 Street Kings Captain Biggs
2009 Monsters vs. Aliens Dr. Cockroach, PhD voice
2009 Monsters vs. Aliens: Mutant Pumpkins from Outer Space Dr. Cockroach, PhD voice
2010 Family Guy Gregory House/himself voice
episode: "Business Guy"
2010 Simpsons, TheThe Simpsons Roger voice
episode: "Treehouse of Horror XXI"
2010 Fry and Laurie Reunited himself
2011 Hop Mr Bunny voice
2011 The Oranges
2011 Later... with Jools Holland himself Performed "You Don't Know My Mind" and "Swanee River"

(both from his forthcoming album Let Them Talk )
Writing

Hugh Laurie has written one full-length novel, The Gun Seller, which has undergone multiple printings from several publishers. His second novel, Paper Soldiers (US: The Paper Soldier), was scheduled for September 2009, but has yet to appear.

    * The Gun Seller UK (HB) (William Heinemann Ltd (May 1996)) ISBN 0-434-00297-6 (PB) (William Heinemann Ltd (May 1996)) ISBN 0-434-00375-1
          o (PB) (Arrow Books Ltd (November 2000); New Ed (October 2004)) ISBN 0-09-941927-0 & ISBN 0-09-946939-1
    * The Gun Seller US (HB) (Soho Press (May 1997)) ISBN 1-56947-087-1 (PB) (Mandarin (March 1997)) ISBN 0-7493-2385-X
          o (PB) (Washington Square Press (November 1998)) ISBN 0-671-02082-X
    * Paper Soldiers UK (PB) (Michael Joseph (24 September 2009)) ISBN 0-7181-4391-4
    * The Paper Soldier US (HB) (Michael Joseph (27 September 2009)) ISBN 0-7181-4390-6
          o (PB) (Penguin Books (28 September 2009)) ISBN 0-14-028210-6
http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d102/blueapplejack/hugh_laurie.jpg
http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y20/w_cowart/hugh_laurie.jpg
One of our nation's treasures.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 06/12/11 at 2:42 pm


The person of the day for June 11th......Hugh Laurie
James Hugh Calum Laurie, OBE (born 11 June 1959) better known as Hugh Laurie (play /hjuː ˈlɒri/), is a British actor, voice artist, comedian, writer, musician, recording artist, and director. He first became well known in the media as one half of the Fry and Laurie double act, along with his friend and comedy partner Stephen Fry, whom he joined in the cast of Blackadder and Jeeves and Wooster from 1987 until 1999. Since 2004, he has played the lead as Dr. Gregory House, the protagonist of House, for which he received two Golden Globe awards, two Screen Actors Guild awards and several Emmy nominations.

As of August 2010, Laurie is the highest paid actor in a drama series on US television. His debut album, Let Them Talk, was released in May 2011.
Laurie was born in Oxford, England. The youngest of four children, Laurie has an older brother named Charles and two older sisters named Susan and Janet. He had a somewhat strained relationship with his mother, Patricia (née Laidlaw). His father, Ran Laurie, was a medical doctor who also won an Olympic gold medal in the coxless pairs (rowing) at the 1948 London Games.

Although Laurie was raised in the Presbyterian church as a child, he has declared: "I don't believe in God, but I have this idea that if there were a God, or destiny of some kind looking down on us, that if he saw you taking anything for granted he'd take it away." He was brought up in Oxford and attended the Dragon School. He later went on to Eton and then to Selwyn College, Cambridge, where he studied for a degree in archaeology and social anthropology. While at Cambridge he was a member of Footlights, the university dramatic club that has produced many well known actors and comedians, and he was club president in 1981. He was also a member of the Hermes Club and the Hawks' Club.

Like his father, Laurie was an oarsman at school and university; in 1977, he was a member of the junior coxed pair that won the British national title before representing Britain's Youth Team at the 1977 Junior World Rowing Championships. In 1980, Laurie and his rowing partner, J. S. Palmer, were runners-up in the Silver Goblets coxless pairs for Eton Vikings rowing club. Later, he also achieved a Blue while taking part in the 1980 Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race. Cambridge lost that year by 5 feet. Laurie is a member of Leander Club, one of the oldest rowing clubs in the world.

Forced to abandon rowing during a bout of glandular fever (mononucleosis), he joined the Cambridge Footlights, which has been the starting point for many successful British comedians. There he met Emma Thompson, with whom he had a romantic relationship; the two remain good friends. She introduced him to his future comedy partner, Stephen Fry. Laurie, Fry and Thompson later parodied themselves as the University Challenge representatives of "Footlights College, Oxbridge" in "Bambi", an episode of The Young Ones, with the series' co-writer Ben Elton completing their team. In 1980–81, his final year at university, besides rowing, Laurie was also president of the Footlights, with Thompson as vice-president. They took their annual revue, The Cellar Tapes, to the Edinburgh Festival Fringe and won the first Perrier Comedy Award. The revue was written principally by Laurie and Fry, and the cast also included Thompson, Tony Slattery, Paul Shearer and Penny Dwyer.
Career

The Perrier Award led to a West End transfer for The Cellar Tapes and a television version of the revue, broadcast in May 1982. It resulted in Laurie, Fry and Thompson being selected, along with Ben Elton, Robbie Coltrane and Siobhan Redmond to write and appear in a new sketch comedy show for Granada Television, Alfresco, which ran for two series.

Fry and Laurie went on to work together on various projects throughout the 1980s and 1990s. Among them were the Blackadder series, written by Ben Elton and Richard Curtis, starring Rowan Atkinson, with Laurie in various roles, but most notably Prince George and Lieutenant George. Other projects followed, of which one was their BBC sketch comedy series A Bit of Fry & Laurie; another project was Jeeves and Wooster, an adaptation of P. G. Wodehouse’s stories, in which Laurie played Jeeves’s employer, the amiable twit Bertie Wooster. He and Fry worked together at various charity stage events, such as Hysteria! 1, 2 & 3 and Amnesty International’s The Secret Policeman’s Third Ball, Comic Relief TV shows and the variety show Fry and Laurie Host a Christmas Night with the Stars. They collaborated again on the film Peter's Friends and came together for a retrospective show in 2010 titled Fry and Laurie Reunited.

Laurie starred in the Thames Television film "Letters from a Bomber Pilot" (1985) directed by David Hodgson. This was a serious acting role, the film being dramatised from the letters home of Pilot Officer J.R.A. "Bob" Hodgson, a pilot in RAF Bomber Command, who was killed in action in 1943.

Laurie appeared in the music videos for the 1986 single "Experiment IV" by Kate Bush and the 1992 single "Walking on Broken Glass" by Annie Lennox, in full Regency-period costume, a toned-down version of his Prince George character from Blackadder the Third, opposite John Malkovich, similarly reprising his role of the Vicomte Valmont from Dangerous Liaisons.

Laurie’s later film appearances include Sense and Sensibility (1995), adapted by and starring Emma Thompson; the Disney live-action film 101 Dalmatians (1996), where he played Jasper, one of the bumbling criminals hired to kidnap the puppies; Elton’s adaptation of his novel Inconceivable, Maybe Baby (2000); Girl From Rio; the 2004 remake of The Flight of the Phoenix; and the three Stuart Little films.

In 1996, Laurie’s first novel, The Gun Seller, an intricate thriller laced with Wodehouseian humour, was published and became a bestseller. He has since been working on the screenplay for a movie version and on a second novel, The Paper Soldier. In 1998, Laurie had a brief guest-starring role on Friends in "The One with Ross's Wedding, Part Two".

Since 2002, Laurie has appeared in a range of British television dramas, guest-starring that year in two episodes of the first season of the spy thriller series Spooks on BBC One. In 2003, he starred in and also directed ITV's comedy-drama series fortysomething (in one episode of which Stephen Fry appears). In 2001, he voiced the character of a bar patron in the Family Guy episode "One If by Clam, Two If by Sea". Laurie voiced the character of Mr. Wolf in the cartoon Preston Pig. He was a panellist on the first episode of QI, alongside Fry as host. In 2004, Laurie guest-starred as a professor in charge of a space probe called Beagle, on The Lenny Henry Show.

Laurie's fame expanded to the American public in 2004, when he first starred as the acerbic physician specialising in diagnostic medicine, Dr Gregory House in the popular Fox medical drama House. For his portrayal, Laurie assumes an American accent. Laurie was in Namibia filming Flight of the Phoenix and recorded the audition tape for the show in the bathroom of the hotel, the only place he could get enough light. His US accent was so convincing that executive producer Bryan Singer, who was unaware at the time that Laurie is English, pointed to him as an example of just the kind of compelling American actor he had been looking for. Laurie also adopts the accent between takes on the set of House, as well as during script read-throughs, although he used his native accent when directing the House episode "Lockdown".

Laurie was nominated for an Emmy Award for his role in House in 2005. Although he did not win, he did receive a Golden Globe in both 2006 and 2007 for his work on the series and the Screen Actors Guild award in 2007 and 2009. Laurie was also awarded a large increase in salary, from what was rumoured to be a mid-range five-figure sum to $350,000 per episode. Laurie was not nominated for the 2006 Emmys, apparently to the outrage of Fox executives, but he still appeared in a scripted, pre-taped intro, where he parodied his House character by rapidly diagnosing host Conan O'Brien and then proceeded to grope him as the latter asked him for help to get to the Emmys on time. He would later go on to speak in French while presenting an Emmy with Dame Helen Mirren, and has since been nominated in 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2010. Laurie's success on the show extends to the financial: in August 2010, TV Guide identified him as the highest-paid actor in a drama, saying he's paid over $400,000 per episode.

Laurie was initially cast as Perry White, the editor of the Daily Planet, in Singer's film Superman Returns but had to bow out of the project because of his involvement in House. In July 2006, Laurie appeared on Bravo!'s Inside the Actors Studio, where he also performed one of his own comic songs, "Mystery", accompanying himself on the piano. He hosted NBC's Saturday Night Live, in which he appeared in drag in a sketch about a man (Kenan Thompson) with a broken leg who accuses his doctor of being dishonest. Laurie played the man’s wife.

In August 2007, Laurie appeared on BBC Four's documentary Stephen Fry: 50 Not Out, filmed in celebration of Fry’s 50th birthday.

In 2008, Laurie appeared as Captain James Biggs in Street Kings, opposite Keanu Reeves and Forest Whitaker, and then in 2009 as the eccentric Dr. Cockroach, PhD in DreamWorks' Monsters vs. Aliens. He also hosted Saturday Night Live for the second time on the Christmas show in which he sang a medley of three-second Christmas songs to close his monologue.

In 2009, Laurie returned to guest star in another Family Guy episode, "Business Guy", parodying Gregory House and himself assuming an American accent.

In 2010, Laurie filmed an independent feature called The Oranges and played piano on a track of Meat Loaf's CD Hang Cool Teddy Bear.

In 2010, Laurie guest starred in The Simpsons "Treehouse of Horror XXI" as Roger, a castaway who is planning a murder scheme on a ship during Homer and Marge's second honeymoon.
Music
Musical ability

From the age of six Laurie took piano lessons with a Mrs Hare. He plays the piano, guitar, drums, harmonica and saxophone. He has displayed his musical talents in episodes of several series, most notably A Bit of Fry & Laurie, Jeeves and Wooster, House and when he hosted Saturday Night Live in October 2006. He is a vocalist and keyboard player for the Los Angeles charity rock group Band From TV. Additionally, following Meat Loaf's appearance in the House episode "Simple Explanation," Laurie played piano as a special guest on the song "If I Can't Have You" from Meat Loaf's 2010 album Hang Cool Teddy Bear.

On episodes of House he has played several classic rock 'n roll instruments including Gibson Flying V and Les Paul guitars. His character has a Hammond B-3 organ in his home and on one episode performed the introduction to Procol Harum's classic "Whiter Shade of Pale". Laurie appears as a scientist/doctor in the pop video to accompany Kate Bush's song Experiment IV. On 1 May 2011, Laurie and a jazz quintet closed the 2011 Cheltenham Jazz Festival to great acclaim.

On 15 May 2011 Laurie appeared in the UK ITV series Perspectives, explaining his love for the Music of New Orleans and playing music, from his album Let Them Talk, at studios and live venues in the city itself.
Discography
Albums

On 26 July 2010 it was announced that Laurie would be releasing a blues album, after signing a contract with Warner Bros. The album, called Let Them Talk, was released in France on 18 April 2011 and in Germany on 29 April.
Year Album details Peak chart positions Certifications
(sales thresholds)
UK AUS
AUT
BEL (FLA)
BEL (WAL)
FRA
GER
IRE
NL
SWI

2011 Let Them Talk

    * Released: 18 April 2011
    * Label: Warner Bros.
    * Formats: CD, digital download

2 37 1 22 5 2 8 14 25 4

    * UK: Gold

Singles
Year Single Peak chart
positions Album
UK
AUT

2011 "You Don't Know My Mind" 164 47 Let Them Talk
Other charting songs
Year Single Charts Album
FRA

2011 "St James' Infirmary" 92 Let Them Talk
Appearances
Year Song Album
2010 "If I Can't Have You" (Meat Loaf featuring Kara DioGuardi & Hugh Laurie) Hang Cool Teddy Bear
Personal life

Laurie's mother, Patricia (née Laidlaw), died from motor neurone disease in Oxfordshire at aged 73 in 1989, when Laurie was 30. According to Laurie, it took her two years to die, and she suffered "painful, plodding paralysis" while being cared for by Laurie's father, whom he called "the sweetest man in the whole world".

Laurie married theatre administrator Jo Green in June 1989 in Camden, London. They live in Belsize Park, London with sons Charles Archibald "Charlie" (born November 1988, Camden), William Albert "Bill" (born January 1991, Camden) and daughter Rebecca Augusta (born 10 September 1993, Westminster, London). They had planned to move the whole family to Los Angeles in 2008 due to the strain of being mostly separated for 9 months each year, but ultimately decided against it. Charlie had a cameo in A Bit of Fry & Laurie in the last sketch of the episode entitled Special Squad, as baby William (whom Stephen and Hugh begin to "interrogate" about "what he's done with the stuff", calling him a scumbag and telling him that he's been a very naughty boy) during his infancy, while Rebecca had a role in the film Wit as five-year-old Vivian Bearing.

Laurie is good friends with his House co-star Robert Sean Leonard and continues his friendship with actress Emma Thompson. His best friend is long time comedy partner Stephen Fry.

Laurie was made an Officer of the Order of the British Empire in the 2007 New Year Honours List for his services to drama on 23 May 2007 by Queen Elizabeth II.

Laurie has periodically struggled with severe clinical depression, and continues to receive regular treatment from a psychotherapist. He stated in an interview that he first concluded he had a problem while driving in a charity demolition derby in 1996, and realised that driving around explosive crashes caused him to be neither excited nor frightened (he said that he felt bored). "Boredom," he commented in an interview on Inside the Actors Studio, "is not an appropriate response to exploding cars."

Laurie admires the writings of P.G. Wodehouse, explaining in a 27 May 1999 article in The Daily Telegraph how reading Wodehouse novels had saved his life.

Laurie is an avid motorcycle enthusiast. He has two motorcycles, one at his Los Angeles home and one at his London home. His bike in the United States is a Triumph Bonneville, his "feeble attempt to fly the British flag".
Awards

All of the following are nominations or wins for Laurie's role on House:

Emmy Awards

    * 2005 – Nominated – Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series
    * 2007 – Nominated – Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series
    * 2008 – Nominated – Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series
    * 2009 – Nominated – Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series
    * 2010 – Nominated – Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series

Golden Globe Awards

    * 2005 – Winner – Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama
    * 2006 – Winner – Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama
    * 2007 – Nominated – Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama
    * 2008 – Nominated – Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama
    * 2009 – Nominated – Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama
    * 2010 – Nominated – Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama

Satellite Awards

    * 2005 – Winner – Outstanding Actor in a Series, Drama
    * 2006 – Winner – Outstanding Actor in a Series, Drama
    * 2007 – Nominated – Outstanding Actor in a Series, Drama

Screen Actors Guild Awards

    * 2006 – Nominated – Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series
    * 2007 – Winner – Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series
    * 2008 – Nominated – Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series
    * 2009 – Winner – Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series
    * 2010 – Nominated – Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series
    * 2011 – Nominated – Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series

Television Critics Association

    * 2005 – Winner – Individual Achievement in Drama
    * 2006 – Winner – Individual Achievement in Drama
    * 2007 – Nominated – Individual Achievement in Drama

Teen Choice Award

    * 2006 – Nominated – TV Actor: Drama
    * 2007 – Winner – TV Actor: Drama

People's Choice Awards

    * 2008 – Winner – Favorite Male TV Star
    * 2009 – Winner – Favorite Male TV Star
    * 2010 – Winner – Favorite TV Drama Actor
    * 2011 – Winner – Favorite TV Drama Actor
    * 2011 – Winner – Favorite TV Doctor

Filmography
Year↓ Title↓ Role↓ Notes
1981 Cellar Tapes, TheThe Cellar Tapes various characters also writer
1983 Alfresco various characters also writer
1983 Crystal Cube, TheThe Crystal Cube Max Belhaven
various characters
1984 Young Ones, TheThe Young Ones Lord Monty episode: "Bambi"
1985 From a Bomber Pilot, LettersLetters From a Bomber Pilot Pilot Officer Bob Hodgson Thames Television film
1985 Plenty Michael
1985 Mrs. Capper's Birthday Bobby
1985 Happy Families Jim
1986 Blackadder II Simon Partridge (also known as Mr Ostrich & Farters Parters)
Prince Ludwig the Indestructible
1986 Platoon Pte Trevor
1987 Filthy Rich & Catflap N'Bend
1987 Blackadder the Third George, Prince of Wales, The Prince Regent
1988 Blackadder's Christmas Carol Prince George
Lord Pigmot (future)
1989–1995 Bit of Fry & Laurie, AA Bit of Fry & Laurie various characters also writer
1989 Blackadder Goes Forth Lt. the Honourable George Colhurst St. Barleigh
1989 Strapless Colin
1989 New Statesman, TheThe New Statesman Waiter
1990–1993 Jeeves and Wooster Bertie Wooster
1992 Peter's Friends Roger Charleston
1993 All or Nothing at All Leo Hopkins television film
1993–1995 Legends of Treasure Island, TheThe Legends of Treasure Island Squire Trelawney voice
1994 Pin for the Butterfly, AA Pin for the Butterfly Uncle television film
1995 Sense and Sensibility Mr. Palmer
1996 Tracey Takes On... Timothy Bugge season 1
1996 101 Dalmatians Jasper
1997 Spiceworld Poirot
1997 Borrowers, TheThe Borrowers Police Officer Oliver Steady
1997 Ugly Duckling, TheThe Ugly Duckling Tarquin voice
1998 Friends Gentleman on the Plane episode: "The One with Ross's Wedding"
1998 Bill, TheThe Bill Harrap, a Barrister
1998 Man in the Iron Mask, TheThe Man in the Iron Mask Pierre, The King's Advisor
1998 Cousin Bette Baron Hector Hulot
1999 Blackadder: Back & Forth Viscount George Bufton-Tufton/Georgius
1999 Stuart Little Mr. Frederick Little
2000 Randall & Hopkirk (Deceased) Dr. Lawyer episode: "Mental Apparition Disorder"
2000 Maybe Baby Sam Bell
2001 Chica de Río Raymond Woods alternate title: Girl from Rio
2001 Life with Judy Garland: Me and My Shadows Vincente Minnelli
2001 Family Guy Bar patron voice
episode: "One If by Clam, Two If by Sea"
2001 Discovering the Real World of Harry Potter Narrator voice
2002 Stuart Little 2 Mr. Frederick Little
2002 Spooks Jools Siviter
2003 The Young Visiters Lord Bernard Clark
2003 Fortysomething Paul Slippery
2003 Stuart Little: The Animated Series' Mr. Frederick Little (Voice) episode: "The Meatloaf Bandit"
2004–present House Dr. Gregory House lead actor
also directed episode: Lockdown
2004 Fire Engine Fred
2004 Flight of the Phoenix Ian
2005 Valiant Wing Commander Gutsy voice
2005 Big Empty, TheThe Big Empty Doctor #5
2006 Stuart Little 3: Call of the Wild Mr. Frederick Little voice
2006, 2008 Saturday Night Live Host
various characters season 32, episode 4
season 34, episode 11
2008 Street Kings Captain Biggs
2009 Monsters vs. Aliens Dr. Cockroach, PhD voice
2009 Monsters vs. Aliens: Mutant Pumpkins from Outer Space Dr. Cockroach, PhD voice
2010 Family Guy Gregory House/himself voice
episode: "Business Guy"
2010 Simpsons, TheThe Simpsons Roger voice
episode: "Treehouse of Horror XXI"
2010 Fry and Laurie Reunited himself
2011 Hop Mr Bunny voice
2011 The Oranges
2011 Later... with Jools Holland himself Performed "You Don't Know My Mind" and "Swanee River"

(both from his forthcoming album Let Them Talk )
Writing

Hugh Laurie has written one full-length novel, The Gun Seller, which has undergone multiple printings from several publishers. His second novel, Paper Soldiers (US: The Paper Soldier), was scheduled for September 2009, but has yet to appear.

    * The Gun Seller UK (HB) (William Heinemann Ltd (May 1996)) ISBN 0-434-00297-6 (PB) (William Heinemann Ltd (May 1996)) ISBN 0-434-00375-1
          o (PB) (Arrow Books Ltd (November 2000); New Ed (October 2004)) ISBN 0-09-941927-0 & ISBN 0-09-946939-1
    * The Gun Seller US (HB) (Soho Press (May 1997)) ISBN 1-56947-087-1 (PB) (Mandarin (March 1997)) ISBN 0-7493-2385-X
          o (PB) (Washington Square Press (November 1998)) ISBN 0-671-02082-X
    * Paper Soldiers UK (PB) (Michael Joseph (24 September 2009)) ISBN 0-7181-4391-4
    * The Paper Soldier US (HB) (Michael Joseph (27 September 2009)) ISBN 0-7181-4390-6
          o (PB) (Penguin Books (28 September 2009)) ISBN 0-14-028210-6
http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d102/blueapplejack/hugh_laurie.jpg
http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y20/w_cowart/hugh_laurie.jpg


I've watched House before

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/13/11 at 2:09 pm


One of our nation's treasures.

You know I never knew till a short while ago that he was even British.
I've watched House before

I just started to in the last year or so.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/13/11 at 2:15 pm

The person of the day...Malcolm McDowell
Malcolm McDowell (born 13 June 1943) is an English actor with a career spanning over forty years.

McDowell is principally known for his roles in the controversial films If...., O Lucky Man!, A Clockwork Orange. and Caligula. His versatility as an actor has led to his presence in many films and television series of different genres, including Tank Girl, Star Trek Generations, the TV serial Our Friends in the North, Entourage, Heroes, Metalocalypse, animated film Bolt and the 2007 remake of Halloween and the 2009 sequel Halloween II. He is also well known for his narration of the seminal 1982 documentary, The Compleat Beatles.
McDowell began his professional life serving drinks in his parents' pub and then as a coffee salesman (the latter job providing inspiration for the movie O Lucky Man!). While enrolled in Cannock House School, he began taking acting classes, and eventually secured work as an extra with the Royal Shakespeare Company. McDowell made his screen debut as school rebel Mick Travis in If.... (1968) by British director Lindsay Anderson. This was followed by Figures in a Landscape (1970) and The Raging Moon (1971). His performance in If.... caught the attention of Stanley Kubrick, who cast McDowell as the lead in A Clockwork Orange, adapted from the novel of the same name by Anthony Burgess. He won great acclaim (nominated for a Golden Globe and an award by the New York Film Critics Circle in the category of Best Actor) for his role as Alex, a young sociopath brainwashed by an authoritarian British government.

McDowell worked with Anderson again for O Lucky Man! (1973), which was based on his own idea, and Britannia Hospital (1982). McDowell regularly turned up on British television productions in the 1970s in adaptations of theatre classics, one example being with Laurence Olivier in The Collection (1976), as part of the series Laurence Olivier Presents, as Olivier's younger lover. He starred in Aces High (1975) and co-starred in Voyage of the Damned (1976), and as Dornford Yates' gentleman hero Richard Chandos in She Fell Among Thieves (1977). He made his Hollywood debut as H.G. Wells in Time After Time (1979).

McDowell mainly portrayed antagonists in the late 1970s and 1980s, including the title character in Caligula (1979). He later remarked upon his career playing film villains: "I suppose I'm primarily known for that but in fact, that would only be half of my career if I was to tot it all up."

In his biography Anthony Burgess: A Life, author Roger Lewis commented on McDowell's later career; "his pretty-boy looks faded and he was condemned to playing villains in straight-to-video movies that turn up on Channel 5."

McDowell also appeared in the 1983 action film Blue Thunder as F.E. Cochrane, and the 1982 remake of Cat People. In 1983, he starred in Get Crazy as Reggie Wanker, a parody of Mick Jagger. Also in 1983, McDowell starred as The Wolf (Reginald von Lupen) in Faerie Tale Theatre's rendition of "Little Red Riding Hood" (his wife at that time, Mary Steenburgen, played Little Red Riding Hood). In 1984, he narrated the documentary The Compleat Beatles.

McDowell is well known in Star Trek circles as "the man who killed Captain Kirk" in the 1994 film Star Trek Generations, in which he played the mad scientist Dr. Tolian Soran. McDowell has also appeared in several computer games, most notably as Admiral Tolwyn in the Wing Commander series of computer games. His appearance in Wing Commander III marked the series transition from 2D pre-rendered cutscenes to live-action cutscenes. His appearance in Wing Commander IV was during the final days of video game live action cutscenes.

In 1995, McDowell co-starred with actress and artist Lori Petty in the action/science fiction/comedy film Tank Girl. Here, he played the villain Dr. Kesslee, the evil director of the global Water and Power Company, whose main goal in the story was to control the planet's entire water supply on a future desert-like, post-apocalyptic Earth.

McDowell played himself in Robert Altman's The Player, in which he chastises protagonist Griffin Mill (Tim Robbins) for badmouthing him behind his back. He worked with Altman once again in 2003 for The Company as Mr. A. the fictional director of the Joffrey Ballet of Chicago. His character was based on real-life director Gerald Arpino.

In the 2003 film I'll Sleep When I'm Dead, he played a straight married man who rapes a young drug dealer to "teach him a lesson". The film also starred Clive Owen as the victim's older brother.

In 2006, McDowell portrayed radio mogul Jonas Slaughter on Law & Order: Criminal Intent, In 2007, he portrayed the wealthy, conspiratorial villain Mr. Linderman during the first season of the NBC hit series Heroes, a role he reprised in the third season premiere. He has starred in Jerry Was a Man, which has appeared as an episode of Masters of Science Fiction, on ABC and Sky. He also portrayed Terrence McQuewick on Entourage and Julian Hodge on Monk.

McDowell appeared as Dr. Sam Loomis in Rob Zombie's 2007 remake of the horror film Halloween, and its sequel Halloween II. He also played Desmond LaRochette in Robert Whitlow's The List, and Irish patriarch Enda Doyle in 2008's Red Roses and Petrol. His next film is Canadian vampire comedy rock and roll movie Suck with director and actor Rob Stefaniuk and the upcoming Alex Wright film Two Wolves. In December 2009 McDowell made an appearance in the music video "Snuff" by the band Slipknot. He appears, uncredited, as Lombardi, the curator, in the 2010 film The Book of Eli. McDowell portrayed Satan in the upcoming comedy drama thriller Suing the Devil. He will appear in the upcoming film Silent Hill: Revelation 3D as Leonard Wolf, the insane co-leader of a cult.
Voice acting

McDowell was the featured narrator in the documentary, The Compleat Beatles released in 1982.

McDowell has lent his voice to Lord Maliss in Happily Ever After, the Superman villain Metallo in Superman: The Animated Series, Mad Mod in Teen Titans, Merlyn in DC Showcase: Green Arrow, Arkady Duvall (son of Ra's Al Ghul) in Batman: The Animated Series, the narrator of an episode of South Park - wherein he is introduced as "A British Person" - and as the voice of a Death Star commander in a Robot Chicken episode parodying Star Wars. He is also a regular on the second season of the Adult Swim cartoon Metalocalypse as Vater Orlaag and other characters. McDowell also voiced Dr. Calico in Disney's Bolt.

In 2006-07, he contributed spoken word to two Pink Floyd tribute albums produced by Billy Sherwood: Back Against the Wall, and Return to the Dark Side of the Moon. In 2008, McDowell began a recurring role as Grandpa Fletcher on Phineas and Ferb. He also narrated the award-winning documentary Blue Gold: World Water Wars.

McDowell reprised his role of Metallo in the video game Superman: Shadow of Apokolips and an episode of Justice League Unlimited. He also provided his voice for the character President John Henry Eden in the video game Fallout 3, Rupert Pelham in the game WET, King Solomon in the Word of Promise Audio Bible, and the CEO of Stahl Arms in Killzone 3, Jorhan Stahl. He also voiced Daedalus in God of War III.

McDowell portrays the role of "Caiaphas" in "The Truth & Life Dramatized audio New Testament Bible," a 22-hour, celebrity-voiced, fully-dramatized audio New Testament which uses the RSV-CE translation.
Personal life

McDowell was married to actress Margot Bennett from 1975-80. He then married actress Mary Steenburgen, whom he had first met while filming Time After Time, and they had two children together: Lily Amanda (born 21 January 1981) and Charles Malcolm (born 10 July 1983), before divorcing in 1990. In 1991, McDowell married Kelley Kuhr, with whom he has three children: Beckett Taylor McDowell (born 29 January 2004), Finnian Anderson McDowell (born 23 December 2006), and Seamus Hudson McDowell (born 7 January 2009). He currently resides in Ojai, California. He is the maternal uncle of actor Alexander Siddig, who appeared in Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, Kingdom of Heaven, Syriana, 24, and the current fourth (2011) season of the UK and BBC America hit series Primeval. He and his nephew both appeared in the movie Doomsday by director Neil Marshall. McDowell has been known to enjoy a hot cup of Russian Caravan with a spot of milk.
Filmography, Voice-overs and TV work

    * if.... (1968)
    * Figures in a Landscape (1970)
    * The Raging Moon (1971)
    * A Clockwork Orange (1971)
    * O Lucky Man!- also writer (1973)
    * Royal Flash (1975)
    * Voyage of the Damned (1976)
    * Aces High (1976)
    * The Collection (1976)
    * Caligula (1979)
    * The Passage (1979)
    * Time After Time (1979)
    * Look Back in Anger (1980)
    * Britannia Hospital (1982)
    * Cat People (1982)
    * Blue Thunder (1983)
    * Cross Creek (1983)
    * Faerie Tale Theatre's Little Red Riding Hood (TV) (1983)
    * Get Crazy (1983)
    * The Compleat Beatles (1984)
    * Merlin and the Sword (TV) (1985)
    * Gulag (TV) (1985)
    * The Caller (1987)
    * Buy & Cell (1987)
    * Sunset (1988)
    * Mortacci (1989)
    * II Maestro (1989)
    * Jezebel's Kiss (1990)
    * Schweitzer (1990)
    * Class of 1999 (1990)
    * Moon 44 (1990)
    * Disturbed (1990).
    * The Assassin of the Tsar (1991)
    * Tales from the Crypt (episode The Reluctant Vampire)(TV)(1991)
    * The Player (1992)
    * Chain of Desire (1992)
    * Vent d'est (1993)
    * Happily Ever After (voice) (1993)
    * Night Train to Venice (1993)
    * Bopha! (1993)
    * Wing Commander III: Heart of the Tiger (VG) (1994)
    * The Man Who Wouldn't Die (TV) (1994)
    * Cyborg 3: The Recycler (1994)
    * Star Trek Generations (1994)
    * In The Eye of the Snake (1994)
    * Dangerous Indescretion (1994)
    * Milk Money (1994)
    * Spider-Man (TV) (voice)(1994)
    * Exquisite Tenderness (1995)
    * Tank Girl (1995)
    * Fist of the North Star (1995)
    * The Great War and the Shaping of the 20th Century (TV) (voice) (1996)
    * Ringer (1996)
    * Wing Commander IV: The Price of Freedom (VG) (1996)
    * Our Friends in the North (TV) (1996)
    * The Little Riders (TV) (1996)
    * Where Truth Lies (1996)
    * Wing Commander Academy (TV) (voice) (1996)
    * Pearl (TV) (1996–1997)
    * Superman: The Animated Series (TV) (voice) (1996–2000)
    * Kids of the Round Table (1995)
    * Asylum (1997)
    * 2103: The Deadly Wake (1997)
    * Hugo Pool (1997)
    * Mr. Magoo (1997)
    * Lexx (TV, episode Giga Shadow) (1997)
    * Fantasy Island (TV) (1998–1999)
    * The Fairy King of Ar (1998)
    * The Gardener (1998) (Also known as Garden of Evil and as Silent Screams)
    * Fatal Pursuit (1998)
    * The First 9½ Weeks (1998)
    * Can of Worms (TV) (voice) (1999)
    * Southern Cross (1999)
    * Love Lies Bleeding (1999)
    * My Life So Far (1999)
    * Y2K (1999) (Also known as Terminal Countdown)
    * The David Cassidy Story (TV) (2000)
    * Gangster No. 1 (2000)
    * Island of the Dead (2000)
    * St. Patrick: The Irish Legend (TV) (2000)
    * South Park (episode Pip) (TV) (2000)
    * The Barber (2001) (Also known as Le Barbier)
    * Pact with the Devil (2001)
    * Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures (2001)
    * Just Visiting (2001)
    * Princess of Thieves (TV) (2001)
    * The Void (2001)
    * Firestarter 2: Rekindled (TV) (2002)
    * I Spy (2002)
    * Between Strangers (2002)
    * Shadow Realm (TV) (2002)
    * Superman: Shadow of Apokolips (VG) (voice) (2002)
    * Tempo (2003)
    * The Company (2003)
    * Inhabited (2003)
    * I'll Sleep When I'm Dead (2003)
    * Hidalgo (2004)
    * Evilenko (2004)
    * Bobby Jones: A Stroke of Genius (2004)
    * Tempesta (2004)
    * Pinocchio 3000 (voice) (2004)
    * Chalkzone (TV) (voice) (2004)
    * In Good Company (2004)
    * Rag Tale (2005)
    * Dinotopia: Quest for the Ruby Sunstone (voice) (2005)
    * Mirror Wars: Reflection One (2005)
    * The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy (TV) (voice) (2005)
    * Cut Off (2006)
    * Bye Bye Benjamin (2006)
    * Spooks (TV) (2006)
    * Monk (TV) (2006)
    * The Curse of King Tut's Tomb (TV) (2006)
    * Entourage (TV) (2005–2006, 2009)
    * The List (2007)
    * Exitz (2007)
    * Robot Chicken: Star Wars (TV) (2007)
    * Halloween (2007)
    * Heroes (TV) (2007, 2008)
    * War and Peace (TV) (2007)
    * Metalocalypse (TV) (voice) (2007–Present)
    * Phineas and Ferb (TV) (voice) (2007–2009)
    * Red Roses and Petrol (2008)
    * Doomsday (2008)
    * Delgo (voice) (2008)
    * Coco Chanel (TV) (2008)
    * Fallout 3 (VG) (voice) (2008)
    * Bolt (voice) (2008)
    * The Evening Journey (2008)
    * Blue Gold: World Water Wars (2008)
    * Bolt (VG) (voice) (2009)
    * Super Rhino (short) (voice) (2009)
    * Command & Conquer: Red Alert 3 – Uprising (VG) (2009)
    * Halloween II (2009)
    * Suck (2009)
    * Wet (VG) (2009)
    * Snuff (Music video) by Slipknot (2009)
    * The Book of Eli (2010)
    * CSI: Miami (TV series) (2010)
    * Barry Munday (2010)
    * Pound of Flesh (2010)
    * Golf in the Kingdom (2010)
    * LEGO Hero Factory (TV series) (voice) (2010-2011)
    * Easy A (2010)
    * Santiago Files (narrator) (2010)
    * God of War 3 (VG) (2010)
    * Green Arrow (voice) (2010)
    * The Mentalist (TV series) (2010)
    * Franklin & Bash (TV series)
    * Killzone 3 (VG) (2011)
    * Psych (2011)
    * Suing the Devil (2011)
    * Silent Hill: Revelation 3D (TBA)

http://i494.photobucket.com/albums/rr301/myersgirl_2008/malcolm.jpg
http://i524.photobucket.com/albums/cc321/stellastellina2/soapealtro/Heroes.jpg

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/14/11 at 6:34 am

The person of the day...Donald Trump
Donald John Trump, Sr. (born June 14, 1946) is an American business magnate, author, and television personality. He is the Chairman and CEO of The Trump Organization, a real-estate developer based in the United States. Trump is also the founder of Trump Entertainment Resorts, which operates numerous casinos and hotels worldwide. Trump's extravagant lifestyle and outspoken manner have made him a celebrity for years, and more recently with his NBC reality show, The Apprentice, where he serves as host and executive producer. In 2010, Trump expressed interest in becoming a candidate for President of the United States in 2012. On May 16, 2011, he announced he would not run. On May 23, he stated he has not completely ruled out running if no viable Republican Party candidate emerges. In 2011, he ranked #17 on Forbes Celebrity 100 List.

Trump is the fourth of five children of Fred Trump, a real-estate tycoon and developer based in New York City. Donald was inspired to follow his father into real-estate development, and began working on projects for his father's real-estate firm while still in college. Upon his graduation from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1968, Trump formally joined his father's company, Elizabeth Trump & Son. He took the helm in 1971 and renamed it The Trump Organization.
Starting with the renovation of the Commodore Hotel into the Grand Hyatt with the Pritzker family, Trump continued with Trump Tower in New York City and several other residential projects. He would later expand into the airline industry (buying the Eastern Shuttle routes), and Atlantic City casino business, including acquiring the Taj Mahal Casino in a transaction with Merv Griffin and Resorts International.

In March 1990, Trump threatened to sue Janney Montgomery Scott, a stock brokerage, whose analyst made negative comments on the financial prospects of Taj Mahal. The analyst refused to retract the statements, and the firm fired him. The firm denied being influenced by Trump's threat. Taj Mahal declared bankruptcy for the first time in November 1990. The analyst was awarded $750,000 by arbitration panel against his firm for his termination. A defamation lawsuit by the analyst against Trump for $2 million was settled out of court.

This expansion, both personal and business, led to mounting debt. Much of the news about him in the early 1990s involved his much publicized financial problems, creditor-led bailout, extramarital affair with Marla Maples (whom he later married), and the resulting divorce from his first wife, Ivana Trump.

The late 1990s saw a resurgence in his financial situation and fame. In 2001, he completed Trump World Tower, a 72-story residential tower across from the United Nations Headquarters. Also, he began construction on Trump Place, a multi-building development along the Hudson River. Trump owns commercial space in Trump International Hotel and Tower, a 44-story mixed-use (hotel and condominium) tower on Columbus Circle. Trump currently owns several million square feet of prime Manhattan real estate, and remains a major figure in the field of real estate in the United States and a celebrity for his prominent media exposures.
Early success (1968–1989)

Trump began his career at his father's company, the Trump Organization, and initially concentrated on his father's preferred field of middle-class rental housing in Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island. One of Trump's first projects, while he was still in college, was the revitalization of the foreclosed Swifton Village apartment complex in Cincinnati, Ohio, which his father had purchased for $5.7 million in 1962. Trump became intimately involved in the project, personally flying in for a few days at a time to carry out landscaping and other low-level tasks. After $500,000 investment, Trump successfully turned a 1200-unit complex with a 66% vacancy rate to 100% occupancy within two years. The Trump Organization sold Swifton Village for $6.75 million in 1972.

In 1971 Trump moved to Manhattan, where he became convinced of the economic opportunity in the city, specifically large building projects in Manhattan that would offer opportunities for earning high profits, utilizing attractive architectural design, and winning public recognition. Trump began by landing the rights to develop the old Penn Central yards on the West Side, then — with the help of a 40-year tax abatement by the financially strained New York City government, which was eager to give tax concessions in exchange for investments at a time of financial crisis — turned the bankrupt Commodore Hotel into a new Grand Hyatt.

He was also instrumental in steering the development of the Javits Convention Center on property he had an option on. The development saga of the Javits Convention Center brought Trump into contact with the New York City government when a project that he had estimated could have been completed by his company for $110 million ended up costing the city between $750 million and $1 billion. He offered to take over the project at cost, but the offer was not accepted.

A similar opportunity would arise in the city's attempt to restore the Wollman Rink in Central Park, a project started in 1980 with an expected 2½-year construction schedule that was still, with $12 million spent, nowhere near completion in 1986. Trump offered to take over the job at no charge to the city, an offer that was initially rebuffed until it received much local media attention. Trump then was given the job which he completed in six months and with $750,000 of the $3 million budgeted for the project left over.

Trump was also involved with the old USFL, a competitor to the NFL, as owner of the New Jersey Generals. In addition, Trump at one time acted as a financial advisor for Mike Tyson, hosting Tyson's fight against Michael Spinks in Atlantic City.
Financial problems (1989–1997)

By 1989, the effects of the recession left Trump unable to meet loan payments. Trump financed the construction of his third casino, the $1 billion Taj Mahal, primarily with high-interest junk bonds. Although he shored up his businesses with additional loans and postponed interest payments, by 1991 increasing debt brought Trump to business bankruptcy and the brink of personal bankruptcy. Banks and bond holders had lost hundreds of millions of dollars, but opted to restructure his debt to avoid the risk of losing more money in court. The Taj Mahal re-emerged from bankruptcy on October 5, 1991, with Trump ceding 50% ownership in the casino to the original bondholders in exchange for lowered interest rates on the debt and more time to pay it off.

On November 2, 1992, the Trump Plaza Hotel was forced to file a prepackaged Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection plan after being unable to make its debt payments. Under the plan, Trump agreed to give up a 49% stake in the luxury hotel to Citibank and five other lenders. In return Trump would receive more favorable terms on the remaining $550+ million owed to the lenders, and retain his position as chief executive, though he would not be paid and would not have a role in day-to-day operations.

By 1994, Trump had eliminated a large portion of his $900 million personal debt and reduced significantly his nearly $3.5 billion in business debt. While he was forced to relinquish the Trump Shuttle (which he had bought in 1989), he managed to retain Trump Tower in New York City and control of his three casinos in Atlantic City. Chase Manhattan Bank, which lent Trump the money to buy the West Side yards, his biggest Manhattan parcel, forced the sale of a parcel to Asian developers. According to former members of the Trump Organization, Trump did not retain any ownership of the site's real estate – the owners merely promised to give him about 30 percent of the profits once the site was completely developed or sold. Until that time, the owners wanted to keep Trump on to do what he did best: build things. They gave him modest construction and management fees to oversee the development, and allowed him to put his name on the buildings that eventually rose on the yards because his well-known moniker allowed them to charge a premium for their condos.

Trump was elected to the Gaming Hall of Fame in 1995.

In 1995, he combined his casino holdings into the publicly held Trump Hotels & Casino Resorts. Wall Street drove its stock above $35 in 1996, but by 1998 it had fallen into single digits as the company remained profitless and struggled to pay just the interest on its nearly $3 billion in debt. Under such financial pressure, the properties were unable to make the improvements necessary for keeping up with their flashier competitors.
Legal developments (2002–2005)

In January 2002, the Securities and Exchange Commission brought a financial-reporting case against Trump Hotels & Casino Resorts Inc., alleging that it had committed several "misleading statements in the company's third-quarter 1999 earnings release." The matter was settled with the defendant neither admitting nor denying the charge.

Finally, on October 21, 2004, Trump Hotels & Casino Resorts announced a restructuring of its debt. The plan called for Trump's individual ownership to be reduced from 56 percent to 27 percent, with bondholders receiving stock in exchange for surrendering part of the debt. Since then, Trump Hotels has been forced to seek voluntary bankruptcy protection to stay afloat. After the company applied for Chapter 11 Protection in November 2004, Trump relinquished his CEO position but retained a role as Chairman of the Board. In May 2005 the company re-emerged from bankruptcy as Trump Entertainment Resorts Holdings.
Resurgence (1997–2007)

Trump has several projects under way, with varying levels of success in their progress. The Trump International Hotel and Tower – Honolulu seems to be a success. According to Trump, buyers paid non-refundable deposits, committing to purchase every unit on the first day they were made available. Construction of the Trump International Hotel and Tower – Chicago seems to be proceeding as planned, although 30% of the units remain unsold. The Trump International Hotel and Tower – Toronto has had a series of delays and a height reduction. The Trump Tower – Tampa has been quite controversial because the initial sales were so successful that all deposits were returned in order to charge a higher price. Three years after construction of this controversial development began, construction has delayed and lawsuits have been filed. In Fort Lauderdale, Florida, one Trump construction project was put on hold in favor of another (Trump International Hotel and Tower – Fort Lauderdale). Meanwhile, Trump Towers – Atlanta is being developed in a housing market having the nation's second-highest inventory of unsold homes.
Financial crisis

Sales for Trump International Hotel and Tower in Chicago have been lagging. Lender Deutsche Bank refused to let Trump lower the prices on the units to spur sales. Arguing that the financial crisis and resulting drop in the real estate market is due to circumstances beyond his control, Trump invoked a clause in the contract to not pay the loan. Deutsche Bank then noted in court that "Trump is no stranger to overdue debt" and that he had twice previously filed for bankruptcy regarding his casino operations. Trump then initiated a suit asserting that his image had been damaged. Both parties agreed to drop their suits, and sale of the units is nearly complete.

On February 17, 2009 Trump Entertainment Resorts filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy; Trump stating on February 13 that he would resign from the board. Trump Entertainment Resorts has three properties in Atlantic City.
In 2003, Trump became the executive producer and host of the NBC reality show, The Apprentice, in which a group of competitors battled for a high-level management job in one of Trump's commercial enterprises. The other contestants were successively "fired" and eliminated from the game. In 2004, Donald Trump filed a trademark application for the catchphrase "You're fired."

For the first year of the show Trump was paid $50,000 per episode (roughly $700,000 for the first season), but following the show's initial success, he is now paid a reported $3 million per episode, making him one of the highest paid TV personalities. In 2007, Trump received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for his contribution to television (The Apprentice).

Along with British TV producer Mark Burnett, Trump also put together The Celebrity Apprentice, where well-known stars compete to win money for their charities. While Trump and Burnett co-produced the show, Trump stayed in the forefront, deciding winners and "firing" losers.
World Wrestling Entertainment

Trump is a known World Wrestling Entertainment fan and friend of WWE owner Vince McMahon. He has hosted two WrestleMania events in the Trump Plaza and has been an active participant in several of the shows. Trump's Trump Taj Mahal in Atlantic City was host to the 1991 WBF Championship (which was owned by WWE, known at the time as the "World Wrestling Federation."). Trump was interviewed by Jesse Ventura ringside at WrestleMania XX. He also appeared at WrestleMania 23 in the corner of Bobby Lashley who competed against Umaga with WWE Chairman McMahon in his corner, in a hair versus hair match, with either Trump or McMahon having their head shaved if their competitor lost. Lashley won the match, and he and Trump both proceeded to shave McMahon bald.

On June 15, 2009, as part of a storyline, McMahon announced on WWE Raw that he had 'sold' the show to Donald Trump. Appearing on screen, Trump confirmed it and declared he would be at the following commercial-free episode in person and would give a full refund to the people who purchased tickets to the arena for that night's show in the amount of USD $235,000. McMahon "bought back" Raw on June 22, 2009. His entrance theme "Money, Money" was written by Jim Johnston.
Beauty pageants

The Miss Universe Organization is owned by Donald Trump and the National Broadcasting Company (NBC). The organization produces the Miss Universe, Miss USA, and Miss Teen USA pageants.

In December 2006, talk show host Rosie O'Donnell criticized Trump's lenience toward Miss USA, Tara Conner, who had violated pageant behavioral guidelines. This sparked a tabloid war between the two celebrities which lasted for several weeks thereafter.
The Trump Brand

In 2011, Forbes reported that its financial experts had estimated the value of the Trump brand at $200 million. Trump disputes this valuation, saying that his brand is worth about $3 billion.
Speaking to an audience in Boca Raton, Florida on April 16, 2011, Trump contended that voter reaction to George W. Bush's performance as U.S. President was the cause for the election of his successor, Barack Obama, and further that Obama would probably be known as the worst president in U.S. history.

Trump has promoted conspiracy theories about Obama's citizenship status in media appearances, and been criticized for this. In an NBC-TV interview broadcast April 7, 2011, Trump said he was not satisfied that Obama had proven his citizenship.

In an April, 2011 NBC interview, Trump claimed he had sent people to Hawaii to investigate Obama's citizenship, commenting "they cannot believe what they're finding." On Anderson Cooper 360 on CNN April 25, 2011, Trump said he wanted Obama to end the issue by releasing his long-form Certificate of Live Birth (distinct from the short-form Certification of Live Birth – Hawaii's prima facie evidence of birth), adding, "I've been told very recently ... the birth certificate is missing."

On April 27, 2011, the long-form of Obama's birth certificate was released by the White House. Obama said it should put the matter to rest; that the nation had more pressing problems to solve and could not afford to be "distracted by side shows and carnival barkers". Trump expressed pride at his role in the release of the long-form certificate in a press conference followup. Public Policy Polling described the events as "one of the quickest rises and falls in the history of presidential politics", reporting:

    "Trump really made hay out of the 'birther' issue and as the resonance of that has declined, so has his standing. In February we found that 51% of Republican primary voters thought Barack Obama was not born in the United States. Now with the release of his birth certificate only 34% of Republican partisans fall into that camp, and Trump's only in fifth place with that now smaller group of the electorate at 9%."
http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t44/BlackMoonVampyre/donald_trump.jpg
http://i137.photobucket.com/albums/q218/cityblueasian1108/donald-trump.jpg

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 06/14/11 at 6:36 am


The person of the day...Donald Trump
Donald John Trump, Sr. (born June 14, 1946) is an American business magnate, author, and television personality. He is the Chairman and CEO of The Trump Organization, a real-estate developer based in the United States. Trump is also the founder of Trump Entertainment Resorts, which operates numerous casinos and hotels worldwide. Trump's extravagant lifestyle and outspoken manner have made him a celebrity for years, and more recently with his NBC reality show, The Apprentice, where he serves as host and executive producer. In 2010, Trump expressed interest in becoming a candidate for President of the United States in 2012. On May 16, 2011, he announced he would not run. On May 23, he stated he has not completely ruled out running if no viable Republican Party candidate emerges. In 2011, he ranked #17 on Forbes Celebrity 100 List.

Trump is the fourth of five children of Fred Trump, a real-estate tycoon and developer based in New York City. Donald was inspired to follow his father into real-estate development, and began working on projects for his father's real-estate firm while still in college. Upon his graduation from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1968, Trump formally joined his father's company, Elizabeth Trump & Son. He took the helm in 1971 and renamed it The Trump Organization.
Starting with the renovation of the Commodore Hotel into the Grand Hyatt with the Pritzker family, Trump continued with Trump Tower in New York City and several other residential projects. He would later expand into the airline industry (buying the Eastern Shuttle routes), and Atlantic City casino business, including acquiring the Taj Mahal Casino in a transaction with Merv Griffin and Resorts International.

In March 1990, Trump threatened to sue Janney Montgomery Scott, a stock brokerage, whose analyst made negative comments on the financial prospects of Taj Mahal. The analyst refused to retract the statements, and the firm fired him. The firm denied being influenced by Trump's threat. Taj Mahal declared bankruptcy for the first time in November 1990. The analyst was awarded $750,000 by arbitration panel against his firm for his termination. A defamation lawsuit by the analyst against Trump for $2 million was settled out of court.

This expansion, both personal and business, led to mounting debt. Much of the news about him in the early 1990s involved his much publicized financial problems, creditor-led bailout, extramarital affair with Marla Maples (whom he later married), and the resulting divorce from his first wife, Ivana Trump.

The late 1990s saw a resurgence in his financial situation and fame. In 2001, he completed Trump World Tower, a 72-story residential tower across from the United Nations Headquarters. Also, he began construction on Trump Place, a multi-building development along the Hudson River. Trump owns commercial space in Trump International Hotel and Tower, a 44-story mixed-use (hotel and condominium) tower on Columbus Circle. Trump currently owns several million square feet of prime Manhattan real estate, and remains a major figure in the field of real estate in the United States and a celebrity for his prominent media exposures.
Early success (1968–1989)

Trump began his career at his father's company, the Trump Organization, and initially concentrated on his father's preferred field of middle-class rental housing in Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island. One of Trump's first projects, while he was still in college, was the revitalization of the foreclosed Swifton Village apartment complex in Cincinnati, Ohio, which his father had purchased for $5.7 million in 1962. Trump became intimately involved in the project, personally flying in for a few days at a time to carry out landscaping and other low-level tasks. After $500,000 investment, Trump successfully turned a 1200-unit complex with a 66% vacancy rate to 100% occupancy within two years. The Trump Organization sold Swifton Village for $6.75 million in 1972.

In 1971 Trump moved to Manhattan, where he became convinced of the economic opportunity in the city, specifically large building projects in Manhattan that would offer opportunities for earning high profits, utilizing attractive architectural design, and winning public recognition. Trump began by landing the rights to develop the old Penn Central yards on the West Side, then — with the help of a 40-year tax abatement by the financially strained New York City government, which was eager to give tax concessions in exchange for investments at a time of financial crisis — turned the bankrupt Commodore Hotel into a new Grand Hyatt.

He was also instrumental in steering the development of the Javits Convention Center on property he had an option on. The development saga of the Javits Convention Center brought Trump into contact with the New York City government when a project that he had estimated could have been completed by his company for $110 million ended up costing the city between $750 million and $1 billion. He offered to take over the project at cost, but the offer was not accepted.

A similar opportunity would arise in the city's attempt to restore the Wollman Rink in Central Park, a project started in 1980 with an expected 2½-year construction schedule that was still, with $12 million spent, nowhere near completion in 1986. Trump offered to take over the job at no charge to the city, an offer that was initially rebuffed until it received much local media attention. Trump then was given the job which he completed in six months and with $750,000 of the $3 million budgeted for the project left over.

Trump was also involved with the old USFL, a competitor to the NFL, as owner of the New Jersey Generals. In addition, Trump at one time acted as a financial advisor for Mike Tyson, hosting Tyson's fight against Michael Spinks in Atlantic City.
Financial problems (1989–1997)

By 1989, the effects of the recession left Trump unable to meet loan payments. Trump financed the construction of his third casino, the $1 billion Taj Mahal, primarily with high-interest junk bonds. Although he shored up his businesses with additional loans and postponed interest payments, by 1991 increasing debt brought Trump to business bankruptcy and the brink of personal bankruptcy. Banks and bond holders had lost hundreds of millions of dollars, but opted to restructure his debt to avoid the risk of losing more money in court. The Taj Mahal re-emerged from bankruptcy on October 5, 1991, with Trump ceding 50% ownership in the casino to the original bondholders in exchange for lowered interest rates on the debt and more time to pay it off.

On November 2, 1992, the Trump Plaza Hotel was forced to file a prepackaged Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection plan after being unable to make its debt payments. Under the plan, Trump agreed to give up a 49% stake in the luxury hotel to Citibank and five other lenders. In return Trump would receive more favorable terms on the remaining $550+ million owed to the lenders, and retain his position as chief executive, though he would not be paid and would not have a role in day-to-day operations.

By 1994, Trump had eliminated a large portion of his $900 million personal debt and reduced significantly his nearly $3.5 billion in business debt. While he was forced to relinquish the Trump Shuttle (which he had bought in 1989), he managed to retain Trump Tower in New York City and control of his three casinos in Atlantic City. Chase Manhattan Bank, which lent Trump the money to buy the West Side yards, his biggest Manhattan parcel, forced the sale of a parcel to Asian developers. According to former members of the Trump Organization, Trump did not retain any ownership of the site's real estate – the owners merely promised to give him about 30 percent of the profits once the site was completely developed or sold. Until that time, the owners wanted to keep Trump on to do what he did best: build things. They gave him modest construction and management fees to oversee the development, and allowed him to put his name on the buildings that eventually rose on the yards because his well-known moniker allowed them to charge a premium for their condos.

Trump was elected to the Gaming Hall of Fame in 1995.

In 1995, he combined his casino holdings into the publicly held Trump Hotels & Casino Resorts. Wall Street drove its stock above $35 in 1996, but by 1998 it had fallen into single digits as the company remained profitless and struggled to pay just the interest on its nearly $3 billion in debt. Under such financial pressure, the properties were unable to make the improvements necessary for keeping up with their flashier competitors.
Legal developments (2002–2005)

In January 2002, the Securities and Exchange Commission brought a financial-reporting case against Trump Hotels & Casino Resorts Inc., alleging that it had committed several "misleading statements in the company's third-quarter 1999 earnings release." The matter was settled with the defendant neither admitting nor denying the charge.

Finally, on October 21, 2004, Trump Hotels & Casino Resorts announced a restructuring of its debt. The plan called for Trump's individual ownership to be reduced from 56 percent to 27 percent, with bondholders receiving stock in exchange for surrendering part of the debt. Since then, Trump Hotels has been forced to seek voluntary bankruptcy protection to stay afloat. After the company applied for Chapter 11 Protection in November 2004, Trump relinquished his CEO position but retained a role as Chairman of the Board. In May 2005 the company re-emerged from bankruptcy as Trump Entertainment Resorts Holdings.
Resurgence (1997–2007)

Trump has several projects under way, with varying levels of success in their progress. The Trump International Hotel and Tower – Honolulu seems to be a success. According to Trump, buyers paid non-refundable deposits, committing to purchase every unit on the first day they were made available. Construction of the Trump International Hotel and Tower – Chicago seems to be proceeding as planned, although 30% of the units remain unsold. The Trump International Hotel and Tower – Toronto has had a series of delays and a height reduction. The Trump Tower – Tampa has been quite controversial because the initial sales were so successful that all deposits were returned in order to charge a higher price. Three years after construction of this controversial development began, construction has delayed and lawsuits have been filed. In Fort Lauderdale, Florida, one Trump construction project was put on hold in favor of another (Trump International Hotel and Tower – Fort Lauderdale). Meanwhile, Trump Towers – Atlanta is being developed in a housing market having the nation's second-highest inventory of unsold homes.
Financial crisis

Sales for Trump International Hotel and Tower in Chicago have been lagging. Lender Deutsche Bank refused to let Trump lower the prices on the units to spur sales. Arguing that the financial crisis and resulting drop in the real estate market is due to circumstances beyond his control, Trump invoked a clause in the contract to not pay the loan. Deutsche Bank then noted in court that "Trump is no stranger to overdue debt" and that he had twice previously filed for bankruptcy regarding his casino operations. Trump then initiated a suit asserting that his image had been damaged. Both parties agreed to drop their suits, and sale of the units is nearly complete.

On February 17, 2009 Trump Entertainment Resorts filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy; Trump stating on February 13 that he would resign from the board. Trump Entertainment Resorts has three properties in Atlantic City.
In 2003, Trump became the executive producer and host of the NBC reality show, The Apprentice, in which a group of competitors battled for a high-level management job in one of Trump's commercial enterprises. The other contestants were successively "fired" and eliminated from the game. In 2004, Donald Trump filed a trademark application for the catchphrase "You're fired."

For the first year of the show Trump was paid $50,000 per episode (roughly $700,000 for the first season), but following the show's initial success, he is now paid a reported $3 million per episode, making him one of the highest paid TV personalities. In 2007, Trump received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for his contribution to television (The Apprentice).

Along with British TV producer Mark Burnett, Trump also put together The Celebrity Apprentice, where well-known stars compete to win money for their charities. While Trump and Burnett co-produced the show, Trump stayed in the forefront, deciding winners and "firing" losers.
World Wrestling Entertainment

Trump is a known World Wrestling Entertainment fan and friend of WWE owner Vince McMahon. He has hosted two WrestleMania events in the Trump Plaza and has been an active participant in several of the shows. Trump's Trump Taj Mahal in Atlantic City was host to the 1991 WBF Championship (which was owned by WWE, known at the time as the "World Wrestling Federation."). Trump was interviewed by Jesse Ventura ringside at WrestleMania XX. He also appeared at WrestleMania 23 in the corner of Bobby Lashley who competed against Umaga with WWE Chairman McMahon in his corner, in a hair versus hair match, with either Trump or McMahon having their head shaved if their competitor lost. Lashley won the match, and he and Trump both proceeded to shave McMahon bald.

On June 15, 2009, as part of a storyline, McMahon announced on WWE Raw that he had 'sold' the show to Donald Trump. Appearing on screen, Trump confirmed it and declared he would be at the following commercial-free episode in person and would give a full refund to the people who purchased tickets to the arena for that night's show in the amount of USD $235,000. McMahon "bought back" Raw on June 22, 2009. His entrance theme "Money, Money" was written by Jim Johnston.
Beauty pageants

The Miss Universe Organization is owned by Donald Trump and the National Broadcasting Company (NBC). The organization produces the Miss Universe, Miss USA, and Miss Teen USA pageants.

In December 2006, talk show host Rosie O'Donnell criticized Trump's lenience toward Miss USA, Tara Conner, who had violated pageant behavioral guidelines. This sparked a tabloid war between the two celebrities which lasted for several weeks thereafter.
The Trump Brand

In 2011, Forbes reported that its financial experts had estimated the value of the Trump brand at $200 million. Trump disputes this valuation, saying that his brand is worth about $3 billion.
Speaking to an audience in Boca Raton, Florida on April 16, 2011, Trump contended that voter reaction to George W. Bush's performance as U.S. President was the cause for the election of his successor, Barack Obama, and further that Obama would probably be known as the worst president in U.S. history.

Trump has promoted conspiracy theories about Obama's citizenship status in media appearances, and been criticized for this. In an NBC-TV interview broadcast April 7, 2011, Trump said he was not satisfied that Obama had proven his citizenship.

In an April, 2011 NBC interview, Trump claimed he had sent people to Hawaii to investigate Obama's citizenship, commenting "they cannot believe what they're finding." On Anderson Cooper 360 on CNN April 25, 2011, Trump said he wanted Obama to end the issue by releasing his long-form Certificate of Live Birth (distinct from the short-form Certification of Live Birth – Hawaii's prima facie evidence of birth), adding, "I've been told very recently ... the birth certificate is missing."

On April 27, 2011, the long-form of Obama's birth certificate was released by the White House. Obama said it should put the matter to rest; that the nation had more pressing problems to solve and could not afford to be "distracted by side shows and carnival barkers". Trump expressed pride at his role in the release of the long-form certificate in a press conference followup. Public Policy Polling described the events as "one of the quickest rises and falls in the history of presidential politics", reporting:

    "Trump really made hay out of the 'birther' issue and as the resonance of that has declined, so has his standing. In February we found that 51% of Republican primary voters thought Barack Obama was not born in the United States. Now with the release of his birth certificate only 34% of Republican partisans fall into that camp, and Trump's only in fifth place with that now smaller group of the electorate at 9%."
http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t44/BlackMoonVampyre/donald_trump.jpg
http://i137.photobucket.com/albums/q218/cityblueasian1108/donald-trump.jpg


How would Donald look in a crewcut?  :D

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: gibbo on 06/14/11 at 7:06 am


How would Donald look in a crewcut?  :D


You could only tell when that badger stopped living on his head!

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: CatwomanofV on 06/14/11 at 7:27 am


You could only tell when that badger stopped living on his head!



Badgers? We don't need no stinkin' badgers!



Cat

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/14/11 at 7:28 am


You could only tell when that badger stopped living on his head!

He's got a lifetime supply.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 06/14/11 at 8:00 pm


You could only tell when that badger stopped living on his head!


That's a badger?  :D

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/15/11 at 7:53 am

The person of the day...Ice Cube
Ice Cube, whose real name is O'Shea Jackson (born June 15, 1969), is an American rapper, actor, screenwriter, film director, and producer. He began his career as a member of C.I.A. and later joined the rap group N.W.A. After leaving N.W.A in December 1989, he built a successful solo career in music, and also as a writer, director, actor and producer in cinema. Additionally, he has served as one of the producers of the Showtime television series Barbershop and the TBS series Are We There Yet?, both of which are based upon films in which he portrayed the lead character.
In 1987, Ice Cube and Dr. Dre released the single My Posse, under the alias CIA. After the collaboration, Ice Cube showed Eazy-E the lyrics to "Boyz-n-the-Hood". Eazy-E, although initially rejecting the lyrics, eventually recorded the song for N.W.A. and the Posse, the debut album for the group N.W.A that included him, Dre, and other rappers MC Ren and DJ Yella.

By this point Ice Cube was a full-time member of N.W.A along with Dr. Dre and MC Ren. Ice Cube wrote Dr. Dre and Eazy-E's rhymes for the group's landmark album, Straight Outta Compton, released in 1988. However, as 1990 approached, Ice Cube found himself at odds with the group's manager, Jerry Heller, after rejecting Heller's proposed contract terms.

Since Ice Cube wrote the lyrics to approximately half of both Straight Outta Compton, and Eazy-E's solo album, Eazy-Duz-It, he was advised of the amounts he was truly owed by Heller, and took legal action soon after leaving the group and the label. In response, the remaining N.W.A members attacked him on the EP 100 Miles and Runnin' and on their next and final album, Efil4zaggin (Niggaz4life spelled backwards).
Solo career

In late 1989, Ice Cube recorded his debut solo album in Los Angeles with the Bomb Squad (Public Enemy's production team). AmeriKKKa's Most Wanted was released in May 1990 and was an instant hit, riding and contributing to the rising tide of rap's popularity in mainstream society. The album was charged with controversy, and he was accused of misogyny and racism. Subsequently, Ice Cube appointed the female rapper Yo-Yo (who appeared on AmeriKKKa's Most Wanted) to the head of his own record label and helped produce her debut album, Make Way for the Motherlode. This was followed by a critically acclaimed role as 'Doughboy' in John Singleton's hood-based drama, Boyz n the Hood. In the same year as AmeriKKKa's Most Wanted, Ice Cube released the acclaimed EP, Kill At Will which sold well, becoming the first hip hop EP to go both Gold and Platinum.

His 1991 follow-up, Death Certificate was regarded as more focused, yet even more controversial, and critics accused him again of being anti-white, misogynist, and antisemitic. The album is thematically divided into the 'Death Side' ("a vision of where we are today") and the 'Life Side' ("a vision of where we need to go"). It features "No Vaseline", a scathing response to N.W.A's attacks and "Black Korea," a track regarded by some as prophetic of the 1992 Los Angeles riots, but also interpreted as racist by many; it was still being cited years after its release. Ice Cube toured with Lollapalooza in 1992, which widened his fan base.

Ice Cube released The Predator in November 1992. Referring specifically to that year's Los Angeles riots, in the first single, "Wicked", he rapped "April 29 was power to the people, and we might just see a sequel". The Predator debuted at number one on both the pop and R&B charts, the first album in history to do so. Singles from The Predator included "It Was a Good Day" and the "Check Yo Self" remix, and the songs had a two-part music video. The album remains his most successful release, with over three million copies sold in the US. However, after The Predator, Ice Cube's rap audience diminished. Lethal Injection which was released in the end of 1993 and represented Ice Cube's first attempt at imitating the G-Funk sound of Dr. Dre's The Chronic, was not well received by critics. He had more successful hits from Lethal Injection, including "Really Doe", "Bop Gun (One Nation)", "You Know How We Do It" & "What Can I Do?". After 1994, he took a hiatus from music and concentrated on film work and developing the careers of other rap musicians, Mack 10, Mr. Short Khop, Kausion, and Da Lench Mob.

In 1994, Ice Cube had reunited with former N.W.A member Dr. Dre, who was now part of Death Row Records, in their duet "Natural Born Killaz". In 1998, he released his long-awaited solo album, War & Peace Volume 1. The delayed Volume 2, was released in 2000. The albums featured appearances from Westside Connection as well as a reunion with fellow N.W.A members, Dr. Dre and MC Ren, though many fans maintained that the two albums were not on par with his past work, especially the second volume. In 2000, Ice Cube also joined Dr. Dre, Eminem & Snoop Dogg on the Up In Smoke Tour.

In 2006, Ice Cube released his seventh solo album, Laugh Now, Cry Later, on his Lench Mob Records label, debuting at number four on the Billboard Charts and selling 144,000 units in the first week. The album featured production from Lil Jon and Scott Storch, who produced the lead single "Why We Thugs". He released his eighth studio album, Raw Footage, on August 19, 2008, featuring the controversial single "Gangsta Rap Made Me Do It".

On Oct 12, 2009 he released a non-album track called 'Raider Nation' in tribute to the Oakland Raiders' football team he supports.

On May 11, 2010, Ice Cube released a 30 for 30 documentary, "Straight Outta L.A.", for ESPN on the relationship between the gangster rap scene in Los Angeles and the tenure of the Raiders there. He has been voted as eighth of MTV's "greatest emcees of all time."
Westside Connection

In 1996, Ice Cube formed Westside Connection with Mack 10 and WC, and together they released an album called Bow Down. Most of the album was used to engage in the East Coast-West Coast hip hop rivalry of the 90s. The album's eponymous single reached number 21 on the singles charts, and the album itself was certified Platinum by the end of 1996. With Bow Down, Westside Connection brought their own agenda to the hip hop scene. Ice Cube, Mack 10 and WC had grown tired of being overlooked by most East Coast media outlets; the album was designed to instil a sense of pride in West Coast rap fans and to start a larger movement that some people who felt underappreciated might identify with. Songs like "Bow Down" and "Gangstas Make the World Go 'Round" make reference to this. Ice Cube would also eventually make amends with Eazy-E shortly before the latter's death in 1995.

After a seven-year hiatus, Westside Connection returned with their second effort Terrorist Threats in 2003. The album fared well critically, but its commercial reception was less than that of Bow Down. "Gangsta Nation" was the only single released from the album, which was produced by Fredwreck and featured Nate Dogg; it was a radio hit. After a rift between Ice Cube and Mack 10 about Ice Cube's commitments to film work rather than touring with the group, Westside Connection disbanded. WC, however, did release a new solo album on Lench Mob Records entitled Guilty by Affiliation on August 14, 2007.
Collaborations

In 1992 Ice Cube assisted on debut albums from Da Lench Mob (Guerillas in tha Mist, 1992) and Kam (Neva Again, 1993), both of which enjoyed critical acclaim and some moderate commercial success. He handled most of the production on Guerillas in tha Mist.

In 1993, Lench Mob member, J-Dee, was sentenced to life imprisonment for attempted murder, and Ice Cube did not produce their next album, Planet of tha Apes. Around this time in 1993, he also worked with Tupac Shakur on his album Strictly 4 My N.I.G.G.A.Z., appearing on the track "Last Wordz" with Ice-T. He also did a song with Dr. Dre for the first time since he left N.W.A: "Natural Born Killaz", for the Murder Was The Case soundtrack, and also contributed to the Office Space soundtrack. He also featured on Kool G Rap's song "Two To The Head" from the Kool G Rap & DJ Polo album "Live And Let Die". Ice Cube appeared on the song "Children of the Korn" by the band Korn, and lent his voice to British DJ Paul Oakenfold's solo debut album, Bunkka, on the track "Get Em Up".
2004–2010

In 2004, his hit singles "Check Yo Self", "It Was a Good Day" and affiliated song "Guerrillas in tha Mist" with Da Lench Mob appeared on popular video game Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas on fictional radio station Radio Los Santos.

In late 2005, Ice Cube and R. J. Cutler teamed up to create the six-part documentary series titled Black. White., which was broadcast on cable network FX. In May 2006 Ice Cube complained that Oprah Winfrey would not welcome him and other rappers on her show. Ice Cube's other movie projects include Teacher of the Year, released in 2007, and The Extractors, released in 2008.

He has signed on to star in and produce Welcome Back, Kotter, a big-screen adaptation of the 1970s television series. Ice Cube will play the title character, originally portrayed by Gabe Kaplan and his film company, Cube Vision Productions, has sealed a deal with Dimension Films to bring the show to the big screen.

In a London interview he revealed he is in talks of a collaboration with Gorillaz after speaking to frontman Damon Albarn.

In October 2006 Xzibit, Lil Jon and WC from the Westside Connection honoured Ice Cube at VH1's Annual Hip Hop Honors, performing some classic Ice Cube tracks, and Ice Cube also performed "Why We Thugs" and "Go To Church" from his album Laugh Now, Cry Later, where the New York crowd were greeted with Cube's vintage Cali sound. After launching that comeback album, Ice Cube toured across the world to promote it. The tour is known as "Straight Outta Compton Tour", and accompanying him is his friend and fellow rapper WC from the Westside Connection. Some places he has recently performed include the Paradiso in Amsterdam and various venues in England. After touring the U.S. and Europe, he performed all around Australia, from Sydney's Enmore Theatre to The Forum Arena in Melbourne, before heading to Japan.

Although Ice Cube has made references of going to church and mosque, he has indicated that he is a deist, without following religious "rituals and traditions".

Ice Cube collaborated with Tech N9ne on the song "Blackboy" that appears on Tech N9ne's July 2008 album Killer. The eighth Ice Cube studio LP, titled Raw Footage, was released on August 19, 2008, and featured the singles Gangsta Rap Made Me Do It and Do Ya Thang. Ice Cube appeared on a song by rapper The Game titled "State of Emergency" off The Game's Album, L.A.X. In 2009, Ice Cube performed at the Gathering of the Juggalos, and will return to perform at the 2011 festival.

Despite rumors of conflicts with other rappers in 2010, Ice Cube stated in an interview with DJ Whoo Kid on Sirius Shade 45 that he has "no beef."

Ice Cube's ninth studio album I Am the West was released on September 28, 2010. Ice Cube has stated this album has a different direction than any one of his other albums. He received beats from West coast veteran producers such as DJ Quik, Dr. Dre, E-A-Ski, and Sir Jinx, not having worked on a solo album with the latter in nearly 20 years. The album was released independently under his label Lench Mob. Ice Cube has stated that "being independent is beautiful because we can do things 'out the box' that record companies would usually frown at. Instead of working from a ready-made cookie-cutter marketing plan, we can tailor make a marketing plan specifically for me."
Other ventures
Film and television career

Following his role as 'Doughboy' in Boyz-n-the-Hood, in 1992 he starred alongside Ice-T, and Bill Paxton in Walter Hill's action film, Trespass, and then in The Glass Shield.

Ice Cube was offered a co-star role with Janet Jackson in the 1993 romantic film Poetic Justice, but he refused the role, which was given to Tupac Shakur instead.

John Singleton had encouraged Ice Cube to try his hand at screenwriting, telling him, "If you can write a record, you can write a movie." With this encouragement, Ice Cube wrote the screenplay for what became the 1995 comedy Friday, in which he also starred, alongside then up-and-coming comedian Chris Tucker. Friday earned $28 million worldwide on a $3.5 million budget, and spawned two sequels, Next Friday and Friday After Next. That year, he also starred in his second collaboration with John Singleton, Higher Learning, as world-weary university student "Fudge"; a role for which he earned award nominations.

In 1997 Ice Cube starred in the action thriller Dangerous Ground as a South African exiled to America who returns 15 years later. He also had a supporting role in the film Anaconda that same year. He wrote, executive produced, and made his directorial debut in The Players Club in 1998, and in 1999 starred alongside George Clooney and Mark Wahlberg in the critically acclaimed Three Kings. In 2000, he wrote and appeared in the Friday sequel Next Friday. In 2002, Ice Cube starred in the commercially successful movie Barbershop, as well as All About the Benjamins and the third film in the Friday trilogy, Friday after Next (which he again wrote). In 2004, he appeared in Barbershop 2: Back in Business, and Torque; in 2005 he starred in the action movie XXX: State of the Union, the comedy Are We There Yet? and Are We Done Yet?, co-starring Nia Long.

In early April 2007 Ice Cube was a guest on Angie Martinez' Hot97 radio show and stated that he was interested in bringing back Chris Tucker as Smokey in a possible Friday sequel, but that was only possible "if New Line cuts the cheque." In an interview with BlackFilm.com, Ice Cube stated that he would be interested in involving all major characters from the Friday franchise in a possible sequel, but added "I know I'm not going to get Chris back, but I'd love to get everybody else back."

In the Movies is a compilation album of Ice Cube songs that have appeared in movie soundtracks, which was released on September 4, 2007.

Ice Cube and basketball star LeBron James have paired up to pitch a one-hour special to ABC based on James's life. Ice Cube's Are We There Yet television series premiered on TBS on June 2, 2010. Based on the 2005 feature film of the same name, the show revolves around a family adjusting to the matriarch's new husband (Terry Crews) and trying to deal with normal family situations. On August 16, 2010, Are We There Yet? was renewed for 90 additional episodes. In an August 2010 interview with UrbLife.com, Ice Cube expressed excitement about the show being picked up for the run, which will pan out to around six seasons. He also credits Tyler Perry for opening the door for him at TBS.
Clothing line

Ice Cube has licenced a clothing line, SOLO by Cube, which features hooded sweatshirts with built -in headphones in the hood strings.
Personal life
Family

He married Kimberly Woodruff in 1992, with whom he has four children (three boys, one girl).

A father of four, Ice Cube was asked by Fresh Air's Terry Gross to provide some perspective on the relationship between his work and his family. When asked whether or not he allowed his children to listen to his music, he responded: "What's worked for me is instilling in my kids a level of self-respect," helping them to understand the content of not just music but the violence found on the evening news. When asked what he tells his children about profanity, he recalled telling his kids that there are "appropriate times to use any kind of language.... Adults should never hear you use these words. If you want to use these words around your friends, that's really on you." Ice Cube is also the father of rappers OMG and Doughboy, who were featured on his album, I Am the West.
Religion

In an interview with British newspaper The Guardian, Ice Cube stated that he is a Muslim having converted sometime in the 1990s. He described his Muslim faith as a simple, personal one that does not involve attending prayer services or following rituals. Although he has spoken favorably of the Nation of Islam, he denied ever being in the organization.
Discography
Main article: Ice Cube discography

Studio albums

   * 1990: AmeriKKKa's Most Wanted
   * 1991: Death Certificate
   * 1992: The Predator
   * 1993: Lethal Injection
   * 1998: War & Peace Vol. 1 (The War Disc)
   * 2000: War & Peace Vol. 2 (The Peace Disc)
   * 2006: Laugh Now, Cry Later
   * 2008: Raw Footage
   * 2010: I Am the West

Other albums

   * 1991: Kill at Will
   * 1994: Bootlegs & B-Sides
   * 1997: Featuring…Ice Cube
   * 2001: Greatest Hits
   * 2007: In the Movies
   * 2008: The Essentials

Filmography
As an actor
Films
Title Year Role Other notes
Boyz n the Hood 1991 Darin "Doughboy" Baker Main Role
Trespass 1992 Savon Main Role
CB4 1993 himself Cameo
The Glass Shield 1995 Teddy Woods Main Role
Higher Learning 1995 Fudge Main Role
Friday 1995 Craig Jones Main Role
Dangerous Ground 1997 Vusi Madlazi Main Role
Anaconda 1997 Danny Rich Main Role
The Players Club 1998 Reggie Minor Role
I Got The Hook Up 1998 Gun Runner Minor Role
Three Kings 1999 SSgt. Chief Elgin Main Role
Thicker Than Water 1999 Slink Supporting Role
Next Friday 1999 Craig Jones Main Role
Ghosts of Mars 2001 James 'Desolation' Williams Main Role
All About The Benjamins 2002 Detective Bucum Main Role
BarberShop 2002 Calvin Palmer Main Role
Friday After Next 2002 Craig Jones Main Role
Torque 2004 Trey Main Role
BarberShop 2: Back in Business 2004 Calvin Palmer Main Role
Are We There Yet? 2005 Nick Persons Main Role
XXX: State of the Union 2005 Darius Stone Main Role
Are We Done Yet? 2007 Nick Persons Main Role
First Sunday 2008 Durell Main Role
The Longshots 2008 Curtis Plummer Main Role
Janky Promoters 2009 Russell Redds Main Role
Lottery Ticket 2010 Jerome "Thump" Washington Supporting Role
Rampart 2011 TBA TBA
Last Friday 2012 Craig Jones Main Role
21 Jump Street 2012 Capt. Dickson Main Role
Television
Title Year Role Other notes
Are We There Yet? TV series 2010–present Terrence Recurring Role
Video games
Title Year Role Other notes
Call of Duty: Black Ops 2010 Chief Petty Officer Bowman/SOG multiplayer announcer Voice actor
As director/writer/producer

   * Friday (1995) writer, executive producer
   * Dangerous Ground (1997) executive producer
   * The Players Club (1998) writer, director, executive producer
   * Next Friday (2000) writer, producer
   * All About The Benjamins (2002) writer, producer
   * Friday After Next (2002) writer, producer
   * BarberShop 2: Back in Business (2004) executive producer
   * BarberShop: The Series (2005) executive producer
   * Are We There Yet? (2005) producer
   * Beauty Shop (2005) executive producer
   * Black. White. (2006) executive producer
   * Are We Done Yet? (2007) producer
   * Friday: The Animated Series (2007) executive producer
   * Pirate Island (2008) producer
   * The Longshots (2008) producer
   * First Sunday (2008) producer
   * Straight Outta L.A. (2010) director
   * Are We There Yet? (TV series) (2010) executive producer
   * Last Friday (2012) writer, executive producer

Awards
Film award history

Ice Cube has received nominations for several films in the past. To date, he has won two awards:

   * 2000: Blockbuster Entertainment Award: Favorite Action Team (for Three Kings)
   * 2002: MECCA Movie Award: Acting Award

Music awards

   * VH1 Hip Hop Honors 2006
         o 2006 Honoree Snoop Dogg
   * BET Hip-Hop Awards 2009
         o I Am Hip-Hop Award
I'll post pics later my photobucket is not working.


http://i539.photobucket.com/albums/ff352/bukskia/ice_cube.jpg
http://i587.photobucket.com/albums/ss317/DesertPunk-/Ice-Cube.jpg

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 06/15/11 at 7:31 pm


The person of the day...Ice Cube
Ice Cube, whose real name is O'Shea Jackson (born June 15, 1969), is an American rapper, actor, screenwriter, film director, and producer. He began his career as a member of C.I.A. and later joined the rap group N.W.A. After leaving N.W.A in December 1989, he built a successful solo career in music, and also as a writer, director, actor and producer in cinema. Additionally, he has served as one of the producers of the Showtime television series Barbershop and the TBS series Are We There Yet?, both of which are based upon films in which he portrayed the lead character.
In 1987, Ice Cube and Dr. Dre released the single My Posse, under the alias CIA. After the collaboration, Ice Cube showed Eazy-E the lyrics to "Boyz-n-the-Hood". Eazy-E, although initially rejecting the lyrics, eventually recorded the song for N.W.A. and the Posse, the debut album for the group N.W.A that included him, Dre, and other rappers MC Ren and DJ Yella.

By this point Ice Cube was a full-time member of N.W.A along with Dr. Dre and MC Ren. Ice Cube wrote Dr. Dre and Eazy-E's rhymes for the group's landmark album, Straight Outta Compton, released in 1988. However, as 1990 approached, Ice Cube found himself at odds with the group's manager, Jerry Heller, after rejecting Heller's proposed contract terms.

Since Ice Cube wrote the lyrics to approximately half of both Straight Outta Compton, and Eazy-E's solo album, Eazy-Duz-It, he was advised of the amounts he was truly owed by Heller, and took legal action soon after leaving the group and the label. In response, the remaining N.W.A members attacked him on the EP 100 Miles and Runnin' and on their next and final album, Efil4zaggin (Niggaz4life spelled backwards).
Solo career

In late 1989, Ice Cube recorded his debut solo album in Los Angeles with the Bomb Squad (Public Enemy's production team). AmeriKKKa's Most Wanted was released in May 1990 and was an instant hit, riding and contributing to the rising tide of rap's popularity in mainstream society. The album was charged with controversy, and he was accused of misogyny and racism. Subsequently, Ice Cube appointed the female rapper Yo-Yo (who appeared on AmeriKKKa's Most Wanted) to the head of his own record label and helped produce her debut album, Make Way for the Motherlode. This was followed by a critically acclaimed role as 'Doughboy' in John Singleton's hood-based drama, Boyz n the Hood. In the same year as AmeriKKKa's Most Wanted, Ice Cube released the acclaimed EP, Kill At Will which sold well, becoming the first hip hop EP to go both Gold and Platinum.

His 1991 follow-up, Death Certificate was regarded as more focused, yet even more controversial, and critics accused him again of being anti-white, misogynist, and antisemitic. The album is thematically divided into the 'Death Side' ("a vision of where we are today") and the 'Life Side' ("a vision of where we need to go"). It features "No Vaseline", a scathing response to N.W.A's attacks and "Black Korea," a track regarded by some as prophetic of the 1992 Los Angeles riots, but also interpreted as racist by many; it was still being cited years after its release. Ice Cube toured with Lollapalooza in 1992, which widened his fan base.

Ice Cube released The Predator in November 1992. Referring specifically to that year's Los Angeles riots, in the first single, "Wicked", he rapped "April 29 was power to the people, and we might just see a sequel". The Predator debuted at number one on both the pop and R&B charts, the first album in history to do so. Singles from The Predator included "It Was a Good Day" and the "Check Yo Self" remix, and the songs had a two-part music video. The album remains his most successful release, with over three million copies sold in the US. However, after The Predator, Ice Cube's rap audience diminished. Lethal Injection which was released in the end of 1993 and represented Ice Cube's first attempt at imitating the G-Funk sound of Dr. Dre's The Chronic, was not well received by critics. He had more successful hits from Lethal Injection, including "Really Doe", "Bop Gun (One Nation)", "You Know How We Do It" & "What Can I Do?". After 1994, he took a hiatus from music and concentrated on film work and developing the careers of other rap musicians, Mack 10, Mr. Short Khop, Kausion, and Da Lench Mob.

In 1994, Ice Cube had reunited with former N.W.A member Dr. Dre, who was now part of Death Row Records, in their duet "Natural Born Killaz". In 1998, he released his long-awaited solo album, War & Peace Volume 1. The delayed Volume 2, was released in 2000. The albums featured appearances from Westside Connection as well as a reunion with fellow N.W.A members, Dr. Dre and MC Ren, though many fans maintained that the two albums were not on par with his past work, especially the second volume. In 2000, Ice Cube also joined Dr. Dre, Eminem & Snoop Dogg on the Up In Smoke Tour.

In 2006, Ice Cube released his seventh solo album, Laugh Now, Cry Later, on his Lench Mob Records label, debuting at number four on the Billboard Charts and selling 144,000 units in the first week. The album featured production from Lil Jon and Scott Storch, who produced the lead single "Why We Thugs". He released his eighth studio album, Raw Footage, on August 19, 2008, featuring the controversial single "Gangsta Rap Made Me Do It".

On Oct 12, 2009 he released a non-album track called 'Raider Nation' in tribute to the Oakland Raiders' football team he supports.

On May 11, 2010, Ice Cube released a 30 for 30 documentary, "Straight Outta L.A.", for ESPN on the relationship between the gangster rap scene in Los Angeles and the tenure of the Raiders there. He has been voted as eighth of MTV's "greatest emcees of all time."
Westside Connection

In 1996, Ice Cube formed Westside Connection with Mack 10 and WC, and together they released an album called Bow Down. Most of the album was used to engage in the East Coast-West Coast hip hop rivalry of the 90s. The album's eponymous single reached number 21 on the singles charts, and the album itself was certified Platinum by the end of 1996. With Bow Down, Westside Connection brought their own agenda to the hip hop scene. Ice Cube, Mack 10 and WC had grown tired of being overlooked by most East Coast media outlets; the album was designed to instil a sense of pride in West Coast rap fans and to start a larger movement that some people who felt underappreciated might identify with. Songs like "Bow Down" and "Gangstas Make the World Go 'Round" make reference to this. Ice Cube would also eventually make amends with Eazy-E shortly before the latter's death in 1995.

After a seven-year hiatus, Westside Connection returned with their second effort Terrorist Threats in 2003. The album fared well critically, but its commercial reception was less than that of Bow Down. "Gangsta Nation" was the only single released from the album, which was produced by Fredwreck and featured Nate Dogg; it was a radio hit. After a rift between Ice Cube and Mack 10 about Ice Cube's commitments to film work rather than touring with the group, Westside Connection disbanded. WC, however, did release a new solo album on Lench Mob Records entitled Guilty by Affiliation on August 14, 2007.
Collaborations

In 1992 Ice Cube assisted on debut albums from Da Lench Mob (Guerillas in tha Mist, 1992) and Kam (Neva Again, 1993), both of which enjoyed critical acclaim and some moderate commercial success. He handled most of the production on Guerillas in tha Mist.

In 1993, Lench Mob member, J-Dee, was sentenced to life imprisonment for attempted murder, and Ice Cube did not produce their next album, Planet of tha Apes. Around this time in 1993, he also worked with Tupac Shakur on his album Strictly 4 My N.I.G.G.A.Z., appearing on the track "Last Wordz" with Ice-T. He also did a song with Dr. Dre for the first time since he left N.W.A: "Natural Born Killaz", for the Murder Was The Case soundtrack, and also contributed to the Office Space soundtrack. He also featured on Kool G Rap's song "Two To The Head" from the Kool G Rap & DJ Polo album "Live And Let Die". Ice Cube appeared on the song "Children of the Korn" by the band Korn, and lent his voice to British DJ Paul Oakenfold's solo debut album, Bunkka, on the track "Get Em Up".
2004–2010

In 2004, his hit singles "Check Yo Self", "It Was a Good Day" and affiliated song "Guerrillas in tha Mist" with Da Lench Mob appeared on popular video game Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas on fictional radio station Radio Los Santos.

In late 2005, Ice Cube and R. J. Cutler teamed up to create the six-part documentary series titled Black. White., which was broadcast on cable network FX. In May 2006 Ice Cube complained that Oprah Winfrey would not welcome him and other rappers on her show. Ice Cube's other movie projects include Teacher of the Year, released in 2007, and The Extractors, released in 2008.

He has signed on to star in and produce Welcome Back, Kotter, a big-screen adaptation of the 1970s television series. Ice Cube will play the title character, originally portrayed by Gabe Kaplan and his film company, Cube Vision Productions, has sealed a deal with Dimension Films to bring the show to the big screen.

In a London interview he revealed he is in talks of a collaboration with Gorillaz after speaking to frontman Damon Albarn.

In October 2006 Xzibit, Lil Jon and WC from the Westside Connection honoured Ice Cube at VH1's Annual Hip Hop Honors, performing some classic Ice Cube tracks, and Ice Cube also performed "Why We Thugs" and "Go To Church" from his album Laugh Now, Cry Later, where the New York crowd were greeted with Cube's vintage Cali sound. After launching that comeback album, Ice Cube toured across the world to promote it. The tour is known as "Straight Outta Compton Tour", and accompanying him is his friend and fellow rapper WC from the Westside Connection. Some places he has recently performed include the Paradiso in Amsterdam and various venues in England. After touring the U.S. and Europe, he performed all around Australia, from Sydney's Enmore Theatre to The Forum Arena in Melbourne, before heading to Japan.

Although Ice Cube has made references of going to church and mosque, he has indicated that he is a deist, without following religious "rituals and traditions".

Ice Cube collaborated with Tech N9ne on the song "Blackboy" that appears on Tech N9ne's July 2008 album Killer. The eighth Ice Cube studio LP, titled Raw Footage, was released on August 19, 2008, and featured the singles Gangsta Rap Made Me Do It and Do Ya Thang. Ice Cube appeared on a song by rapper The Game titled "State of Emergency" off The Game's Album, L.A.X. In 2009, Ice Cube performed at the Gathering of the Juggalos, and will return to perform at the 2011 festival.

Despite rumors of conflicts with other rappers in 2010, Ice Cube stated in an interview with DJ Whoo Kid on Sirius Shade 45 that he has "no beef."

Ice Cube's ninth studio album I Am the West was released on September 28, 2010. Ice Cube has stated this album has a different direction than any one of his other albums. He received beats from West coast veteran producers such as DJ Quik, Dr. Dre, E-A-Ski, and Sir Jinx, not having worked on a solo album with the latter in nearly 20 years. The album was released independently under his label Lench Mob. Ice Cube has stated that "being independent is beautiful because we can do things 'out the box' that record companies would usually frown at. Instead of working from a ready-made cookie-cutter marketing plan, we can tailor make a marketing plan specifically for me."
Other ventures
Film and television career

Following his role as 'Doughboy' in Boyz-n-the-Hood, in 1992 he starred alongside Ice-T, and Bill Paxton in Walter Hill's action film, Trespass, and then in The Glass Shield.

Ice Cube was offered a co-star role with Janet Jackson in the 1993 romantic film Poetic Justice, but he refused the role, which was given to Tupac Shakur instead.

John Singleton had encouraged Ice Cube to try his hand at screenwriting, telling him, "If you can write a record, you can write a movie." With this encouragement, Ice Cube wrote the screenplay for what became the 1995 comedy Friday, in which he also starred, alongside then up-and-coming comedian Chris Tucker. Friday earned $28 million worldwide on a $3.5 million budget, and spawned two sequels, Next Friday and Friday After Next. That year, he also starred in his second collaboration with John Singleton, Higher Learning, as world-weary university student "Fudge"; a role for which he earned award nominations.

In 1997 Ice Cube starred in the action thriller Dangerous Ground as a South African exiled to America who returns 15 years later. He also had a supporting role in the film Anaconda that same year. He wrote, executive produced, and made his directorial debut in The Players Club in 1998, and in 1999 starred alongside George Clooney and Mark Wahlberg in the critically acclaimed Three Kings. In 2000, he wrote and appeared in the Friday sequel Next Friday. In 2002, Ice Cube starred in the commercially successful movie Barbershop, as well as All About the Benjamins and the third film in the Friday trilogy, Friday after Next (which he again wrote). In 2004, he appeared in Barbershop 2: Back in Business, and Torque; in 2005 he starred in the action movie XXX: State of the Union, the comedy Are We There Yet? and Are We Done Yet?, co-starring Nia Long.

In early April 2007 Ice Cube was a guest on Angie Martinez' Hot97 radio show and stated that he was interested in bringing back Chris Tucker as Smokey in a possible Friday sequel, but that was only possible "if New Line cuts the cheque." In an interview with BlackFilm.com, Ice Cube stated that he would be interested in involving all major characters from the Friday franchise in a possible sequel, but added "I know I'm not going to get Chris back, but I'd love to get everybody else back."

In the Movies is a compilation album of Ice Cube songs that have appeared in movie soundtracks, which was released on September 4, 2007.

Ice Cube and basketball star LeBron James have paired up to pitch a one-hour special to ABC based on James's life. Ice Cube's Are We There Yet television series premiered on TBS on June 2, 2010. Based on the 2005 feature film of the same name, the show revolves around a family adjusting to the matriarch's new husband (Terry Crews) and trying to deal with normal family situations. On August 16, 2010, Are We There Yet? was renewed for 90 additional episodes. In an August 2010 interview with UrbLife.com, Ice Cube expressed excitement about the show being picked up for the run, which will pan out to around six seasons. He also credits Tyler Perry for opening the door for him at TBS.
Clothing line

Ice Cube has licenced a clothing line, SOLO by Cube, which features hooded sweatshirts with built -in headphones in the hood strings.
Personal life
Family

He married Kimberly Woodruff in 1992, with whom he has four children (three boys, one girl).

A father of four, Ice Cube was asked by Fresh Air's Terry Gross to provide some perspective on the relationship between his work and his family. When asked whether or not he allowed his children to listen to his music, he responded: "What's worked for me is instilling in my kids a level of self-respect," helping them to understand the content of not just music but the violence found on the evening news. When asked what he tells his children about profanity, he recalled telling his kids that there are "appropriate times to use any kind of language.... Adults should never hear you use these words. If you want to use these words around your friends, that's really on you." Ice Cube is also the father of rappers OMG and Doughboy, who were featured on his album, I Am the West.
Religion

In an interview with British newspaper The Guardian, Ice Cube stated that he is a Muslim having converted sometime in the 1990s. He described his Muslim faith as a simple, personal one that does not involve attending prayer services or following rituals. Although he has spoken favorably of the Nation of Islam, he denied ever being in the organization.
Discography
Main article: Ice Cube discography

Studio albums

   * 1990: AmeriKKKa's Most Wanted
   * 1991: Death Certificate
   * 1992: The Predator
   * 1993: Lethal Injection
   * 1998: War & Peace Vol. 1 (The War Disc)
   * 2000: War & Peace Vol. 2 (The Peace Disc)
   * 2006: Laugh Now, Cry Later
   * 2008: Raw Footage
   * 2010: I Am the West

Other albums

   * 1991: Kill at Will
   * 1994: Bootlegs & B-Sides
   * 1997: Featuring…Ice Cube
   * 2001: Greatest Hits
   * 2007: In the Movies
   * 2008: The Essentials

Filmography
As an actor
Films
Title Year Role Other notes
Boyz n the Hood 1991 Darin "Doughboy" Baker Main Role
Trespass 1992 Savon Main Role
CB4 1993 himself Cameo
The Glass Shield 1995 Teddy Woods Main Role
Higher Learning 1995 Fudge Main Role
Friday 1995 Craig Jones Main Role
Dangerous Ground 1997 Vusi Madlazi Main Role
Anaconda 1997 Danny Rich Main Role
The Players Club 1998 Reggie Minor Role
I Got The Hook Up 1998 Gun Runner Minor Role
Three Kings 1999 SSgt. Chief Elgin Main Role
Thicker Than Water 1999 Slink Supporting Role
Next Friday 1999 Craig Jones Main Role
Ghosts of Mars 2001 James 'Desolation' Williams Main Role
All About The Benjamins 2002 Detective Bucum Main Role
BarberShop 2002 Calvin Palmer Main Role
Friday After Next 2002 Craig Jones Main Role
Torque 2004 Trey Main Role
BarberShop 2: Back in Business 2004 Calvin Palmer Main Role
Are We There Yet? 2005 Nick Persons Main Role
XXX: State of the Union 2005 Darius Stone Main Role
Are We Done Yet? 2007 Nick Persons Main Role
First Sunday 2008 Durell Main Role
The Longshots 2008 Curtis Plummer Main Role
Janky Promoters 2009 Russell Redds Main Role
Lottery Ticket 2010 Jerome "Thump" Washington Supporting Role
Rampart 2011 TBA TBA
Last Friday 2012 Craig Jones Main Role
21 Jump Street 2012 Capt. Dickson Main Role
Television
Title Year Role Other notes
Are We There Yet? TV series 2010–present Terrence Recurring Role
Video games
Title Year Role Other notes
Call of Duty: Black Ops 2010 Chief Petty Officer Bowman/SOG multiplayer announcer Voice actor
As director/writer/producer

   * Friday (1995) writer, executive producer
   * Dangerous Ground (1997) executive producer
   * The Players Club (1998) writer, director, executive producer
   * Next Friday (2000) writer, producer
   * All About The Benjamins (2002) writer, producer
   * Friday After Next (2002) writer, producer
   * BarberShop 2: Back in Business (2004) executive producer
   * BarberShop: The Series (2005) executive producer
   * Are We There Yet? (2005) producer
   * Beauty Shop (2005) executive producer
   * Black. White. (2006) executive producer
   * Are We Done Yet? (2007) producer
   * Friday: The Animated Series (2007) executive producer
   * Pirate Island (2008) producer
   * The Longshots (2008) producer
   * First Sunday (2008) producer
   * Straight Outta L.A. (2010) director
   * Are We There Yet? (TV series) (2010) executive producer
   * Last Friday (2012) writer, executive producer

Awards
Film award history

Ice Cube has received nominations for several films in the past. To date, he has won two awards:

   * 2000: Blockbuster Entertainment Award: Favorite Action Team (for Three Kings)
   * 2002: MECCA Movie Award: Acting Award

Music awards

   * VH1 Hip Hop Honors 2006
         o 2006 Honoree Snoop Dogg
   * BET Hip-Hop Awards 2009
         o I Am Hip-Hop Award
I'll post pics later my photobucket is not working.


http://i539.photobucket.com/albums/ff352/bukskia/ice_cube.jpg
http://i587.photobucket.com/albums/ss317/DesertPunk-/Ice-Cube.jpg


I always thought Ice Cube and Ice T were the same person. :D

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/16/11 at 6:44 am


I always thought Ice Cube and Ice T were the same person. :D

:D
We need Ice Cream :D

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/16/11 at 6:48 am

The person of the day...Phil Mickelson
Philip Alfred Mickelson (born June 16, 1970) is an American professional golfer. He has won four major championships and a total of 39 events on the PGA Tour. He has reached a career high world ranking of 2nd in multiple years. He is nicknamed "Lefty" for his left-handed swing, even though he is otherwise right-handed. According to estimates by Fortune Magazine, Mickelson's income for 2007 was over $51 million, with $47 million coming from endorsements.
Mickelson's first major championship win came at the 2004 Masters, where he won with an 18-foot final hole birdie putt, defeating Ernie Els in a Sunday back-nine duel in which the two traded birdies and eagles back and forth. In addition to getting the "majors monkey" off his back, this made him only the third golfer with a left-handed swing to win a major, the others being New Zealander Sir Bob Charles who won the British Open in 1963 and Canadian Mike Weir who won The Masters in 2003. (Like Mickelson, Weir is a right-hander who plays left-handed.)

Just prior to the 2004 Ryder Cup, Mickelson was dropped from his long-standing contract with Titleist/Acushnet Golf, when he took heat for a voicemail message he left for a Callaway Golf executive. In it, he praised their driver and golf ball and thanked them for their help in getting some equipment for his brother. This memo was played to all of their salesmen, and eventually found its way back to Titleist. He was then let out of his multi-year deal with Titleist 16 months early, and signed on with Callaway Golf, his current equipment sponsor. He endured a great deal of ridicule and scrutiny from the press and fellow Ryder Cup members for his equipment change so close to the Ryder Cup matches. He faltered at the 2004 Ryder Cup, going 1-3-0, but refused to blame the sudden change in equipment or his practice methods for his performance.

The following year, in a Monday final round conclusion forced by weather, Mickelson captured his second career major championship with his victory at the 2005 PGA Championship at Baltusrol. On the 18th hole, Mickelson hit one of his trademark soft pitches from deep greenside rough to within a foot and a half of the cup, and then made his birdie to finish at a 4-under-par total of 276, one shot ahead of Steve Elkington and Thomas Bjørn.

Mickelson captured his third major championship the following spring by winning the 2006 Masters. Mickelson won his second Green Jacket after shooting a 3-under-par final round, winning by two strokes over his nearest rival Tim Clark. This win propelled him to 2nd place in the Official World Golf Rankings (his career best), behind Tiger Woods and ahead of Vijay Singh and Retief Goosen.
Winged Foot

At the 2006 U.S. Open at Winged Foot, Mickelson was part of a wild finish, in which he ended up in a tie for second place at +6 (286), one shot behind champion Geoff Ogilvy. On the 71st hole, Mickelson, with the lead at +3, missed the fairway to the left, and his drive finished inside a garbage can, from which he was granted a free drop; he parred the hole, but his bogey on the previous hole reduced his lead to one shot heading to the final hole. Needing a par for a one-shot victory, he chose to hit driver on the final hole of the tournament, and hit it well left of the fairway (he had only hit two of thirteen fairways previously in the round). The ball bounced off a corporate hospitality tent and settled in an area of trampled-down grass that was enclosed with trees. He decided to go for the green with his second shot, rather than play it safe and pitch out into the fairway. His ball then hit a tree, and did not advance more than 50 yards. His next shot plugged into the left greenside bunker. He was unable to get up and down from there, resulting in a double bogey, and costing him a chance of winning the championship outright or getting into a playoff, and also ending his bid to join Ben Hogan and Tiger Woods as the only players to win three consecutive professional majors (he had won two in a row heading into Winged Foot).
2006–08
Phil Mickelson at 2007 Barclays Singapore Open.

During the third round of the 2006 Ford Championship at Doral, Mickelson gave $200 to a spectator after his wayward tee shot at the par-5 10th broke the man's watch.

Mickelson has also shown other signs of appreciation. In 2007, after hearing the story of retired NFL player Conrad Dobler and his family on ESPN explaining their struggles to pay medical bills, Mickelson volunteered to pay tuition for Holli Dobler, Conrad Dobler's daughter, at Miami University in Ohio.

Frustrated with his driving accuracy, Mickelson made the decision in April 2007 to leave longtime swing coach Rick Smith. He currently works with Butch Harmon, a former coach of Tiger Woods. On May 13, 2007, Mickelson came from a stroke back on the final round to shoot a three-under 69 to win The Players Championship with an 11-under-par 277. This Mother's Day win was his first without his wife and children present.

In the 2007 U.S. Open at Oakmont, after shooting 11 over par after 2 rounds, Mickelson missed the cut (by a stroke) for the first time in 31 majors, since the 1999 British Open at Carnoustie. He had been hampered by a wrist injury that was incurred while practicing in the thick rough at Oakmont a few weeks before the tournament.

On September 3, 2007, Mickelson won the Deutsche Bank Championship which is the second FedEx Cup playoff event. On the final day, he was paired with Tiger Woods, who ended up finishing two strokes behind Mickelson in a tie for second. It was the first time Mickelson was able to best Woods while paired together on the final day of a tournament. The next day Mickelson announced that he would not be competing in the third FedEx Cup playoff event. The day before his withdrawal, Mickelson said during a television interview that PGA Tour Commissioner Tim Finchem had not responded to advice he had given him on undisclosed issues.

In a Men's Vogue article, Mickelson recounted his effort to lose 20 pounds with the help of trainer Sean Cochran. "Once the younger players started to come on tour, he realized that he had to start working out to maintain longevity in his career," Cochran said. Mickelson's regimen consisted of increasing flexibility and power, eating five smaller meals a day, aerobic training, and carrying his own golf bag.

Mickelson was inducted into the National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame in 2008.
2009

Mickelson won for the first time in 2009 by defending his title at the Northern Trust Open at Riviera Country Club. He finished one stroke ahead of Steve Stricker. It was Mickelson's 35th win on tour; he surpassed Vijay Singh for second place on the current PGA Tour wins list. A month later, he won his 36th title on the tour, and his first World Golf Championship, at the 2009 WGC-CA Championship with a one- stroke win over Nick Watney.

On May 20, 2009, it was announced that Mickelson's wife, Amy, was diagnosed with breast cancer, and Mickelson announced he would suspend his PGA Tour schedule indefinitely. His management company said that Amy Mickelson would begin treatment with major surgery as early as the following two weeks. Mickelson was scheduled to play the HP Byron Nelson Championship May 21–24, and to defend his title May 28–31 at the Crowne Plaza Invitational at Colonial, but withdrew from both events. During the final round of the 2009 BMW PGA Championship, fellow golfer and family friend John Daly wore bright pink trousers in support of Mickelson's wife. Also, the next Saturday, at the Crowne Plaza Invitational at Colonial, a "Pink Out" event was hosted, and the PGA Tour players all wore pink that day, to support the Mickelson family. On May 31, Mickelson announced that he would return to play on the PGA Tour in June at the St. Jude Classic and the U.S. Open, since he had heard from the doctors treating his wife that her cancer had been detected in an early stage.

Mickelson shot a final round 70 at the 2009 U.S. Open and recorded his fifth runner-up finish at the U.S. Open, a record. He shared the lead after an eagle at the 13th hole, but fell back with bogeys on 15 and 17; Lucas Glover captured the championship.

On July 6, 2009 it was announced that his mother, Mary Mickelson, was diagnosed with breast cancer and would have surgery at the same hospital where his wife was treated. After hearing the news of his mother now being diagnosed with breast cancer, Mickelson took another leave of absence from the Tour, missing The Open Championship. On July 28, Mickelson announced he would return to the PGA Tour in August at the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational, the week before the PGA Championship at Hazeltine National Golf Club in Chaska, Minnesota.

In September, Mickelson won The Tour Championship for the second time in his career. He entered the final round four strokes off the lead, but shot a final round 65 to win the event by three strokes over Tiger Woods. With the win, Mickelson finished the season second behind Woods in the 2009 FedEx Cup standings.

On November 8, 2009, Mickelson won the WGC-HSBC Champions by one shot over Ernie Els in Shanghai.
2010: Third Masters win

On April 11, 2010, Mickelson won the 2010 Masters Tournament with a 16-under-par performance, giving him a three-stroke win over Lee Westwood in Augusta, Georgia. The win marked the third Masters victory for Mickelson and his fourth major championship overall. Critical to Mickelson's win was a dramatic run in the third round on Saturday in which Mickelson, trailing leader Westwood by five strokes as he prepared his approach shot to the 13th green, proceeded to make eagle, then to hole-out for eagle from 141 yards at the next hole, the par 4 14th, then on the next, the par 5 15th, to miss eagle from 81 yards by mere inches. After tapping in for birdie at 15, Mickelson, at -12, led Westwood, at -11, who had bogeyed hole 12 and failed to capitalize on the par 5 13th, settling for par.

Westwood did recapture the one-stroke lead by round's end, but the momentum carried forward for Mickelson into round 4, where he posted a bogey-free 67 to Westwood's 71, and no other pursuer was able to keep pace to the end, though K.J. Choi and Anthony Kim made notable charges. For good measure, Mickelson birdied the final hole and memorably greeted his waiting wife, Amy, with a prolonged hug and kiss.

For many fans, this finish to the tournament was especially poignant, given Amy's suffering from breast cancer for the preceding year; Mary Mickelson, Phil's mother, was also dealing with cancer. CBS Sports announcer Jim Nantz's call of the final birdie putt, "That's a win for the family," was seen by many as capturing the moment well.

Thanks to the dramatic return of Tiger Woods to competitive play after a scandal-ridden 20-week absence, to his close contention throughout for the lead (he finished tied with Choi for 4th at -11), and to Mickelson and others' memorably exciting play over the weekend, the 2010 Masters showed strong television ratings in the United States, ranking third all-time to Woods's historic wins in 1997 and 2001. Mickelson's win left him second only to Woods in major championships among his competitive contemporaries, moving him ahead of Ernie Els, Vijay Singh and Pádraig Harrington, with three major championships each and each, like Mickelson, with dozens of worldwide wins.

Mickelson, who was one of the favorites for the U.S. Open at Pebble Beach, shot 74 and 66 on Thursday and Friday to sit a shot off the lead. However, two weekend scores of 73 gave him a T4 finish. During the rest of the 2010 season, Mickelson had multiple opportunities to become the number one player in the Official World Golf Rankings following the travails of Tiger Woods. However, a string of disappointing finishes by Mickelson saw the number one spot eventually go to Englishman Lee Westwood.

In the days leading up to the 2010 PGA Championship at Whistling Straits, Mickelson announced he had been diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis. He added that he had started medical treatment, and had become a vegetarian in hopes of aiding his recovery. He maintains that both his short and long term prognosis are good, that the condition should have no long term effect on his golfing career, and that he currently feels well. He also stated that the arthritis may go into permanent remission after one year of medical treatment. He went on to finish the championship T12, five shots back of victor Martin Kaymer.
2011

On April 3, 2011, Mickelson won the Shell Houston Open with a 20-under-par performance, giving him a three-stroke win over Scott Verplank. Mickelson rose to No. 3 in the world ranking, while Tiger Woods fell to No. 7. Mickelson had not been ranked above Woods since the week prior to the 1997 Masters Tournament.
Amateur wins (7)

    * 1981 Junior World Golf Championships (Boys 9-10)
    * 1989 NCAA Division I Championship
    * 1990 NCAA Division I Championship, U.S. Amateur, Porter Cup
    * 1991 Western Amateur
    * 1992 NCAA Division I Championship

Professional wins (47)
Mickelson with the trophy for the 2007 Players Championship
PGA Tour wins (39)
Legend
Major Championships (4)
World Golf Championships (1)
FedEx Cup Events (2)
Other PGA Tour (32)
http://i558.photobucket.com/albums/ss21/Henry_Taso/mickelson1.jpg
http://i201.photobucket.com/albums/aa303/aaaswingersgolf/MP_Phil.jpg

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 06/16/11 at 7:00 am


:D
We need Ice Cream :D


or Vanilla Ice. :D

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/16/11 at 10:00 am


or Vanilla Ice. :D

Nice ;)

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 06/16/11 at 1:16 pm

It's also Stan Laurel's birthday,today he would've been 121.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/17/11 at 7:08 am

The person of the day...Barry Manilow
Barry Manilow (born June 17, 1943) is an American singer-songwriter, musician, arranger, producer, conductor, and performer, best known for such recordings as "Could It Be Magic", "Mandy", "Can't Smile Without You", and "Copacabana (At the Copa)."

In 1978, five of his albums were on the best-selling charts simultaneously, a feat equalled only by Frank Sinatra, Michael Jackson, Bruce Springsteen and Johnny Mathis. He has recorded a string of Billboard hit singles and multi-platinum albums that have resulted in his being named Radio & Records number one Adult Contemporary artist and winning three straight American Music Awards for Favorite Pop/Rock Male Artist. Several well-known entertainers have given Manilow their "stamp of approval," including Sinatra, who was quoted in the 1970s regarding Manilow, "He's next." In 1988, Bob Dylan stopped Manilow at a party, hugged him and said, "Don't stop what you're doing, man. We're all inspired by you."

As well as producing and arranging albums for other artists, such as Bette Midler and Dionne Warwick, Manilow has written songs for musicals, films, and commercials. From February 2005 to December 30, 2009, he was the headliner at the Las Vegas Hilton, performing hundreds of shows before ending relationship with the hotel. From March 2010, he has headlined at the Paris Hotel in Las Vegas. He has sold more than 250 million records worldwide.
Manilow's well-known association with Bette Midler began at the Continental Baths in New York City. He accompanied her and other artists on the piano from 1970 to 1971, and Midler chose him to assist with the production of her first two albums, The Divine Miss M (1972) and Bette Midler (1973), and act as her musical director on The Divine Miss M tour. Manilow worked with Midler for four years, from 1971 to 1975. In 1974, Bell Records released Manilow's first album, Barry Manilow, which offered an eclectic mix of piano-driven pop and guitar-driven rock music, including a song that Manilow had composed for the 1972 war drama Parades.

Among other songs on the album were "Cloudburst", and "Could It Be Magic." The latter's music was based on Chopin's "Prelude in C Minor, Opus 28, Number 20", and provided Donna Summer with one of her major hits. (It was also covered by Take That in the 1990s, as an up-beat disco version of the song. Take That have since performed Manilow's original version in their Beautiful World Tour.) When Manilow's record company, Bell Records, merged with other labels, new entity Arista Records formed. Under the auspices of its head Clive Davis many artists were dropped. Davis was reassured by the Manilow acquisition after seeing him perform as the opening act at a Dionne Warwick concert.

The partnership began to gain traction in 1974, with the release of Manilow's second album, Barry Manilow II, originally titled Sweetwater Jones on Bell Records and given its eventual title when reissued on Arista, which contained the breakthrough number-one hit, "Mandy." Manilow had not wanted to record "Mandy," which had originally been titled "Brandy" and was co-written and originally recorded by Scott English, but the song was included at the insistence of Davis. Following the success of Barry Manilow II, the first Bell Records album release was re-mixed and re-issued on Arista Records as Barry Manilow I. When Manilow went on his first tour, he included, in his show, what he called "A V.S.M.," or "A Very Strange Medley." As previously stated, this was a sampling of some of the commercial jingles that he had written, composed, and/or sung. Beginning with Manilow's March 22, 1975, appearance on American Bandstand to promote the second album, a productive friendship with Dick Clark started. Numerous appearances by Manilow on Clark's productions of Dick Clark's New Year's Rockin' Eve, singing his original seasonal favorite "It's Just Another New Year's Eve," American Bandstand anniversary shows, American Music Awards performances, and his 1985 television movie Copacabana are among their projects together.

"Mandy" was the start of a string of hit singles and albums that lasted through the rest of the 1970s to the early 1980s, coming from the multi-platinum and multi-hit albums Tryin' to Get the Feeling, This One's for You, Even Now, and One Voice. Despite being a songwriter in his own right, several of Manilow's commercial successes were with songs by others. Among hits he did not write or compose are "Mandy," "Tryin’ to Get the Feeling Again" by David Pomerantz, "Weekend in New England" (by Randy Edelman), "Looks Like We Made It" by Richard Kerr and Will Jennings, "Can't Smile Without You" and "Ready to Take a Chance Again." Ironically, another one of his hits that Manilow did not write or compose himself was his number 1 "I Write The Songs" (by Bruce Johnston of The Beach Boys). According to album liner notes, Manilow did, however, co-produce them with Ron Dante and arrange them.

Manilow's breakthrough in Britain came with the release of "Even Now," the first of many top 20 albums on that side of the Atlantic. This was quickly followed by Manilow Magic – The Best Of Barry Manilow, also known as Greatest Hits. On its initial release it was marketed with a large television campaign by the mail order label "Teledisc." In the late 1970s and early 1980s, ABC aired four variety television specials starring and executive produced by Manilow. The Barry Manilow Special with Penny Marshall as his guest premiered on March 2, 1977 to an audience of 37 million. The breakthrough special was nominated for four Emmys and won in the category of "Outstanding Comedy-Variety or Music Special." The Second Barry Manilow Special in 1978, with Ray Charles as his guest, was also nominated for four Emmys.
Manilow in 1979

Manilow's "Ready To Take a Chance Again" originated in the film Foul Play, which also featured "Copacabana," from his 4th studio album "Even Now." "Ready To Take A Chance Again" was nominated that year for the "Best Original Song" Oscar. Copacabana would later take the form of a musical television movie, starring Manilow, and three musical plays. On February 11, 1979, a concert from Manilow's sold-out dates at the Greek Theater in Los Angeles, California aired on HBO series Standing Room Only, which was the first pay-television show to pose a serious challenge to network primetime specials in the ratings. From the same tour in 1978, a one-hour special from Manilow's sold out concert at the Royal Albert Hall aired in the UK.

On May 23, 1979, ABC aired The Third Barry Manilow Special, with John Denver as his guest. This special was nominated for two Emmy awards and won for "Outstanding Achievement in Choreography." Also in 1979, Manilow produced Dionne Warwick's "comeback" album Dionne, her first to go platinum. He scored a top ten hit of his own in the fall of 1979 with the song "Ships" (written and composed by Ian Hunter, former lead singer of Mott the Hoople) from the album "One Voice."
1980s

The 1980s gave Manilow the adult contemporary chart-topping songs "The Old Songs", "Somewhere Down the Road", "Read 'Em and Weep" (a Meat Loaf cover, written by Jim Steinman) and a remake of the 1941 Jule Styne and Frank Loesser standard "I Don't Want to Walk Without You." Manilow continued having high radio airplay throughout the decade. In the UK, Manilow had five sold-out performances at Royal Albert Hall. In the United States, at Radio City Music Hall (1984) his 10-night run set a box-office sales record of nearly $2 million, making him the top draw in the then 52-year history of the venue. In 1980, Manilow's One Voice special, with Dionne Warwick as his guest, was nominated for an Emmy for "Outstanding Achievement in Music Direction".

Also in 1980, a concert from Manilow's sold-out shows at England's Wembley Arena was broadcast while he was on a world tour. Manilow released the self-titled Barry (1980), which was his first album to not reach the top ten in the United States, stopping at #15. The album contained "I Made It Through The Rain" (originally a minor hit for its writer, Gerard Kenny) and "Bermuda Triangle." The album If I Should Love Again followed in 1981, containing "The Old Songs," "Let's Hang On," and "Somewhere Down The Road." This was the first of his own albums that Manilow produced without Ron Dante, who had co-produced all the previous albums. Manilow's sold-out concert at the Pittsburgh Civic Arena in Pittsburgh aired nationally on Showtime, and locally on Philadelphia's now-defunct PRISM. In 1982, a concert from his sold out Royal Albert Hall show was broadcast in England. The live album and video Barry Live in Britain also came from his Royal Albert Hall shows.

On August 27, 1983, Manilow performed a landmark open air concert at Blenheim Palace in Britain. It was the first such event ever held at that venue and was attended by a conservative estimate of 40,000 people. This concert was also taped for airing on Showtime. In December 1983, Manilow was reported to have endowed the music departments at six major universities in the United States and Canada. The endowments were part of a continuing endeavor by Manilow to recognize and encourage new musical talent.

In 1984 Manilow released 2:00 AM Paradise Cafe, a jazz/blues collection of original barroom tunes recorded in one live take in the studio. That same year, Showtime aired a documentary of Manilow recording the album with a number of jazz legends, such as Sarah Vaughn and Mel Tormé. In 1984 and 1985, England aired two one-hour concert specials from his National Exhibition Centre (NEC) concerts. In 1985, Manilow left Arista Records for RCA Records. There he released the pop album Manilow, and began a phase of international music, as he performed songs and duets in French, Spanish, Portuguese, and Japanese, among other languages. The Manilow album was a complete about face from the Paradise Cafe album, containing a number of tracks of a modern uptempo and synthesized quality. In 1985, Japan aired a Manilow concert special where he played "Sakura" on the koto.

In his only lead acting role, he portrayed Tony Starr in a 1985 CBS film based on Copacabana, alongside Annette O'Toole as Lola Lamarr and Joseph Bologna as Rico. Manilow penned all the songs for the movie, with lyrics provided by established collaborators Bruce Sussman and Jack Feldman, and released Copacabana: The Original Motion Picture Soundtrack Album on RCA Records. In October 1986, Manilow, along with Bruce Sussman, Tom Scott, and Charlie Fox, went to Washington, D.C. for two days of meetings with legislators, including lunch with then Senator Al Gore (D-TN). They were there to lobby against a copyright bill put forward by local television broadcasters that would mandate songwriter-producer source licensing of theme and incidental music on syndicated television show reruns and would disallow use of the blanket license now in effect. The songwriters said without the blanket license, artists would have to negotiate up front with producers individually, without knowing if a series would be a success. The license now pays according to a per-use formula. Manilow said that such a bill would act as a precedent for broadcasters to get rid of the blanket license entirely.

The following year, McGraw-Hill published his autobiography, Sweet Life: Adventures on the Way to Paradise, which had taken him about three years to complete. While promoting the work, Manilow defended his music in a telephone interview: "I live in laid-back L.A., but in my heart, I'm an energetic New Yorker and that's what has always come out of my music. I've always been surprised when the critics said I made wimpy little ballads". Manilow returned to Arista Records in 1987 with the release of Swing Street. The album, a mixture of traditional after-dark and techno jazz, contained "Brooklyn Blues," an autobiographical song for Manilow, and "Hey Mambo," an uptempo Latin style duet with Kid Creole, produced with the help of Emilio Estefan, Jr., founder of Miami Sound Machine.

In March 1988, CBS aired Manilow's Big Fun on Swing Street special. It featured songs and special guests from his Swing Street and 2:00 AM Paradise Cafe albums, including Kid Creole and the Coconuts, Phyllis Hyman, Stanley Clarke, Carmen McRae, Tom Scott, and Uncle Festive, a band within Manilow's band at the time. The special was nominated for two Emmys in technical categories, and won in the category of "Outstanding Art Direction for a Variety or Music program".

In 1988, he performed "Please Don't Be Scared" and "Mandy/Could It Be Magic" at That's What Friends Are For: AIDS Concert '88, a benefit concert for the Warwick Foundation headed by Dionne Warwick and shown on Showtime a few years later. In the 1988 Walt Disney Pictures animated feature Oliver & Company, Bette Midler's character sang a new Manilow composition called "Perfect Isn't Easy." The 1989 release of Barry Manilow, which contained "Please Don't Be Scared," "Keep Each Other Warm," and "The One That Got Away," ended Manilow's streak of albums of original self-written material (he neither wrote nor arranged any of the songs except for two) and began a phase of his recording career consisting of covers and compilations.

From April 18 to June 10, 1989, Manilow put on a show called Barry Manilow at the Gershwin, making 44 appearances at the Gershwin Theatre (also known as the Uris Theatre), where, by coincidence, he recorded Barry Manilow Live in 1976. A best-selling 90-minute video of the same show was released the following year as Barry Manilow Live On Broadway. The Showtime one-hour special Barry Manilow SRO on Broadway consisted of edited highlights from this video. Manilow followed this set of shows with a world tour of the Broadway show.
Discography
Main article: Barry Manilow discography
Awards

    * 1977 Grammy – I Write The Songs – Song of the Year (award went to the song's writer Bruce Johnston)
    * 1977 Emmy for Outstanding Special – Comedy, Variety or Music – The Barry Manilow Special
    * 1977 Special Tony Award – Barry Manilow on Broadway
    * 1978 American Music Awards – Best Pop/Rock Male Artist
    * 1979 Grammy – Copacabana Best Pop Male Vocal Performance
    * 1979 American Music Awards – Best Pop/Rock Male Artist
    * 1980 American Music Awards – Best Pop/Rock Male Artist
    * 2002 Songwriter's Hall of Fame
    * 2006 Emmy for Outstanding Individual Performance in a Variety or Music Program – Barry Manilow: Music And Passion
    * 2007 RIAA – Plaque commemorating worldwide record sales of 75 million
    * 2009 Clio Awards Honorary award for prior work with commercial jingles
    *  ? Kentucky Colonel
    * 2009 Inducted into the Hit Parade Hall of Fame

Selected TV and movie appearances
Barry Manilow at the premiere of The Rose (starring Bette Midler), November 7, 1979

    * Donny & Marie in 1977.

    * ABC special The Stars Salute Israel At 30 on May 8, 1978.

    * May 8, 1982, Goldie & Kids a special where he acted in skits and sang "One Voice" and "I Am Your Child" with hostess Goldie Hawn.

    * On September 17, 1987 he appeared in the star-studded CBS special We The People 200: The Constitutional Gala taped at the Philadelphia Civic Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to debut his song "Let Freedom Ring" where President Ronald Reagan was in attendance.

    * On May 17, 1993, Manilow made a guest appearance on the CBS show Murphy Brown. On the show, Candice Bergen's title character had frequently made reference to her hatred of Manilow's music, but after she became a mother, Manilow appeared to sing her a sweet version of his tune "I Am Your Child," winning her over with the song about a parent's bond with a child. Later that year he appeared in England on Surprise! Surprise! with Cilla Black where he performed the new single he had recorded with Cilla of "You'll Never Walk Alone".

    * Guest appearance in a 2001 episode of Ally McBeal. He played both a hallucination of Ally's and himself on stage at the end of the show.

    * Played himself in a cameo in the 2002 dark comedy Unconditional Love starring Kathy Bates and Rupert Everett where "Can't Smile Without You" also played a key role in the plot.

    * On December 11, 2003, Manilow appeared on the NBC show Will & Grace as himself backstage between tour stops. The name of the episode is

"Fanilow" as in a fan of Manilow.

    * On April 20, 2004 – April 21, 2004 Manilow reunited with Debra Byrd his former backup singer who is now the vocal coach at American Idol when he appeared as a guest judge and worked with the top seven finalists for the popular FOX variety prize show where the season three contestants sang his songs as the theme for the week.

    * On December 8, 2004, he was a guest on the NBC special A Clay Aiken Christmas, hosted by the former Idol runner-up.

    * On March 21, 2006 – March 22, 2006 Manilow returned to American Idol in season five when 1950s music was the theme. He again helped the top eleven finalists to fine tune their performances and again sang on the results show.

    * In November 2006, he appeared on Logo's reality show Jacob and Joshua: Nemesis Rising as himself in Las Vegas for a recording session with the twins.

    * On November 23, 2006, Manilow appeared live on a float in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, and performed the song "What the World Needs Now" on the television broadcast of the parade.

    * On December 2, 2006, Manilow was the celebrity guest and theme for the week on series three of The X Factor where he assisted the top four acts with their performances.

    * On December 12, 2006, appeared live at the 2006 Royal Variety Performance and performed a selection from his latest album.

    * The Tonight Show with Jay Leno on October 31, 2007 and on November 17, 2008.

    * He guest starred on Family Guy in "Back to the Woods" on February 17, 2008

    * He guest starred on Strictly Come Dancing on December 7, 2008

    * Barry narrated and wrote original music for the Ocean Spray Christmas special "Cranberry Christmas".
    * He appeared as a guest on Friday Night with Jonathan Ross (UK) on September 11, 2009.

    * On October 2, 2009 he appeared on BBC Radio 4's Desert Island Discs.

    * He appeared as a guest on The Jay Leno Show (US) on December 10, 2009.

    * He appeared as a guest on The Tonight Show with Conan O'Brien (US) on January 21, 2010. He mentioned that, before he became famous, he wrote advertising jingles, including two well-known jingles for Band-Aid and State Farm. Also, he commented on his diet of "forgetting to eat".

    * On February 6, 2010, he was a guest on The Jimmy Kimmel Show where Jimmy showed a photo of him in the 1970s and discussed his new album.

    * On December 11, 2010 he ended the Nobel Peace Prize concert in Oslo, Norway singing four of his most known and popular songs. The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to the Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo.

    * On June 15, 2011 he appeared on "Good Morning America" performing his new album, "Fifteen Minutes".
http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj77/micksluvsmanilow/Manilow/1.jpg
http://i392.photobucket.com/albums/pp1/kaneang/Barry-Manilow-pb031.jpg

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: CatwomanofV on 06/17/11 at 7:37 am

I'll confess, I really like the song, "Ready To Take A Chance." (I also like the movie it came from, too-Foul Play.)



Cat

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Philip Eno on 06/17/11 at 12:38 pm


The person of the day...Barry Manilow
Barry Manilow (born June 17, 1943) is an American singer-songwriter, musician, arranger, producer, conductor, and performer, best known for such recordings as "Could It Be Magic", "Mandy", "Can't Smile Without You", and "Copacabana (At the Copa)."

In 1978, five of his albums were on the best-selling charts simultaneously, a feat equalled only by Frank Sinatra, Michael Jackson, Bruce Springsteen and Johnny Mathis. He has recorded a string of Billboard hit singles and multi-platinum albums that have resulted in his being named Radio & Records number one Adult Contemporary artist and winning three straight American Music Awards for Favorite Pop/Rock Male Artist. Several well-known entertainers have given Manilow their "stamp of approval," including Sinatra, who was quoted in the 1970s regarding Manilow, "He's next." In 1988, Bob Dylan stopped Manilow at a party, hugged him and said, "Don't stop what you're doing, man. We're all inspired by you."

As well as producing and arranging albums for other artists, such as Bette Midler and Dionne Warwick, Manilow has written songs for musicals, films, and commercials. From February 2005 to December 30, 2009, he was the headliner at the Las Vegas Hilton, performing hundreds of shows before ending relationship with the hotel. From March 2010, he has headlined at the Paris Hotel in Las Vegas. He has sold more than 250 million records worldwide.
Manilow's well-known association with Bette Midler began at the Continental Baths in New York City. He accompanied her and other artists on the piano from 1970 to 1971, and Midler chose him to assist with the production of her first two albums, The Divine Miss M (1972) and Bette Midler (1973), and act as her musical director on The Divine Miss M tour. Manilow worked with Midler for four years, from 1971 to 1975. In 1974, Bell Records released Manilow's first album, Barry Manilow, which offered an eclectic mix of piano-driven pop and guitar-driven rock music, including a song that Manilow had composed for the 1972 war drama Parades.

Among other songs on the album were "Cloudburst", and "Could It Be Magic." The latter's music was based on Chopin's "Prelude in C Minor, Opus 28, Number 20", and provided Donna Summer with one of her major hits. (It was also covered by Take That in the 1990s, as an up-beat disco version of the song. Take That have since performed Manilow's original version in their Beautiful World Tour.) When Manilow's record company, Bell Records, merged with other labels, new entity Arista Records formed. Under the auspices of its head Clive Davis many artists were dropped. Davis was reassured by the Manilow acquisition after seeing him perform as the opening act at a Dionne Warwick concert.

The partnership began to gain traction in 1974, with the release of Manilow's second album, Barry Manilow II, originally titled Sweetwater Jones on Bell Records and given its eventual title when reissued on Arista, which contained the breakthrough number-one hit, "Mandy." Manilow had not wanted to record "Mandy," which had originally been titled "Brandy" and was co-written and originally recorded by Scott English, but the song was included at the insistence of Davis. Following the success of Barry Manilow II, the first Bell Records album release was re-mixed and re-issued on Arista Records as Barry Manilow I. When Manilow went on his first tour, he included, in his show, what he called "A V.S.M.," or "A Very Strange Medley." As previously stated, this was a sampling of some of the commercial jingles that he had written, composed, and/or sung. Beginning with Manilow's March 22, 1975, appearance on American Bandstand to promote the second album, a productive friendship with Dick Clark started. Numerous appearances by Manilow on Clark's productions of Dick Clark's New Year's Rockin' Eve, singing his original seasonal favorite "It's Just Another New Year's Eve," American Bandstand anniversary shows, American Music Awards performances, and his 1985 television movie Copacabana are among their projects together.

"Mandy" was the start of a string of hit singles and albums that lasted through the rest of the 1970s to the early 1980s, coming from the multi-platinum and multi-hit albums Tryin' to Get the Feeling, This One's for You, Even Now, and One Voice. Despite being a songwriter in his own right, several of Manilow's commercial successes were with songs by others. Among hits he did not write or compose are "Mandy," "Tryin’ to Get the Feeling Again" by David Pomerantz, "Weekend in New England" (by Randy Edelman), "Looks Like We Made It" by Richard Kerr and Will Jennings, "Can't Smile Without You" and "Ready to Take a Chance Again." Ironically, another one of his hits that Manilow did not write or compose himself was his number 1 "I Write The Songs" (by Bruce Johnston of The Beach Boys). According to album liner notes, Manilow did, however, co-produce them with Ron Dante and arrange them.

Manilow's breakthrough in Britain came with the release of "Even Now," the first of many top 20 albums on that side of the Atlantic. This was quickly followed by Manilow Magic – The Best Of Barry Manilow, also known as Greatest Hits. On its initial release it was marketed with a large television campaign by the mail order label "Teledisc." In the late 1970s and early 1980s, ABC aired four variety television specials starring and executive produced by Manilow. The Barry Manilow Special with Penny Marshall as his guest premiered on March 2, 1977 to an audience of 37 million. The breakthrough special was nominated for four Emmys and won in the category of "Outstanding Comedy-Variety or Music Special." The Second Barry Manilow Special in 1978, with Ray Charles as his guest, was also nominated for four Emmys.
Manilow in 1979

Manilow's "Ready To Take a Chance Again" originated in the film Foul Play, which also featured "Copacabana," from his 4th studio album "Even Now." "Ready To Take A Chance Again" was nominated that year for the "Best Original Song" Oscar. Copacabana would later take the form of a musical television movie, starring Manilow, and three musical plays. On February 11, 1979, a concert from Manilow's sold-out dates at the Greek Theater in Los Angeles, California aired on HBO series Standing Room Only, which was the first pay-television show to pose a serious challenge to network primetime specials in the ratings. From the same tour in 1978, a one-hour special from Manilow's sold out concert at the Royal Albert Hall aired in the UK.

On May 23, 1979, ABC aired The Third Barry Manilow Special, with John Denver as his guest. This special was nominated for two Emmy awards and won for "Outstanding Achievement in Choreography." Also in 1979, Manilow produced Dionne Warwick's "comeback" album Dionne, her first to go platinum. He scored a top ten hit of his own in the fall of 1979 with the song "Ships" (written and composed by Ian Hunter, former lead singer of Mott the Hoople) from the album "One Voice."
1980s

The 1980s gave Manilow the adult contemporary chart-topping songs "The Old Songs", "Somewhere Down the Road", "Read 'Em and Weep" (a Meat Loaf cover, written by Jim Steinman) and a remake of the 1941 Jule Styne and Frank Loesser standard "I Don't Want to Walk Without You." Manilow continued having high radio airplay throughout the decade. In the UK, Manilow had five sold-out performances at Royal Albert Hall. In the United States, at Radio City Music Hall (1984) his 10-night run set a box-office sales record of nearly $2 million, making him the top draw in the then 52-year history of the venue. In 1980, Manilow's One Voice special, with Dionne Warwick as his guest, was nominated for an Emmy for "Outstanding Achievement in Music Direction".

Also in 1980, a concert from Manilow's sold-out shows at England's Wembley Arena was broadcast while he was on a world tour. Manilow released the self-titled Barry (1980), which was his first album to not reach the top ten in the United States, stopping at #15. The album contained "I Made It Through The Rain" (originally a minor hit for its writer, Gerard Kenny) and "Bermuda Triangle." The album If I Should Love Again followed in 1981, containing "The Old Songs," "Let's Hang On," and "Somewhere Down The Road." This was the first of his own albums that Manilow produced without Ron Dante, who had co-produced all the previous albums. Manilow's sold-out concert at the Pittsburgh Civic Arena in Pittsburgh aired nationally on Showtime, and locally on Philadelphia's now-defunct PRISM. In 1982, a concert from his sold out Royal Albert Hall show was broadcast in England. The live album and video Barry Live in Britain also came from his Royal Albert Hall shows.

On August 27, 1983, Manilow performed a landmark open air concert at Blenheim Palace in Britain. It was the first such event ever held at that venue and was attended by a conservative estimate of 40,000 people. This concert was also taped for airing on Showtime. In December 1983, Manilow was reported to have endowed the music departments at six major universities in the United States and Canada. The endowments were part of a continuing endeavor by Manilow to recognize and encourage new musical talent.

In 1984 Manilow released 2:00 AM Paradise Cafe, a jazz/blues collection of original barroom tunes recorded in one live take in the studio. That same year, Showtime aired a documentary of Manilow recording the album with a number of jazz legends, such as Sarah Vaughn and Mel Tormé. In 1984 and 1985, England aired two one-hour concert specials from his National Exhibition Centre (NEC) concerts. In 1985, Manilow left Arista Records for RCA Records. There he released the pop album Manilow, and began a phase of international music, as he performed songs and duets in French, Spanish, Portuguese, and Japanese, among other languages. The Manilow album was a complete about face from the Paradise Cafe album, containing a number of tracks of a modern uptempo and synthesized quality. In 1985, Japan aired a Manilow concert special where he played "Sakura" on the koto.

In his only lead acting role, he portrayed Tony Starr in a 1985 CBS film based on Copacabana, alongside Annette O'Toole as Lola Lamarr and Joseph Bologna as Rico. Manilow penned all the songs for the movie, with lyrics provided by established collaborators Bruce Sussman and Jack Feldman, and released Copacabana: The Original Motion Picture Soundtrack Album on RCA Records. In October 1986, Manilow, along with Bruce Sussman, Tom Scott, and Charlie Fox, went to Washington, D.C. for two days of meetings with legislators, including lunch with then Senator Al Gore (D-TN). They were there to lobby against a copyright bill put forward by local television broadcasters that would mandate songwriter-producer source licensing of theme and incidental music on syndicated television show reruns and would disallow use of the blanket license now in effect. The songwriters said without the blanket license, artists would have to negotiate up front with producers individually, without knowing if a series would be a success. The license now pays according to a per-use formula. Manilow said that such a bill would act as a precedent for broadcasters to get rid of the blanket license entirely.

The following year, McGraw-Hill published his autobiography, Sweet Life: Adventures on the Way to Paradise, which had taken him about three years to complete. While promoting the work, Manilow defended his music in a telephone interview: "I live in laid-back L.A., but in my heart, I'm an energetic New Yorker and that's what has always come out of my music. I've always been surprised when the critics said I made wimpy little ballads". Manilow returned to Arista Records in 1987 with the release of Swing Street. The album, a mixture of traditional after-dark and techno jazz, contained "Brooklyn Blues," an autobiographical song for Manilow, and "Hey Mambo," an uptempo Latin style duet with Kid Creole, produced with the help of Emilio Estefan, Jr., founder of Miami Sound Machine.

In March 1988, CBS aired Manilow's Big Fun on Swing Street special. It featured songs and special guests from his Swing Street and 2:00 AM Paradise Cafe albums, including Kid Creole and the Coconuts, Phyllis Hyman, Stanley Clarke, Carmen McRae, Tom Scott, and Uncle Festive, a band within Manilow's band at the time. The special was nominated for two Emmys in technical categories, and won in the category of "Outstanding Art Direction for a Variety or Music program".

In 1988, he performed "Please Don't Be Scared" and "Mandy/Could It Be Magic" at That's What Friends Are For: AIDS Concert '88, a benefit concert for the Warwick Foundation headed by Dionne Warwick and shown on Showtime a few years later. In the 1988 Walt Disney Pictures animated feature Oliver & Company, Bette Midler's character sang a new Manilow composition called "Perfect Isn't Easy." The 1989 release of Barry Manilow, which contained "Please Don't Be Scared," "Keep Each Other Warm," and "The One That Got Away," ended Manilow's streak of albums of original self-written material (he neither wrote nor arranged any of the songs except for two) and began a phase of his recording career consisting of covers and compilations.

From April 18 to June 10, 1989, Manilow put on a show called Barry Manilow at the Gershwin, making 44 appearances at the Gershwin Theatre (also known as the Uris Theatre), where, by coincidence, he recorded Barry Manilow Live in 1976. A best-selling 90-minute video of the same show was released the following year as Barry Manilow Live On Broadway. The Showtime one-hour special Barry Manilow SRO on Broadway consisted of edited highlights from this video. Manilow followed this set of shows with a world tour of the Broadway show.
Discography
Main article: Barry Manilow discography
Awards

    * 1977 Grammy – I Write The Songs – Song of the Year (award went to the song's writer Bruce Johnston)
    * 1977 Emmy for Outstanding Special – Comedy, Variety or Music – The Barry Manilow Special
    * 1977 Special Tony Award – Barry Manilow on Broadway
    * 1978 American Music Awards – Best Pop/Rock Male Artist
    * 1979 Grammy – Copacabana Best Pop Male Vocal Performance
    * 1979 American Music Awards – Best Pop/Rock Male Artist
    * 1980 American Music Awards – Best Pop/Rock Male Artist
    * 2002 Songwriter's Hall of Fame
    * 2006 Emmy for Outstanding Individual Performance in a Variety or Music Program – Barry Manilow: Music And Passion
    * 2007 RIAA – Plaque commemorating worldwide record sales of 75 million
    * 2009 Clio Awards Honorary award for prior work with commercial jingles
    *  ? Kentucky Colonel
    * 2009 Inducted into the Hit Parade Hall of Fame

Selected TV and movie appearances
Barry Manilow at the premiere of The Rose (starring Bette Midler), November 7, 1979

    * Donny & Marie in 1977.

    * ABC special The Stars Salute Israel At 30 on May 8, 1978.

    * May 8, 1982, Goldie & Kids a special where he acted in skits and sang "One Voice" and "I Am Your Child" with hostess Goldie Hawn.

    * On September 17, 1987 he appeared in the star-studded CBS special We The People 200: The Constitutional Gala taped at the Philadelphia Civic Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to debut his song "Let Freedom Ring" where President Ronald Reagan was in attendance.

    * On May 17, 1993, Manilow made a guest appearance on the CBS show Murphy Brown. On the show, Candice Bergen's title character had frequently made reference to her hatred of Manilow's music, but after she became a mother, Manilow appeared to sing her a sweet version of his tune "I Am Your Child," winning her over with the song about a parent's bond with a child. Later that year he appeared in England on Surprise! Surprise! with Cilla Black where he performed the new single he had recorded with Cilla of "You'll Never Walk Alone".

    * Guest appearance in a 2001 episode of Ally McBeal. He played both a hallucination of Ally's and himself on stage at the end of the show.

    * Played himself in a cameo in the 2002 dark comedy Unconditional Love starring Kathy Bates and Rupert Everett where "Can't Smile Without You" also played a key role in the plot.

    * On December 11, 2003, Manilow appeared on the NBC show Will & Grace as himself backstage between tour stops. The name of the episode is

"Fanilow" as in a fan of Manilow.

    * On April 20, 2004 – April 21, 2004 Manilow reunited with Debra Byrd his former backup singer who is now the vocal coach at American Idol when he appeared as a guest judge and worked with the top seven finalists for the popular FOX variety prize show where the season three contestants sang his songs as the theme for the week.

    * On December 8, 2004, he was a guest on the NBC special A Clay Aiken Christmas, hosted by the former Idol runner-up.

    * On March 21, 2006 – March 22, 2006 Manilow returned to American Idol in season five when 1950s music was the theme. He again helped the top eleven finalists to fine tune their performances and again sang on the results show.

    * In November 2006, he appeared on Logo's reality show Jacob and Joshua: Nemesis Rising as himself in Las Vegas for a recording session with the twins.

    * On November 23, 2006, Manilow appeared live on a float in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, and performed the song "What the World Needs Now" on the television broadcast of the parade.

    * On December 2, 2006, Manilow was the celebrity guest and theme for the week on series three of The X Factor where he assisted the top four acts with their performances.

    * On December 12, 2006, appeared live at the 2006 Royal Variety Performance and performed a selection from his latest album.

    * The Tonight Show with Jay Leno on October 31, 2007 and on November 17, 2008.

    * He guest starred on Family Guy in "Back to the Woods" on February 17, 2008

    * He guest starred on Strictly Come Dancing on December 7, 2008

    * Barry narrated and wrote original music for the Ocean Spray Christmas special "Cranberry Christmas".
    * He appeared as a guest on Friday Night with Jonathan Ross (UK) on September 11, 2009.

    * On October 2, 2009 he appeared on BBC Radio 4's Desert Island Discs.

    * He appeared as a guest on The Jay Leno Show (US) on December 10, 2009.

    * He appeared as a guest on The Tonight Show with Conan O'Brien (US) on January 21, 2010. He mentioned that, before he became famous, he wrote advertising jingles, including two well-known jingles for Band-Aid and State Farm. Also, he commented on his diet of "forgetting to eat".

    * On February 6, 2010, he was a guest on The Jimmy Kimmel Show where Jimmy showed a photo of him in the 1970s and discussed his new album.

    * On December 11, 2010 he ended the Nobel Peace Prize concert in Oslo, Norway singing four of his most known and popular songs. The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to the Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo.

    * On June 15, 2011 he appeared on "Good Morning America" performing his new album, "Fifteen Minutes".
http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj77/micksluvsmanilow/Manilow/1.jpg
http://i392.photobucket.com/albums/pp1/kaneang/Barry-Manilow-pb031.jpg
Currently on tour here in the UK.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 06/17/11 at 7:34 pm


The person of the day...Barry Manilow
Barry Manilow (born June 17, 1943) is an American singer-songwriter, musician, arranger, producer, conductor, and performer, best known for such recordings as "Could It Be Magic", "Mandy", "Can't Smile Without You", and "Copacabana (At the Copa)."

In 1978, five of his albums were on the best-selling charts simultaneously, a feat equalled only by Frank Sinatra, Michael Jackson, Bruce Springsteen and Johnny Mathis. He has recorded a string of Billboard hit singles and multi-platinum albums that have resulted in his being named Radio & Records number one Adult Contemporary artist and winning three straight American Music Awards for Favorite Pop/Rock Male Artist. Several well-known entertainers have given Manilow their "stamp of approval," including Sinatra, who was quoted in the 1970s regarding Manilow, "He's next." In 1988, Bob Dylan stopped Manilow at a party, hugged him and said, "Don't stop what you're doing, man. We're all inspired by you."

As well as producing and arranging albums for other artists, such as Bette Midler and Dionne Warwick, Manilow has written songs for musicals, films, and commercials. From February 2005 to December 30, 2009, he was the headliner at the Las Vegas Hilton, performing hundreds of shows before ending relationship with the hotel. From March 2010, he has headlined at the Paris Hotel in Las Vegas. He has sold more than 250 million records worldwide.
Manilow's well-known association with Bette Midler began at the Continental Baths in New York City. He accompanied her and other artists on the piano from 1970 to 1971, and Midler chose him to assist with the production of her first two albums, The Divine Miss M (1972) and Bette Midler (1973), and act as her musical director on The Divine Miss M tour. Manilow worked with Midler for four years, from 1971 to 1975. In 1974, Bell Records released Manilow's first album, Barry Manilow, which offered an eclectic mix of piano-driven pop and guitar-driven rock music, including a song that Manilow had composed for the 1972 war drama Parades.

Among other songs on the album were "Cloudburst", and "Could It Be Magic." The latter's music was based on Chopin's "Prelude in C Minor, Opus 28, Number 20", and provided Donna Summer with one of her major hits. (It was also covered by Take That in the 1990s, as an up-beat disco version of the song. Take That have since performed Manilow's original version in their Beautiful World Tour.) When Manilow's record company, Bell Records, merged with other labels, new entity Arista Records formed. Under the auspices of its head Clive Davis many artists were dropped. Davis was reassured by the Manilow acquisition after seeing him perform as the opening act at a Dionne Warwick concert.

The partnership began to gain traction in 1974, with the release of Manilow's second album, Barry Manilow II, originally titled Sweetwater Jones on Bell Records and given its eventual title when reissued on Arista, which contained the breakthrough number-one hit, "Mandy." Manilow had not wanted to record "Mandy," which had originally been titled "Brandy" and was co-written and originally recorded by Scott English, but the song was included at the insistence of Davis. Following the success of Barry Manilow II, the first Bell Records album release was re-mixed and re-issued on Arista Records as Barry Manilow I. When Manilow went on his first tour, he included, in his show, what he called "A V.S.M.," or "A Very Strange Medley." As previously stated, this was a sampling of some of the commercial jingles that he had written, composed, and/or sung. Beginning with Manilow's March 22, 1975, appearance on American Bandstand to promote the second album, a productive friendship with Dick Clark started. Numerous appearances by Manilow on Clark's productions of Dick Clark's New Year's Rockin' Eve, singing his original seasonal favorite "It's Just Another New Year's Eve," American Bandstand anniversary shows, American Music Awards performances, and his 1985 television movie Copacabana are among their projects together.

"Mandy" was the start of a string of hit singles and albums that lasted through the rest of the 1970s to the early 1980s, coming from the multi-platinum and multi-hit albums Tryin' to Get the Feeling, This One's for You, Even Now, and One Voice. Despite being a songwriter in his own right, several of Manilow's commercial successes were with songs by others. Among hits he did not write or compose are "Mandy," "Tryin’ to Get the Feeling Again" by David Pomerantz, "Weekend in New England" (by Randy Edelman), "Looks Like We Made It" by Richard Kerr and Will Jennings, "Can't Smile Without You" and "Ready to Take a Chance Again." Ironically, another one of his hits that Manilow did not write or compose himself was his number 1 "I Write The Songs" (by Bruce Johnston of The Beach Boys). According to album liner notes, Manilow did, however, co-produce them with Ron Dante and arrange them.

Manilow's breakthrough in Britain came with the release of "Even Now," the first of many top 20 albums on that side of the Atlantic. This was quickly followed by Manilow Magic – The Best Of Barry Manilow, also known as Greatest Hits. On its initial release it was marketed with a large television campaign by the mail order label "Teledisc." In the late 1970s and early 1980s, ABC aired four variety television specials starring and executive produced by Manilow. The Barry Manilow Special with Penny Marshall as his guest premiered on March 2, 1977 to an audience of 37 million. The breakthrough special was nominated for four Emmys and won in the category of "Outstanding Comedy-Variety or Music Special." The Second Barry Manilow Special in 1978, with Ray Charles as his guest, was also nominated for four Emmys.
Manilow in 1979

Manilow's "Ready To Take a Chance Again" originated in the film Foul Play, which also featured "Copacabana," from his 4th studio album "Even Now." "Ready To Take A Chance Again" was nominated that year for the "Best Original Song" Oscar. Copacabana would later take the form of a musical television movie, starring Manilow, and three musical plays. On February 11, 1979, a concert from Manilow's sold-out dates at the Greek Theater in Los Angeles, California aired on HBO series Standing Room Only, which was the first pay-television show to pose a serious challenge to network primetime specials in the ratings. From the same tour in 1978, a one-hour special from Manilow's sold out concert at the Royal Albert Hall aired in the UK.

On May 23, 1979, ABC aired The Third Barry Manilow Special, with John Denver as his guest. This special was nominated for two Emmy awards and won for "Outstanding Achievement in Choreography." Also in 1979, Manilow produced Dionne Warwick's "comeback" album Dionne, her first to go platinum. He scored a top ten hit of his own in the fall of 1979 with the song "Ships" (written and composed by Ian Hunter, former lead singer of Mott the Hoople) from the album "One Voice."
1980s

The 1980s gave Manilow the adult contemporary chart-topping songs "The Old Songs", "Somewhere Down the Road", "Read 'Em and Weep" (a Meat Loaf cover, written by Jim Steinman) and a remake of the 1941 Jule Styne and Frank Loesser standard "I Don't Want to Walk Without You." Manilow continued having high radio airplay throughout the decade. In the UK, Manilow had five sold-out performances at Royal Albert Hall. In the United States, at Radio City Music Hall (1984) his 10-night run set a box-office sales record of nearly $2 million, making him the top draw in the then 52-year history of the venue. In 1980, Manilow's One Voice special, with Dionne Warwick as his guest, was nominated for an Emmy for "Outstanding Achievement in Music Direction".

Also in 1980, a concert from Manilow's sold-out shows at England's Wembley Arena was broadcast while he was on a world tour. Manilow released the self-titled Barry (1980), which was his first album to not reach the top ten in the United States, stopping at #15. The album contained "I Made It Through The Rain" (originally a minor hit for its writer, Gerard Kenny) and "Bermuda Triangle." The album If I Should Love Again followed in 1981, containing "The Old Songs," "Let's Hang On," and "Somewhere Down The Road." This was the first of his own albums that Manilow produced without Ron Dante, who had co-produced all the previous albums. Manilow's sold-out concert at the Pittsburgh Civic Arena in Pittsburgh aired nationally on Showtime, and locally on Philadelphia's now-defunct PRISM. In 1982, a concert from his sold out Royal Albert Hall show was broadcast in England. The live album and video Barry Live in Britain also came from his Royal Albert Hall shows.

On August 27, 1983, Manilow performed a landmark open air concert at Blenheim Palace in Britain. It was the first such event ever held at that venue and was attended by a conservative estimate of 40,000 people. This concert was also taped for airing on Showtime. In December 1983, Manilow was reported to have endowed the music departments at six major universities in the United States and Canada. The endowments were part of a continuing endeavor by Manilow to recognize and encourage new musical talent.

In 1984 Manilow released 2:00 AM Paradise Cafe, a jazz/blues collection of original barroom tunes recorded in one live take in the studio. That same year, Showtime aired a documentary of Manilow recording the album with a number of jazz legends, such as Sarah Vaughn and Mel Tormé. In 1984 and 1985, England aired two one-hour concert specials from his National Exhibition Centre (NEC) concerts. In 1985, Manilow left Arista Records for RCA Records. There he released the pop album Manilow, and began a phase of international music, as he performed songs and duets in French, Spanish, Portuguese, and Japanese, among other languages. The Manilow album was a complete about face from the Paradise Cafe album, containing a number of tracks of a modern uptempo and synthesized quality. In 1985, Japan aired a Manilow concert special where he played "Sakura" on the koto.

In his only lead acting role, he portrayed Tony Starr in a 1985 CBS film based on Copacabana, alongside Annette O'Toole as Lola Lamarr and Joseph Bologna as Rico. Manilow penned all the songs for the movie, with lyrics provided by established collaborators Bruce Sussman and Jack Feldman, and released Copacabana: The Original Motion Picture Soundtrack Album on RCA Records. In October 1986, Manilow, along with Bruce Sussman, Tom Scott, and Charlie Fox, went to Washington, D.C. for two days of meetings with legislators, including lunch with then Senator Al Gore (D-TN). They were there to lobby against a copyright bill put forward by local television broadcasters that would mandate songwriter-producer source licensing of theme and incidental music on syndicated television show reruns and would disallow use of the blanket license now in effect. The songwriters said without the blanket license, artists would have to negotiate up front with producers individually, without knowing if a series would be a success. The license now pays according to a per-use formula. Manilow said that such a bill would act as a precedent for broadcasters to get rid of the blanket license entirely.

The following year, McGraw-Hill published his autobiography, Sweet Life: Adventures on the Way to Paradise, which had taken him about three years to complete. While promoting the work, Manilow defended his music in a telephone interview: "I live in laid-back L.A., but in my heart, I'm an energetic New Yorker and that's what has always come out of my music. I've always been surprised when the critics said I made wimpy little ballads". Manilow returned to Arista Records in 1987 with the release of Swing Street. The album, a mixture of traditional after-dark and techno jazz, contained "Brooklyn Blues," an autobiographical song for Manilow, and "Hey Mambo," an uptempo Latin style duet with Kid Creole, produced with the help of Emilio Estefan, Jr., founder of Miami Sound Machine.

In March 1988, CBS aired Manilow's Big Fun on Swing Street special. It featured songs and special guests from his Swing Street and 2:00 AM Paradise Cafe albums, including Kid Creole and the Coconuts, Phyllis Hyman, Stanley Clarke, Carmen McRae, Tom Scott, and Uncle Festive, a band within Manilow's band at the time. The special was nominated for two Emmys in technical categories, and won in the category of "Outstanding Art Direction for a Variety or Music program".

In 1988, he performed "Please Don't Be Scared" and "Mandy/Could It Be Magic" at That's What Friends Are For: AIDS Concert '88, a benefit concert for the Warwick Foundation headed by Dionne Warwick and shown on Showtime a few years later. In the 1988 Walt Disney Pictures animated feature Oliver & Company, Bette Midler's character sang a new Manilow composition called "Perfect Isn't Easy." The 1989 release of Barry Manilow, which contained "Please Don't Be Scared," "Keep Each Other Warm," and "The One That Got Away," ended Manilow's streak of albums of original self-written material (he neither wrote nor arranged any of the songs except for two) and began a phase of his recording career consisting of covers and compilations.

From April 18 to June 10, 1989, Manilow put on a show called Barry Manilow at the Gershwin, making 44 appearances at the Gershwin Theatre (also known as the Uris Theatre), where, by coincidence, he recorded Barry Manilow Live in 1976. A best-selling 90-minute video of the same show was released the following year as Barry Manilow Live On Broadway. The Showtime one-hour special Barry Manilow SRO on Broadway consisted of edited highlights from this video. Manilow followed this set of shows with a world tour of the Broadway show.
Discography
Main article: Barry Manilow discography
Awards

    * 1977 Grammy – I Write The Songs – Song of the Year (award went to the song's writer Bruce Johnston)
    * 1977 Emmy for Outstanding Special – Comedy, Variety or Music – The Barry Manilow Special
    * 1977 Special Tony Award – Barry Manilow on Broadway
    * 1978 American Music Awards – Best Pop/Rock Male Artist
    * 1979 Grammy – Copacabana Best Pop Male Vocal Performance
    * 1979 American Music Awards – Best Pop/Rock Male Artist
    * 1980 American Music Awards – Best Pop/Rock Male Artist
    * 2002 Songwriter's Hall of Fame
    * 2006 Emmy for Outstanding Individual Performance in a Variety or Music Program – Barry Manilow: Music And Passion
    * 2007 RIAA – Plaque commemorating worldwide record sales of 75 million
    * 2009 Clio Awards Honorary award for prior work with commercial jingles
    *  ? Kentucky Colonel
    * 2009 Inducted into the Hit Parade Hall of Fame

Selected TV and movie appearances
Barry Manilow at the premiere of The Rose (starring Bette Midler), November 7, 1979

    * Donny & Marie in 1977.

    * ABC special The Stars Salute Israel At 30 on May 8, 1978.

    * May 8, 1982, Goldie & Kids a special where he acted in skits and sang "One Voice" and "I Am Your Child" with hostess Goldie Hawn.

    * On September 17, 1987 he appeared in the star-studded CBS special We The People 200: The Constitutional Gala taped at the Philadelphia Civic Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to debut his song "Let Freedom Ring" where President Ronald Reagan was in attendance.

    * On May 17, 1993, Manilow made a guest appearance on the CBS show Murphy Brown. On the show, Candice Bergen's title character had frequently made reference to her hatred of Manilow's music, but after she became a mother, Manilow appeared to sing her a sweet version of his tune "I Am Your Child," winning her over with the song about a parent's bond with a child. Later that year he appeared in England on Surprise! Surprise! with Cilla Black where he performed the new single he had recorded with Cilla of "You'll Never Walk Alone".

    * Guest appearance in a 2001 episode of Ally McBeal. He played both a hallucination of Ally's and himself on stage at the end of the show.

    * Played himself in a cameo in the 2002 dark comedy Unconditional Love starring Kathy Bates and Rupert Everett where "Can't Smile Without You" also played a key role in the plot.

    * On December 11, 2003, Manilow appeared on the NBC show Will & Grace as himself backstage between tour stops. The name of the episode is

"Fanilow" as in a fan of Manilow.

    * On April 20, 2004 – April 21, 2004 Manilow reunited with Debra Byrd his former backup singer who is now the vocal coach at American Idol when he appeared as a guest judge and worked with the top seven finalists for the popular FOX variety prize show where the season three contestants sang his songs as the theme for the week.

    * On December 8, 2004, he was a guest on the NBC special A Clay Aiken Christmas, hosted by the former Idol runner-up.

    * On March 21, 2006 – March 22, 2006 Manilow returned to American Idol in season five when 1950s music was the theme. He again helped the top eleven finalists to fine tune their performances and again sang on the results show.

    * In November 2006, he appeared on Logo's reality show Jacob and Joshua: Nemesis Rising as himself in Las Vegas for a recording session with the twins.

    * On November 23, 2006, Manilow appeared live on a float in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, and performed the song "What the World Needs Now" on the television broadcast of the parade.

    * On December 2, 2006, Manilow was the celebrity guest and theme for the week on series three of The X Factor where he assisted the top four acts with their performances.

    * On December 12, 2006, appeared live at the 2006 Royal Variety Performance and performed a selection from his latest album.

    * The Tonight Show with Jay Leno on October 31, 2007 and on November 17, 2008.

    * He guest starred on Family Guy in "Back to the Woods" on February 17, 2008

    * He guest starred on Strictly Come Dancing on December 7, 2008

    * Barry narrated and wrote original music for the Ocean Spray Christmas special "Cranberry Christmas".
    * He appeared as a guest on Friday Night with Jonathan Ross (UK) on September 11, 2009.

    * On October 2, 2009 he appeared on BBC Radio 4's Desert Island Discs.

    * He appeared as a guest on The Jay Leno Show (US) on December 10, 2009.

    * He appeared as a guest on The Tonight Show with Conan O'Brien (US) on January 21, 2010. He mentioned that, before he became famous, he wrote advertising jingles, including two well-known jingles for Band-Aid and State Farm. Also, he commented on his diet of "forgetting to eat".

    * On February 6, 2010, he was a guest on The Jimmy Kimmel Show where Jimmy showed a photo of him in the 1970s and discussed his new album.

    * On December 11, 2010 he ended the Nobel Peace Prize concert in Oslo, Norway singing four of his most known and popular songs. The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to the Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo.

    * On June 15, 2011 he appeared on "Good Morning America" performing his new album, "Fifteen Minutes".
http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj77/micksluvsmanilow/Manilow/1.jpg
http://i392.photobucket.com/albums/pp1/kaneang/Barry-Manilow-pb031.jpg


I love his music. :)

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: gibbo on 06/18/11 at 1:03 am



Badgers? We don't need no stinkin' badgers!



Cat


;D ;D ;D  I always loved that line!!

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/18/11 at 7:12 am

The person of the day...Paul McCartney
Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an English musician, singer-songwriter and composer. Formerly of The Beatles (1960–1970) and Wings (1971–1981), McCartney is the most commercially successful songwriter in the history of popular music, according to Guinness World Records.

McCartney gained worldwide fame as a member of The Beatles, alongside John Lennon, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr. McCartney and Lennon formed one of the most influential and successful songwriting partnerships and wrote some of the most popular songs in the history of rock music. After leaving The Beatles, McCartney launched a successful solo career and formed the band Wings with his first wife, Linda Eastman, and singer-songwriter Denny Laine. McCartney is listed in Guinness World Records as the "most successful musician and composer in popular music history", with 60 gold discs and sales of 100 million singles in the UK.

BBC News Online readers named McCartney the "greatest composer of the millennium", and BBC News cites his Beatles song "Yesterday" as the most covered song in the history of recorded music—by over 2,200 artists—and since its 1965 release, has been played more than 7,000,000 times on American television and radio according to the BBC. Wings' 1977 single "Mull of Kintyre" became the first single to sell more than two million copies in the UK, and remains the UK's top selling non-charity single. Based on the 93 weeks his compositions have spent at the top spot of the UK chart, and 24 number one singles to his credit, McCartney is the most successful songwriter in UK singles chart history. As a performer or songwriter, McCartney was responsible for 32 number one singles on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart, and has sold 15.5 million RIAA certified albums in the US alone.

McCartney has composed film scores, classical and electronic music, released a large catalogue of songs as a solo artist, and has taken part in projects to help international charities. He is an advocate for animal rights, for vegetarianism, and for music education; he is active in campaigns against landmines, seal hunting, and Third World debt. He is a keen football fan, supporting both Everton and Liverpool football clubs. His company MPL Communications owns the copyrights to more than 3,000 songs, including all of the songs written by Buddy Holly, along with the publishing rights to such musicals as Guys and Dolls, A Chorus Line, and Grease. McCartney is one of the UK's wealthiest people, with an estimated fortune of £475 million in 2010.
At the age of 15, McCartney met John Lennon and The Quarrymen at the St. Peter's Church Hall fête in Woolton on 6 July 1957. He formed a close working relationship with Lennon and they collaborated writing many songs. Harrison joined the group in early 1958 as lead guitarist, followed in early 1960 by Lennon's art school friend, Stuart Sutcliffe on bass. By May 1960, they had tried several new names, including "Johnny and the Moondogs" and "The Silver Beetles", playing a tour of Scotland under that name with Johnny Gentle. They finally changed the name of the group to "The Beatles" in mid-August 1960 and recruited Pete Best at short-notice to become their drummer for an imminent engagement in Hamburg.
1960–1970: The Beatles
A black-and-white image of three men playing guitar. They are wearing grey buttoned-up suit jackets with ties underneath. An audience is visible behind them on the left.
McCartney (left) in 1964 with Beatles bandmates George Harrison and John Lennon

From August 1960, The Beatles were booked by Allan Williams, to perform at a club in Hamburg. During extended stays over the next two years, The Beatles performed as a resident group in a number of Hamburg clubs. On returns to Liverpool they played at the Cavern club. Prior to the end of the residency, Sutcliffe left the band, so McCartney, reluctantly, became The Beatles' bass player. The Beatles recorded their first published musical material in Hamburg, performing as the backing group for Tony Sheridan on the single "My Bonnie". This recording later brought the Beatles to the attention of a key figure in their subsequent development and commercial success, Brian Epstein, who became their next manager. Epstein eventually negotiated a record contract for the group with Parlophone in May 1962. After replacing Best with Ringo Starr on drums, The Beatles became popular in the UK in 1963 and in the US in 1964. In 1965, they were each appointed Members of the Order of the British Empire (MBE). After performing concerts, plays, and tours almost non-stop for a period of nearly four years, and giving more than one thousand four hundred live performances internationally, The Beatles gave their last commercial concert at the end of their 1966 US tour. They continued to work in the recording studio from 1966 until their break-up in 1970. In the eight years from 1962 to 1970, the group had released twenty-four UK singles and twelve studio albums, often released in different configurations in the USA and other countries (see discography).
Since 1970
Coloured image of a long-haired McCartney in the 70s playing a guitar.
McCartney during a Wings concert, 1976

After the break-up of The Beatles, McCartney continued his musical career, in solo work as well as in collaborations with other musicians. After releasing his solo album McCartney in 1970, he worked with Linda McCartney to record the album Ram in 1971. Later the same year, the pair were joined by guitarist Denny Laine and drummer Denny Seiwell to form the group Wings, which was active between 1971 and 1981 and released numerous successful singles and albums (see discography). McCartney also collaborated with a number of other popular artists including Stevie Wonder, Michael Jackson, Eric Stewart, and Elvis Costello. In 1985, McCartney played "Let It Be" at the Live Aid concert in London, backed by Bob Geldof, Pete Townshend, David Bowie, and Alison Moyet. The 1990s saw McCartney venture into orchestral music, and in 1991 the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Society commissioned a musical piece by McCartney to celebrate its sesquicentennial.

He collaborated with Carl Davis to release Liverpool Oratorio; involving the opera singers Dame Kiri Te Kanawa, Sally Burgess, Jerry Hadley and Willard White, with the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra and the choir of Liverpool Cathedral. The Prince of Wales later honoured McCartney as a Fellow of The Royal College of Music and Honorary Member of the Royal Academy of Music (2008). Other forays into classical music included Standing Stone (1997), Working Classical (1999), and Ecce Cor Meum (2006). It was announced in the 1997 New Year Honours that McCartney was to be knighted for services to music, becoming Sir Paul McCartney. In 1999, McCartney was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a solo artist and in May 2000, he was awarded a Fellowship by the British Academy of Composers and Songwriters. The 1990s also saw McCartney, Harrison, and Starr working together on Apple's The Beatles Anthology documentary series.

Having witnessed the 11 September 2001 terrorist attacks from the JFK airport tarmac, McCartney took a lead role in organising The Concert for New York City. In November 2002, on the first anniversary of George Harrison's death, McCartney performed at the Concert for George. He has also participated in the National Football League's Super Bowl, performing in the pre-game show for Super Bowl XXXVI and headlining the halftime show at Super Bowl XXXIX.
McCartney and Ringo Starr promoting The Beatles: Rock Band in 2009.
Black-and-white image of McCartney, in his sixties, holding an electric bass. He wears a black buttoned-up suit jacket with black pants.
McCartney performing in England in 2010

McCartney has continued to work in the realms of popular and classical music, touring the world and performing at a large number of concerts and events; on more than one occasion he has performed again with Ringo Starr. In 2008, he received a BRIT award for Outstanding Contribution to Music and an honorary degree, Doctor of Music, from Yale University. The same year, he performed at a concert in Liverpool to celebrate the city's year as European Capital of Culture. In 2009, he received two nominations for the 51st annual Grammy awards, while in October of the same year he was named songwriter of the year at the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) Awards. On 15 July 2009, more than 45 years after The Beatles first appeared on American television on The Ed Sullivan Show, McCartney returned to the Ed Sullivan Theater and performed atop the marquee of Late Show with David Letterman. McCartney was portrayed in the 2009 film Nowhere Boy, about Lennon's teenage years, by Thomas Sangster.

On 2 June 2010, McCartney was honoured by Barack Obama with the Gershwin Prize for his contributions to popular music in a live show for the White House with performances by Stevie Wonder, Lang Lang and many others.

McCartney's enduring popularity has helped him schedule performances in new venues. He played three sold out concerts at newly-built Citi Field in Queens, New York (built to replace the Shea Stadium) in July 2009. On 18 August 2010, McCartney opened the Consol Energy Center in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

McCartney has been touring since 2001 with guitarists Rusty Anderson and Brian Ray, Paul "Wix" Wickens on keyboards and drummer Abe Laboriel, Jr.

There are plans for an upcoming Paul McCartney tribute album with recordings of McCartney songs by Kiss, Garth Brooks, Billy Joel, B.B. King and others.
McCartney is listed in The Guinness Book Of Records as the most successful musician and composer in popular music history with sales of 100 million singles and 60 gold discs, "Sir Paul McCartney became the Most Successful Songwriter who has written/co written 188 charted records, of which 91 reached the Top 10 and 33 made it to No.1 totalling 1,662 weeks on the chart (up to the beginning of 2008)."

In the US, McCartney has achieved thirty-two number-one singles on the Billboard Hot 100, including twenty-one with The Beatles, one as a co-writer on Elton John's cover of "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds", nine solo, with Wings or other collaborators, and one as the composer of "A World Without Love", a number one single for Peter and Gordon. In the UK, McCartney has been involved in more number-one singles than any other artist under a variety of credits, although Elvis Presley has achieved more as a solo artist. McCartney has twenty four number-one singles in the UK, including seventeen with the Beatles, one solo, and one each with Wings, Stevie Wonder, Ferry Aid, Band Aid, Band Aid 20 and one with "The Christians et all". McCartney is the only artist to reach the UK number one as a soloist ("Pipes of Peace"), duo ("Ebony and Ivory" with Stevie Wonder), trio ("Mull of Kintyre", Wings), quartet ("She Loves You", The Beatles), quintet ("Get Back", The Beatles with Billy Preston), and as part of a musical ensemble for charity (Ferry Aid).

McCartney was voted the "Greatest Composer of the Millennium" by BBC News Online readers and McCartney's song "Yesterday" is thought to be the most covered song in history with more than 2,200 recorded versions and according to the BBC, "The track is the only one by a UK writer to have been aired more than seven million times on American TV and radio and is third in the all-time list. Sir Paul McCartney's Yesterday is the most played song by a British writer this century in the US." After its 1977 release, the Wings single "Mull of Kintyre" became the highest-selling record in British chart history, and remained so until 1984. (Three charity singles have since surpassed it in sales; the first to do so, in 1984, was Band Aid's "Do They Know It's Christmas?" in which McCartney was a participant.)

On 2 July 2005, he was involved with the fastest-released single in history. His performance of "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" with U2 at Live 8 was released only 45 minutes after it was performed, before the end of the concert. The single reached number six on the Billboard charts, just hours after the single's release, and hit number one on numerous online download charts across the world. McCartney played for the largest stadium audience in history when 184,000 people paid to see him perform at Maracanã Stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on 21 April 1990.

McCartney's scheduled concert in St Petersburg, Russia was his 3,000th concert and took place in front of 60,000 fans in Russia, on 20 June 2004. Over his career, McCartney has played 2,523 gigs with The Beatles, 140 with Wings, and 325 as a solo artist. Only his second concert in Russia, with the first just the year before on Moscow's Red Square as the former Communist U.S.S.R. had previously banned music from The Beatles as a "corrupting influence", McCartney hired 3 jets, at a reported cost of $36,000 (€29,800) (£28,000), to spray dry ice in the clouds above Saint Petersburg's Winter Palace Square in a successful attempt to prevent rain.

The day McCartney flew into the former Soviet country, he celebrated his 62nd birthday, and after the concert, according to RIA Novosti news agency, he received a phone call from a fan; then-President Vladimir Putin, who telephoned him after the concert to wish him a happy birthday.
McCartney receiving the Gershwin Award from President Barack Obama in the White House, June 2010

In the concert programme for his 1989 world tour, McCartney wrote that Lennon received all the credit for being the avant-garde Beatle, and McCartney was known as "baby-faced", which he disagreed with. People also assumed that Lennon was the "hard-edged one", and McCartney was the "soft-edged" Beatle, although McCartney admitted to "bossing Lennon around." Linda McCartney said that McCartney had a "hard-edge"—and not just on the surface—which she knew about after all the years she had spent living with him. McCartney seemed to confirm this edge when he commented that he sometimes meditates, which he said is better than "sleeping, eating, or shouting at someone".

The minor planet 4148, discovered in 1983, was named "McCartney" in his honour.

On 18 June 2006, McCartney celebrated his 64th birthday, a milestone that was the subject of one of the first songs he ever wrote, at the age of sixteen, The Beatles' song "When I'm Sixty-Four". Paul Vallely noted in The Independent:
“ "Paul McCartney's 64th birthday is not merely a personal event. It is a cultural milestone for a generation. Such is the nature of celebrity, McCartney is one of those people who has represented the hopes and aspirations of those born in the baby-boom era, which had its awakening in the Sixties."
Discography
Main articles: Paul McCartney discography, Wings discography, and The Beatles discography
http://i1122.photobucket.com/albums/l533/Your_Favorite_Lover/Fun%20Stuff/Music%20Groups/PaulMcCartney.png
http://i152.photobucket.com/albums/s191/Atravesdevenezuela/paul-mccartney.jpg



* You can read more in Wikipedia.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 06/18/11 at 7:36 pm

Say Say Say is my favorite,corny video but all time good party music. :)

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/19/11 at 7:29 am

The person of the day...Ann Wilson
Ann Dustin Wilson (born June 19, 1950) is an American musician, best known as the lead singer, flute player,songwriter, and occasional guitar player of the rock band Heart.
Wilson was born in San Diego, California. Her father was a colonel in the Marine Corps, and she moved frequently. Her family eventually settled in Bellevue, then a suburb (and now a city) east of Seattle, Washington. Shy because of a stutter, Wilson sought fulfillment in music. In the early 1970s she joined a local band, White Heart, which changed its name to Hocus Pocus, and then in 1974, to Heart.

During the 1970s, Ann Wilson was in a relationship with Michael Fisher, the manager of the band, while her younger sister Nancy was involved with lead guitarist Roger Fisher, Michael's younger brother. Both couples controlled the band. In 1979, both relationships ended; Ann stated that Michael had fallen in love with another woman and they parted. The song "Magic Man" was written about Michael and contains autobiographical lyrics about the beginning of their relationship.

Ann adopted her daughter Marie in 1991 and her son Dustin in 1998.

As a child, Ann was teased for being overweight. She revealed that in the 1970s she would starve herself to stay thin. When Heart created a comeback in the mid-1980s, Ann had gained significant weight. Fearing it would compromise the band's image, record company executives and band members began pressuring her to lose weight. In music videos, camera angles and clothes were often used to minimize her girth, and more focus was put on her sister Nancy. Ann stated she began suffering from stress-related panic attacks due to the negative publicity surrounding her obesity. She underwent a weight-loss surgery called "adjustable gastric band" in January 2002 after what she calls "a lifelong battle" with her weight.
Recording career

In 1974 Ann's younger sister Nancy joined Heart, and the band moved to Canada. Heart recorded their first album Dreamboat Annie in Vancouver in 1975; it was released in the United States in 1976. In 1977 Little Queen was released, and in 1978, Dog & Butterfly. Ann also sang the duet "Almost Paradise" with Mike Reno in the movie Footloose from 1984 which reached number seven on Billboard's Hot 100. In 1986 she released a solo single from the movie "The Golden Child" called "The Best Man in the World" which reached number sixty-one in the U.S. She also had a hit with "Surrender to Me" in 1988/1989, a duet with Cheap Trick singer Robin Zander, taken from the film Tequila Sunrise which reached number six in the U.S. singles chart.

In 1992 Ann appeared on Alice in Chains' EP Sap; she did vocals for "Brother", "Am I Inside" and "Love Song". In 1993, Alice in Chains singer Layne Staley contributed to vocals on "Ring Them Bells," a Bob Dylan cover from Heart's album Desire Walks On. In addition, Alice in Chains bassist Mike Inez and touring guitarist Scott Olson appeared on Heart's 2003 release Alive in Seattle.

Ann and Nancy started a recording studio, Bad Animals, in Seattle in the mid-1990s. They formed a side band, The Lovemongers, which performed "The Battle of Evermore" on the 1992 soundtrack to the Cameron Crowe (Nancy's then husband) movie Singles, and later released a four-song EP. The Lovemongers' debut album Whirlygig was released in 1997.
Solo career

In 2006 Ann began recording her first solo album, Hope & Glory, produced by Ben Mink, and released by the Rounder (Zoe) Music Group on September 11, 2007. Hope & Glory features guest appearances from Elton John, k.d. lang, Alison Krauss, Gretchen Wilson, Shawn Colvin, Rufus Wainwright, Wynonna Judd and Deana Carter. Ann's sister, Nancy, also contributed. Four singles were released from the project, "Little Problems, Little Lies", "Isolation" and "Immigrant Song".

The Hope & Glory version of Led Zeppelin's "Immigrant Song" is available on Ann's official MySpace page, and charted as "the #9 most podcasted song of 2007" on the PMC Top10's annual countdown. Ann's powerful, piercing voice led many to refer to her as "the female Robert Plant" (Led Zeppelin's lead vocalist).

Ann joined producer Alan Parsons in the 2001 live tribute tour to Beatles music called A Walk Down Abbey Road.

In June 2007 she sang with the group Sed Nove and Ian Gillan in the Festival of Music in Paris.
http://i830.photobucket.com/albums/zz230/roger_paul_fan/general/Ann_Wilson_70s.jpg
http://i496.photobucket.com/albums/rr324/Thewholetruth1/musicians/ann_wilson.jpg

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: CatwomanofV on 06/19/11 at 9:03 am

On the plane down here, I was watching a Heart concert.



Cat

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 06/19/11 at 1:33 pm


The person of the day...Ann Wilson
Ann Dustin Wilson (born June 19, 1950) is an American musician, best known as the lead singer, flute player,songwriter, and occasional guitar player of the rock band Heart.
Wilson was born in San Diego, California. Her father was a colonel in the Marine Corps, and she moved frequently. Her family eventually settled in Bellevue, then a suburb (and now a city) east of Seattle, Washington. Shy because of a stutter, Wilson sought fulfillment in music. In the early 1970s she joined a local band, White Heart, which changed its name to Hocus Pocus, and then in 1974, to Heart.

During the 1970s, Ann Wilson was in a relationship with Michael Fisher, the manager of the band, while her younger sister Nancy was involved with lead guitarist Roger Fisher, Michael's younger brother. Both couples controlled the band. In 1979, both relationships ended; Ann stated that Michael had fallen in love with another woman and they parted. The song "Magic Man" was written about Michael and contains autobiographical lyrics about the beginning of their relationship.

Ann adopted her daughter Marie in 1991 and her son Dustin in 1998.

As a child, Ann was teased for being overweight. She revealed that in the 1970s she would starve herself to stay thin. When Heart created a comeback in the mid-1980s, Ann had gained significant weight. Fearing it would compromise the band's image, record company executives and band members began pressuring her to lose weight. In music videos, camera angles and clothes were often used to minimize her girth, and more focus was put on her sister Nancy. Ann stated she began suffering from stress-related panic attacks due to the negative publicity surrounding her obesity. She underwent a weight-loss surgery called "adjustable gastric band" in January 2002 after what she calls "a lifelong battle" with her weight.
Recording career

In 1974 Ann's younger sister Nancy joined Heart, and the band moved to Canada. Heart recorded their first album Dreamboat Annie in Vancouver in 1975; it was released in the United States in 1976. In 1977 Little Queen was released, and in 1978, Dog & Butterfly. Ann also sang the duet "Almost Paradise" with Mike Reno in the movie Footloose from 1984 which reached number seven on Billboard's Hot 100. In 1986 she released a solo single from the movie "The Golden Child" called "The Best Man in the World" which reached number sixty-one in the U.S. She also had a hit with "Surrender to Me" in 1988/1989, a duet with Cheap Trick singer Robin Zander, taken from the film Tequila Sunrise which reached number six in the U.S. singles chart.

In 1992 Ann appeared on Alice in Chains' EP Sap; she did vocals for "Brother", "Am I Inside" and "Love Song". In 1993, Alice in Chains singer Layne Staley contributed to vocals on "Ring Them Bells," a Bob Dylan cover from Heart's album Desire Walks On. In addition, Alice in Chains bassist Mike Inez and touring guitarist Scott Olson appeared on Heart's 2003 release Alive in Seattle.

Ann and Nancy started a recording studio, Bad Animals, in Seattle in the mid-1990s. They formed a side band, The Lovemongers, which performed "The Battle of Evermore" on the 1992 soundtrack to the Cameron Crowe (Nancy's then husband) movie Singles, and later released a four-song EP. The Lovemongers' debut album Whirlygig was released in 1997.
Solo career

In 2006 Ann began recording her first solo album, Hope & Glory, produced by Ben Mink, and released by the Rounder (Zoe) Music Group on September 11, 2007. Hope & Glory features guest appearances from Elton John, k.d. lang, Alison Krauss, Gretchen Wilson, Shawn Colvin, Rufus Wainwright, Wynonna Judd and Deana Carter. Ann's sister, Nancy, also contributed. Four singles were released from the project, "Little Problems, Little Lies", "Isolation" and "Immigrant Song".

The Hope & Glory version of Led Zeppelin's "Immigrant Song" is available on Ann's official MySpace page, and charted as "the #9 most podcasted song of 2007" on the PMC Top10's annual countdown. Ann's powerful, piercing voice led many to refer to her as "the female Robert Plant" (Led Zeppelin's lead vocalist).

Ann joined producer Alan Parsons in the 2001 live tribute tour to Beatles music called A Walk Down Abbey Road.

In June 2007 she sang with the group Sed Nove and Ian Gillan in the Festival of Music in Paris.
http://i830.photobucket.com/albums/zz230/roger_paul_fan/general/Ann_Wilson_70s.jpg
http://i496.photobucket.com/albums/rr324/Thewholetruth1/musicians/ann_wilson.jpg


Alone is one of my favorites.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/20/11 at 5:13 am


On the plane down here, I was watching a Heart concert.



Cat

Nice :)

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/20/11 at 5:14 am


Alone is one of my favorites.

Mine too :)

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/20/11 at 5:20 am

The person of the day...Nicole Kidman
Nicole Mary Kidman, AC (born 20 June 1967) is an Australian actress, singer, film producer, spokesmodel, and humanitarian. After starring in a number of small Australian films and TV shows, Kidman's breakthrough was in the 1989 thriller Dead Calm. Following several films over the early 1990s, she came to worldwide recognition for her performances in Days of Thunder (1990), Far and Away (1992), and Batman Forever (1995). Kidman followed this with other successful films in the late 1990s, it was her performance in the musical, Moulin Rouge! (2001) which earned Kidman her second Golden Globe Award and first Academy Award nomination for Best Actress. Her performance as Virginia Woolf the following year in the drama film The Hours received critical acclaim and earned Kidman the Academy Award for Best Actress.

Kidman's other successful films include Cold Mountain (2003), The Interpreter (2005), Happy Feet (2006), and Australia (2008). Her performance in 2010's Rabbit Hole (which she also produced) earned Kidman further accolades including a subsequent Academy Award nomination for Best Actress. Kidman has been a Goodwill Ambassador for UNIFEM since 2006. Kidman's work has earned her a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, three Golden Globe Awards, one BAFTA, and an Academy Award. In 2006, Kidman was made a Companion of the Order of Australia, Australia's highest civilian honour, and was also the highest-paid actress in the motion picture industry. As a result of being born to Australian parents in Hawaii, Kidman has dual citizenship of Australia and the United States.
In 1995, Kidman appeared in her highest-grossing film as of 2011, playing Dr. Chase Meridian, the damsel in distress, in the superhero film Batman Forever, opposite Val Kilmer as the film's title character. That same year Kidman appeared in Gus Van Sant's critically acclaimed To Die For, earning praise for her portrayal of murderous newscaster Suzanne Stone Maretto.

Kidman next appeared in The Portrait of a Lady (1996), based on the novel the same name, alongside, Barbara Hershey, John Malkovich and Mary-Louise Parker. The following year she appeared in the action-thriller The Peacemaker (1997) as White House nuclear expert Dr. Julia Kelly, opposite George Clooney. The film received mixed reviews but grossed some $110,000,000 worldwide. That same year she appeared opposite Sandra Bullock in the poorly received fantasy Practical Magic as a modern-day witch. Kidman returned to her work on stage the same year in the David Hare play The Blue Room, which opened in London.

In 1999, Kidman reunited with then husband, Tom Cruise, to portray a married couple in Eyes Wide Shut, the final film of Stanley Kubrick. The film opened to generally positive reviews but was subject to censorship controversies due to the explicit nature of its sex scenes. The film received further attention following Kubrick's death shortly after its release. After brief hiatus and a highly publicized divorce from Cruise, Kidman returned to the screen to play a mail-order bride in the British-American drama Birthday Girl.

In 2001, Kidman appeared in two of her most critically and commercially successful films. In the first she played the cabaret actress and courtesan Satine in Baz Luhrmann's musical Moulin Rouge!, opposite Ewan McGregor. In her first singing role, Kidman's musical numbers and performance earned her critical praise. Subsequently, Kidman received her second Golden Globe Award, for Best Actress in a Motion Picture Musical or Comedy, as well as other acting awards. She also received her first Academy Award nomination, for Best Actress. Also in 2001, she had a well-received starring role in Alejandro Amenábar's Spanish horror film The Others as Grace Stewart. Grossing over $210,947,037 worldwide, the film also earned several Goya Awards award nominations, including a Best Actress nomination for Kidman. Additionally she received her second BAFTA and fifth Golden Globe nominations.

In 2003, Kidman won critical praise for her portrayal of Virginia Woolf in Stephen Daldry's The Hours, which also featured Meryl Streep and Julianne Moore. Kidman wore prosthetics that were applied to her nose making her almost unrecognisable playing the author during her time in 1920s England, and her bouts with depression and mental illness while trying to write her novel, Mrs. Dalloway. The film earned positive notices and several nominations, including for an Academy Award for Best Picture. The New York Times wrote that , "Kidman tunnels like a ferret into the soul of a woman besieged by excruciating bouts of mental illness. As you watch her wrestle with the demon of depression, it is as if its torment has never been shown on the screen before. Directing her desperate, furious stare into the void, her eyes not really focusing, Ms. Kidman, in a performance of astounding bravery, evokes the savage inner war waged by a brilliant mind against a system of faulty wiring that transmits a searing, crazy static into her brain". Kidman won numerous critics' awards, including her first BAFTA, third Golden Globe, and the Academy Award for Best Actress. As the first Australian actress to win an Academy Award, Kidman made a teary acceptance speech about the importance of art, even during times of war, saying, "Why do you come to the Academy Awards when the world is in such turmoil? Because art is important. And because you believe in what you do and you want to honour that, and it is a tradition that needs to be upheld."

Following her Oscar win, Kidman appeared in three very different films in 2003. The first, a leading role in Dogville, by Danish director Lars von Trier, was an experimental film set on a bare soundstage. The second was an adaptation of Philip Roth's novel The Human Stain, opposite Anthony Hopkins. Her third film, Anthony Minghella's war drama Cold Mountain, was a critical and commercial success. Kidman appeared opposite Jude Law and Renée Zellweger, playing Southerner Ada Monroe, who is in love with Law's character and separated by the Civil War. TIME magazine wrote, "Kidman takes strength from Ada's plight and grows steadily, literally luminous. Her sculptural pallor gives way to warm radiance in the firelight". The film garnered several award nominations and wins for its actors; Kidman received her sixth Golden Globe nomination at the 61st Golden Globe Awards for Best Actress.
2004–2008

In 2004 she appeared in the film, Birth, which received controversy over a scene in which Kidman shares a bath with her co-star, 10-year old Cameron Bright. At a press conference at the Venice Film Festival, Kidman addressed the controversy saying, "It wasn't that I wanted to make a film where I kiss a 10-year-old boy. I wanted to make a film where you understand love". Though the film received negative to mixed reviews, Kidman earned her seventh Golden Globe nomination, for Best Actress – Motion Picture. That same year she appeared in the black comedy-science-fiction film The Stepford Wives, a remake of the 1975 film of the same name. Kidman appeared in the lead role as Joanna Eberhart, a successful producer. The film, directed by Frank Oz, was critically panned and a commercial failure. The following year, Kidman appeared opposite Sean Penn in the Sydney Pollack thriller The Interpreter, playing UN translator Silvia Broome. Also that year she starred in Bewitched, based on the 1960s TV sitcom of the same name, opposite Will Ferrell. Both Kidman and Ferrell earned that year's Razzie Award for "Worst Screen Couple". Neither film fared well in the United States, with box office sales falling well short of the production costs, but both films fared well internationally.

In conjunction with her success in the film industry, Kidman became the face of the Chanel No. 5 perfume brand. She starred in a campaign of television and print ads with Rodrigo Santoro, directed by Moulin Rouge! director Baz Luhrmann, to promote the fragrance during the holiday seasons of 2004, 2005, 2006, and 2008. The three-minute commercial produced for Chanel No. 5 made Kidman the record holder for the most money paid per minute to an actor after she reportedly earned US$12million for the three-minute advert. During this time, Kidman was also listed as the 45th Most Powerful Celebrity on the 2005 Forbes Celebrity 100 List. She made a reported US$14.5 million in 2004–2005. On People magazine's list of 2005's highest paid actresses, Kidman was second behind Julia Roberts, with US$16–17 million per-film price tag. Nintendo in 2007 announced that Kidman would be the new face of Nintendo's advertising campaign for the Nintendo DS game More Brain Training in its European market.

Kidman portrayed photographer Diane Arbus in the biography Fur (2006), opposite Robert Downey Jr.. Though the film was released to mixed reviews, both Kidman and Downey Jr. received praise for their performances. She also lent her voice to the animated film Happy Feet (2006), which grossed over US$384 million worldwide. In 2007, she starred in the science-fiction movie The Invasion directed by Oliver Hirschbiegel, a remake of the 1956 Invasion of the Body Snatchers that proved a critical and commercial failure. She also played opposite Jennifer Jason Leigh and Jack Black in Noah Baumbach's comedy-drama Margot at the Wedding, released to positive reviews and earning Kidman a Satellite Award nomination for Best Actress – Musical or Comedy. She then starred in the commercially successful fantasy-adventure, The Golden Compass (2007), playing the villainous Marisa Coulter. In 2008, she reunited with Moulin Rouge! director Baz Luhrmann in the Australian period film Australia, set in the remote Northern Territory during the Japanese attack on Darwin during World War II. Kidman played opposite Hugh Jackman as an Englishwoman feeling overwhelmed by the continent. Despite the film's mixed reviews, the acting was praised and the movie was a box office success worldwide. Kidman was originally set to star in the post-World War II German drama, The Reader, working with previous collaborators Sydney Pollack and Anthony Minghella, but due to her pregnancy prior to filming she had to back out. The role went to Kate Winslet, who ultimately won the Oscar for Best Actress, which Kidman presented to her during the 81st Academy Awards.
2009–present

Kidman appeared in the 2009 Rob Marshall musical Nine, portraying the Federico Fellini-like character's muse, Claudia Jenssen. She was featured alongside fellow Oscar winners Daniel Day-Lewis, Judi Dench, Marion Cotillard, Penélope Cruz and Sophia Loren. Kidman's, whose screen time was brief compared to the other actresses, performed the musical number "Unusual Way" alongside Day-Lewis. Although the film was released to mixed reviews, it received several Golden Globe and Academy Award nominations, and earned Kidman a third Screen Actors Guild Award nomination, as part of the Outstanding Cast. Also in 2009, Kidman was the face of an international Schweppes advertisement. In 2010, she starred with Aaron Eckhart in the film adaptation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play Rabbit Hole, for which she vacated her role in the Woody Allen picture You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger. She lent her voice to a promotional video that Australia used to support its bid to host the 2018 World Cup. The five-minute video was broadcast at the 2010 World Cup in South Africa.

TV Guide reported in 2008 that Kidman will star in The Danish Girl, a film adaptation of the novel of the same name, playing Einar Wegener, the world's first postoperative transsexual. Screen Daily reported that shooting would begin in Germany in July 2011. However the project has been delayed following the exit of the director, Lasse Hallström and Kidman's co-star Rachel Weisz. In 2009, Variety said that she would produce and star in a film adaptation of the Chris Cleave novel Little Bee, in association with BBC Films.

In June 2010, TV Guide announced that Kidman and Clive Owen will star in an HBO film about Ernest Hemingway and his relationship with Martha Gellhorn. entitled Hemingway & Gellhorn. The film, directed by Philip Kaufman, began shooting in March 2011, with an air date scheduled for 2012. She also stars alongside Nicolas Cage in director Joel Schumacher's action-thriller Trespass, with the stars playing a married couple taken hostage.

On 17 September 2010, ContactMusic.com said Kidman will return to Broadway in 2011 to portray Alexandra Del Lago in David Cromer's revival of Tennessee Williams' Sweet Bird of Youth, with Scott Rudin producing and James Franco playing Chance Wayne. In February 2011, the Los Angeles Times reported Kidman is in talks to join the cast of Park Chan Wook's Stoker. In May 2011 it was reported that Kidman would star and produce in Spectre, a supernatural thriller directed by James Wan. The film closed major territory deals at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival.
Singing

Not a singer before Moulin Rouge!, Kidman had well-received vocal performances in the film. Her collaboration with Ewan McGregor on "Come What May" peaked at No.27 in the UK Singles Chart. Later she collaborated with Robbie Williams on "Somethin' Stupid", a cover of Williams' swing covers album Swing When You're Winning. It peaked at No.8 in the Australian ARIAnet Singles Chart, and at No.1 for three weeks in the UK.

In 2006, while voicing a role in the animated movie Happy Feet, she provided vocals for Norma Jean's "heartsong", a slightly altered version of "Kiss" by Prince. Kidman sang in Rob Marshall's movie musical Nine.
Personal life

Kidman has been married twice, first to actor Tom Cruise, and then to singer Keith Urban.
Kidman's movies have grossed more than $2 billion (US), with 17 movies making more than $100 million.
Feature films and television Year↓ Title↓ Role Notes
1983 BMX Bandits Judy
1983 Bush Christmas Helen
1983 Five Mile Creek Annie TV series
1983 Skin Deep Sheena Henderson TV movie
1983 Chase Through the Night Petra TV movie
1984 Matthew and Son Bridget Elliot TV movie
1984 The Wacky World of Wills & Burke Julia Matthews
1984 Country Practice, AA Country Practice Simone Jenkins TV series, 2 episodes (4x43-44)
1985 Archer's Adventure Catherine TV movie
1985 Winners Carol Trig TV series – episode 1
1986 Windrider Jade
1987 Watch the Shadows Dance Amy Gabriel
1987 Bit Part, TheThe Bit Part Mary McAllister
1987 Room to Move Carol Trig TV miniseries
1987 Australian in Rome, AnAn Australian in Rome Jill TV movie
1987 Vietnam Megan Goddard TV mini-series
1988 Emerald City Helen
1989 Dead Calm Rae Ingram
1989 Bangkok Hilton Katrina Stanton TV mini-series
1990 Days of Thunder Dr. Claire Lewicki
1991 Flirting Nicola
1991 Billy Bathgate Drew Preston Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture
1992 Far and Away Shannon Christie
1993 Malice Tracy Kennsinger
1993 My Life Gail Jones
1995 To Die For Suzanne Stone Maretto Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
Nominated—BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role
1995 Batman Forever Dr. Chase Meridian Nominated—MTV Movie Award for Most Desirable Female
1996 Portrait of a Lady, TheThe Portrait of a Lady Isabel Archer
1996 Shine Woman in bar uncredited cameo
1996 Leading Man, TheThe Leading Man Academy Awards Presenter
1997 Peacemaker, TheThe Peacemaker Dr. Julia Kelly
1998 Practical Magic Gillian Owens
1999 Eyes Wide Shut Alice Harford
2001 Moulin Rouge! Satine Empire Award for Best Actress
Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
Satellite Award for Best Actress – Musical or Comedy
London Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress (also for The Others)
MTV Movie Award for Best Female Performance
MTV Movie Award for Best Musical Sequence (shared with Ewan McGregor)
Nominated—Academy Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Australian Film Institute Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role
Nominated—Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Film Critics Circle of Australia Awards for Best Female Actor
Nominated—IF Award for Best Actress
Nominated—MTV Movie Award for Best Kiss (shared with Ewan McGregor)
Nominated—MTV Movie Award for Best Musical Sequence
Nominated—Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture
2001 Others, TheThe Others Grace Stewart Kansas City Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress
London Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress (also for Moulin Rouge!)
Saturn Award for Best Actress
Nominated—BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role
Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama
Nominated—Goya Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
2001 Birthday Girl Sophia/Nadia
2002 Panic Room Stephen's girlfriend, on the phone
2002 Hours, TheThe Hours Virginia Woolf Academy Award for Best Actress
BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role
Berlin Film Festival For Best Actress
Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama
Las Vegas Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Cast
Nominated—Satellite Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama
Nominated—Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role
Nominated—Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture
2003 Dogville Grace Margaret Mulligan Russian Guild of Film Critics Golden Aries Award for Best Foreign Actress
Nominated—Bodil Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Chlotrudis Award for Best Cast
2003 Human Stain, TheThe Human Stain Faunia Farley
2003 Cold Mountain Ada Monroe Nominated—Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Empire Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama
Nominated—Las Vegas Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Nominated—London Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress
2004 Stepford Wives, TheThe Stepford Wives Joanna Eberhart
2004 Birth Anna Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama
2005 Interpreter, TheThe Interpreter Silvia Broome
2005 Bewitched Isabel Bigelow/Samantha Razzie Award for Worst Screen Couple (with Will Ferrell)
2006 Fur Diane Arbus
2006 Happy Feet Norma Jean voice
2007 Invasion, TheThe Invasion Dr. Carol Bennell
2007 Margot at the Wedding Margot Nominated—Satellite Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
Nominated—Gotham Awards For Best Ensemble Cast
2007 Golden Compass, TheThe Golden Compass Marisa Coulter
2008 Australia Lady Sarah Ashley
2009 Nine Claudia Jenssen Satellite Award for Best Cast – Motion Picture
Nominated—Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Cast
Nominated—Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture
2010 Rabbit Hole Becca Corbett Nominated—Academy Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama
Nominated—Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Dallas-Fort Worth Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Detroit Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Houston Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Las Vegas Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Independent Spirit Award for Best Female Lead
Nominated—Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Satellite Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama
Nominated—Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role
Nominated—Washington D.C. Area Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
2011 Just Go With It Devlin Adams
2011 Trespass Sarah Post-production
2011 Monte Carlo – Producer
2012 Hemingway & Gellhorn Martha Gellhorn post-production
Awards
Main article: List of awards and nominations received by Nicole Kidman

In 2003, Kidman received a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. In addition to her 2003 Academy Award for Best Actress, Kidman has received Best Actress awards from the following critics' groups or award-granting organisations: the Hollywood Foreign Press (Golden Globes), the Australian Film Institute, Blockbuster Entertainment Awards, Empire Awards, Golden Satellite Awards, Hollywood Film Festival, London Critics Circle, Russian Guild of Film Critics, and the Southeastern Film Critics Association. In 2003, Kidman was given the American Cinematheque Award. She also received recognition from the National Association of Theatre Owners at the ShoWest Convention in 1992 as the Female Star of Tomorrow and in 2002 for a Distinguished Decade of Achievement in Film.
Government honours

In 2006, Kidman was made a Companion of the Order of Australia (AC), Australia's highest civilian honour, for "service to the performing arts as an acclaimed motion picture performer, to health care through contributions to improve medical treatment for women and children and advocacy for cancer research, to youth as a principal supporter of young performing artists, and to humanitarian causes in Australia and internationally." However, due to film commitments and her wedding to Urban, it was 13 April 2007 that she was presented with the honour. It was presented by Governor-General of Australia, Major General Michael Jeffery in a ceremony at Government House, Canberra.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v314/hilihili/nicole_kidman.jpg
http://i244.photobucket.com/albums/gg12/nixybixy/nicole_kidman.jpg

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 06/20/11 at 6:30 am


Mine too :)


and "Who Do You Run" To as well.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 06/20/11 at 6:32 am


The person of the day...Nicole Kidman
Nicole Mary Kidman, AC (born 20 June 1967) is an Australian actress, singer, film producer, spokesmodel, and humanitarian. After starring in a number of small Australian films and TV shows, Kidman's breakthrough was in the 1989 thriller Dead Calm. Following several films over the early 1990s, she came to worldwide recognition for her performances in Days of Thunder (1990), Far and Away (1992), and Batman Forever (1995). Kidman followed this with other successful films in the late 1990s, it was her performance in the musical, Moulin Rouge! (2001) which earned Kidman her second Golden Globe Award and first Academy Award nomination for Best Actress. Her performance as Virginia Woolf the following year in the drama film The Hours received critical acclaim and earned Kidman the Academy Award for Best Actress.

Kidman's other successful films include Cold Mountain (2003), The Interpreter (2005), Happy Feet (2006), and Australia (2008). Her performance in 2010's Rabbit Hole (which she also produced) earned Kidman further accolades including a subsequent Academy Award nomination for Best Actress. Kidman has been a Goodwill Ambassador for UNIFEM since 2006. Kidman's work has earned her a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, three Golden Globe Awards, one BAFTA, and an Academy Award. In 2006, Kidman was made a Companion of the Order of Australia, Australia's highest civilian honour, and was also the highest-paid actress in the motion picture industry. As a result of being born to Australian parents in Hawaii, Kidman has dual citizenship of Australia and the United States.
In 1995, Kidman appeared in her highest-grossing film as of 2011, playing Dr. Chase Meridian, the damsel in distress, in the superhero film Batman Forever, opposite Val Kilmer as the film's title character. That same year Kidman appeared in Gus Van Sant's critically acclaimed To Die For, earning praise for her portrayal of murderous newscaster Suzanne Stone Maretto.

Kidman next appeared in The Portrait of a Lady (1996), based on the novel the same name, alongside, Barbara Hershey, John Malkovich and Mary-Louise Parker. The following year she appeared in the action-thriller The Peacemaker (1997) as White House nuclear expert Dr. Julia Kelly, opposite George Clooney. The film received mixed reviews but grossed some $110,000,000 worldwide. That same year she appeared opposite Sandra Bullock in the poorly received fantasy Practical Magic as a modern-day witch. Kidman returned to her work on stage the same year in the David Hare play The Blue Room, which opened in London.

In 1999, Kidman reunited with then husband, Tom Cruise, to portray a married couple in Eyes Wide Shut, the final film of Stanley Kubrick. The film opened to generally positive reviews but was subject to censorship controversies due to the explicit nature of its sex scenes. The film received further attention following Kubrick's death shortly after its release. After brief hiatus and a highly publicized divorce from Cruise, Kidman returned to the screen to play a mail-order bride in the British-American drama Birthday Girl.

In 2001, Kidman appeared in two of her most critically and commercially successful films. In the first she played the cabaret actress and courtesan Satine in Baz Luhrmann's musical Moulin Rouge!, opposite Ewan McGregor. In her first singing role, Kidman's musical numbers and performance earned her critical praise. Subsequently, Kidman received her second Golden Globe Award, for Best Actress in a Motion Picture Musical or Comedy, as well as other acting awards. She also received her first Academy Award nomination, for Best Actress. Also in 2001, she had a well-received starring role in Alejandro Amenábar's Spanish horror film The Others as Grace Stewart. Grossing over $210,947,037 worldwide, the film also earned several Goya Awards award nominations, including a Best Actress nomination for Kidman. Additionally she received her second BAFTA and fifth Golden Globe nominations.

In 2003, Kidman won critical praise for her portrayal of Virginia Woolf in Stephen Daldry's The Hours, which also featured Meryl Streep and Julianne Moore. Kidman wore prosthetics that were applied to her nose making her almost unrecognisable playing the author during her time in 1920s England, and her bouts with depression and mental illness while trying to write her novel, Mrs. Dalloway. The film earned positive notices and several nominations, including for an Academy Award for Best Picture. The New York Times wrote that , "Kidman tunnels like a ferret into the soul of a woman besieged by excruciating bouts of mental illness. As you watch her wrestle with the demon of depression, it is as if its torment has never been shown on the screen before. Directing her desperate, furious stare into the void, her eyes not really focusing, Ms. Kidman, in a performance of astounding bravery, evokes the savage inner war waged by a brilliant mind against a system of faulty wiring that transmits a searing, crazy static into her brain". Kidman won numerous critics' awards, including her first BAFTA, third Golden Globe, and the Academy Award for Best Actress. As the first Australian actress to win an Academy Award, Kidman made a teary acceptance speech about the importance of art, even during times of war, saying, "Why do you come to the Academy Awards when the world is in such turmoil? Because art is important. And because you believe in what you do and you want to honour that, and it is a tradition that needs to be upheld."

Following her Oscar win, Kidman appeared in three very different films in 2003. The first, a leading role in Dogville, by Danish director Lars von Trier, was an experimental film set on a bare soundstage. The second was an adaptation of Philip Roth's novel The Human Stain, opposite Anthony Hopkins. Her third film, Anthony Minghella's war drama Cold Mountain, was a critical and commercial success. Kidman appeared opposite Jude Law and Renée Zellweger, playing Southerner Ada Monroe, who is in love with Law's character and separated by the Civil War. TIME magazine wrote, "Kidman takes strength from Ada's plight and grows steadily, literally luminous. Her sculptural pallor gives way to warm radiance in the firelight". The film garnered several award nominations and wins for its actors; Kidman received her sixth Golden Globe nomination at the 61st Golden Globe Awards for Best Actress.
2004–2008

In 2004 she appeared in the film, Birth, which received controversy over a scene in which Kidman shares a bath with her co-star, 10-year old Cameron Bright. At a press conference at the Venice Film Festival, Kidman addressed the controversy saying, "It wasn't that I wanted to make a film where I kiss a 10-year-old boy. I wanted to make a film where you understand love". Though the film received negative to mixed reviews, Kidman earned her seventh Golden Globe nomination, for Best Actress – Motion Picture. That same year she appeared in the black comedy-science-fiction film The Stepford Wives, a remake of the 1975 film of the same name. Kidman appeared in the lead role as Joanna Eberhart, a successful producer. The film, directed by Frank Oz, was critically panned and a commercial failure. The following year, Kidman appeared opposite Sean Penn in the Sydney Pollack thriller The Interpreter, playing UN translator Silvia Broome. Also that year she starred in Bewitched, based on the 1960s TV sitcom of the same name, opposite Will Ferrell. Both Kidman and Ferrell earned that year's Razzie Award for "Worst Screen Couple". Neither film fared well in the United States, with box office sales falling well short of the production costs, but both films fared well internationally.

In conjunction with her success in the film industry, Kidman became the face of the Chanel No. 5 perfume brand. She starred in a campaign of television and print ads with Rodrigo Santoro, directed by Moulin Rouge! director Baz Luhrmann, to promote the fragrance during the holiday seasons of 2004, 2005, 2006, and 2008. The three-minute commercial produced for Chanel No. 5 made Kidman the record holder for the most money paid per minute to an actor after she reportedly earned US$12million for the three-minute advert. During this time, Kidman was also listed as the 45th Most Powerful Celebrity on the 2005 Forbes Celebrity 100 List. She made a reported US$14.5 million in 2004–2005. On People magazine's list of 2005's highest paid actresses, Kidman was second behind Julia Roberts, with US$16–17 million per-film price tag. Nintendo in 2007 announced that Kidman would be the new face of Nintendo's advertising campaign for the Nintendo DS game More Brain Training in its European market.

Kidman portrayed photographer Diane Arbus in the biography Fur (2006), opposite Robert Downey Jr.. Though the film was released to mixed reviews, both Kidman and Downey Jr. received praise for their performances. She also lent her voice to the animated film Happy Feet (2006), which grossed over US$384 million worldwide. In 2007, she starred in the science-fiction movie The Invasion directed by Oliver Hirschbiegel, a remake of the 1956 Invasion of the Body Snatchers that proved a critical and commercial failure. She also played opposite Jennifer Jason Leigh and Jack Black in Noah Baumbach's comedy-drama Margot at the Wedding, released to positive reviews and earning Kidman a Satellite Award nomination for Best Actress – Musical or Comedy. She then starred in the commercially successful fantasy-adventure, The Golden Compass (2007), playing the villainous Marisa Coulter. In 2008, she reunited with Moulin Rouge! director Baz Luhrmann in the Australian period film Australia, set in the remote Northern Territory during the Japanese attack on Darwin during World War II. Kidman played opposite Hugh Jackman as an Englishwoman feeling overwhelmed by the continent. Despite the film's mixed reviews, the acting was praised and the movie was a box office success worldwide. Kidman was originally set to star in the post-World War II German drama, The Reader, working with previous collaborators Sydney Pollack and Anthony Minghella, but due to her pregnancy prior to filming she had to back out. The role went to Kate Winslet, who ultimately won the Oscar for Best Actress, which Kidman presented to her during the 81st Academy Awards.
2009–present

Kidman appeared in the 2009 Rob Marshall musical Nine, portraying the Federico Fellini-like character's muse, Claudia Jenssen. She was featured alongside fellow Oscar winners Daniel Day-Lewis, Judi Dench, Marion Cotillard, Penélope Cruz and Sophia Loren. Kidman's, whose screen time was brief compared to the other actresses, performed the musical number "Unusual Way" alongside Day-Lewis. Although the film was released to mixed reviews, it received several Golden Globe and Academy Award nominations, and earned Kidman a third Screen Actors Guild Award nomination, as part of the Outstanding Cast. Also in 2009, Kidman was the face of an international Schweppes advertisement. In 2010, she starred with Aaron Eckhart in the film adaptation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play Rabbit Hole, for which she vacated her role in the Woody Allen picture You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger. She lent her voice to a promotional video that Australia used to support its bid to host the 2018 World Cup. The five-minute video was broadcast at the 2010 World Cup in South Africa.

TV Guide reported in 2008 that Kidman will star in The Danish Girl, a film adaptation of the novel of the same name, playing Einar Wegener, the world's first postoperative transsexual. Screen Daily reported that shooting would begin in Germany in July 2011. However the project has been delayed following the exit of the director, Lasse Hallström and Kidman's co-star Rachel Weisz. In 2009, Variety said that she would produce and star in a film adaptation of the Chris Cleave novel Little Bee, in association with BBC Films.

In June 2010, TV Guide announced that Kidman and Clive Owen will star in an HBO film about Ernest Hemingway and his relationship with Martha Gellhorn. entitled Hemingway & Gellhorn. The film, directed by Philip Kaufman, began shooting in March 2011, with an air date scheduled for 2012. She also stars alongside Nicolas Cage in director Joel Schumacher's action-thriller Trespass, with the stars playing a married couple taken hostage.

On 17 September 2010, ContactMusic.com said Kidman will return to Broadway in 2011 to portray Alexandra Del Lago in David Cromer's revival of Tennessee Williams' Sweet Bird of Youth, with Scott Rudin producing and James Franco playing Chance Wayne. In February 2011, the Los Angeles Times reported Kidman is in talks to join the cast of Park Chan Wook's Stoker. In May 2011 it was reported that Kidman would star and produce in Spectre, a supernatural thriller directed by James Wan. The film closed major territory deals at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival.
Singing

Not a singer before Moulin Rouge!, Kidman had well-received vocal performances in the film. Her collaboration with Ewan McGregor on "Come What May" peaked at No.27 in the UK Singles Chart. Later she collaborated with Robbie Williams on "Somethin' Stupid", a cover of Williams' swing covers album Swing When You're Winning. It peaked at No.8 in the Australian ARIAnet Singles Chart, and at No.1 for three weeks in the UK.

In 2006, while voicing a role in the animated movie Happy Feet, she provided vocals for Norma Jean's "heartsong", a slightly altered version of "Kiss" by Prince. Kidman sang in Rob Marshall's movie musical Nine.
Personal life

Kidman has been married twice, first to actor Tom Cruise, and then to singer Keith Urban.
Kidman's movies have grossed more than $2 billion (US), with 17 movies making more than $100 million.
Feature films and television Year↓ Title↓ Role Notes
1983 BMX Bandits Judy
1983 Bush Christmas Helen
1983 Five Mile Creek Annie TV series
1983 Skin Deep Sheena Henderson TV movie
1983 Chase Through the Night Petra TV movie
1984 Matthew and Son Bridget Elliot TV movie
1984 The Wacky World of Wills & Burke Julia Matthews
1984 Country Practice, AA Country Practice Simone Jenkins TV series, 2 episodes (4x43-44)
1985 Archer's Adventure Catherine TV movie
1985 Winners Carol Trig TV series – episode 1
1986 Windrider Jade
1987 Watch the Shadows Dance Amy Gabriel
1987 Bit Part, TheThe Bit Part Mary McAllister
1987 Room to Move Carol Trig TV miniseries
1987 Australian in Rome, AnAn Australian in Rome Jill TV movie
1987 Vietnam Megan Goddard TV mini-series
1988 Emerald City Helen
1989 Dead Calm Rae Ingram
1989 Bangkok Hilton Katrina Stanton TV mini-series
1990 Days of Thunder Dr. Claire Lewicki
1991 Flirting Nicola
1991 Billy Bathgate Drew Preston Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture
1992 Far and Away Shannon Christie
1993 Malice Tracy Kennsinger
1993 My Life Gail Jones
1995 To Die For Suzanne Stone Maretto Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
Nominated—BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role
1995 Batman Forever Dr. Chase Meridian Nominated—MTV Movie Award for Most Desirable Female
1996 Portrait of a Lady, TheThe Portrait of a Lady Isabel Archer
1996 Shine Woman in bar uncredited cameo
1996 Leading Man, TheThe Leading Man Academy Awards Presenter
1997 Peacemaker, TheThe Peacemaker Dr. Julia Kelly
1998 Practical Magic Gillian Owens
1999 Eyes Wide Shut Alice Harford
2001 Moulin Rouge! Satine Empire Award for Best Actress
Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
Satellite Award for Best Actress – Musical or Comedy
London Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress (also for The Others)
MTV Movie Award for Best Female Performance
MTV Movie Award for Best Musical Sequence (shared with Ewan McGregor)
Nominated—Academy Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Australian Film Institute Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role
Nominated—Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Film Critics Circle of Australia Awards for Best Female Actor
Nominated—IF Award for Best Actress
Nominated—MTV Movie Award for Best Kiss (shared with Ewan McGregor)
Nominated—MTV Movie Award for Best Musical Sequence
Nominated—Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture
2001 Others, TheThe Others Grace Stewart Kansas City Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress
London Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress (also for Moulin Rouge!)
Saturn Award for Best Actress
Nominated—BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role
Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama
Nominated—Goya Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
2001 Birthday Girl Sophia/Nadia
2002 Panic Room Stephen's girlfriend, on the phone
2002 Hours, TheThe Hours Virginia Woolf Academy Award for Best Actress
BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role
Berlin Film Festival For Best Actress
Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama
Las Vegas Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Cast
Nominated—Satellite Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama
Nominated—Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role
Nominated—Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture
2003 Dogville Grace Margaret Mulligan Russian Guild of Film Critics Golden Aries Award for Best Foreign Actress
Nominated—Bodil Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Chlotrudis Award for Best Cast
2003 Human Stain, TheThe Human Stain Faunia Farley
2003 Cold Mountain Ada Monroe Nominated—Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Empire Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama
Nominated—Las Vegas Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Nominated—London Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress
2004 Stepford Wives, TheThe Stepford Wives Joanna Eberhart
2004 Birth Anna Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama
2005 Interpreter, TheThe Interpreter Silvia Broome
2005 Bewitched Isabel Bigelow/Samantha Razzie Award for Worst Screen Couple (with Will Ferrell)
2006 Fur Diane Arbus
2006 Happy Feet Norma Jean voice
2007 Invasion, TheThe Invasion Dr. Carol Bennell
2007 Margot at the Wedding Margot Nominated—Satellite Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
Nominated—Gotham Awards For Best Ensemble Cast
2007 Golden Compass, TheThe Golden Compass Marisa Coulter
2008 Australia Lady Sarah Ashley
2009 Nine Claudia Jenssen Satellite Award for Best Cast – Motion Picture
Nominated—Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Cast
Nominated—Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture
2010 Rabbit Hole Becca Corbett Nominated—Academy Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama
Nominated—Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Dallas-Fort Worth Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Detroit Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Houston Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Las Vegas Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Independent Spirit Award for Best Female Lead
Nominated—Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Satellite Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama
Nominated—Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role
Nominated—Washington D.C. Area Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
2011 Just Go With It Devlin Adams
2011 Trespass Sarah Post-production
2011 Monte Carlo – Producer
2012 Hemingway & Gellhorn Martha Gellhorn post-production
Awards
Main article: List of awards and nominations received by Nicole Kidman

In 2003, Kidman received a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. In addition to her 2003 Academy Award for Best Actress, Kidman has received Best Actress awards from the following critics' groups or award-granting organisations: the Hollywood Foreign Press (Golden Globes), the Australian Film Institute, Blockbuster Entertainment Awards, Empire Awards, Golden Satellite Awards, Hollywood Film Festival, London Critics Circle, Russian Guild of Film Critics, and the Southeastern Film Critics Association. In 2003, Kidman was given the American Cinematheque Award. She also received recognition from the National Association of Theatre Owners at the ShoWest Convention in 1992 as the Female Star of Tomorrow and in 2002 for a Distinguished Decade of Achievement in Film.
Government honours

In 2006, Kidman was made a Companion of the Order of Australia (AC), Australia's highest civilian honour, for "service to the performing arts as an acclaimed motion picture performer, to health care through contributions to improve medical treatment for women and children and advocacy for cancer research, to youth as a principal supporter of young performing artists, and to humanitarian causes in Australia and internationally." However, due to film commitments and her wedding to Urban, it was 13 April 2007 that she was presented with the honour. It was presented by Governor-General of Australia, Major General Michael Jeffery in a ceremony at Government House, Canberra.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v314/hilihili/nicole_kidman.jpg
http://i244.photobucket.com/albums/gg12/nixybixy/nicole_kidman.jpg


I like her films especially in I Dream Of Jeannie.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/21/11 at 6:17 am

The person of the day...Juliette Lewis
Juliette Lewis (born June 21, 1973) is an American actress and musician. She gained international fame for her role in the 1991 thriller Cape Fear for which she received an Academy Award and Golden Globe nomination for Best Supporting Actress. This followed with major roles in What's Eating Gilbert Grape, Natural Born Killers, The Evening Star, and From Dusk Till Dawn. Her work in television has resulted in two Emmy nominations.
Juliette Lewis was born in Los Angeles, California to Geoffrey Lewis, an actor, and Glenis Duggan Batley, a graphic designer. She has four siblings – brothers Lightfield and Peter, and sisters Deirdre and Brandy.

She appeared in The Wonder Years as Wayne's girlfriend in Episodes 24, 34 and 36. Lewis first garnered international attention and acclaim in 1991 with her turn as Danielle Bowden in Martin Scorsese's remake of Cape Fear, for which she was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress in 1991. Over the next few years, she won further critical support in Woody Allen's "Husbands and Wives," Peter Medak's Romeo Is Bleeding, and opposite Brad Pitt in Kalifornia. In 1993, she acted alongside Leonardo DiCaprio and Johnny Depp in the drama film What's Eating Gilbert Grape. She played Mallory Knox in Oliver Stone's Natural Born Killers. She played a rock singer in the film Strange Days, doing her own singing on covers of two songs written by PJ Harvey, revealing her musical ability.

She received an Emmy nomination for her performance in Hysterical Blindness in 2003. She also appeared in the HIM music video for "Buried Alive By Love" in 2003.

Lewis appeared in Rockstar Games' Grand Theft Auto IV, providing the voice of "Juliette," the host of fictional radio station "Radio Broker." She starred in the video for the Melissa Etheridge song "Come To My Window," and has also appeared in a GAP commercial in which she was dancing with Daft Punk to the tune of the song "Digital Love." She also hosted the UK pop quiz show "Never Mind the Buzzcocks" in 2010.
Music
Lewis performing with the Licks at the Eurockéennes 2007

Lewis launched a career as a solo singer and musician, leading American rock band Juliette and the Licks until 2009. After splitting with the Licks, she has formed a new band The New Romantiques, with whom she has recorded an album entitled Terra Incognita.

Lewis features on the track "Bad Brother" by the band The Infidels, from The Crow: Salvation Soundtrack album, which was released on April 2000. She is working with rock songwriter Linda Perry, among others. Lewis has also appeared on three tracks by Electronic Music group The Prodigy's 2004 CD Always Outnumbered, Never Outgunned ("Spitfire", "Get Up Get Off", and "Hot Ride"). In 2006, Blender magazine included her in their hottest women of rock music list while saying, " delivered sonically varnished melodic punk replete with purring vocals and lyrics that bash porn, pharmaceutical companies and rotten lovers. (in no particular order)".

Lewis says of her acting and music, "I was always using music in my acting to prepare for roles. To me, cinema and music go hand in hand. Now I’m just giving attention to the other side of my art.”

In 2009, Juliette played at Przystanek Woodstock in Poland.
Personal life

At fourteen, she left her parents and went to live with family friend and actress, Karen Black, before moving into her own apartment. Dropping out of high school, she got into trouble with the law for driving illegally at age fifteen and then for illegally patronizing a nightclub when she was sixteen. While in her twenties, she eventually went into rehab for drug addiction.

Lewis married professional skateboarder Steve Berra in 1999; they divorced in 2003.

Lewis is a Christian and a member of the Church of Scientology.

In October 2010, she was the victim of a hit-and-run car accident in which an unknown driver T-boned the Lincoln Town Car she was traveling in.
Discography

    * …Like a Bolt of Lightning (2004)
    * You're Speaking My Language (2005)
    * Four on the Floor (2006)
    * Terra Incognita (2009)

Filmography
Year Film Role Notes
1987 I Married Dora Kate Farrell (TV series)
Nominated — Young Artist Award for Best Young Actress Starring in a New Television Comedy Series
Home Fires Maty (TV)
1988 My Stepmother Is an Alien Lexie, Jessie's Friend #1
The Facts of Life Terry Rankin (TV series)
1989 National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation Audrey Griswold
Meet the Hollowheads Cindy Hollowhead
The Runnin' Kind Amy Curtis
The Wonder Years Delores (TV Series)
1990 A Family for Joe Holly Bankston #2 (TV Series)
Too Young to Die? Amanda Sue Bradley
1991 Cape Fear Danielle Bowden Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Most Promising Actress
Kansas City Film Critics Circle Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated — Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated — Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated — Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture
Nominated — MTV Movie Award for Best Kiss (Shared with Robert De Niro)
Crooked Hearts Cassie
1992 That Night Sheryl O'Connor
Husbands and Wives Rain
1993 What's Eating Gilbert Grape Becky
Romeo Is Bleeding Sheri
Kalifornia Adele Corners
1994 Mixed Nuts Gracie Barzini
Natural Born Killers Mallory Knox Pasinetti Award for Best Actress
Nominated — MTV Movie Award for Best Kiss (Shared with Woody Harrelson)
Nominated — MTV Movie Award for Best On-Screen Duo (Shared with Woody Harrelson)
1995 Strange Days Faith Justin
The Basketball Diaries Diane Moody
1996 The Evening Star Melanie Horton Blockbuster Entertainment Award for Favorite Supporting Actress - Drama
From Dusk till Dawn Kate Fuller Nominated — Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actress
1998 Some Girl April
1999 The Other Sister Carla Tate Nominated — Razzie Award for Worst Supporting Actress
The 4th Floor Jane Emelin
2000 Room to Rent Linda
The Way of the Gun Robin
2001 Picture Claire Claire Beaucage
My Louisiana Sky Dorie Kay (TV)
Nominated — Emmy Award for Outstanding Performer in a Children's Special
Gaudi Afternoon April
2002 Enough Ginny
Armitage: Dual Matrix (Anime)
Dharma & Greg September "Try To Remember This Kind Of September" episode
Hysterical Blindness Beth (TV)
Nominated — Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress – Miniseries or a Movie
Nominated — Independent Spirit Award for Best Supporting Female
2003 Cold Creek Manor
Free for All Paula
Old School Heidi
2004 Renegade Maria Sullivan aka Blueberry
Starsky & Hutch Kitty
Chasing Freedom Libby (TV)
2005 Daltry Calhoun Flora Flick
The Darwin Awards Joleen
Lightfield's Home Videos
Aurora Borealis Kate
Grilled Suzanne
2006 My Name Is Earl Jesse — Bounty Hunter in "The Bounty Hunter" episode
2007 Catch and Release Maureen
2008 Grand Theft Auto IV Herself as a radio DJ (video game)
2009 Whip It! Iron Maven
Metropia Nina (voice)
2010 Sympathy for Delicious Ariel Lee
The Switch Debbie Epstein
Conviction Roseanna Perry Boston Society of Film Critics Award for Best Supporting Actress
Due Date Heidi
Memphis Beat Cleo (TV Series) "Baby, Let's Play House"
http://i368.photobucket.com/albums/oo121/khizaw/juliette_lewis_3.jpg
http://i974.photobucket.com/albums/ae225/EmilyinChains714/Leading%20Ladies/juliette.jpg

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 06/21/11 at 6:43 am

also Happy Birthday to Michael Gross and Meredith Baxter Birney from Family Ties who both turn 64.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/21/11 at 8:58 am


also Happy Birthday to Michael Gross and Meredith Baxter Birney from Family Ties who both turn 64.

Thanks Howie :)

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 06/21/11 at 7:41 pm


Thanks Howie :)


you're welcome.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/22/11 at 10:57 am

The person of the day...Amy Brenneman
Amy Frederica Brenneman (born June 22, 1964) is an American actress, perhaps best known for her roles in the television series NYPD Blue, Judging Amy and Private Practice. She has also starred in films such as Heat, Fear, Daylight, Nine Lives and 88 Minutes.
In her first major television role, Brenneman played mob-connected uniformed officer Janice Licalsi on the police drama NYPD Blue. Her story arc, which included a romantic relationship with David Caruso's character, ran through the show's first season (1993–1994) and the first few episodes of the second season. She was nominated for an Emmy Award for Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series in 1994 and for Outstanding Guest Actress the following year.

After leaving NYPD Blue, Brenneman appeared in a number of films, including Casper (1995), Heat (1995), Fear (1996), Daylight (1996) and Nevada (1997). She had a brief recurring role on Frasier in its 1998–1999 season.

In 1999, Brenneman became creator and executive producer of the television series Judging Amy, in which she played the title character. Brenneman portrayed a divorced single mother working as a Family Court Judge in Hartford, Connecticut. The show's concept was based on the real-life experiences of her mother, Frederica Brenneman, as a superior court judge in the state of Connecticut. Judging Amy ran on CBS for six seasons and 138 episodes from September 19, 1999 to May 3, 2005 to good ratings. Frederica Brenneman was one of Harvard Law School's first female graduates and became a juvenile court judge in Connecticut when Amy was 3 years old. Amy has said, "I play my mother's job, not my mother."

In 2002, she was awarded the Women in Film Lucy Award in recognition of her excellence and innovation in her creative works that have enhanced the perception of women through the medium of television.

In March 2007, Brenneman was cast to co-star in the Grey's Anatomy spinoff, Private Practice.

In 2007, Brenneman played "Sylvia Avila" in The Jane Austen Book Club. In 2008, Brenneman co-starred in 88 Minutes alongside Al Pacino.
Personal life

In 1995, Brenneman married director Brad Silberling in the garden at the home of her parents. They have two children: Charlotte Tucker (b. March 20, 2001) and Bodhi Russell (b. June 8, 2005). Brenneman attends an Episcopalian church (and has described herself as "also half-Jewish", on her mother's side).

Brenneman, who is very actively pro-choice, signed the "We Had Abortions" petition which appears in the October 2006 issue of Ms. Magazine. The petition contains signatures of over 5,000 women declaring that they had an abortion and were "unashamed of the choice they made".

In the February 28, 2007, all-star benefit reading of "The Gift of Peace" at UCLA's Freud Playhouse, she portrays an entrepreneur, alongside actors Ed Asner, Barbara Bain, George Coe, Wendie Malick, and James Pickens, Jr.. The play was an open appeal and fundraiser for passage of U.S. House Resolution 808, which sought to establish a Cabinet-level "Department of Peace" in the U.S. government, funded by a two percent diversion of The Pentagon's annual budget.

In July 2008, Brenneman was nominated as a candidate on the 'Unite for Strength' slate for a place on the national governing board of the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) in elections scheduled for 18 September 2008. The bid was successful.

Brenneman is also a strong supporter of more restrictive gun control laws, and in 2009 she hosted the Target for a Safe America gala at the Riviera Country Club in Los Angeles for the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence, a gun control group that favors restrictive gun laws and supports gun bans.
Filmography
Feature films
Year Film Role Notes
1995 Bye Bye Love Susan
Casper Amelia
Heat Eady
1996 Fear Laura Walker aka No Fear
Daylight Madelyne Thompson
1997 Lesser Prophets Annie aka The Last Bet
Nevada Chrysty
1998 Your Friends & Neighbors Mary
1999 The Suburbans Grace
Mary Cassatt: An American Impressionist Mary Cassatt
2000 Things You Can Tell Just by Looking at Her Detective Kathy Faber segment "Love Waits For Kathy"
2003 Off The Map Adult Bo Grodin
2005 Nine Lives Lorna Won - Locarno International Film Festival - Best Actress (2005)

Nominated Gotham Awards - Best Ensemble Cast (2005)
2007 The Jane Austen Book Club Sylvia Avila
88 Minutes Shelly Barnes
2008 Downloading Nancy Carol
2010 Mother and Child Dr. Stone
Television
Year Title Role Other notes
1993–1994 NYPD Blue Officer Janice Licalsi Nominated – Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
Nominated - Emmy Award for Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series
1998–1999 Frasier Faye Moskowitz Episodes: "Merry Christmas, Mrs. Moskowitz", "When a Man Loves Two Women", "Shutout in Seattle: Part 1", "Shutout in Seattle: Part 2"
1999–2005 Judging Amy Amy Madison Gray Nominated – Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series (2000-2002,3 times)

Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Actress in a Drama Series (2003)
Golden Globe for Best Actress in a Television Drama Series (2000-2002,3 times)
PGA Awards - Television Producer of the Year Award in Episodic (2000)
Satellite Awards Best Actress – Television Series Drama (2002)
TV Guide Awards - Actress of the Year in a Drama Series (2000-2001)
Viewers for Quality Television Awards - Best Actress in a Quality Drama Series (2000)
2007 Grey's Anatomy Dr. Violet Turner Episodes: The Other Side of This Life: Part 1/Part 2 (Private Practice backdoor pilot)
2007–present Private Practice Dr. Violet Turner
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v378/karlena_simon/Backgrounds/AmyBrennemanBackground.jpg
http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b188/DTrent/The%20Beauty%20Of%20Woman/dal5.jpg

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 06/22/11 at 7:47 pm

Happy Birthday Cyndi Lauper,She is 58.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/23/11 at 8:41 am


Happy Birthday Cyndi Lauper,She is 58.

:)

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/23/11 at 8:48 am

The person of the day...Joss Whedon
Joseph Hill "Joss" Whedon (play /ˈwiːdən/; born June 23, 1964) is an American screenwriter, executive producer, director, occasional composer and actor, and founder of Mutant Enemy Productions. He is best known as the creator and showrunner of the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1997–2003), Angel (1999–2004), Firefly (2002) and Dollhouse (2009–2010), as well as the short film Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog (2008). He is also notable for his work in film, comic books, and online media. Many of Whedon's projects, as well as Whedon himself, enjoy a cult status.
Following a move to Los Angeles, Whedon secured his first writing job on the television series Roseanne. After working several years as a script doctor for films, he returned to television, where he created four TV shows.
(From left to right) Tom Lenk, Emma Caulfield, Alexis Denisof, Alyson Hannigan, Anthony Stewart Head, Whedon, Michelle Trachtenberg at the Buffy cast party.

Years after having his script for the movie Buffy the Vampire Slayer produced, Whedon revived the concept as a television series of the same name. Buffy the Vampire Slayer went on to become a critical and cult hit receiving an Emmy Award nomination for Outstanding Writing in a Drama Series in 2000. Buffy ran for five seasons on The WB Television Network before being relocated to the UPN Network for its final two seasons. Angel was a spin-off of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, featuring Buffy's vampire-with-a-soul ex-boyfriend as the title character. Debuting in September 1999 on the WB, Angel was broadcast following Buffy during its first two seasons. The WB canceled the show in February 2004 while it was in its fifth season.

In 2002, Fox canceled Firefly, after only 11 of 14 episodes were aired, many out of intended order. The original ninety-minute pilot ("Serenity") was aired last. After the cancellation, Whedon wrote the script for a Firefly movie, titled Serenity. In early 2004 Whedon announced that it had been greenlit by Universal Studios. It was widely released in the United States on September 30, 2005. In the DVD release, Whedon discusses how Serenity would not have been made if not for the dedication of the Browncoats, fans of the series.

In late 2007, Eliza Dushku, with whom Whedon worked on Buffy and Angel, met over lunch to discuss possible ideas for a series for her to star in and came up with an idea which excited both of them. The show, Dollhouse, was announced by Fox in November 2008 to begin airing on February 13, 2009. Dollhouse was canceled after two seasons due to low ratings.

Whedon is also noted for his directing work in television, which includes two 2007 episodes of The Office ("Business School" and "Branch Wars") as well as a 2010 episode of the musical series Glee ("Dream On") in which he reunited with his Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog star Neil Patrick Harris.

Although not an actor, he has made cameos in his own shows as well as others. He appeared as a newsreader in the Buffy season one episode, "I, Robot... You, Jane". During the second season of Angel, he made a cameo appearance as the character Numfar under heavy makeup, where his entire role was to perform comical dances in "Through the Looking Glass". In Firefly, Whedon appeared as a guest at a funeral in the final produced episode, "The Message". He made a brief appearance as an overbearing rental-car clerk in an episode of Veronica Mars, "Rat Saw God", in 2005; Whedon is a vocal fan of Veronica Mars. He voiced himself in two episodes of Seth Green's television series Robot Chicken titled "Rabbits on a Roller Coaster" in 2007 and "Help Me" in 2008.
Feature films and video

Whedon wrote or co-wrote several films, including Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Toy Story, Atlantis: The Lost Empire, Alien Resurrection and Titan A.E.. The song "My Lullaby" from The Lion King II: Simba's Pride was written by him and Seattle native Scott Warrender. He was nominated (along with six other writers) for an Academy Award for Toy Story's screenplay.

He also wrote uncredited drafts or rewrites of Speed, Waterworld, Twister and X-Men, although in interviews, Whedon disowned the latter three films.He claimed that he had a good script for Alien Resurrection, which he felt was spoiled by its director Jean-Pierre Jeunet. His Waterworld script was thrown out, and only two of his lines were kept in the final script of X-Men. Even the Buffy movie bore little resemblance to his original screenplay. According to Graham Yost, the credited writer of Speed, Whedon wrote most of its dialogue.

He wrote and directed 2005's Serenity, based on his television series Firefly. Serenity won the 2006 Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation, Long Form. Beginning in January 2006, fans (with Universal's blessing) began organizing worldwide charity screenings of Serenity called "Can't Stop the Serenity" (CSTS) to benefit Equality Now, a human rights organization supported by Joss Whedon. Over $500,000 has been raised for Equality Now since 2006. As of May 1, 2011, 45 cities were registered for CSTS 2011 in 6 countries and 24 U.S. states.

Whedon wrote a horror film titled The Cabin in the Woods with Drew Goddard which is currently in production with MGM, with Goddard directing.

In November 2008, Whedon guest starred in the premiere episode of The Write Environment, a direct to DVD series featuring in-depth, candid one-on-one interviews with some of TV's most prolific and well known series creator/writers.

In April 2010 it was confirmed that Whedon will direct The Avengers, a live-action adaptation of the Marvel Comics superhero team of the same name.
Comic books

Whedon, a lifelong comic book fan, is the author of the Dark Horse Comics miniseries Fray which takes place in the far future of the Buffyverse. Whedon returned to the world of Fray during the Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season Eight arc, "Time of Your Life".

Like many other authors from the Buffy TV show, he also contributed to the show's comic book version: he wrote three stories in the anthology Tales of the Slayers (including one featuring Melaka Fray from Fray) and also the main storyline of the five-issue miniseries Tales of the Vampires.

The three-issue miniseries Serenity: Those Left Behind, based on the Firefly series and leading up to the film Serenity, was released June through August 2005. Co-written with Brett Matthews and pencilled by Will Conrad, the first issue featured covers drawn by John Cassaday, J.G. Jones, and Bryan Hitch, as well as other artists for the second and third issues. The first two issues went to a second printing. The trade paperback featured a new cover by acclaimed painter Adam Hughes.

A second three-issue Serenity miniseries Serenity: Better Days, was released in March, April, and May 2008. "Better Days" reunites Whedon, Matthews, Conrad, and Adam Hughes, who will provide all three covers. The three covers form a larger panorama of the ship's crew. "Better Days" is set before "Those Left Behind", and features the full crew of Serenity. A trade paperback featuring a cover by Jo Chen was released in October 2008.

Whedon and others have mentioned that more Serenity comics are planned for the near future, and will be based in the Firefly continuation of the series, including one about Shepherd Book. Likewise, Whedon and other former Buffy writers have released a new ongoing Buffy which takes place after the series finale "Chosen", which he officially recognizes as the canonical "Season 8". The first issue was released on March 14, 2007 by Dark Horse Comics. Following the success of issue one of Buffy season eight, IDW Publishing approached Whedon about similarly producing a canonical Angel Season 6. Angel: After the Fall has 14 issues published as of November 19, 2008 with 3 more to come following the adventures of Angel and his team after the TV series ended, where the title of the series will then change to Angel: Aftermath. Although Whedon has not had the time to write the series, he has served as executive producer with Brian Lynch, writing the season 6 story.

Whedon wrote Astonishing X-Men in Marvel Comics' popular line of comics about the X-Men but finished his 24 issue run in 2008 and handed over the writing reins to Warren Ellis. The title, recreated specifically for Whedon, has been one of Marvel's best-selling comics as of 2006 and was nominated for several Eisner Awards including Best Serialized Story, Best Continuing Series, Best New Series and Best Writer, winning the Best Continuing Series award in 2006. One storyline from this comic, the notion of a cure for mutation being found, was also an element in the third X-Men film, X-Men: The Last Stand. Whedon also introduced several new characters into the Marvel Universe such as the villainous Ord, X-Men Ruth "Blindfold" Aldine and Hisako "Armor" Ichiki, Runaway Klara Prast and Special Agent Abigail Brand, along with S.W.O.R.D., the organization she commands.

Whedon is the second writer of the critically acclaimed and fan-favorite Marvel comic Runaways, taking over after series creator Brian K. Vaughan completed his run. Whedon had been a fan of the series for some time, and had a letter published in the first volume, which was included in the Volume 1 hardcover.

Whedon's other comic-related work includes writing the introduction to Identity Crisis trade paperback and a contribution to the "jam issue" Superman/Batman #26 (to date his only published work for DC Comics), writing short pieces for Marvel's Stan Lee Meets Spider-Man and Giant-Size X-Men #3 and also being the subject of an issue of Marvel Spotlight (alongside artist Michael Lark). He contributed as part of a panel of writers to Marvel Comics' Civil War crossover event, lending advice in how to tell the story and how to end it.

In February 2009, Astonishing X-Men #6, which depicted the return of Colossus to the title, and concluded Whedon's first story arc on that title, was named by Marvel Comics readers the #65 in Marvel's Top 70 Comics of all time.
Online media

In 2005 he released a series of online shorts titled the R. Tam sessions, starring himself and Summer Glau, which served as a form of viral marketing for Serenity. In 2007, he launched a free webcomic, titled Sugarshock! hosted on Dark Horse comic's Myspace page.

In March 2008, Whedon teamed up with his brothers Zack Whedon and Jed Whedon, along with Jed's then-fiancée Maurissa Tancharoen to write, compose and produce the musical superhero spoof, Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog. The musical stars Neil Patrick Harris, Nathan Fillion and Felicia Day. Whedon conceived of Dr. Horrible over the year before and production took place over seven days during the Writers Guild strike. The project was freely available online from July 15 until July 20. In August, Whedon released a new Serenity/Firefly comic free online Serenity: The Other Half. In September, Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog Soundtrack, made the top 40 Album list despite being a digital exclusive only available on iTunes. The Soundtrack was successful enough to pay its crew and all its bills.

In February 2009, he stated that after his series Dollhouse is over, whether by cancellation or reaching its end, that he plans on putting his efforts purely into on-line content like Dr. Horrible. In the Dr. Horrible bonus feature Commentary! The Musical!, Joss sings the song "Heart (Broken)" about the crippling scrutiny and commercialisation of producing fiction for a modern consumer audience.
Unrealized projects

Whedon had a number of planned television projects that have become stuck in development or terminally stalled. Among these was a Buffy animated series, a set of made-for-television movies for The WB based on Angel and Buffy characters, and Ripper, a proposed BBC pilot about Rupert Giles. Ripper was announced to be in development at the San Diego Comic-Con 2007. The development process was set to begin in 2008 and Ripper to be shown that summer but the pilot has not materialized yet due to characters rights.

Early in his career Whedon sold two spec scripts that have not yet been produced, Suspension and Afterlife. He sold Suspension for $750,000 with an additional $250,000 if production commences. It has been described as "Die Hard on a bridge." A year later in 1994 he sold Afterlife for $1.5 million with an additional $500,000 if production commences. As of 2000 Andy Tennant was in talks to direct and rewrite. In Afterlife are precursors to many of the themes Whedon would later explore in Dollhouse. The script is about Daniel Hoffstetter, a government scientist, who awakes after dying to discover his mind has been imprinted on a mind-wiped body.

Whedon had been signed to write and direct Warner Bros.' adaptation of Wonder Woman but on February 3, 2007, Whedon announced that he would no longer be involved with the project. "We just saw different movies, and at the price range this kind of movie hangs in, that's never gonna work. Non-sympatico. It happens all the time."

Late in 2009, Whedon made a humorous bid of $10,000 for control of future Terminator material. He was rebuffed at that time and it is not known if he has plans to attempt this again.
Common themes and motifs in Whedon's works
Feminism

Whedon identifies himself as a feminist, and feminist themes are common in his work. For his part, Whedon credits his mother, Lee Stearns, as the inspiration for his feminist worldview. When Roseanne Barr asked him how he could write so well for women, he replied, "If you met my mom, you wouldn't ask."

The character Kitty Pryde from the X-Men comics was an early model for Whedon's strong teenage girl characters: "If there's a bigger influence on Buffy than Kitty, I don't know what it was. She was an adolescent girl finding out she has great power and dealing with it." Kitty Pryde was one of the main characters in Whedon's run on Astonishing X-Men.

Whedon was honored at an Equality Now benefit in 2006: "Honoring Men on the Front Lines", and his fans raised a considerable amount of money in support of the organization.
Dialogue

The dialogue in Joss Whedon's shows and movies usually involves pop culture references both notable and obscure, and the turning of nouns into adjectives by adding a "y" at the end of the word ("listy"). According to one of the Buffy writers, "It's just the way that Joss actually talks."

Whedon also heavily favors the suffix -age (Linkage, Lurkage, Poofage, Postage, Scrollage, Slayage). Also, phrasal verbs usually ending with "out" are changed into direct verbs, for example "freak" rather than "freak out", "bail" rather than "bail out", or "hang" rather than "hang out". Whedon also tends to change adjectives into nouns such as "happy", "shiny" (positive thing), "bad" (mistake), "funny" (joke) – for example, a character may say "I made a funny" instead of "I made a joke". Another common phrase used in most of Whedon's shows is "safe as houses." So many of Whedon's altered usages, new words, and heavily popularized words have entered the common usage that PBS in their article series "Do You Speak American" included an entire section on "Slayer Slang".
Spiritual and philosophical beliefs

Whedon has identified himself as an atheist on multiple occasions. When interviewed by The AV Club on October 9, 2002, Whedon answered the question "Is there a God?" with one word: "No." The interviewer followed up with: "That's it, end of story, no?" Whedon answered: "Absolutely not. That's a very important and necessary thing to learn." In one of the Buffy DVD commentaries, Whedon comments that "I don't believe in the 'sky bully'", referring to God under a name coined by his colleague Tim Minear. In addition, during a question and answer session found on the Serenity DVD with fans of the Firefly series at Fox Studios in Sydney, he identifies himself as an atheist and absurdist.

Whedon has also spoken about existentialism. On the Firefly DVD set, Whedon explains in detail how existentialism, and more specifically the book Nausea, by Jean-Paul Sartre, was used as a basis for the episode "Objects in Space". On this commentary he claimed interest in existential ideas and described the impact of Nausea on his early life.

Whedon also identifies himself as a humanist. In April 2009, the Humanist Chaplaincy at Harvard presented Whedon with the 2009 Outstanding Lifetime Achievement Award in Cultural Humanism.


    * Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1992) – writer
    * Speed (1994) – co-writer (uncredited)
    * The Getaway (1994) – co-writer (uncredited)
    * Waterworld (1995) – co-writer (uncredited)
    * Toy Story (1995) – co-writer
    * Alien Resurrection (1997) – writer
    * Titan A.E. (2000) – co-writer
    * X-Men (2000) – treatment (uncredited)
    * Atlantis: The Lost Empire (2001) – treatment
    * Serenity (2005) – writer and director
    * Captain America: The First Avenger (2011) – co-writer
    * The Avengers (2012) – co-writer and director
    * The Cabin in the Woods (TBA) – co-writer and producer
    * Goners (TBA) – writer and director

Television

    * Roseanne (1989–1990) – writer, story editor
    * Parenthood (1990) – writer, co-producer
    * Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1997–2003) – creator, executive producer, writer, director
    * Angel (1999–2004) – co-creator, executive producer, writer, director
    * Firefly (2002) – creator, executive producer, writer, director
    * Buffy the Animated Series (2004) (unaired) – co-creator, executive producer, writer
    * The Office (2007) – guest director
    * Dollhouse (2009–2010) – creator, executive producer, writer, director
    * Glee (2010) – guest director

Web

    * Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog (2008) – co-creator, executive producer, writer, director

Awards
Awards won

Nebula Awards:

    * Best Script – Serenity (2005)

Hugo Awards:

    * Best Dramatic Presentation, Long Form – Serenity (2006)
    * Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form – Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog (2009)

Emmy Awards:

    * Outstanding Special Class – Short-format Live-action Entertainment Program – Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog (2009)

Eisner Awards:

    * Best Continuing Series – Astonishing X-Men with John Cassaday (2006)
    * Best New Series – Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season Eight with Brian K. Vaughan, Georges Jeanty, and Andy Owens (2008)
    * Best Digital Comic – Sugarshock! with Fábio Moon (2008)

Prometheus Award:

    * Special Award – Serenity (2006)

Humanist Chaplaincy at Harvard:

    * Outstanding Lifetime Achievement Award in Cultural Humanism (2009)

Streamy Awards:

    * Best Directing in a Comedy Series – Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog (2009)
    * Best Writing in a Comedy Series – Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog with Maurissa Tancharoen, Jed Whedon and Zack Whedon (2009)

Awards nominated

Academy Awards:

    * Best Writing (Original Screenplay) – Toy Story (1995)

Emmy Awards:

    * Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series – "Hush" (Buffy the Vampire Slayer, 2000)

Hugo Awards:

    * Dramatic Presentation, Short Form – "Waiting in the Wings" (Angel, 2003)
    * Dramatic Presentation, Short Form – "Serenity" (Firefly, 2003)
    * Dramatic Presentation, Short Form – "Chosen" (Buffy the Vampire Slayer, 2004)
    * Dramatic Presentation, Short Form – "The Message" with Tim Minear (Firefly, 2004)
    * Dramatic Presentation, Short Form – "Not Fade Away" with Jeffrey Bell (Angel, 2005)
    * Dramatic Presentation, Short Form – "Smile Time" with Ben Edlund (Angel, 2005)
    * Dramatic Presentation, Short Form – "Epitaph One" with Maurissa Tancharoen and Jed Whedon (Dollhouse, 2010)
    * Graphic Story – Serenity: Better Days with Brett Matthews, Will Conrad, Michelle Madsen, and Jo Chen (2009)

Nebula Awards:

    * Best Script – "The Body" (Buffy the Vampire Slayer, 2001)
    * Best Script – "Once More, with Feeling" (Buffy the Vampire Slayer, 2002)

Saturn Awards:

    * Best Writing – Screenplay for Toy Story (1996)
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Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/24/11 at 8:01 am

The person of the day...Jeff Beck
Geoffrey Arnold "Jeff" Beck (born 24 June 1944) is an English rock guitarist. One of three noted guitarists, with Eric Clapton and Jimmy Page, to have played with The Yardbirds, Beck also formed The Jeff Beck Group and Beck, Bogert & Appice. He was ranked 14th in Rolling Stone's list of the "100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time" and the magazine has described him as "one of the most influential lead guitarists in rock". He was also ranked second greatest rock guitarist of all time in Digital Dream Door, a site that ranks movies and music. MSNBC has called him a "guitarist's guitarist".

Much of Beck's recorded output has been instrumental, with a focus on innovative sound and his releases have spanned genres ranging from blues-rock, heavy metal, jazz fusion and most recently, an additional blend of guitar-rock and electronica. Beck has earned wide critical praise; furthermore, he has received the Grammy Award for Best Rock Instrumental Performance six times. Although he has had two hit albums (in 1975 and 1976) as a solo act, Beck has not established or maintained a broad following or the sustained commercial success of many of his collaborators and bandmates. Beck appears on albums by Mick Jagger, Kate Bush, Roger Waters, Stevie Wonder, Les Paul, Zucchero, Cyndi Lauper, Brian May and ZZ Top. He also made a cameo appearance in the movie Twins (1988).

He has been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame twice: as a member of The Yardbirds (1992) and as a solo artist (2009).
Beck began his career in the 1960s. He joined "The Rumbles" a Croydon band in 1963 for a short period as lead guitarist, playing Gene Vincent and Buddy Holly songs, displaying a talent for mimicking guitar styles. His first appearance on vinyl was as a session guitarist on a 1964 Parlophone single by The Fitz and Startz entitled 'I'm Not Running Away' c/w 'So Sweet'.

In March 1965 Beck was recruited to replace Eric Clapton in The Yardbirds on the recommendation of fellow session man Jimmy Page, their initial choice. The Yardbirds recorded most of their Top 40 hit songs during Beck's time with The Yardbirds, which was short (but significant), allowing him only one full album, Yardbirds which became known as Roger the Engineer, released in 1966. From September to November 1966 he shared lead guitar duties with Page, who initially joined as bass player in June of that year.
Beck with the Jeff Beck Group, 1968

In February 1967, after recording the one-off "Beck's Bolero" (with Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones, Nicky Hopkins and Keith Moon) and two solo hit singles in the UK, "Hi Ho Silver Lining" and "Tallyman", Beck formed The Jeff Beck Group, which featured Rod Stewart on vocals, Ronnie Wood on bass, Nicky Hopkins on piano and, after a series of drummers, eventually Micky Waller.

The group produced two albums for Columbia Records (Epic in the US): Truth (August 1968) and Beck-Ola (July 1969), both highly acclaimed. Truth, released five months before the first Led Zeppelin album, features "You Shook Me", a song written and first recorded by Willie Dixon that was also covered on the Led Zeppelin debut. It sold well (reaching number 15 on the Billboard charts). Beck-Ola while well-received, was less successful both commercially and critically. Resentment, coupled with touring incidents, led the group to dissolve in July 1969.

During 1967 Pink Floyd wanted Beck to be their guitarist after the departure of Syd Barrett but Nick Mason recalls in his autobiography that, "None of us had the nerve to ask him".

After the break-up of his group Beck took part in the Music From Free Creek "super session" project, billed as "A.N. Other" and contributed lead guitar on four songs, including one co-written by him. Next he teamed up with bassist Tim Bogert and drummer Carmine Appice, the rhythm section of Vanilla Fudge in September 1969, when Bogert and Appice came to England to resolve contractual issues, but when Beck fractured his skull in a car accident near Maidstone in December the plan was postponed for two-and-a-half years, during which time Bogert and Appice formed Cactus.

In 1970, when Beck had regained his health, he set about forming a band with drummer Cozy Powell. Beck, Powell and producer Mickie Most flew to the US and recorded several tracks at Motown Studios with Motown session men, but the results remained unreleased. By April 1971 Beck had completed the line-up of this new group with guitarist/vocalist Bobby Tench, keyboard player Max Middleton and bassist Clive Chaman. The new band performed as the "Jeff Beck Group" but had a substantially different sound from the first line-up. Rough and Ready (October 1971), the first album they recorded, on which Beck wrote or co-wrote six of the album's seven tracks (the exception being written by Middleton), included elements of soul, rhythm-and-blues and jazz, foreshadowing the direction Beck's music would take later in the decade.
Beck playing in 1973

A second album Jeff Beck Group (July 1972) was recorded at TMI studios in Memphis, Tennessee with the same personnel. Beck employed Steve Cropper as producer and the album displayed a strong soul influence, five of the nine tracks being covers of songs by American artists. One, "I Got To Have A Song", was the first of four Stevie Wonder compositions covered by Beck. Shortly after the release of the Jeff Beck Group album the band was dissolved and Beck's management put out this statement:

    “ The fusion of the musical styles of the various members has been successful within the terms of individual musicians, but they didn't feel it had led to the creation of a new musical style with the strength they had originally sought.

Beck then started collaborating with bassist Tim Bogert and drummer Carmine Appice, who became available following the demise of Cactus but continued touring as Jeff Beck Group in August 1972, to fulfil contractual obligations with his promoter, with a line-up including Bogert, Appice, Max Middleton and vocalist Kim Milford. After six appearances Milford was replaced by Bobby Tench, who was flown in from the UK for the Arie Crown Theatre Chicago performance and the rest of the tour, which concluded at the Paramount North West Theatre, Seattle.

After the tour Tench and Middleton left the band and the power trio Beck, Bogert & Appice appeared: Appice took on the role of vocalist with Bogert and Beck contributing occasionally. They were included on the bill for Rock at The Oval in September 1972, still as the "Jeff Beck Group", which marked the start of a tour schedule of UK, the Netherlands and Germany. Another US tour began in October 1972, starting at the Hollywood Sportatorium Florida and concluding on 11 November 1972 at The Warehouse, New Orleans. In April 1973 the album Beck, Bogert & Appice was released (on Epic Records). While critics acknowledged the band's instrumental prowess the album was not commercially well received except for its cover of Stevie Wonder's hit "Superstition".

On 3 July 1973 Beck joined David Bowie on-stage to perform "The Jean Genie"/"Love Me Do" and "Around and Around". The show was recorded and filmed but none of the released editions included Beck. During October 1973 Beck recorded tracks for Michael Fennelly's album Lane Changer and attended sessions with Hummingbird, a band derived from The Jeff Beck Group, but did not to contribute to their eponymous first album

Early in January 1974 the band played at the Rainbow Theatre, as part of a European tour. The concert was broadcast in full on the US show Rock Around the World in September of the same year. This last recorded work by the band previewed material intended for a second studio album, included on the bootleg At Last Rainbow. The tracks Blues Deluxe and BBA Boogie from this concert were later included on the Jeff Beck compilation Beckology (1991). Beck, Bogert & Appice dissolved in April 1974 before their second studio album (produced by Jimmy Miller) was finished. Their live album Beck, Bogert & Appice Live in Japan, recorded during their 1973 tour of Japan, was not released until February 1975 by Epic/Sony.

After a few months Beck entered Underhill Studio and met with the group Upp, whom he recruited as backing band for his appearance on the BBC TV programme "Guitar Workshop" in August 1974. Beck produced and played on their self-titled debut album and their second album This Way Upp, though his contributions to the second album went uncredited. In October Beck began to record instrumentals at AIR Studios with Max Middleton, bassist Phil Chen and drummer Richard Bailey, using George Martin as producer and arranger. Blow by Blow (March 1975) evolved from these sessions and showcased Beck's technical prowess in jazz-rock. The album reached number four in the charts and is Beck's most commercially-successful release. Beck, fastidious about overdubs and often dissatisfied with his solos, often returned to AIR Studios until he was satisfied. A couple of months after the sessions had finished Martin received a telephone call from Beck, who wanted to record a solo section again. Bemused, Martin replied: "I'm sorry, Jeff, but the record is in the shops!"

Beck put together a live band for a US tour, preceded by a small and unannounced gig at The Newlands Tavern in Peckham, London. He toured through April and May 1975, mostly supporting the Mahavishnu Orchestra, retaining Max Middleton on keyboards but with the new rhythm section of Wilbur Bascomb (bass) and noted session drummer Bernard "Pretty" Purdie. In a May 1975 show in Cleveland, Ohio (Music Hall), he became frustrated with an early version of a "talk box" he used on his arrangement of The Beatles "She's A Woman," and after breaking a string, tossed his legendary Yardbirds-era Stratocaster off the stage. He did the same with the talk box and finished the show playing a Les Paul and without the box. During this tour he performed at Yuya Uchida's "World Rock Festival," playing a total of eight songs with Purdie. In addition he performed a guitar and drum instrumental with Johnny Yoshinaga and, at the end of the festival, joined in a live jam with bassist Felix Pappalardi of Mountain and vocalist Akira "Joe" Yamanaka from the Flower Travellin' Band. Only his set with Purdie was recorded and released.

He returned to the studio and recorded Wired (1976), which paired the drummer and composer Narada Michael Walden and keyboardist Jan Hammer. The album used a jazz-rock fusion style which sounded similar to the work of his two collaborators. To promote the album, Beck joined forces with the Jan Hammer Group and they played a show supporting Alvin Lee at The Roundhouse in May 1976, before embarking on a seven-month long world tour. This resulted in the live album Jeff Beck with The Jan Hammer Group - Live (1977).
“ Everyone thinks of the 1960s as something they really weren't. It was the frustration period of my life. The electronic equipment just wasn't up to the sounds I had in my head. ”

NME - September 1976

At this point, Beck was a tax exile and took up residency in the US, remaining there until his return to the UK in the autumn of 1977. In the spring of 1978, he began rehearsing with bassist Stanley Clarke and drummer Gerry Brown towards a projected appearance at the Knebworth Festival, but this was cancelled after Brown dropped out. Beck toured Japan for three weeks in November 1978 with an ad-hoc group consisting of Clarke and newcomers Tony Hymas (keyboards) and Simon Phillips (drums) from Jack Bruce's band. Work then began on a new studio album at The Who's Ramport Studios in London and continued sporadically throughout 1979, resulting in There and Back in June 1980. It featured three tracks composed and recorded with Jan Hammer, while five were written with Hymas. Stanley Clarke was replaced by Mo Foster on bass, both on the album and the subsequent tours. Its release was followed by extensive touring in the USA, Japan and the UK.
1980s

In 1981 Beck made a series of historic live appearances with his Yardbirds predecessor Eric Clapton at the Amnesty International-sponsored benefit concerts dubbed The Secret Policeman's Other Ball shows. He appeared with Clapton on "Crossroads", "Further On Up The Road", and his own arrangement of Stevie Wonder's "Cause We've Ended As Lovers". Beck also featured prominently in an all-star band finale performance of "I Shall Be Released" with Clapton, Sting, Phil Collins, Donovan and Bob Geldof. Beck's contributions were seen and heard in the resulting album and film, both of which achieved worldwide success in 1982. Another benefit show, the ARMS Concert for Multiple Sclerosis featured a jam with Beck, Eric Clapton and Jimmy Page. They performed "Tulsa Time" and "Layla". This is the only time all of the Yardbirds lead guitarists appeared on stage together.

In 1985 Jeff released Flash, featurng a variety of vocalists, but most notably former bandmate Rod Stewart on a rendition of Curtis Mayfield's People Get Ready.

After a four year break, Jeff made a return to instrumental music with the album Jeff Beck's Guitar Shop (1989), the first album to feature Jeff's switch to a pick free playing style. It was only his 3rd album to be released in the 1980s. Much of Beck's sparse and sporadic recording schedule was due in part to a long battle with noise-induced tinnitus.
Discography
Year Album US UK RIAA Certification Notes
1968 Truth 15 — Gold First album with original line-up of the Jeff Beck Group
1969 Beck-Ola 15 39 Gold Second album with original line-up of the Jeff Beck Group
1971 Rough and Ready 46 — — First album with new line-up of the Jeff Beck Group
1972 Jeff Beck Group 19 — Gold Second album with new line-up of the Jeff Beck Group
1973 Beck, Bogert & Appice 12 28 Gold Only studio album as Beck, Bogert & Appice
1975 Blow by Blow 4 — Platinum First solo album
1975 UPP — — — Plays guitar and produced this debut album by UPP
1975 Truth/Beck-Ola — — — double album of Truth & Beck-Ola records
1976 Wired 16 38 Platinum Second solo album
1980 There and Back 21 38 — Contains one of his more acclaimed pieces, "The Pump"
1985 Flash 42 83 — Grammy Award winner
1989 Jeff Beck's Guitar Shop 49 — — Grammy Award winner
1992 Frankie's House — — — Soundtrack collaboration with Jed Lieber
1993 Crazy Legs 171 — — Album with covers of Gene Vincent's songs
1999 Who Else! 99 74 — Album with influence of electronic music
2001 You Had It Coming 110 — — Grammy Award winner
2003 Jeff — — — Grammy Award winner
April 2010 Emotion & Commotion 11 21 — Highest charting album by Jeff Beck in UK
Live Albums
1974 Live in Japan — — — First live album
1977 Jeff Beck With the Jan Hammer Group Live 23 — Gold Last album with RIAA Certification
2003 Live At BB King Blues Club — — — Official bootleg
2007 Official Bootleg USA '06 — — — Official bootleg
2008 Live at Ronnie Scotts — 143 — Complemented later with a DVD that was certified Platinum for the US sales of 'Jeff Beck performing this week.. live at Ronnie Scott's'. This is an extreme rarity for a music concert DVD of any musical genre. Grammy Award winner.
Oct 2010 Live and Exclusive from the Grammy Museum — — — Follow up live album for Emotion and Commotion.
2011 Rock & Roll Party: Honoring Les Paul — 106 —
Compilations
1991 Beckology — — — Included songs from Beck's early bands such as Tridents and Yardbirds
1995 Best of Beck — — — Abbreviated compilation
DVDs
2008 Performing This Week... Live at Ronnie Scott's — — Platinum Grammy Award winner
2011 Rock & Roll Party: Honoring Les Paul — —
Guest Appearances

Beck has appeared as a guest artist on dozens of recordings, including:

    * John's Childrens single "Just What You Want - Just What You'll Get" b/w "But She's Mine" (rel. Feb 1967) as uncredited session musician.
    * Beck's group plays with Donovan on the songs "Barabajagal (Love is Hot)," "Trudi" and "Homesickness"
    * Stevie Wonder's Talking Book
    * Stanley Clarke's 1975 album Journey to Love
    * Stanley Clarke's 1978 album Modern Man
    * The soundtrack to the movie Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band featuring The Bee Gees and Peter Frampton (Beck was once quoted as saying that after he saw Peter Frampton use the talk box, he gave it up).
    * Murray Head's Voices (1981)
    * Rod Stewart's 1983 album Camouflage on three tracks, also appears in video for the song "Infatuation" and in the video for " People Get Ready"
    * Tina Turner's Private Dancer
    * Reunited with former Yardbirds bandmates in 1984 with the group Box of Frogs
    * Mick Jagger's "She's the Boss"
    * The Honeydrippers: Volume One
    * Malcolm McLaren's album Waltz Darling, released in 1989, on the songs "House Of The Blue Danube" and "Call A Wave".
    * Tony Hymas's Oyaté, on the track "Crazy Horse" (feat. John Trudell) and "Tashunka Witko" 1990.
    * Buddy Guy's Damn Right, I've Got the Blues, on the tracks "Mustang Sally" and "Early In The Morning" 1991.
    * Kate Bush's 1993 album The Red Shoes
    * Two songs of the Italian singer Zucchero: the song Papa Perche? (from the 1995 album Spirito DiVino) and Like the sun (from out of nowhere) (from the 2004 album ZU & Co, also featuring Macy Gray).
    * The 2003 Yardbirds' reunion album Birdland - on track "My Blind Life"
    * Toots & the Maytals 2004 album "True Love" on the song "54-46."
    * Ursus Minor's Zugzwang released in 2005
    * Cyndi Lauper's song "Above The Clouds" from her 2005 album The Body Acoustic
    * American Idol on 24 April 2007 for the Idol Gives Back special, with Kelly Clarkson, playing "Up to the Mountain", originally by Patty Griffin
    * Played guitar solo in Pavarotti's rendition of "Caruso"
    * The rare blues album Guitar Boogie with Eric Clapton and Jimmy Page
    * Guitarist for Hans Zimmer's Days of Thunder Instrumental Score.
    * Beck plays an instrumental version of Lennon/McCartney classic "A Day in the Life" on Sir George Martin's album In My Life (1998), which also appeared in Julie Taymor's Beatles-inspired movie, Across the Universe.
    * His song "Hot Rod Honeymoon" was used for the video game Gran Turismo 4
    * Stone Free: A Tribute To Jimi Hendrix on Manic Depression with Seal.
    * The Pretenders album Viva El Amor on the song "Legalise Me"
    * Stevie Wonder originally wrote "Superstition" for Beck. However, Wonder's manager insisted that he record it before Beck did.
    * John McLaughlin's The Promise, on the track "Django".
    * Joe Cocker's Heart & Soul album on 4th track I (Who Have Nothing) playing lead guitar.
    * Brian May's "The Guv'nor" from the album Another World
    * Imogen Heap's Speak for Yourself
    * Roger Waters' Amused to Death
    * Cozy Powell's Tilt on the tracks "Cat Moves" and "Hot Rock"
    * Mood Swings' song Skinthieves
    * Jon Bon Jovi's solo album Blaze of Glory
    * Paul Rodgers' song "Good Morning Little School Girl"
    * Appears in the movie Twins with Danny DeVito and Arnold Schwarzenegger
    * Morrissey album Years of Refusal on the song Black Cloud.
    * "Mystery Train" on Never Stop Rockin', Carlo Little All Stars album (released 2009, Angel Air Records)
    * Beverley Craven album Love Scenes (EPIC 1993) on the songs Love is the Light, Hope and The Winner Takes It All
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Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/25/11 at 8:04 am

The person of the day...Ricky Gervais
Ricky Dene Gervais (English pronunciation: /dʒəˈveɪz/; born 25 June 1961) is an English comedian, actor, director, producer, musician and writer.

Gervais achieved mainstream fame with his television series The Office and the subsequent series Extras, both of which he co-wrote and co-directed with friend and frequent collaborator Stephen Merchant. In addition to writing and directing the shows, Gervais also played the lead roles of David Brent in The Office and Andy Millman in Extras. Gervais has also starred in a number of Hollywood films, assuming leading roles in Ghost Town and The Invention of Lying. He has performed on four sell-out stand-up comedy tours, written the best-selling Flanimals book series and starred with Merchant and Karl Pilkington in the most downloaded podcast in the world as of March 2009, The Ricky Gervais Show.

He has won a multitude of awards and honours, including seven BAFTA Awards, five British Comedy Awards, two Emmy Awards, three Golden Globe Awards and the 2006 Rose d'Or, as well as a Screen Actors Guild Award nomination. In 2007 he was voted the 11th greatest stand-up comic on Channel 4's 100 Greatest Stand-Ups and again in the updated 2010 list as the 3rd greatest stand-up comic. In 2010 he was named on the TIME 100 list of the world's most influential people. Gervais hosted both the 2010 and 2011 Golden Globe Awards.
Gervais has contributed to the BAFTA-winning The Sketch Show (ITV), penning several sketches. His mainstream-TV debut came in September 1998 as part of Channel 4's "Comedy Lab" series of pilots. His one-off show Golden Years focused on a David Bowie–obsessed character called Clive Meadows. Gervais then came to much wider national attention with an obnoxious, cutting persona featured in a topical slot that replaced Ali G's segments on the satirical Channel 4 comedy programme The 11 O'Clock Show in early 1999, in which his character used as many expletives as was possible and produced an inordinate amount of politically incorrect statements. Among the other regular featured comedians on the show was Mackenzie Crook, later a co-star of The Office. Two years later, Gervais went on to present his own comedy chat show for Channel 4 called Meet Ricky Gervais; it was poorly received and has since been mocked by Gervais himself. The Independent newspaper has described Gervais as "obsessed by his own celebrity", but adds, "Who wouldn't want to be Peter Lawford in a comedy Rat Pack?" in reference to Ricky Gervais Meets...; the article, however, also describes him as "a very funny man" who "created one of the great sitcoms". The Guardian's Chris Tryhorn explained the "few gripes" he had with Extras, "particularly in the second series". "You can forgive Gervais a certain arrogance after the success of The Office, but..." He remarks on the confused tone of the series, taking in the clash between the broad comedy of characters Barry (Shaun Williamson) and Darren (Stephen Merchant), and the apparent parody of this style with When The Whistle Blows, and "given their total indulgence of Gervais, the BBC is portrayed as interfering, its comedy department run by a rather crudely stereotyped gay couple".

Throughout this time, Gervais also wrote for the BBC sketch show Bruiser and The Jim Tavare Show, and he had cameo roles in Channel 4's sitcom Spaced; it is speculated that the cameo is indeed The Office character David Brent. However, both series of Spaced finished airing before The Office premiered. Gervais also appeared in a few of Channel 4's 'Top 100...' list programmes, and he voiced the character of Penguin in Robbie the Reindeer's Legend of the Lost Tribe. His voice was redubbed for the US market.

On 5 January 2006 he interviewed Larry David in a one off special, Ricky Gervais Meets... Larry David. On 25 and 26 December of the same year Channel 4 aired similar specials in which he interviewed the actor/comedian Christopher Guest and comedian Garry Shandling. There are no plans for further episodes of "Meets...", although editions with John Cleese and Matt Groening were recorded in 2006 for broadcast in 2007. A source claimed, "The Shandling experience put him off for good".

Gervais guest-starred in an episode of The Simpsons entitled "Homer Simpson, This Is Your Wife", which aired on 26 March 2006 in the United States, on 23 April 2006 on satellite station Sky One in the United Kingdom (first appearing on terrestrial television in 2010), and on 18 July 2006 in Australia. He is the only British comic to write and star in a Simpsons episode. The episode was the highest rated in Sky One's history, arguably because of its extensive promotion, which revolved around the angle that Gervais was the episode's sole writer (and the first guest star on the show to also receive a writing credit for the episode of his appearance). Gervais clarified the extent of his input in a joint interview (with Christopher Guest) for Dazed and Confused magazine (January 2006): "No, all I did was put down a load of observations on an email and they made it look like a Simpsons script. I'm going to get the credit, but I think everyone in the industry knows it was a joint effort". Asked in a separate interview about how his idea for the episode (in which Homer swaps Marge on a game show) came about, Gervais replied:

    I've always been fascinated with reality game shows but I think it was my girlfriend's idea. We watch Celebrity Big Brother at the moment, we watch I'm a Celebrity, Get Me out of Here... we watch all those reality TV shows — The Office came out of those docu-soaps".

Gervais, a longstanding Simpsons fan, presented a segment to mark the show's 20th anniversary on BBC Two's The Culture Show on 16 June 2007. Recently on Gervais's blog it was announced that he will be returning to The Simpsons and will feature him doing a skit based on his recent controversial performance at the 2011 Golden Globes. It is unknown if he will be writing the episode this time around.

Gervais has also guest-starred on Alias (appearing in the third-season episode "Façade") as Daniel Ryan, a former Royal Navy bomb-disposal specialist turned rogue Irish Republican Army bomb-maker. He has said about the appearance, "I did an episode of Alias, and I can't watch it. Me being serious. I can't watch it".

Gervais made a cameo appearance on Saturday Night Live in a Digital Short during which he claims that The Office was adapted from a Japanese program of the same name (with Steve Carell reprising his role as Michael Scott). The sketch re-creates scenes from the American and British pilot episode with Japanese elements (although in an exaggerated way). "It's funny", Gervais laughs at the end, "because it's racist".

In January 2009 Gervais was interviewed by James Lipton for Season 15 of BravoTV's Inside the Actors Studio.

In January 2010 he hosted the 67th Golden Globe Awards, making him the first master of ceremonies since 1995. He stated:

    "I have resisted many other offers like this, but there are just some things you don't turn down."

His performance as host received a mixed response with positive reviews from the New York Daily News and The Associated Press, but also some negative comments from industry bible, The Hollywood Reporter.

Gervais was a guest judge/panelist on Jerry Seinfeld's NBC show The Marriage Ref alongside Larry David and Madonna. On 1 April 2010 Gervais made his first appearance on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon on NBC.

As of April 2011 he has made 18 guest appearances on The Late Show With David Letterman on the CBS network.

In April 2010 it was announced that Gervais and Stephen Merchant will be writing a new show, called Life's Too Short, which they described as, "A cross between Extras and Curb your Enthusiasm and One Foot in the Grave but with a dwarf. That is out and out funny." The show will star actor Warwick Davis as himself, as well as Gervais and Merchant.

In June 2010 it was announced that Gervais had been cast in the upcoming Season 8 of Curb Your Enthusiasm playing himself.
The Office
Main article: The Office (UK TV series)

In August 1999, while on a BBC production course, Stephen Merchant had to make his own short film. He chose to make a docu-soap parody, set in an office. This sketch later formed the basis of the interview episode. With help from Ash Atalla, Merchant passed this tape on to the BBC's Head of Entertainment Paul Jackson at the Edinburgh Fringe, who then passed it on to Head of Comedy Jon Plowman, who eventually commissioned a full-pilot script from Merchant and Gervais.

The first six-episode series of The Office aired in the UK in July and August 2001 to little fanfare or attention. Word-of-mouth, repeats, and DVDs helped spread the word, building up huge momentum and anticipation for the second series, also comprising six episodes, in September 2002. The second series topped the BBC Two ratings, and the show then switched to BBC One in December 2003 for its final two special episodes.

The Office has since been remade for audiences in France, Germany, Quebec, Brazil, and the United States. Gervais and Merchant are producers of the American version, and they also co-wrote the episode "The Convict" for the show's third season. The original UK version is currently airing on Adult Swim on Fridays, and prior to the show's airing, Gervais appears as himself talking about the episode that will air. In one of those segments Gervais claimed the episode "Training" to be his favourite.
Gervais has received many awards for his work on The Office, most notably two Golden Globes (one for acting, one for the show itself), as well as numerous British Academy Television Awards and British Comedy Awards, amongst others.

Gervais received an honorary award at the annual Rose d'Or ceremony in Switzerland on 29 April 2006. The award is given to "an individual who has made an exceptional contribution to the global entertainment business".

On 16 September 2007, Gervais won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series for his role of Andy Millman on Extras.
Awarding Body/Event Awarded
Writers Guild of America

    * 2007 Best Comedy Series The Office (U.S.)

Rose d'Or

    * 2006 Honorary Rose for Exceptional Contribution to the Global Entertainment Business

Emmy Awards

    * 2007 Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series Extras
    * 2006 Emmy Outstanding Comedy Series The Office (U.S.)

Golden Globe

    * 2008 Best Television Comedy or Musical (TV) Extras
    * 2003 Best Actor — Musical or Comedy (TV) The Office (UK)
    * 2003 Best Television Comedy The Office (UK)

Peabody Awards

    * 2004 Peabody Award The Office (UK)

BAFTA Awards

    * 2007 Best Comedy Performance
    * 2004 Best Comedy Performance
    * 2004 Best Situation Comedy The Office (UK)
    * 2003 Best Comedy Performance
    * 2003 Situation Comedy Award The Office (UK)
    * 2002 Best Comedy Performance
    * 2002 Situation Comedy Award The Office (UK)

Royal Television Society

    * 2003 Best Comedy Performance for: The Office (UK)

British Comedy Award

    * 2008 Best TV Comedy Actor
    * 2004 Writer of the Year Ricky Gervais & Stephen Merchant
    * 2002 Best Comedy Actor
    * 2002 Best Television Comedy The Office (UK)
    * 2001 Best New Television Comedy The Office (UK)

Broadcasting Press Guild Awards

    * 2003 Writer's Award for: The Office (UK)
    * 2002 Writer's Award for: The Office (UK)

Satellite Awards

    * 2008 Best Actor in a Motion Picture, Comedy or Musical Ghost Town

Television Critics Association

    * 2004 Individual Achievement in Comedy The Office (UK)

Filmography
Film
Year Film Role Notes
2001 Dog Eat Dog Bouncer
2005 Valiant Bugsy Voice role
2006 For Your Consideration Martin Gibb
Night at the Museum Dr. McPhee
2007 Stardust Ferdy the Fence
2008 Ghost Town Dr. Bertram Pincus Satellite Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
2009 Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian Dr. McPhee
The Invention of Lying Mark Bellison Also Writer/Producer/Director
2010 Cemetery Junction Len Taylor Also Writer/Executive Producer/Director (with Stephen Merchant)
2011 Spy Kids 4: All the Time in the World Argonut Voice Only
The Muppets Cameo post-production
2012 The Wind in the Willows Mole Voice Only
pre-production
Television
Year Programme Role Notes
1998 The 11 O'Clock Show Various Unknown episodes
1999 Comedy Lab Clive Meadows Episode: "Golden Years"
2000 Bruiser Recurring 6 episodes
Meet Ricky Gervais Himself 6 episodes
2001 The Sketch Show Various (Unknown episodes)
The Office David Brent 2001–2003, (14 episodes including 2 Christmas specials) Also writer, director
2004 Alias Daniel Ryan Episode: "Façade"
2005 Kelsey Grammer Presents: The Sketch Show Various (Unknown episodes)
Extras Andy Millman 2005–2007, (13 episodes) Also writer, director, executive producer
2006 The Simpsons Charles Heathbar Also Writer, Episode: "Homer Simpson, This Is Your Wife"
2008 Ricky Gervais: Out of England-The Stand-Up Special Himself (written by)
2009 Sesame Street Himself
2010– The Ricky Gervais Show Himself with Karl Pilkington & Stephen Merchant
An Idiot Abroad Himself with Karl Pilkington & Stephen Merchant
2010 Louie Dr. Ben guest star (episodes "Dr. Ben/Nick" & "Gym")
2011 Life's Too Short Himself with Stephen Merchant & Warwick Davis
The Office David Brent Episode: The Seminar & Search Committee
The Simpsons Himself Episode: "Angry Dad: The Movie"
Talking Funny Himself With Jerry Seinfeld, Chris Rock and Louis C.K.
Video games
Year Title Role Notes
2008 Grand Theft Auto IV Himself
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Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/26/11 at 11:59 am

The person of the day...Pearl Buck
Pearl Sydenstricker Buck (June 26, 1892 – March 6, 1973) also known by her Chinese name Sai Zhenzhu (Chinese: 賽珍珠; pinyin: Sài Zhēnzhū), was an award-winning American writer who spent most of her time until 1934 in China. Her novel The Good Earth was the best-selling fiction book in the U.S. in 1931 and 1932, and won the Pulitzer Prize in 1932. In 1938, she became the first American woman to be awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, "for her rich and truly epic descriptions of peasant life in China and for her biographical masterpieces."
Buck was highly committed and passionate about a range of issues that were largely ignored by her generation; many of her life experiences and political views are described in her novels, short stories, fiction, children's stories, and the biographies of her parents entitled Fighting Angel (on Absalom) and The Exile (on Carrie). She wrote on a diverse variety of topics including woman's rights, Asian cultures, immigration, adoption, missionary work, and war.

In 1949, outraged that existing adoption services considered Asian and mixed-race children unadoptable, Buck established Welcome House, Inc., the first international, interracial adoption agency. In nearly five decades of work, Welcome House has placed over five thousand children. In 1964, to support children who were not eligible for adoption, Buck established the Pearl S. Buck Foundation to "address poverty and discrimination faced by children in Asian countries." In 1965, she opened the Opportunity Center and Orphanage in South Korea, and later offices were opened in Thailand, the Philippines, and Vietnam. When establishing Opportunity House, Buck said, "The purpose... is to publicize and eliminate injustices and prejudices suffered by children, who, because of their birth, are not permitted to enjoy the educational, social, economic and civil privileges normally accorded to children."

In the late 1960s, Buck toured West Virginia to raise money to preserve her family farm in Hillsboro, WV. Today The Pearl S. Buck Birthplace is a historic house museum and cultural center. She hoped the house would "belong to everyone who cares to go there," and serve as a "gateway to new thoughts and dreams and ways of life."

Long before it was considered fashionable or politically safe to do so, Buck challenged the American public on topics such as racism, sex discrimination and the plight of the thousands of babies born to Asian women left behind and unwanted wherever American soldiers were based in Asia. During her life Buck combined the multiple careers of wife, mother, author, editor and political activist.
Legacy

Contemporary reviewers were positive, and praised her "beautiful prose," even though her "style is apt to degenerate into overrepetition and confusion." Peter Conn, in his biography of Buck, argues that despite the accolades awarded her, Buck's contribution to literature has been mostly forgotten or deliberately ignored by America's cultural gatekeepers. Kang Liao argues that Buck played a "pioneering role in demythologizing China and the Chinese people in the American mind." Phyllis Bentley, in an overview of her work published in 1935, was altogether impressed: "But we may say at least that for the interest of her chosen material, the sustained high level of her technical skill, and the frequent universality of her conceptions, Mrs. Buck is entitled to take rank as a considerable artist. To read her novels is to gain not merely knowledge of China but wisdom about life." These works aroused considerable popular sympathy for China, and helped foment poor relations with Japan.

Anchee Min, author of a fictionalized life of Pearl Buck, broke down upon reading Buck's work, because she had portrayed the Chinese peasants "with such love, affection and humanity"."

Buck was honored by the United States Postal Service with a 5¢ Great Americans series postage stamp.

(賽珍珠故居) Buck's former residence at Nanjing University is now the Nanjing University Science and Technology Industry Group Building along the West Wall of the university's north campus. U.S. President George H.W. Bush toured the Pearl S. Buck House in October 1998. He expressed that he, like millions of other Americans, had gained an appreciation for the Chinese through Buck's writing.
Selected bibliography
Autobiographies

    * My Several Worlds (1954)
    * A Bridge For Passing (1962)

Biographies

    * The Exile (1936)
    * Fighting Angel (1936)

Novels
See also: List of bestselling novels in the United States in the 1930s

    * East Wind:West Wind (1930)
    * The House of Earth (1935)
          o The Good Earth (1931)
          o Sons (1933)
          o A House Divided (1935)
    * The Mother (1933)
    * This Proud Heart (1938)
    * The Patriot (1939)
    * Other Gods (1940)
    * China Sky (1941)
    * Dragon Seed (1942)
    * The Promise (1943)
    * China Flight (1943)
    * The Townsman (1945) – as John Sedges
    * Portrait of a Marriage (1945)
    * Pavilion of Women (1946)
    * The Angry Wife (1947) – as John Sedges
    * Peony (1948)
    * The Big Wave (1948)
    * A Long Love (1949) – as John Sedges
    * Kinfolk (1950)
    * God's Men (1951)
    * The Hidden Flower (1952)
    * Come, My Beloved (1953)
    * Voices in the House (1953) – as John Sedges
    * Imperial Woman (1956)
    * Letter from Peking (1957)
    * Command the Morning (1959)
    * Satan Never Sleeps (1962; see 1962 film Satan Never Sleeps)
    * The Living Reed (1963)
    * Death in the Castle (1965)
    * The Time Is Noon (1966)
    * Matthew, Mark, Luke and John (1967)
    * The New Year (1968)
    * The Three Daughters of Madame Liang (1969)
    * Mandala (1970)
    * The Goddess Abides (1972)
    * All Under Heaven (1973)
    * The Rainbow (1974)

Non-fiction

    * Of Men and Women (1941)
    * How It Happens: Talk about the German People, 1914–1933, with Erna von Pustau (1947)
    * The Child Who Never Grew (1950)
    * The Man Who Changed China: The Story of Sun Yat-sen (1953) for young readers
    * My Several Worlds (1954)
    * For Spacious Skies (1966)
    * The People of Japan (1966)
    * The Kennedy Women (1970)
    * China as I See It (1970)
    * The Story Bible (1971)
    * Pearl S. Buck's Oriental Cookbook (1972)

Short Stories

    * The First Wife and Other Stories (1933)
    * Today and Forever: Stories of China (1941)
    * Twenty-Seven Stories (1943)
    * Far and Near: Stories of Japan, China, and America (1949)
    * Fourteen Stories (1961)
    * Hearts Come Home and Other Stories (1962)
    * Stories of China (1964)
    * Escape at Midnight and Other Stories (1964)
    * The Good Deed and Other Stories of Asia, Past and Present (1969)
    * Once Upon a Christmas (1972)
    * East and West Stories (1975)
    * Secrets of the Heart: Stories (1976)
    * The Lovers and Other Stories (1977)
    * Mrs. Stoner and the Sea and Other Stories (1978)
    * The Woman Who Was Changed and Other Stories (1979)
    * The Good Deed (1969)
    * "Christmas Day in the Morning"
    * "The Refugee"
    * "The Chinese Children Next Door" (for children)
    * ″The Enemy"
    * "The Frill"
    * "The Golden Flower"

Awards

    * Pulitzer Prize for the Novel: The Good Earth (1932)
    * William Dean Howells Medal (1935)
    * Nobel Prize in Literature (1938)

Museums and historic houses

Several historic sites work to preserve and display artifacts from Pearl's profoundly multicultural life:

    * The Pearl S. Buck Birthplace in Hillsboro, West Virginia
    * Green Hills Farm in Bucks County, Pennsylvania
    * The Zhenjiang Pearl S. Buck Research Association in Zhenjiang, China
    * Pearl S. Buck House in Nanjing, China
    * The Pearl S. Buck Summer Villa, on Lushan Mountain in Jiangxi Province, China
    * The Pearl S. Buck Memorial Hall, Bucheon City, South Korea
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Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Philip Eno on 06/26/11 at 12:01 pm


The person of the day...Ricky Gervais
Ricky Dene Gervais (English pronunciation: /dʒəˈveɪz/; born 25 June 1961) is an English comedian, actor, director, producer, musician and writer.

Gervais achieved mainstream fame with his television series The Office and the subsequent series Extras, both of which he co-wrote and co-directed with friend and frequent collaborator Stephen Merchant. In addition to writing and directing the shows, Gervais also played the lead roles of David Brent in The Office and Andy Millman in Extras. Gervais has also starred in a number of Hollywood films, assuming leading roles in Ghost Town and The Invention of Lying. He has performed on four sell-out stand-up comedy tours, written the best-selling Flanimals book series and starred with Merchant and Karl Pilkington in the most downloaded podcast in the world as of March 2009, The Ricky Gervais Show.

He has won a multitude of awards and honours, including seven BAFTA Awards, five British Comedy Awards, two Emmy Awards, three Golden Globe Awards and the 2006 Rose d'Or, as well as a Screen Actors Guild Award nomination. In 2007 he was voted the 11th greatest stand-up comic on Channel 4's 100 Greatest Stand-Ups and again in the updated 2010 list as the 3rd greatest stand-up comic. In 2010 he was named on the TIME 100 list of the world's most influential people. Gervais hosted both the 2010 and 2011 Golden Globe Awards.
Gervais has contributed to the BAFTA-winning The Sketch Show (ITV), penning several sketches. His mainstream-TV debut came in September 1998 as part of Channel 4's "Comedy Lab" series of pilots. His one-off show Golden Years focused on a David Bowie–obsessed character called Clive Meadows. Gervais then came to much wider national attention with an obnoxious, cutting persona featured in a topical slot that replaced Ali G's segments on the satirical Channel 4 comedy programme The 11 O'Clock Show in early 1999, in which his character used as many expletives as was possible and produced an inordinate amount of politically incorrect statements. Among the other regular featured comedians on the show was Mackenzie Crook, later a co-star of The Office. Two years later, Gervais went on to present his own comedy chat show for Channel 4 called Meet Ricky Gervais; it was poorly received and has since been mocked by Gervais himself. The Independent newspaper has described Gervais as "obsessed by his own celebrity", but adds, "Who wouldn't want to be Peter Lawford in a comedy Rat Pack?" in reference to Ricky Gervais Meets...; the article, however, also describes him as "a very funny man" who "created one of the great sitcoms". The Guardian's Chris Tryhorn explained the "few gripes" he had with Extras, "particularly in the second series". "You can forgive Gervais a certain arrogance after the success of The Office, but..." He remarks on the confused tone of the series, taking in the clash between the broad comedy of characters Barry (Shaun Williamson) and Darren (Stephen Merchant), and the apparent parody of this style with When The Whistle Blows, and "given their total indulgence of Gervais, the BBC is portrayed as interfering, its comedy department run by a rather crudely stereotyped gay couple".

Throughout this time, Gervais also wrote for the BBC sketch show Bruiser and The Jim Tavare Show, and he had cameo roles in Channel 4's sitcom Spaced; it is speculated that the cameo is indeed The Office character David Brent. However, both series of Spaced finished airing before The Office premiered. Gervais also appeared in a few of Channel 4's 'Top 100...' list programmes, and he voiced the character of Penguin in Robbie the Reindeer's Legend of the Lost Tribe. His voice was redubbed for the US market.

On 5 January 2006 he interviewed Larry David in a one off special, Ricky Gervais Meets... Larry David. On 25 and 26 December of the same year Channel 4 aired similar specials in which he interviewed the actor/comedian Christopher Guest and comedian Garry Shandling. There are no plans for further episodes of "Meets...", although editions with John Cleese and Matt Groening were recorded in 2006 for broadcast in 2007. A source claimed, "The Shandling experience put him off for good".

Gervais guest-starred in an episode of The Simpsons entitled "Homer Simpson, This Is Your Wife", which aired on 26 March 2006 in the United States, on 23 April 2006 on satellite station Sky One in the United Kingdom (first appearing on terrestrial television in 2010), and on 18 July 2006 in Australia. He is the only British comic to write and star in a Simpsons episode. The episode was the highest rated in Sky One's history, arguably because of its extensive promotion, which revolved around the angle that Gervais was the episode's sole writer (and the first guest star on the show to also receive a writing credit for the episode of his appearance). Gervais clarified the extent of his input in a joint interview (with Christopher Guest) for Dazed and Confused magazine (January 2006): "No, all I did was put down a load of observations on an email and they made it look like a Simpsons script. I'm going to get the credit, but I think everyone in the industry knows it was a joint effort". Asked in a separate interview about how his idea for the episode (in which Homer swaps Marge on a game show) came about, Gervais replied:

    I've always been fascinated with reality game shows but I think it was my girlfriend's idea. We watch Celebrity Big Brother at the moment, we watch I'm a Celebrity, Get Me out of Here... we watch all those reality TV shows — The Office came out of those docu-soaps".

Gervais, a longstanding Simpsons fan, presented a segment to mark the show's 20th anniversary on BBC Two's The Culture Show on 16 June 2007. Recently on Gervais's blog it was announced that he will be returning to The Simpsons and will feature him doing a skit based on his recent controversial performance at the 2011 Golden Globes. It is unknown if he will be writing the episode this time around.

Gervais has also guest-starred on Alias (appearing in the third-season episode "Façade") as Daniel Ryan, a former Royal Navy bomb-disposal specialist turned rogue Irish Republican Army bomb-maker. He has said about the appearance, "I did an episode of Alias, and I can't watch it. Me being serious. I can't watch it".

Gervais made a cameo appearance on Saturday Night Live in a Digital Short during which he claims that The Office was adapted from a Japanese program of the same name (with Steve Carell reprising his role as Michael Scott). The sketch re-creates scenes from the American and British pilot episode with Japanese elements (although in an exaggerated way). "It's funny", Gervais laughs at the end, "because it's racist".

In January 2009 Gervais was interviewed by James Lipton for Season 15 of BravoTV's Inside the Actors Studio.

In January 2010 he hosted the 67th Golden Globe Awards, making him the first master of ceremonies since 1995. He stated:

    "I have resisted many other offers like this, but there are just some things you don't turn down."

His performance as host received a mixed response with positive reviews from the New York Daily News and The Associated Press, but also some negative comments from industry bible, The Hollywood Reporter.

Gervais was a guest judge/panelist on Jerry Seinfeld's NBC show The Marriage Ref alongside Larry David and Madonna. On 1 April 2010 Gervais made his first appearance on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon on NBC.

As of April 2011 he has made 18 guest appearances on The Late Show With David Letterman on the CBS network.

In April 2010 it was announced that Gervais and Stephen Merchant will be writing a new show, called Life's Too Short, which they described as, "A cross between Extras and Curb your Enthusiasm and One Foot in the Grave but with a dwarf. That is out and out funny." The show will star actor Warwick Davis as himself, as well as Gervais and Merchant.

In June 2010 it was announced that Gervais had been cast in the upcoming Season 8 of Curb Your Enthusiasm playing himself.
The Office
Main article: The Office (UK TV series)

In August 1999, while on a BBC production course, Stephen Merchant had to make his own short film. He chose to make a docu-soap parody, set in an office. This sketch later formed the basis of the interview episode. With help from Ash Atalla, Merchant passed this tape on to the BBC's Head of Entertainment Paul Jackson at the Edinburgh Fringe, who then passed it on to Head of Comedy Jon Plowman, who eventually commissioned a full-pilot script from Merchant and Gervais.

The first six-episode series of The Office aired in the UK in July and August 2001 to little fanfare or attention. Word-of-mouth, repeats, and DVDs helped spread the word, building up huge momentum and anticipation for the second series, also comprising six episodes, in September 2002. The second series topped the BBC Two ratings, and the show then switched to BBC One in December 2003 for its final two special episodes.

The Office has since been remade for audiences in France, Germany, Quebec, Brazil, and the United States. Gervais and Merchant are producers of the American version, and they also co-wrote the episode "The Convict" for the show's third season. The original UK version is currently airing on Adult Swim on Fridays, and prior to the show's airing, Gervais appears as himself talking about the episode that will air. In one of those segments Gervais claimed the episode "Training" to be his favourite.
Gervais has received many awards for his work on The Office, most notably two Golden Globes (one for acting, one for the show itself), as well as numerous British Academy Television Awards and British Comedy Awards, amongst others.

Gervais received an honorary award at the annual Rose d'Or ceremony in Switzerland on 29 April 2006. The award is given to "an individual who has made an exceptional contribution to the global entertainment business".

On 16 September 2007, Gervais won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series for his role of Andy Millman on Extras.
Awarding Body/Event Awarded
Writers Guild of America

    * 2007 Best Comedy Series The Office (U.S.)

Rose d'Or

    * 2006 Honorary Rose for Exceptional Contribution to the Global Entertainment Business

Emmy Awards

    * 2007 Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series Extras
    * 2006 Emmy Outstanding Comedy Series The Office (U.S.)

Golden Globe

    * 2008 Best Television Comedy or Musical (TV) Extras
    * 2003 Best Actor — Musical or Comedy (TV) The Office (UK)
    * 2003 Best Television Comedy The Office (UK)

Peabody Awards

    * 2004 Peabody Award The Office (UK)

BAFTA Awards

    * 2007 Best Comedy Performance
    * 2004 Best Comedy Performance
    * 2004 Best Situation Comedy The Office (UK)
    * 2003 Best Comedy Performance
    * 2003 Situation Comedy Award The Office (UK)
    * 2002 Best Comedy Performance
    * 2002 Situation Comedy Award The Office (UK)

Royal Television Society

    * 2003 Best Comedy Performance for: The Office (UK)

British Comedy Award

    * 2008 Best TV Comedy Actor
    * 2004 Writer of the Year Ricky Gervais & Stephen Merchant
    * 2002 Best Comedy Actor
    * 2002 Best Television Comedy The Office (UK)
    * 2001 Best New Television Comedy The Office (UK)

Broadcasting Press Guild Awards

    * 2003 Writer's Award for: The Office (UK)
    * 2002 Writer's Award for: The Office (UK)

Satellite Awards

    * 2008 Best Actor in a Motion Picture, Comedy or Musical Ghost Town

Television Critics Association

    * 2004 Individual Achievement in Comedy The Office (UK)

Filmography
Film
Year Film Role Notes
2001 Dog Eat Dog Bouncer
2005 Valiant Bugsy Voice role
2006 For Your Consideration Martin Gibb
Night at the Museum Dr. McPhee
2007 Stardust Ferdy the Fence
2008 Ghost Town Dr. Bertram Pincus Satellite Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
2009 Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian Dr. McPhee
The Invention of Lying Mark Bellison Also Writer/Producer/Director
2010 Cemetery Junction Len Taylor Also Writer/Executive Producer/Director (with Stephen Merchant)
2011 Spy Kids 4: All the Time in the World Argonut Voice Only
The Muppets Cameo post-production
2012 The Wind in the Willows Mole Voice Only
pre-production
Television
Year Programme Role Notes
1998 The 11 O'Clock Show Various Unknown episodes
1999 Comedy Lab Clive Meadows Episode: "Golden Years"
2000 Bruiser Recurring 6 episodes
Meet Ricky Gervais Himself 6 episodes
2001 The Sketch Show Various (Unknown episodes)
The Office David Brent 2001–2003, (14 episodes including 2 Christmas specials) Also writer, director
2004 Alias Daniel Ryan Episode: "Façade"
2005 Kelsey Grammer Presents: The Sketch Show Various (Unknown episodes)
Extras Andy Millman 2005–2007, (13 episodes) Also writer, director, executive producer
2006 The Simpsons Charles Heathbar Also Writer, Episode: "Homer Simpson, This Is Your Wife"
2008 Ricky Gervais: Out of England-The Stand-Up Special Himself (written by)
2009 Sesame Street Himself
2010– The Ricky Gervais Show Himself with Karl Pilkington & Stephen Merchant
An Idiot Abroad Himself with Karl Pilkington & Stephen Merchant
2010 Louie Dr. Ben guest star (episodes "Dr. Ben/Nick" & "Gym")
2011 Life's Too Short Himself with Stephen Merchant & Warwick Davis
The Office David Brent Episode: The Seminar & Search Committee
The Simpsons Himself Episode: "Angry Dad: The Movie"
Talking Funny Himself With Jerry Seinfeld, Chris Rock and Louis C.K.
Video games
Year Title Role Notes
2008 Grand Theft Auto IV Himself
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http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p262/earthtoemilee/myspace/ricky.jpg
Believe it or not, The Office has never made me laugh.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 06/26/11 at 1:00 pm


Believe it or not, The Office has never made me laugh.


It's an ok show.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/27/11 at 8:36 am


Believe it or not, The Office has never made me laugh.

I've never watched either version.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/27/11 at 8:40 am

The person of the day J.J. Abrams
Jeffrey Jacob "J.J." Abrams (born June 27, 1966), is an American film and television producer, screenwriter, director, actor, and composer. He wrote and produced feature films before co-creating the television series Felicity (1998–2002). He also created Alias (2001–2006) and co-created Lost (2004–2010), Fringe (2008–present), and Undercovers (2010). Abrams directed the films Mission: Impossible III (2006), Star Trek (2009), and Super 8 (2011) and produced the films Cloverfield (2008) and Morning Glory (2010).
Abrams's first job in the movie business started when he was 16 when he wrote music for Don Dohler's film Nightbeast. During his senior year at college, he teamed with Jill Mazursky to write a feature film treatment. Purchased by Touchstone Pictures, the treatment was the basis for Taking Care of Business, Abrams's first produced film, which starred Charles Grodin and Jim Belushi. He followed that up with Regarding Henry, starring Harrison Ford, and Forever Young, starring Mel Gibson.

Abrams collaborated with producer Jerry Bruckheimer and director Michael Bay on the 1998 film, Armageddon. That same year, he made his first foray into television with Felicity, which ran for four seasons on The WB Network, serving as the show's co-creator (with Matt Reeves) and executive producer. He also composed its opening theme music.

Under his production company, Bad Robot, Abrams created and executive-produced ABC's Alias and is co-creator (with Damon Lindelof) and executive producer of Lost. He later co-wrote the teleplay for Lost's third season premiere "A Tale of Two Cities". As with Felicity, Abrams also composed the opening theme music for Alias and Lost.

In 2001 Abrams co-wrote and produced the thriller Joy Ride, and wrote an unproduced screenplay for a fifth Superman film in 2002.

In 2006 he served as executive producer of What About Brian and Six Degrees, also on ABC. Abrams directed and wrote the two-part pilot for Lost and remained active producer for the first half of the season. That same year he made his feature directorial debut in 2006 with Mission: Impossible III, starring Tom Cruise.
Abrams at the San Diego Comic-Con International in July 2010.

Abrams spoke at the TED conference in 2007.

In 2008 Abrams produced the monster movie, Cloverfield. In 2009 he directed the science fiction film Star Trek, which he produced with Lost co-creator Damon Lindelof. While it was speculated that they would be writing and producing an adaptation of Stephen King's The Dark Tower series of novels, they publicly stated in November 2009 that they were no longer looking to take on that project.

He is one of the creators of the Fox Network series Fringe, for which he again composed the theme music.

Abrams is featured in the 2009 MTV Movie Awards 1980s-style digital short "Cool Guys Don't Look at Explosions", with Andy Samberg and Will Ferrell, in which he plays a keyboard solo.

The NBC network picked up Abrams's Undercovers as its first new drama series for the 2010–11 season. However, it was subsequently cancelled by NBC in November 2010. He wrote and directed Super 8, while co-producing with Steven Spielberg; it was released on June 10, 2011.
Personal life

Abrams is married to public relations exec Katie McGrath and has three children: sons August and Henry and daughter Gracie. He resides in Pacific Palisades, California.

Abrams has made donations to the Democratic Party. Campaigns he has contributed to include those of Bill Clinton, Barack Obama, Bill Bradley, John Edwards, Hillary Clinton, Bob Casey, Jr., Mark Udall, Harry Reid, Russ Feingold, and Patrick J. Kennedy. However, he has also donated $2,000 to the Republican Robert Vasquez.
Filmography

    * Taking Care of Business (1990) (writer)
    * Regarding Henry (1991) (writer, co-producer)
    * Forever Young (1992) (writer, executive producer)
    * Diabolique (1996) Actor, Videographer #2, as Jeffrey Abrams
    * The Pallbearer (1996) (producer)
    * Gone Fishin' (1997) (co-writer)
    * Armageddon (1998) (writer)
    * The Suburbans (1999) (producer)
    * Joy Ride (2001) (writer, producer)
    * Mission: Impossible III (2006) (director, co-writer)
    * Cloverfield (2008) (producer)
    * Star Trek (2009) (director, producer)
    * Morning Glory (2010) (producer)
    * Super 8 (June 10, 2011) (director, writer, producer)
    * Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol (December 16, 2011) (writer, producer)
    * Untitled Star Trek sequel (2012) (producer/possible director)
    * Samurai Jack feature film (TBA) (co-producer)
    * Infinitely Polar Bear feature film (TBA) (co-producer)

Television

    * Felicity (1998–2002) (co-creator, writer, executive producer, director, co-composer of theme music)
    * Alias (2001–2006) (creator, writer, executive producer, director, theme music composer)
    * Lost (2004) (Executive Producer, theme music composer, co-creator, writer, director)
    * The Office (2005–2011) (guest director)
    * What About Brian (2006–2007) (executive producer)
    * Six Degrees (2006–2007) (executive producer)
    * Jimmy Kimmel Live! (2006) (guest director)
    * Fringe (2008–present) (co-creator, writer, executive producer, theme music composer)
    * Anatomy of Hope (2009) (executive producer, writer, director)
    * Undercovers (2010) (co-creator, executive producer, writer, director)
    * Person of Interest (Announced - Series by CBS)
    * Alcatraz (Announced - Series by Fox)

Awards and nominations
Wins

    * 2005 Emmy Award Winner, Outstanding Drama Series (Lost)
    * 2005 Emmy Award Winner, Outstanding Directing for A Drama Series (Lost)
    * 2006 Golden Globe Award Winner, Best Television Series —Drama (Lost)

Nominations

    * 2002 Emmy Award Nomination, Outstanding Writing for A Drama Series (Alias)
    * 2005 Emmy Award Nomination, Outstanding Writing for A Drama Series (Lost)
    * 2007 Golden Globe Award Nomination, Best Television Series —Drama (Lost)
    * 2006 Writers Guild of America Award Nomination for Best Dramatic Series (Lost season 1)
http://i771.photobucket.com/albums/xx353/masterpenguin/StarTrekJapanPremierei15ni80Nclpl.jpg
http://i170.photobucket.com/albums/u277/lostieforever/jj_abrams_1.jpg

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/28/11 at 7:31 am

The person of the day...John Cusack
John Paul Cusack (born June 28, 1966) is an American film actor and screenwriter. He has appeared in more than 50 films, including The Journey of Natty Gann, Say Anything..., Grosse Point Blank, The Thin Red Line, Stand By Me, Con Air, High Fidelity, Serendipity, and 2012.
Cusack was born in Evanston, Illinois, to an Irish Catholic family. His father, Dick Cusack (1925–2003), was also an actor, as are his siblings Ann, Joan, Bill and Susie. His father was also a documentary filmmaker, owned a film production company, and was a friend of activist Philip Berrigan. Cusack's mother, Nancy (née Carolan), is a former mathematics teacher and political activist. Cusack spent a year at New York University before dropping out, saying that he had "too much fire in belly".
Career

Cusack gained fame in the mid-1980s after appearing in teen movies such as Better Off Dead, The Sure Thing, One Crazy Summer, and Sixteen Candles. Cusack made a cameo in the 1988 music video for "Trip At The Brain" by Suicidal Tendencies. In 1989 he starred as Lloyd Dobler in Cameron Crowe's Say Anything.... His roles broadened in the late 1980s and early 1990s with more serious-minded fare such as the political satire True Colors and the film noir thriller The Grifters.

Cusack experienced box office success with his roles in the dark comedy Grosse Pointe Blank and the Jerry Bruckheimer blockbuster Con Air. In the years since, his range of films has diversified, appearing in roles such as an obsessive puppeteer in Being John Malkovich, a lovelorn record store owner in High Fidelity, and a Jewish art dealer mentoring a young Adolf Hitler in Max. He starred in the horror film 1408, based on Stephen King's short story of the same name. He next appeared as a widowed father in the Iraq War-themed drama Grace is Gone and as assassin Brand Hauser in the dark political satire, War, Inc., along with Hilary Duff and Marisa Tomei.

His sister Joan Cusack and close friend Jeremy Piven have appeared in many of his films. The siblings appeared as two geeks in Sixteen Candles: John as one of Farmer Ted's posse, and Joan as the geek with the neck brace. They also appeared together in Say Anything, Grosse Pointe Blank, High Fidelity, Cradle Will Rock, Martian Child, and War, Inc.. Piven and Cusack played opposite one another in One Crazy Summer, Serendipity, Say Anything, and Grosse Pointe Blank. Cusack also had a brief cameo, seen from behind but speaking a line of dialogue, in Broadcast News, in which Joan also appeared. Piven also had roles in The Grifters and Runaway Jury.

Cusack was next seen in Roland Emmerich's disaster film, 2012, which was released in theaters November 13, 2009; he played Jackson Curtis, a book writer and limo driver, with his Identity and Martian Child co-star Amanda Peet. Most recently Cusack was seen in Hot Tub Time Machine, opposite Rob Corddry and Craig Robinson, which came out in March 2010.
Personal life

Cusack has an allegiance to both the Chicago Cubs and the Chicago White Sox, for which, he says, he's "in trouble there for that." He has led the crowd in a performance of "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" at Wrigley Field.

Cusack has trained in kickboxing for over 20 years under former world kickboxing champion Benny “The Jet" Urquidez. He began training under Urquidez in preparation for his role in Say Anything and currently holds the rank of Level 6 black belt in Urquidez’ Ukidokan Kickboxing system.
Politics

Since May 2005, John Cusack has been an avid blogger at The Huffington Post, including an interview with Naomi Klein. He has written extensively on his opposition to the war in Iraq and his disdain for the Bush administration, calling its worldview "depressing, corrupt, unlawful, and tragically absurd".

He also appeared in a June 2008 MoveOn.org ad, where he made the claim that George W. Bush and John McCain have the same governing priorities.
Stalking incident

In March 2008, police arrested Emily Leatherman outside Cusack's home for stalking the actor. On October 10, 2008, Leatherman pled no contest and received five years probation and mandatory psychiatric counseling, and was ordered to stay away from Cusack, his home and business for the next 10 years.
Filmography
Year Film Role Notes
1983 Class Roscoe Maibaum
1984 Sixteen Candles Bryce
Grandview, U.S.A. Johnny Maine
1985 The Sure Thing Walter (Gib) Gibson
The Journey of Natty Gann Harry
Better Off Dead Lane Meyer
1986 Stand by Me Denny Lachance
One Crazy Summer Hoops McCann
1987 Hot Pursuit Dan Bartlett
Broadcast News Angry Messenger
1988 Eight Men Out George 'Buck' Weaver
Tapeheads Ivan Alexeev
1989 Elvis Stories Corky short subject
Say Anything... Lloyd Dobler Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Emerging Actor
Fat Man and Little Boy Michael Merriman
1990 The Grifters Roy Dillon
1991 True Colors Peter Burton
1992 Shadows and Fog Student Jack
The Player Self Cameo
Bob Roberts Cutting Edge Host
Roadside Prophets Caspar
1993 Map of the Human Heart The Mapmaker
Money for Nothing Joey Coyle
1994 Floundering JC
Bullets Over Broadway David Shayne
The Road to Wellville Charles Ossining
1996 City Hall Deputy Mayor Kevin Calhoun
1997 Grosse Pointe Blank Martin Q. Blank Screenplay and co-producer
Nominated — Chlotrudis Award for Best Adapted Screenplay
Con Air U.S. Marshal Vince Larkin Blockbuster Entertainment Award for Favorite Supporting Actor — Action/Adventure
Anastasia Dimitri voice
Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil John Kelso
1998 Chicago Cab Scary man Executive producer
This Is My Father Eddie Sharp, the Pilot
The Thin Red Line Capt. Gaff Satellite Special Achievement Award for Outstanding Motion Picture Ensemble
1999 Pushing Tin Nick Falzone
Cradle Will Rock Nelson Rockefeller Nominated - Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Cast
Being John Malkovich Craig Schwartz Nominated — Independent Spirit Award for Best Actor
Nominated — London Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor
Nominated — Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Cast
Nominated — Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture
The Jack Bull Myrl Redding TV film, executive producer
2000 High Fidelity Rob Gordon Screenplay and co-producer
Nominated — American Comedy Award
Nominated — BAFTA Award for Best Adapted Screenplay
Nominated — Empire Award for Best Actor
Nominated — Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
Nominated — Teen Choice Award for Choice Hissy Fit
Nominated — USC Scripter Award 2000
Nominated — Writers Guild of America Award for Best Adapted Screenplay
2001 America's Sweethearts Eddie Thomas
Serendipity Jonathan Trager
2002 Max Max Rothman associate producer
Adaptation. Himself uncredited
2003 Identity Ed Dakota
Breakfast With Hunter Himself documentary
Runaway Jury Nicholas Easter
2005 Must Love Dogs Jake Anderson
The Ice Harvest Charlie Arglist
2006 Buy the Ticket, Take the Ride: Hunter S. Thompson on Film Himself documentary
The Contract Ray Keene
2007 Joe Strummer: The Future Is Unwritten Himself documentary
Martian Child David Gordon
1408 Mike Enslin Nominated - Saturn Award for Best Actor
Grace Is Gone Stanley Philipps Producer
2008 Igor Igor voice
2008 War, Inc. Brand Hauser also writer, producer
2009 2012 Jackson Curtis nominated-Teen choice award: Actor SCI-FI
2010
Hot Tub Time Machine Adam also producer
2011 The Factory Mike Fletcher post-production
The Raven Edgar Allan Poe filming
http://i221.photobucket.com/albums/dd112/zmeli666/cusack.jpg
http://i293.photobucket.com/albums/mm66/chhilt/j_cusack.jpg

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 06/28/11 at 7:48 pm


The person of the day...John Cusack
John Paul Cusack (born June 28, 1966) is an American film actor and screenwriter. He has appeared in more than 50 films, including The Journey of Natty Gann, Say Anything..., Grosse Point Blank, The Thin Red Line, Stand By Me, Con Air, High Fidelity, Serendipity, and 2012.
Cusack was born in Evanston, Illinois, to an Irish Catholic family. His father, Dick Cusack (1925–2003), was also an actor, as are his siblings Ann, Joan, Bill and Susie. His father was also a documentary filmmaker, owned a film production company, and was a friend of activist Philip Berrigan. Cusack's mother, Nancy (née Carolan), is a former mathematics teacher and political activist. Cusack spent a year at New York University before dropping out, saying that he had "too much fire in belly".
Career

Cusack gained fame in the mid-1980s after appearing in teen movies such as Better Off Dead, The Sure Thing, One Crazy Summer, and Sixteen Candles. Cusack made a cameo in the 1988 music video for "Trip At The Brain" by Suicidal Tendencies. In 1989 he starred as Lloyd Dobler in Cameron Crowe's Say Anything.... His roles broadened in the late 1980s and early 1990s with more serious-minded fare such as the political satire True Colors and the film noir thriller The Grifters.

Cusack experienced box office success with his roles in the dark comedy Grosse Pointe Blank and the Jerry Bruckheimer blockbuster Con Air. In the years since, his range of films has diversified, appearing in roles such as an obsessive puppeteer in Being John Malkovich, a lovelorn record store owner in High Fidelity, and a Jewish art dealer mentoring a young Adolf Hitler in Max. He starred in the horror film 1408, based on Stephen King's short story of the same name. He next appeared as a widowed father in the Iraq War-themed drama Grace is Gone and as assassin Brand Hauser in the dark political satire, War, Inc., along with Hilary Duff and Marisa Tomei.

His sister Joan Cusack and close friend Jeremy Piven have appeared in many of his films. The siblings appeared as two geeks in Sixteen Candles: John as one of Farmer Ted's posse, and Joan as the geek with the neck brace. They also appeared together in Say Anything, Grosse Pointe Blank, High Fidelity, Cradle Will Rock, Martian Child, and War, Inc.. Piven and Cusack played opposite one another in One Crazy Summer, Serendipity, Say Anything, and Grosse Pointe Blank. Cusack also had a brief cameo, seen from behind but speaking a line of dialogue, in Broadcast News, in which Joan also appeared. Piven also had roles in The Grifters and Runaway Jury.

Cusack was next seen in Roland Emmerich's disaster film, 2012, which was released in theaters November 13, 2009; he played Jackson Curtis, a book writer and limo driver, with his Identity and Martian Child co-star Amanda Peet. Most recently Cusack was seen in Hot Tub Time Machine, opposite Rob Corddry and Craig Robinson, which came out in March 2010.
Personal life

Cusack has an allegiance to both the Chicago Cubs and the Chicago White Sox, for which, he says, he's "in trouble there for that." He has led the crowd in a performance of "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" at Wrigley Field.

Cusack has trained in kickboxing for over 20 years under former world kickboxing champion Benny “The Jet" Urquidez. He began training under Urquidez in preparation for his role in Say Anything and currently holds the rank of Level 6 black belt in Urquidez’ Ukidokan Kickboxing system.
Politics

Since May 2005, John Cusack has been an avid blogger at The Huffington Post, including an interview with Naomi Klein. He has written extensively on his opposition to the war in Iraq and his disdain for the Bush administration, calling its worldview "depressing, corrupt, unlawful, and tragically absurd".

He also appeared in a June 2008 MoveOn.org ad, where he made the claim that George W. Bush and John McCain have the same governing priorities.
Stalking incident

In March 2008, police arrested Emily Leatherman outside Cusack's home for stalking the actor. On October 10, 2008, Leatherman pled no contest and received five years probation and mandatory psychiatric counseling, and was ordered to stay away from Cusack, his home and business for the next 10 years.
Filmography
Year Film Role Notes
1983 Class Roscoe Maibaum
1984 Sixteen Candles Bryce
Grandview, U.S.A. Johnny Maine
1985 The Sure Thing Walter (Gib) Gibson
The Journey of Natty Gann Harry
Better Off Dead Lane Meyer
1986 Stand by Me Denny Lachance
One Crazy Summer Hoops McCann
1987 Hot Pursuit Dan Bartlett
Broadcast News Angry Messenger
1988 Eight Men Out George 'Buck' Weaver
Tapeheads Ivan Alexeev
1989 Elvis Stories Corky short subject
Say Anything... Lloyd Dobler Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Emerging Actor
Fat Man and Little Boy Michael Merriman
1990 The Grifters Roy Dillon
1991 True Colors Peter Burton
1992 Shadows and Fog Student Jack
The Player Self Cameo
Bob Roberts Cutting Edge Host
Roadside Prophets Caspar
1993 Map of the Human Heart The Mapmaker
Money for Nothing Joey Coyle
1994 Floundering JC
Bullets Over Broadway David Shayne
The Road to Wellville Charles Ossining
1996 City Hall Deputy Mayor Kevin Calhoun
1997 Grosse Pointe Blank Martin Q. Blank Screenplay and co-producer
Nominated — Chlotrudis Award for Best Adapted Screenplay
Con Air U.S. Marshal Vince Larkin Blockbuster Entertainment Award for Favorite Supporting Actor — Action/Adventure
Anastasia Dimitri voice
Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil John Kelso
1998 Chicago Cab Scary man Executive producer
This Is My Father Eddie Sharp, the Pilot
The Thin Red Line Capt. Gaff Satellite Special Achievement Award for Outstanding Motion Picture Ensemble
1999 Pushing Tin Nick Falzone
Cradle Will Rock Nelson Rockefeller Nominated - Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Cast
Being John Malkovich Craig Schwartz Nominated — Independent Spirit Award for Best Actor
Nominated — London Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor
Nominated — Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Cast
Nominated — Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture
The Jack Bull Myrl Redding TV film, executive producer
2000 High Fidelity Rob Gordon Screenplay and co-producer
Nominated — American Comedy Award
Nominated — BAFTA Award for Best Adapted Screenplay
Nominated — Empire Award for Best Actor
Nominated — Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
Nominated — Teen Choice Award for Choice Hissy Fit
Nominated — USC Scripter Award 2000
Nominated — Writers Guild of America Award for Best Adapted Screenplay
2001 America's Sweethearts Eddie Thomas
Serendipity Jonathan Trager
2002 Max Max Rothman associate producer
Adaptation. Himself uncredited
2003 Identity Ed Dakota
Breakfast With Hunter Himself documentary
Runaway Jury Nicholas Easter
2005 Must Love Dogs Jake Anderson
The Ice Harvest Charlie Arglist
2006 Buy the Ticket, Take the Ride: Hunter S. Thompson on Film Himself documentary
The Contract Ray Keene
2007 Joe Strummer: The Future Is Unwritten Himself documentary
Martian Child David Gordon
1408 Mike Enslin Nominated - Saturn Award for Best Actor
Grace Is Gone Stanley Philipps Producer
2008 Igor Igor voice
2008 War, Inc. Brand Hauser also writer, producer
2009 2012 Jackson Curtis nominated-Teen choice award: Actor SCI-FI
2010
Hot Tub Time Machine Adam also producer
2011 The Factory Mike Fletcher post-production
The Raven Edgar Allan Poe filming
http://i221.photobucket.com/albums/dd112/zmeli666/cusack.jpg
http://i293.photobucket.com/albums/mm66/chhilt/j_cusack.jpg


I like him,he's a cool actor.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/29/11 at 7:48 am

The person of the day... Gary Busey
William Gary Busey (born June 29, 1944), best known as Gary Busey, is an American film and stage actor and artist. He has appeared in over 120 films, as well as making regular appearances on Gunsmoke, Walker, Texas Ranger, Law & Order, and Entourage. He received an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor in 1978 for his role in The Buddy Holly Story.
Busey began his show-business career as a drummer in The Rubber Band. He appears on several Leon Russell recordings, credited as playing drums under the names "Teddy Jack Eddy" and "Sprunk", a character he created when he was a cast member of a local television comedy show in Tulsa, Oklahoma, called The Uncanny Film Festival and Camp Meeting (which starred fellow Tulsan Gailard Sartain as "Dr. Mazeppa Pompazoidi"). He played in a band called Carp, who released one album on Epic Records in 1969. Busey continued to play several small roles in both film and television during the 1970s. In 1975, as the character "Harvey Daley," he was the last person killed on the series Gunsmoke (in the antepenultimate episode, No. 633 – "The Los Carnales").

In 1976 he was hired by Barbra Streisand and her producer-boyfriend Jon Peters to play Bobby Ritchie, Road Manager to Kris Kristofferson's character in the remake film A Star is Born. On the DVD commentary of the film, Streisand says Busey was great and that she had seen him on a TV series and thought he had the right qualities to play the role.

In 1978, he starred as Buddy Holly in The Buddy Holly Story with Sartain as The Big Bopper. The movie earned Busey an Academy Award nomination and the National Society of Film Critics' Best Actor award. In the film, he changes the lyrics to the song "Well All Right" and sings, "We're gonna love Teddy Jack..." a reference to his Teddy Jack Eddy persona. In the same year he also starred in the surfing movie Big Wednesday.

In the 1980s, Busey's roles included Silver Bullet, Barbarosa, Top Gun (providing voiceover for Tim Robbins' character, Merlin), Insignificance and Lethal Weapon. In the movie D.C. Cab, Busey portrayed the character Dell. At one point, Dell is singing along with a cassette recording of Busey singing the song "Why Baby Why" (which Busey recorded, but still remains unreleased). In the 1990s, he appeared in Predator 2, Rookie of the Year, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Under Siege, The Firm, Lost Highway, Point Break and Black Sheep.

Busey sang the song "Stay All Night" on Saturday Night Live in March 1979, and on the Late Show with David Letterman in the 1990s.

In 2002, Busey voiced the character Phil Cassidy in Grand Theft Auto: Vice City, then again in Grand Theft Auto: Vice City Stories in 2006. He also voiced himself on a 2005 episode of The Simpsons, narrating an informational video about restraining orders.

Busey appeared in the 2006 Turkish film Valley of the Wolves Iraq, (Kurtlar Vadisi: Irak, in Turkish). The film, accused of anti-Americanism and anti-Semitism, tells the story of the U.S. Army run amok in Iraq and brought into check by a brave Turkish soldier; Busey plays a Jewish-American Army doctor who harvests fresh organs from injured Iraqi prisoners to sell to rich patients in New York City, London and Tel Aviv.
Busey in Kazakhstan, 2007.

In 2007, he appeared as himself on HBO's Entourage. Producers at HBO asked Busey to play a "character" on the show who was the self-named actor who is also a famous painter and sculptor.

In 2008, he joined the second season of the reality show Celebrity Rehab with Dr. Drew. Per his contract and VH1's press release, he was to be part of the mentoring team and not a patient. Drew Pinsky has expressed a different opinion, saying that he can help by being in group meetings with others and is not part of the staff, but part of the patients of this second season. Busey returned to reality television in Celebrity Apprentice 4, which premiered in March 2011,

In a series of 2010 YouTube advertisements for Vitamin Water, Busey appears as Norman Tugwater, a lawyer who defends professional athletes' entitlements to a cut from Fantasy Football team owners.

The following year, he was let go from the horror movie Mansion of Blood after filming half his scenes, due what his publicist, Michael Conley, called "contractual issues and misunderstandings."
Personal life
Busey in September 2007
Family

In 1971, Busey's wife Judy Helkenberg gave birth to their son, William Jacob Busey, now known as actor Jake Busey. Busey and Judy divorced when Jake was nineteen.

Busey has a daughter named Alectra from a previous relationship.

On December 9, 2009, it was announced that Gary Busey and girlfriend Steffanie Sampson were expecting their first child in May 2010. On February 23, 2010, their son Luke Sampson Busey was born.
Motorcycle accident and brain damage

On December 4, 1988, Busey was severely injured in a motorcycle accident in which he was not wearing a helmet. His skull was fractured, and doctors feared he suffered permanent brain damage.

At the recommendation of Dr. Drew Pinsky, Busey was seen by psychiatrist Dr. Charles Sophy. Sophy suspected that Busey's brain injury has had a greater effect on him than realized. He described it as essentially weakening his mental "filters" and causing him to speak and act impulsively. He recommended Busey take a medication called Depakote, to which he agreed.
Legal issues

In May 1995, Busey was arrested for cocaine possession after being hospitalized for an overdose of cocaine and GHB.

On August 20, 1997, Busey was accused of pushing a stewardess who bumped him on a flight to Las Vegas. Upon the flight's landing, he was questioned by police, but no charges were filed.

On January 25, 1999, Busey was arrested after a fight with his wife. He was released on bail.

On, December 2, 2001, Busey was again arrested for spousal abuse after his ex-wife Tiani Warden called authorities, complaining he left her bruised. Busey was released on $50,000 bail.

On September 7, 2004, Busey's landlord filed a lawsuit to evict him because Busey had refused to pay his rent for about three months.

On Sept 23, 2004, Busey was arrested for showing up late to a spousal support court hearing. His lawyer bailed him out two-and-a-half hours later.
Filmography

    * Angels Hard as They Come (1971)
    * The Magnificent Seven Ride! (1972)
    * Dirty Little Billy (1972)
    * Lolly-Madonna XXX (1973)
    * Hex (1973)
    * Blood Sport (1973)
    * The Execution of Private Slovik (1974)
    * The Last American Hero (1973)
    * Thunderbolt and Lightfoot (as Garey Busey) (1974)
    * The Law (1974)
    * A Star Is Born (1976)
    * The Gumball Rally (1976)
    * The Buddy Holly Story (1978)
    * Straight Time (1978)
    * Big Wednesday (1978)
    * Carny (1980)
    * Foolin' Around (1980)
    * Barbarosa (1982)
    * Didn't You Hear... (1983)
    * D.C. Cab (1983)
    * The Bear (1984)
    * Insignificance (1985)
    * Silver Bullet (1985)
    * Half a Lifetime (1986)
    * Eye of the Tiger (1986)
    * Let's Get Harry (1986)
    * Lethal Weapon (1987)
    * Bulletproof (1988)
    * A Dangerous Life (1988)
    * The Neon Empire (1989)
    * Hider in the House (1989)
    * Act of Piracy (1990)
    * Predator 2 (1990)
    * Point Break (1991)
    * My Heroes Have Always Been Cowboys (1991)
    * Wild Texas Wind (1991)
    * Canvas (1992)
    * Chrome Soldiers (1992)
    * Under Siege (1992)
    * Breaking Point (1993)
    * The Firm (1993)
    * Rookie of the Year (1993)
    * South Beach (1993)
    * Warriors (1994)
    * Surviving the Game (1994)
    * Drop Zone (1994)
    * Chasers (1994)
    * Man with a Gun (1995)
    * Steel Sharks (1996)
    * One Clean Move (1996)
    * Livers Ain't Cheap (1996) (a.k.a. The Real Thing)
    * Black Sheep (1996)
    * Carried Away (1996)
    * Sticks & Stones (1996)
    * The Chain (1996)
    * Suspicious Minds (1997)
    * The Rage (1997)
    * Lost Highway (1997)
    * Lethal Tender (1997)
    * Plato's Run (1997)
    * Rough Riders (1997)
    * Rough Draft (1998) (a.k.a. Diary of a Serial Killer)
    * Soldier (1998)
    * Fear and Loathing In Las Vegas (1998)
    * Universal Soldier II: Brothers in Arms (1998)
    * Detour (1998) (a.k.a. Too Hard to Die)
    * Hot Boyz (1999)
    * The Girl Next Door (1999)
    * No Tomorrow (1999)
    * Two Shades of Blue (1999)
    * Jacob Two Two Meets the Hooded Fang (1999)
    * A Crack in the Floor (2000)
    * Tribulation (2000)
    * Glory Glory (2000) (a.k.a. Hooded Angels)
    * Inside The Metal Box (2000)
    * Down 'n Dirty (2000)
    * G-Men from Hell (2000)
    * Frost: Portrait of a Vampire (2001)
    * On the Edge (2002)
    * Welcome 2 Ibiza (2002)
    * Sam & Janet (2002)
    * Slap Shot 2: Breaking the Ice (2002)
    * The Prize Fighter (2003)
    * Scorched (2003)
    * Shadowlands (2003)
    * Shade of Pale (2004)
    * Motocross Kids (2004)
    * Lexie (2004)
    * El Padrino (2004)
    * Border Blues (2004)
    * Latin Dragon (2004)
    * Ghost Rock (2004)
    * American Dictators: Documenting the Staged Election of 2004 (2004)
    * The Hand Job (2005)
    * Souled Out (2005)
    * No Rules (2005)
    * Chasing Ghosts (2005)
    * The Baker's Dozen (2005)
    * Into the West (2005)
    * Buckaroo: The Movie (2005)
    * A Sight for Sore Eyes (2005)
    * The Gingerdead Man (2005)
    * The Hard Easy (2005)
    * Descansos (2006)
    * Valley of the Wolves Iraq (2006)
    * Dr. Dolittle 3 (2006) (voice)
    * Shut Up and Shoot! (2006)
    * Buy the Ticket, Take the Ride (2006)
    * Soft Target (2006) (a.k.a. Crooked)
    * Quigley (2006)
    * Lady Samurai (2007)
    * Homo Erectus (2007) (a.k.a. National Lampoon's The Stoned Age)
    * Blizhniy Boy: The Ultimate Fighter (2007)
    * Succubus: Hell Bent (2007)
    * Maneater (2007)
    * Beyond the Ring (2008)
    * Nite Tales: The Movie (2008)
    * Hallettsville (2009)
    * Down and Distance (2009)
    * DaZe: Vol. Too (sic) – NonSeNse (2009)

Television

    * Kung Fu (Season 1, Episode 15 ("The Ancient Warrior")) (1973)
    * Gunsmoke (1975)
    * The Texas Wheelers (ABC-TV 8-episode sitcom, 1974–75)
    * Saturday Night Live (1979) (himself – host)
    * Hawaii Five-O (1997 unaired pilot)
    * Walker, Texas Ranger (1999)
    * The Outer Limits (2000), Episode: "Revival"
    * Law & Order (2001)
    * King of the Hill (2001) (voice)
    * Entourage ("Busey and the Beach", Season 1, Episode 6; "The Boys Are Back In Town", Season 2, Episode 1; "Gary's Desk", Season 4, Episode 8) (2004, 2005, 2007) (as himself)
    * The Man Show (2002) (as himself)
    * I'm with Busey (Comedy Central, 2003) (as himself)
    * Penn & Teller: Bullsheesh! ("12 Stepping", 2004) (as himself)
    * High Chaparall (2004) (as himself)
    * The Simpsons (On a Clear Day I Can't See My Sister, season 16, episode 11) (2005) (as himself)
    * Celebrity Fit Club 2 (VH1, 2005) (as himself)
    * Esenin (2005, Russia) (Zinger, Isedora Dunkan's ex-husbund )
    * Tom Goes to the Mayor (2006) (voice)
    * Scrubs ("My Missed Perception", 2006) (as himself)
    * Celebrity Paranormal Project (VH1, 2006) (as himself)
    * The Smoking Gun Presents: World's Dumbest... (truTV, 2008) (as himself)
    * The Cho Show (VH1, 2008) (as himself)
    * Celebrity Rehab with Dr. Drew (VH1, 2008) (as himself)
    * The Comedy Central Roast of Larry the Cable Guy (Comedy Central, 2009) (as himself)
    * Conan (TBS, 2010) (as himself)
    * Celebrity Apprentice (2011) (as himself)

Video games

    * Grand Theft Auto: Vice City (voice) (2002)
    * Grand Theft Auto: Vice City Stories (voice) (2006)
    * Saints Row 2 (voice) (2008)
http://i527.photobucket.com/albums/cc358/Stefz1991/gary-busey.jpg
http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n554/Reactor2011/The%20Bachelorette/4-gary-busey.jpg

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 06/29/11 at 8:13 pm


The person of the day... Gary Busey
William Gary Busey (born June 29, 1944), best known as Gary Busey, is an American film and stage actor and artist. He has appeared in over 120 films, as well as making regular appearances on Gunsmoke, Walker, Texas Ranger, Law & Order, and Entourage. He received an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor in 1978 for his role in The Buddy Holly Story.
Busey began his show-business career as a drummer in The Rubber Band. He appears on several Leon Russell recordings, credited as playing drums under the names "Teddy Jack Eddy" and "Sprunk", a character he created when he was a cast member of a local television comedy show in Tulsa, Oklahoma, called The Uncanny Film Festival and Camp Meeting (which starred fellow Tulsan Gailard Sartain as "Dr. Mazeppa Pompazoidi"). He played in a band called Carp, who released one album on Epic Records in 1969. Busey continued to play several small roles in both film and television during the 1970s. In 1975, as the character "Harvey Daley," he was the last person killed on the series Gunsmoke (in the antepenultimate episode, No. 633 – "The Los Carnales").

In 1976 he was hired by Barbra Streisand and her producer-boyfriend Jon Peters to play Bobby Ritchie, Road Manager to Kris Kristofferson's character in the remake film A Star is Born. On the DVD commentary of the film, Streisand says Busey was great and that she had seen him on a TV series and thought he had the right qualities to play the role.

In 1978, he starred as Buddy Holly in The Buddy Holly Story with Sartain as The Big Bopper. The movie earned Busey an Academy Award nomination and the National Society of Film Critics' Best Actor award. In the film, he changes the lyrics to the song "Well All Right" and sings, "We're gonna love Teddy Jack..." a reference to his Teddy Jack Eddy persona. In the same year he also starred in the surfing movie Big Wednesday.

In the 1980s, Busey's roles included Silver Bullet, Barbarosa, Top Gun (providing voiceover for Tim Robbins' character, Merlin), Insignificance and Lethal Weapon. In the movie D.C. Cab, Busey portrayed the character Dell. At one point, Dell is singing along with a cassette recording of Busey singing the song "Why Baby Why" (which Busey recorded, but still remains unreleased). In the 1990s, he appeared in Predator 2, Rookie of the Year, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Under Siege, The Firm, Lost Highway, Point Break and Black Sheep.

Busey sang the song "Stay All Night" on Saturday Night Live in March 1979, and on the Late Show with David Letterman in the 1990s.

In 2002, Busey voiced the character Phil Cassidy in Grand Theft Auto: Vice City, then again in Grand Theft Auto: Vice City Stories in 2006. He also voiced himself on a 2005 episode of The Simpsons, narrating an informational video about restraining orders.

Busey appeared in the 2006 Turkish film Valley of the Wolves Iraq, (Kurtlar Vadisi: Irak, in Turkish). The film, accused of anti-Americanism and anti-Semitism, tells the story of the U.S. Army run amok in Iraq and brought into check by a brave Turkish soldier; Busey plays a Jewish-American Army doctor who harvests fresh organs from injured Iraqi prisoners to sell to rich patients in New York City, London and Tel Aviv.
Busey in Kazakhstan, 2007.

In 2007, he appeared as himself on HBO's Entourage. Producers at HBO asked Busey to play a "character" on the show who was the self-named actor who is also a famous painter and sculptor.

In 2008, he joined the second season of the reality show Celebrity Rehab with Dr. Drew. Per his contract and VH1's press release, he was to be part of the mentoring team and not a patient. Drew Pinsky has expressed a different opinion, saying that he can help by being in group meetings with others and is not part of the staff, but part of the patients of this second season. Busey returned to reality television in Celebrity Apprentice 4, which premiered in March 2011,

In a series of 2010 YouTube advertisements for Vitamin Water, Busey appears as Norman Tugwater, a lawyer who defends professional athletes' entitlements to a cut from Fantasy Football team owners.

The following year, he was let go from the horror movie Mansion of Blood after filming half his scenes, due what his publicist, Michael Conley, called "contractual issues and misunderstandings."
Personal life
Busey in September 2007
Family

In 1971, Busey's wife Judy Helkenberg gave birth to their son, William Jacob Busey, now known as actor Jake Busey. Busey and Judy divorced when Jake was nineteen.

Busey has a daughter named Alectra from a previous relationship.

On December 9, 2009, it was announced that Gary Busey and girlfriend Steffanie Sampson were expecting their first child in May 2010. On February 23, 2010, their son Luke Sampson Busey was born.
Motorcycle accident and brain damage

On December 4, 1988, Busey was severely injured in a motorcycle accident in which he was not wearing a helmet. His skull was fractured, and doctors feared he suffered permanent brain damage.

At the recommendation of Dr. Drew Pinsky, Busey was seen by psychiatrist Dr. Charles Sophy. Sophy suspected that Busey's brain injury has had a greater effect on him than realized. He described it as essentially weakening his mental "filters" and causing him to speak and act impulsively. He recommended Busey take a medication called Depakote, to which he agreed.
Legal issues

In May 1995, Busey was arrested for cocaine possession after being hospitalized for an overdose of cocaine and GHB.

On August 20, 1997, Busey was accused of pushing a stewardess who bumped him on a flight to Las Vegas. Upon the flight's landing, he was questioned by police, but no charges were filed.

On January 25, 1999, Busey was arrested after a fight with his wife. He was released on bail.

On, December 2, 2001, Busey was again arrested for spousal abuse after his ex-wife Tiani Warden called authorities, complaining he left her bruised. Busey was released on $50,000 bail.

On September 7, 2004, Busey's landlord filed a lawsuit to evict him because Busey had refused to pay his rent for about three months.

On Sept 23, 2004, Busey was arrested for showing up late to a spousal support court hearing. His lawyer bailed him out two-and-a-half hours later.
Filmography

    * Angels Hard as They Come (1971)
    * The Magnificent Seven Ride! (1972)
    * Dirty Little Billy (1972)
    * Lolly-Madonna XXX (1973)
    * Hex (1973)
    * Blood Sport (1973)
    * The Execution of Private Slovik (1974)
    * The Last American Hero (1973)
    * Thunderbolt and Lightfoot (as Garey Busey) (1974)
    * The Law (1974)
    * A Star Is Born (1976)
    * The Gumball Rally (1976)
    * The Buddy Holly Story (1978)
    * Straight Time (1978)
    * Big Wednesday (1978)
    * Carny (1980)
    * Foolin' Around (1980)
    * Barbarosa (1982)
    * Didn't You Hear... (1983)
    * D.C. Cab (1983)
    * The Bear (1984)
    * Insignificance (1985)
    * Silver Bullet (1985)
    * Half a Lifetime (1986)
    * Eye of the Tiger (1986)
    * Let's Get Harry (1986)
    * Lethal Weapon (1987)
    * Bulletproof (1988)
    * A Dangerous Life (1988)
    * The Neon Empire (1989)
    * Hider in the House (1989)
    * Act of Piracy (1990)
    * Predator 2 (1990)
    * Point Break (1991)
    * My Heroes Have Always Been Cowboys (1991)
    * Wild Texas Wind (1991)
    * Canvas (1992)
    * Chrome Soldiers (1992)
    * Under Siege (1992)
    * Breaking Point (1993)
    * The Firm (1993)
    * Rookie of the Year (1993)
    * South Beach (1993)
    * Warriors (1994)
    * Surviving the Game (1994)
    * Drop Zone (1994)
    * Chasers (1994)
    * Man with a Gun (1995)
    * Steel Sharks (1996)
    * One Clean Move (1996)
    * Livers Ain't Cheap (1996) (a.k.a. The Real Thing)
    * Black Sheep (1996)
    * Carried Away (1996)
    * Sticks & Stones (1996)
    * The Chain (1996)
    * Suspicious Minds (1997)
    * The Rage (1997)
    * Lost Highway (1997)
    * Lethal Tender (1997)
    * Plato's Run (1997)
    * Rough Riders (1997)
    * Rough Draft (1998) (a.k.a. Diary of a Serial Killer)
    * Soldier (1998)
    * Fear and Loathing In Las Vegas (1998)
    * Universal Soldier II: Brothers in Arms (1998)
    * Detour (1998) (a.k.a. Too Hard to Die)
    * Hot Boyz (1999)
    * The Girl Next Door (1999)
    * No Tomorrow (1999)
    * Two Shades of Blue (1999)
    * Jacob Two Two Meets the Hooded Fang (1999)
    * A Crack in the Floor (2000)
    * Tribulation (2000)
    * Glory Glory (2000) (a.k.a. Hooded Angels)
    * Inside The Metal Box (2000)
    * Down 'n Dirty (2000)
    * G-Men from Hell (2000)
    * Frost: Portrait of a Vampire (2001)
    * On the Edge (2002)
    * Welcome 2 Ibiza (2002)
    * Sam & Janet (2002)
    * Slap Shot 2: Breaking the Ice (2002)
    * The Prize Fighter (2003)
    * Scorched (2003)
    * Shadowlands (2003)
    * Shade of Pale (2004)
    * Motocross Kids (2004)
    * Lexie (2004)
    * El Padrino (2004)
    * Border Blues (2004)
    * Latin Dragon (2004)
    * Ghost Rock (2004)
    * American Dictators: Documenting the Staged Election of 2004 (2004)
    * The Hand Job (2005)
    * Souled Out (2005)
    * No Rules (2005)
    * Chasing Ghosts (2005)
    * The Baker's Dozen (2005)
    * Into the West (2005)
    * Buckaroo: The Movie (2005)
    * A Sight for Sore Eyes (2005)
    * The Gingerdead Man (2005)
    * The Hard Easy (2005)
    * Descansos (2006)
    * Valley of the Wolves Iraq (2006)
    * Dr. Dolittle 3 (2006) (voice)
    * Shut Up and Shoot! (2006)
    * Buy the Ticket, Take the Ride (2006)
    * Soft Target (2006) (a.k.a. Crooked)
    * Quigley (2006)
    * Lady Samurai (2007)
    * Homo Erectus (2007) (a.k.a. National Lampoon's The Stoned Age)
    * Blizhniy Boy: The Ultimate Fighter (2007)
    * Succubus: Hell Bent (2007)
    * Maneater (2007)
    * Beyond the Ring (2008)
    * Nite Tales: The Movie (2008)
    * Hallettsville (2009)
    * Down and Distance (2009)
    * DaZe: Vol. Too (sic) – NonSeNse (2009)

Television

    * Kung Fu (Season 1, Episode 15 ("The Ancient Warrior")) (1973)
    * Gunsmoke (1975)
    * The Texas Wheelers (ABC-TV 8-episode sitcom, 1974–75)
    * Saturday Night Live (1979) (himself – host)
    * Hawaii Five-O (1997 unaired pilot)
    * Walker, Texas Ranger (1999)
    * The Outer Limits (2000), Episode: "Revival"
    * Law & Order (2001)
    * King of the Hill (2001) (voice)
    * Entourage ("Busey and the Beach", Season 1, Episode 6; "The Boys Are Back In Town", Season 2, Episode 1; "Gary's Desk", Season 4, Episode 8) (2004, 2005, 2007) (as himself)
    * The Man Show (2002) (as himself)
    * I'm with Busey (Comedy Central, 2003) (as himself)
    * Penn & Teller: Bullsheesh! ("12 Stepping", 2004) (as himself)
    * High Chaparall (2004) (as himself)
    * The Simpsons (On a Clear Day I Can't See My Sister, season 16, episode 11) (2005) (as himself)
    * Celebrity Fit Club 2 (VH1, 2005) (as himself)
    * Esenin (2005, Russia) (Zinger, Isedora Dunkan's ex-husbund )
    * Tom Goes to the Mayor (2006) (voice)
    * Scrubs ("My Missed Perception", 2006) (as himself)
    * Celebrity Paranormal Project (VH1, 2006) (as himself)
    * The Smoking Gun Presents: World's Dumbest... (truTV, 2008) (as himself)
    * The Cho Show (VH1, 2008) (as himself)
    * Celebrity Rehab with Dr. Drew (VH1, 2008) (as himself)
    * The Comedy Central Roast of Larry the Cable Guy (Comedy Central, 2009) (as himself)
    * Conan (TBS, 2010) (as himself)
    * Celebrity Apprentice (2011) (as himself)

Video games

    * Grand Theft Auto: Vice City (voice) (2002)
    * Grand Theft Auto: Vice City Stories (voice) (2006)
    * Saints Row 2 (voice) (2008)
http://i527.photobucket.com/albums/cc358/Stefz1991/gary-busey.jpg
http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n554/Reactor2011/The%20Bachelorette/4-gary-busey.jpg


Did he clean up his act yet?

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/30/11 at 5:35 am


Did he clean up his act yet?

I'm really not sure.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 06/30/11 at 5:40 am


Vincent Phillip D'Onofrio (born June 30, 1959) is an American actor, film producer, and singer. He first gained attention for his role as Private Leonard 'Gomer Pyle' Lawrence in the war film Full Metal Jacket and more recently for his role as Detective Robert Goren in the crime TV series Law & Order: Criminal Intent.
In 1984, D'Onofrio became a full member of the American Stanislavsky Theatre, appearing in a number of its productions, including Of Mice and Men and Sexual Perversity in Chicago. He also made his Broadway debut as Nick Rizzoli in Open Admissions. Before this breakthrough, he had been acting in New York University student films and was working as a bouncer at the Hard Rock Cafe.

In 1987, D'Onofrio entered the mainstream consciousness with two film roles that demonstrated his range as an actor: In the first, he played the overweight Private Leonard "Gomer Pyle" Lawrence in Stanley Kubrick's 1987 film Full Metal Jacket, for which he gained 70 lb (32 kg), bringing his weight to 280 lb (130 kg). In the second, he played Dawson, the owner of Dawson's Garage in Adventures in Babysitting, directed by Chris Columbus. D'Onofrio appears in only one scene near the end of the film, but his role attracted attention because of his muscular physique and long blond hair; they cause Sara, the film's youngest character, to mistakenly believe he is Thor, the comic-book superhero she idolizes. In 1988, D'Onofrio was in the film Mystic Pizza with Julia Roberts.

D'Onofrio continued to play a wide variety of roles, including iconic director Orson Welles in Tim Burton's Ed Wood, farmer Edgar and the evil "Bug" that possesses him from Men in Black, the father of a saint in Nancy Savoca's Household Saints, Yippie founder Abbie Hoffman in Steal This Movie, a time traveler from the distant future in Happy Accidents, and opposite Jennifer Lopez as serial killer Carl Stargher in The Cell.

He produced The Whole Wide World (1996) and Guy (1997); executive produced The Velocity of Gary (1998) and Steal This Movie (2000); and directed the short Five Minutes, Mr. Welles (2005). This last represents a culmination of D'Onofrio's desire to improve on his performance as Welles in Ed Wood, which, in spite of D'Onofrio's striking physical resemblance to the actor/director, reportedly left director Tim Burton underwhelmed. Burton decided to procure the services of voice-over artist Maurice LaMarche (who is known for his peerless imitation of Welles' voice) to produce a more dramatically effective rendering of the character's dialogue.

D'Onofrio received an Emmy nomination in 1997 for his appearance as John Lange, the doomed victim in the Homicide: Life on the Street episode "Subway". He also starred as Det. Robert Goren on the NBC / USA Network television show Law & Order: Criminal Intent (2001–10).

In 2003, it was reported that D'Onofrio and Joe Pantoliano began work on a small film entitled Little Victories, about a 12-year-old boy whose perceptions of the world are forever changed when his gangster uncle comes to live with him. According to a television interview with Pantoliano, Little Victories was not completed and went into turnaround because of a failure to raise the funds necessary for production.

In November 2005, D'Onofrio won Best Actor at the Stockholm International Film Festival for his role as Mike Cobb in the independent film Thumbsucker.

In 2006, he appeared in The Break Up, starring Jennifer Aniston and Vince Vaughn, in which D'Onofrio played Vaughn's eccentric brother. He and Vaughn had appeared together in two previous films, in The Cell, where Vaughn played an FBI agent pursuing D'Onofrio's character, and Thumbsucker.

In 2008, D'Onofrio made a cameo appearance in a presidential election-related sketch in a Saturday Night Live episode as his character Det. Robert Goren. In the sketch, which originally aired on March 1, 2008, he interrogates Hillary Clinton (played by Amy Poehler). His entrance to and exit from the skit are punctuated by the classic Law & Order "dun-DUN" sound.

D'Onofrio turned down a role in The Sopranos.

D'Onofrio left Criminal Intent in the spring of 2010, with his last appearance occurring in the two-part Season 9 premiere. The 10th, and final season of the show features D'Onofrio returning as Detective Goren.
George Geronimo Gerkie

On October 27, 2009, D'Onofrio portrayed a comedic country singer named George Geronimo Gerkie at Joe's Pub in New York City. He appeared as Gerkie again at New York's Hammerstein Ballroom on December 6, 2009, during Matt Pinfield's Holiday Extravaganza Show and at the premiere of his movie Don't go in to the Woods at Joe's Pub on May 28, 2010. A fourth concert was held at the pub on July 22, 2010 with proceeds from the event going to the Utah Meth Cops project. D'Onofrio serves as the projects spokesperson and, alongside his sister Toni, is regularly involved in efforts to raise money for the cause.
Personal life

D'Onofrio's father, Gene, and his sister Beth founded the River Run International Film Festival in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, which began in 1998.

D'Onofrio has a daughter, Leila George D'Onofrio, born March 20, 1992 in Sydney. Her mother is actress Greta Scacchi, with whom D'Onofrio made several movies in the late 1980s and early 1990s (including The Player and Fires Within). The couple were in a relationship from 1991 until 1993. On March 22, 1997, D'Onofrio married model Carin van der Donk. In December 1999, the couple had a son, Elias Gene. D'Onofrio and van der Donk divorced in October 2003 they reconciled in 2007. Carin gave birth to their second son, Luca, on February 14, 2008.

D'Onofrio experienced a health issue when he collapsed on the set of Law & Order: Criminal Intent on November 10, 2004. He collapsed again at home a few days later and was taken back to the hospital for more thorough testing, where he was diagnosed with nervous exhaustion.
Partial filmography

   * The First Turn-On! (1983)
   * It Don't Pay to Be an Honest Citizen (1984)
   * Full Metal Jacket (1987)
   * Adventures in Babysitting (1987)
   * Mystic Pizza (1988)
   * Signs of Life (1989)
   * The Blood of Heroes (1989) – also known as Salute of the Jugger
   * Crooked Hearts (1991)
   * Dying Young (1991)
   * Fires Within (1991)
   * Naked Tango (1991)
   * JFK (1991)
   * The Player (1992)
   * Salt on Our Skin (1992) – also known as Desire
   * Being Human (1993)
   * Household Saints (1993)
   * Mr. Wonderful (1993)
   * Ed Wood (1994)
   * The Investigator (1994)
   * Imaginary Crimes (1994)
   * Nunzio's Second Cousin (1994)
   * Stuart Saves His Family (1995)
   * Strange Days (1995)
   * Hotel Paradise (1995)
   * The Whole Wide World (1996)
   * The Winner (1996)
   * Feeling Minnesota (1996)
   * Good Luck (1996)
   * Boys Life 2 (1997)
   * Men in Black (1997)
   * Guy (1997)
   * The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (1998) – TV remake of the 1974 film
   * The Newton Boys (1998)



   * Claire Dolan (1998)
   * The Velocity of Gary (1998)
   * Spanish Judges (1999)
   * The Thirteenth Floor (1999)
   * That Championship Season (1999)
   * Happy Accidents (2000)
   * Steal This Movie (2000)
   * The Cell (2000)
   * Chelsea Walls (2001)
   * Impostor (2002)
   * Bark! (2002)
   * The Dangerous Lives of Altar Boys (2002)
   * The Red Sneakers (2002)
   * The Salton Sea (2002)
   * Case of Evil (2002)
   * Thumbsucker (2005)
   * Five Minutes, Mr. Welles (2005)
   * The Break Up (2006)
   * 1408 (2007)
   * The Narrows (2008)
   * Cadillac Records (2008)
   * Staten Island (2009)
   * Brooklyn's Finest (2010)
   * Chlorine (2011)
   * Down and Dirty Pictures (2011)
   * High Midnight (2011)
   * Don't go in to the Woods (2011)
   * Ass Backwards (2011)
   * Kill the Irishman (2011)

Television (including notable guest appearances)

   * Law & Order: Criminal Intent (2001—2010, 2011) as Det. Robert Goren
   * Men in Black: The Series as Bugs (voice) in "The Big Bad Bug Syndrome" (Episode 2.5)
   * Homicide: Life on the Street as John Lange in "Subway" (Episode 6.7)
   * The Equalizer as Davy Baylor in "Suspicion of Innocence" (Episode 3.3) and as Thomas Marley in "Counterfire" (Episode 2.7)
   * Miami Vice as Leon Wolf in "The Afternoon Plane" (Episode 3.17)
   * Spanish Judges (1999)
   * Saturday Night Live (2008) as Det. Robert Goren (Episode 33.630)
   * Xavier: Renegade Angel (2009) as Eric in the episode "El Tornadador" (Episode 2.3) and as The Judge in the episode "Damnesia Vu" (Episode 2.6)
   * Morning Joe (2011) as Himself (Aired on April 8, 2011)

Documentaries

   * Anatomy of a Homicide, PBS (1998)
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http://i270.photobucket.com/albums/jj97/universe_moon/vincent%20donofrio/Feel20Min20Interview2036.jpg

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 06/30/11 at 7:19 am


I'm really not sure.


He was arrested a couple of times in the past.

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 07/01/11 at 9:11 am

The person of the day....Liv Tyler
Liv Rundgren Tyler (born July 1, 1977) is an American actress and model. She is the daughter of Aerosmith's lead singer, Steven Tyler, and Bebe Buell, model and singer. Tyler began a career in modeling at the age of 14, but after less than a year she decided to focus on acting. She made her film debut in the 1994 film Silent Fall. She then appeared in supporting roles in Empire Records (1995), Heavy (1996) and That Thing You Do! (1996). Tyler later achieved critical recognition in the leading role Stealing Beauty (1996). She followed this by starring in supporting roles including Inventing the Abbotts (1997) and Cookie's Fortune (1999).

Tyler achieved international recognition as a result of her portrayal of Elf maiden Arwen Undómiel in the Lord of the Rings film trilogy. She has appeared in an eclectic range of films, including the 2004 comedy Jersey Girl, the indie film Lonesome Jim (2005), the drama Reign Over Me (2007) and big-budget studio films such as Armageddon (1998), The Strangers (2008) and The Incredible Hulk (2008).

Since 2003, Tyler has served as a United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) Goodwill Ambassador for the United States, and as a spokesperson for Givenchy's line of perfume and cosmetics.
Tyler was born Liv Rundgren at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. She is the first-born daughter of Bebe Buell, a model, singer, and former Playboy Playmate (Miss November 1974), and Steven Tyler, the lead singer of Aerosmith. Her mother named her after Norwegian actress Liv Ullmann, after seeing Ullmann on the cover of the March 5, 1977 issue of TV Guide. She is of Italian, German, Polish, Russian and English ancestry on her father's side and also has three half-siblings: Mia Tyler (born 1978), Chelsea Anna Tallarico (born 1989), and Taj Monroe Tallarico (born 1992). Her maternal grandmother, Dorothea Johnson, founded the Protocol School of Washington.

At birth, Buell claimed that rock star Todd Rundgren was Tyler's biological father. At age nine, Tyler discovered that she was Steven Tyler's daughter after meeting him and noticing a resemblance she shared with his other daughter, Mia. When she asked her mother about the similarity, the secret was revealed. The truth about Tyler's paternity did not become public until five years later, in 1991, when she changed her name from Rundgren to Tyler, but kept the former as a middle name. Buell's alleged reason for the initial decision was that Steven was too heavily addicted to drugs at the time of her birth. Since learning the truth about her paternity, Liv and Steven have developed a close relationship. They have also worked together professionally, once when she appeared in Aerosmith's music video for "Crazy" in 1993 and again when Aerosmith performed many of the songs in the film Armageddon (1998), in which Liv Tyler starred.

Tyler attended the Congressional Schools of Virginia, Breakwater School and Waynflete School in Portland, Maine, before returning to New York City with her mother at the age of 12. She went to York Preparatory in New York City for junior high and high school, after her mother researched the school to accommodate Tyler's ADHD. She graduated in 1995, and left to continue her acting career. When asked about the way she spent her early life, Tyler said: "For me, I didn’t get much of a childhood in my teen years because I’ve been working since I was 14. But that also kept me out of trouble. When everybody was doing acid and partying like crazy, I was at work on a movie in Tuscany ... having my own fun, of course, but it was a different kind of thing. I have no regrets. I love the way my life has gone."
Career
Early work

At the age of 14, Tyler received her first modeling job with assistance of Paulina Porizkova who took photos of her that ended up in Interview magazine. She later starred in television commercials. However, she became bored with her modeling career less than a year after it started, and decided to go into acting. She never took acting lessons. Tyler first became known to television audiences when she starred alongside Alicia Silverstone in the music video for Aerosmith's 1993 song "Crazy".

Tyler made her feature film debut in Silent Fall in 1994, where she played the older sister of an autistic boy. In 1995, she starred in the comedy drama Empire Records. Tyler has described Empire Records as "one of the best experiences" she has ever had. Soon after, she landed a supporting role in James Mangold's 1996 drama Heavy as Callie, a naive young waitress. The film received favorable reviews; critic Janet Maslin noted: "Ms. Tyler ... gives a charmingly ingenuous performance, betraying no self-consciousness about her lush good looks."
Popular success

Tyler had her breakthrough role in Stealing Beauty (1996), in which she played Lucy Harmon, an innocent, romantic teenager who travels to Italy intent on losing her virginity. The film received generally mixed reviews, but Tyler's performance was favored by the critics; Variety wrote: "Tyler is the perfect accomplice. At times sweetly awkward, at others composed and serene, the actress appears to respond effortlessly and intuitively to the camera, creating a rich sense of what Lucy is about that often is not explicit in the dialogue." Empire noted, "Liv Tyler (here radiantly resembling a ganglier young Ava Gardner) with a rare opportunity to enamour, a break she capitalises on with composure." The film was directed by Bernardo Bertolucci, who chose Tyler for the role after meeting with a number of young girls in Los Angeles, including Tyler's music video co-star Alicia Silverstone. Bertolucci claimed "there was something missing in all of them". He later admitted that what he saw in Tyler was a gravitas he described as "a New York aura". During promotion of the film, Tyler admitted she wanted to separate herself from the character during production; "I tried my damnedest not to think of my own situation. But at one point, after a take, I just started to cry and cry. I remembered when I found out about my dad and how we just stared at each other from head to toe taking in every nook and cranny."
Tyler at the premiere of The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King in 2003

She later appeared in That Thing You Do! (1996), a movie about a fictional one-hit wonder rock band called The Oneders, following their whirlwind rise to the top of the pop charts, and just as quickly, their plunge back to obscurity. The film was written and directed by Tom Hanks. It grossed over $25 million worldwide, and was met with favorable reviews. The following year, she appeared in Inventing the Abbotts in 1997, in which she played the daughter of Will Patton and Barbara Williams' characters. The movie is based on a short story by Sue Miller. Entertainment Weekly declared Tyler's performance as "lovely and pliant". That same year, Tyler was chosen by People magazine as one of the 50 Most Beautiful People.

Tyler next appeared in Armageddon (1998), where she played the daughter of Bruce Willis' character and love interest of Ben Affleck's character. The film generated mixed reviews, but was a box office success earning $553 million worldwide. The movie included the songs "I Don't Want to Miss a Thing" and "What Kind of Love Are You On" by Aerosmith. In a 2001 interview with The Guardian, she admitted that she turned down the role in Armageddon; "I really didn't want to do it at first and I turned it down a couple of times, but the biggest reason I changed my mind was because I was scared of it. I wanted to try it for that very reason. I mean, I'm not really in this to do amazing things in my career - I just want it to be special when I make a movie."

She was then cast in the drama Onegin (1999), a film based on the 19th century Russian novel of the same name by Alexander Pushkin, in which she portrayed Tatyana Larina and co-starred with Ralph Fiennes. Tyler was required to master an English accent, though Stephen Holden of the New York Times felt that her approximation of an English accent was "inert". The film was critically and financially unsuccessful. That same year, she appeared in the historical comedy film Plunkett & Macleane.

She later appeared in two films directed by Robert Altman, Cookie's Fortune (1999) and Dr. T & the Women (2000). In Cookie's Fortune, she was part of an ensemble cast that included Glenn Close, Julianne Moore, Chris O'Donnell, and Patricia Neal. Her performance well received among critics; Salon.com wrote: "This is the first time in which Tyler's acting is a match for her beauty (she's always been a bit forlorn). Altman helps her find some snap, but a relaxed, silly snap, as in the cartoon sound she makes when she takes a midday swig of bourbon. The lazy geniality of the movie is summed up by the way Emma saunters off to take a swim with her cowboy hat and pint of Wild Turkey." Entertainment Weekly also noted that Tyler is "sweetly gruff as the tomboy troublemaker". In the romantic comedy, Dr. T & the Women, she played Marilyn, a gynecological patient of Richard Gere's character, who is the lesbian lover of his daughter, played by Kate Hudson.

In 2001, Tyler played the object of infatuation for three men (Matt Dillon, John Goodman and Paul Reiser) in the black comedy One Night at McCool's. In discussion of the role, she said: "This was definitely the first part where I had to be so physically aware and have people so aware of me physically. Maybe it's not hard for anybody else, but it is a bit for me. I mean I love my body and I feel very comfortable in my skin, but this was tough." Peter Travers of Rolling Stone wrote: "Tyler, a true beauty, gives the role a valiant try, but her range is too limited to play this amalgam of female perfection."
Recent work

In 2001, she starred in the feature film The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, directed by Peter Jackson. She played the Elf maiden Arwen Undómiel. The film is based on the first volume of J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings. The filmmakers approached Tyler after seeing her performance in Plunkett & Macleane. She learned to speak the fictitious Elvish language that was created by Tolkien. Mick LaSalle of the San Francisco Chronicle noted that Tyler's performance was "lovely and earnest".
Tyler and co-star Sean Astin at the premiere of The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King in 2003

A year later, Tyler again starred as Arwen in The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, the second installment of the series. The film received favorable reviews. Tyler spent months before filming learning swordfighting, to be used during the concluding battle scenes in The Two Towers, though her scenes from the battle were removed after the script was changed. The film was an enormous box office success, earning over $926 million worldwide, out grossing its predecessor, which earned over $871 million. In 2003, Tyler featured in the third and last installment of the series, The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King.

Following the success of The Lord of the Rings, she appeared opposite her Armageddon co-star Ben Affleck in writer-director Kevin Smith's romantic comedy Jersey Girl (2004), playing a woman who re-opens a widowed father's heart to love, played by Affleck. In an interview with MTV News, Tyler confessed that she felt "scared and vulnerable" while filming Jersey Girl, adding "I was so used to those other elements of the character . On The Lord of the Rings, a lot of things were done in post-production, whereas this was really just about me and Ben sitting there, just shooting off dialogue." However, she reiterated that doing Jersey Girl was what she wanted to do.

In 2005, she appeared in Steve Buscemi's independent drama Lonesome Jim, where she was cast alongside Casey Affleck, as a single mother and nurse who reconnects with an old fling who has returned to their small town of Indiana after a failed run as a novelist in New York. The film was screened at a special presentation at the 2005 Sundance Film Festival where it was nominated for the Grand Jury Prize. Tyler's next appearance in film was in a supporting role as an insightful therapist who tries to help a once-successful dentist (Adam Sandler) cope with the loss of his family during the events of the September 11th attacks in Reign Over Me (2007).

In 2008, she starred in the horror-thriller The Strangers with Scott Speedman, a film about a young couple who are terrorized one night by three masked assailants in their remote country house. Although the film garnered a mixed reception among critics, it was a box office success. In an interview with Entertainment Weekly, she noted that The Strangers was the most challenging role of her career. "It was as far as I could push myself in every way: physically, emotionally, mentally."

She appeared in The Incredible Hulk (2008), in which she played Dr. Betty Ross, the love interest of the title character, played by Edward Norton. Tyler was attracted to the love story in the script, and was a fan of the television show. She said filming the part was "very physical, which was fun", and compared her performance to "a deer caught in the headlights". The Incredible Hulk was a box office success, earning over $262 million worldwide. The Washington Post, in review of the film, wrote: "Tyler gives Betty an appropriately angelic nimbus of ethereal gentleness as the one Beauty who can tame the Beast ... during their most pivotal encounters."

Tyler is appearing in two films released in 2011: Super and The Ledge. In April 2011, publishing house Rodale announced that Tyler and her grandmother Dorothea Johnson, a noted etiquette expert, have written a book called "Modern Manners." Rodale plans to release the book in May 2012.
Personal life

In 1998, Tyler began dating British musician Royston Langdon of the band Spacehog. She and Langdon became engaged in February 2001, and married in Barbados on March 25, 2003. On December 14, 2004, she gave birth to a son, Milo William Langdon. On May 8, 2008, the couple confirmed through representatives that they would be separating but remain friends. In an interview with the Australian Daily Telegraph, Tyler revealed that her separation from Langdon led her to move to Los Angeles, explaining that it was hard to be in the New York home they shared. In June 2010, Tyler stated she was "far too sensitive" for casual dates, adding "I fall in love once in a blue moon."

Tyler is an active supporter of the charitable United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). She was appointed as a Goodwill Ambassador for the United States in 2003. In November 2004, she hosted the lighting of the UNICEF Snowflake in New York City. Tyler also served as spokesperson for the 2004 Givenchy Mother's Day promotion, in support of UNICEF's Maternal & Neonatal Tetanus (MNT) campaign.

Since 2004, she has donated to the Women's Cancer Research Fund to support innovative research, education, and outreach directed at the development of more effective approaches to the early diagnosis, treatment and prevention of all women's cancers. In October 2007, Tyler, along with her mother, Bebe Buell and her grandmother, Dorothea Johnson, helped launch the Emergen-C Pink energy drink, in which the event was in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness month.

She is good friends with designer Stella McCartney, model Helena Christensen and actresses Kate Hudson and Gwyneth Paltrow. Tyler was formerly a vegan, but has since begun to eat meat. In 2003, she became the spokesperson for Givenchy perfume and cosmetics; in 2005 the brand named a rose after her, which was used in one of its fragrances. In 2009, Tyler signed on for two more years as Givenchy spokesperson.


Filmography
Year Film Role Notes
1994 Silent Fall Sylvie Warden
1995 Heavy Callie
Empire Records Corey Mason
1996 Stealing Beauty Lucy Harmon Nominated – Young Star Award for Best Performance by a Young Actress in a Drama Film
That Thing You Do! Faye Dolan
1997 Inventing the Abbotts Pamela Abbott
U Turn Girl in Bus Station Cameo appearance
1998 Armageddon Grace Stamper Nominated – MTV Movie Award for Best Female Performance
Nominated – MTV Movie Award for Best On-Screen Duo Shared with Ben Affleck
Nominated – Blockbuster Entertainment Award for Favorite Actress -Science Fiction
1999 Plunkett & Macleane Lady Rebecca Gibson
Cookie's Fortune Emma Duvall
Onegin Tatyana Larina Russian Guild of Film Critics Award for Best Foreign Actress
2000 Dr. T & the Women Marilyn
2001 One Night at McCool's Jewel
The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring Arwen Undómiel Phoenix Film Critics Society Award for Best Cast
Nominated – Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast
2002 The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers Arwen Undómiel Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Ensemble
Phoenix Film Critics Society Award for Best Cast
Nominated – Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast
2003 The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Arwen Undómiel Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast
Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Cast
National Board of Review Award for Best Cast
Nominated – Phoenix Film Critics Society Award for Best Ensemble
2004 Jersey Girl Maya
2005 Lonesome Jim Anika
2007 Reign Over Me Dr. Angela Oakhurst
2008 The Strangers Kristen McKay Scream Awards for Best Horror Actress
Nominated – Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Actress: Horror/Thriller
The Incredible Hulk Betty Ross
Smother Clare Cooper
2011 Super Sarah
The Ledge Shana
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Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: ninny on 07/01/11 at 9:15 am

* Princess Diana would have turned 50 today.... :\'( :\'(
http://i463.photobucket.com/albums/qq352/ophase/princess-diana-.jpg
http://i482.photobucket.com/albums/rr187/meadow_bucket/Princess%20Diana/282.jpg

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Philip Eno on 07/01/11 at 2:13 pm


* Princess Diana would have turned 50 today.... :\'( :\'(
http://i463.photobucket.com/albums/qq352/ophase/princess-diana-.jpg
http://i482.photobucket.com/albums/rr187/meadow_bucket/Princess%20Diana/282.jpg
:\'( :\'(

Subject: Re: ninny's New Person & Word of the Day

Written By: Howard on 07/01/11 at 3:31 pm


The person of the day....Liv Tyler
Liv Rundgren Tyler (born July 1, 1977) is an American actress and model. She is the daughter of Aerosmith's lead singer, Steven Tyler, and Bebe Buell, model and singer. Tyler began a career in modeling at the age of 14, but after less than a year she decided to focus on acting. She made her film debut in the 1994 film Silent Fall. She then appeared in supporting roles in Empire Records (1995), Heavy (1996) and That Thing You Do! (1996). Tyler later achieved critical recognition in the leading role Stealing Beauty (1996). She followed this by starring in supporting roles including Inventing the Abbotts (1997) and Cookie's Fortune (1999).

Tyler achieved international recognition as a result of her portrayal of Elf maiden Arwen Undómiel in the Lord of the Rings film trilogy. She has appeared in an eclectic range of films, including the 2004 comedy Jersey Girl, the indie film Lonesome Jim (2005), the drama Reign Over Me (2007) and big-budget studio films such as Armageddon (1998), The Strangers (2008) and The Incredible Hulk (2008).

Since 2003, Tyler has served as a United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) Goodwill Ambassador for the United States, and as a spokesperson for Givenchy's line of perfume and cosmetics.
Tyler was born Liv Rundgren at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. She is the first-born daughter of Bebe Buell, a model, singer, and former Playboy Playmate (Miss November 1974), and Steven Tyler, the lead singer of Aerosmith. Her mother named her after Norwegian actress Liv Ullmann, after seeing Ullmann on the cover of the March 5, 1977 issue of TV Guide. She is of Italian, German, Polish, Russian and English ancestry on her father's side and also has three half-siblings: Mia Tyler (born 1978), Chelsea Anna Tallarico (born 1989), and Taj Monroe Tallarico (born 1992). Her maternal grandmother, Dorothea Johnson, founded the Protocol School of Washington.

At birth, Buell claimed that rock star Todd Rundgren was Tyler's biological father. At age nine, Tyler discovered that she was Steven Tyler's daughter after meeting him and noticing a resemblance she shared with his other daughter, Mia. When she asked her mother about the similarity, the secret was revealed. The truth about Tyler's paternity did not become public until five years later, in 1991, when she changed her name from Rundgren to Tyler, but kept the former as a middle name. Buell's alleged reason for the initial decision was that Steven was too heavily addicted to drugs at the time of her birth. Since learning the truth about her paternity, Liv and Steven have developed a close relationship. They have also worked together professionally, once when she appeared in Aerosmith's music video for "Crazy" in 1993 and again when Aerosmith performed many of the songs in the film Armageddon (1998), in which Liv Tyler starred.

Tyler attended the Congressional Schools of Virginia, Breakwater School and Waynflete School in Portland, Maine, before returning to New York City with her mother at the age of 12. She went to York Preparatory in New York City for junior high and high school, after her mother researched the school to accommodate Tyler's ADHD. She graduated in 1995, and left to continue her acting career. When asked about the way she spent her early life, Tyler said: "For me, I didn’t get much of a childhood in my teen years because I’ve been working since I was 14. But that also kept me out of trouble. When everybody was doing acid and partying like crazy, I was at work on a movie in Tuscany ... having my own fun, of course, but it was a different kind of thing. I have no regrets. I love the way my life has gone."
Career
Early work

At the age of 14, Tyler received her first modeling job with assistance of Paulina Porizkova who took photos of her that ended up in Interview magazine. She later starred in television commercials. However, she became bored with her modeling career less than a year after it started, and decided to go into acting. She never took acting lessons. Tyler first became known to television audiences when she starred alongside Alicia Silverstone in the music video for Aerosmith's 1993 song "Crazy".

Tyler made her feature film debut in Silent Fall in 1994, where she played the older sister of an autistic boy. In 1995, she starred in the comedy drama Empire Records. Tyler has described Empire Records as "one of the best experiences" she has ever had. Soon after, she landed a supporting role in James Mangold's 1996 drama Heavy as Callie, a naive young waitress. The film received favorable reviews; critic Janet Maslin noted: "Ms. Tyler ... gives a charmingly ingenuous performance, betraying no self-consciousness about her lush good looks."
Popular success

Tyler had her breakthrough role in Stealing Beauty (1996), in which she played Lucy Harmon, an innocent, romantic teenager who travels to Italy intent on losing her virginity. The film received generally mixed reviews, but Tyler's performance was favored by the critics; Variety wrote: "Tyler is the perfect accomplice. At times sweetly awkward, at others composed and serene, the actress appears to respond effortlessly and intuitively to the camera, creating a rich sense of what Lucy is about that often is not explicit in the dialogue." Empire noted, "Liv Tyler (here radiantly resembling a ganglier young Ava Gardner) with a rare opportunity to enamour, a break she capitalises on with composure." The film was directed by Bernardo Bertolucci, who chose Tyler for the role after meeting with a number of young girls in Los Angeles, including Tyler's music video co-star Alicia Silverstone. Bertolucci claimed "there was something missing in all of them". He later admitted that what he saw in Tyler was a gravitas he described as "a New York aura". During promotion of the film, Tyler admitted she wanted to separate herself from the character during production; "I tried my damnedest not to think of my own situation. But at one point, after a take, I just started to cry and cry. I remembered when I found out about my dad and how we just stared at each other from head to toe taking in every nook and cranny."
Tyler at the premiere of The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King in 2003

She later appeared in That Thing You Do! (1996), a movie about a fictional one-hit wonder rock band called The Oneders, following their whirlwind rise to the top of the pop charts, and just as quickly, their plunge back to obscurity. The film was written and directed by Tom Hanks. It grossed over $25 million worldwide, and was met with favorable reviews. The following year, she appeared in Inventing the Abbotts in 1997, in which she played the daughter of Will Patton and Barbara Williams' characters. The movie is based on a short story by Sue Miller. Entertainment Weekly declared Tyler's performance as "lovely and pliant". That same year, Tyler was chosen by People magazine as one of the 50 Most Beautiful People.

Tyler next appeared in Armageddon (1998), where she played the daughter of Bruce Willis' character and love interest of Ben Affleck's character. The film generated mixed reviews, but was a box office success earning $553 million worldwide. The movie included the songs "I Don't Want to Miss a Thing" and "What Kind of Love Are You On" by Aerosmith. In a 2001 interview with The Guardian, she admitted that she turned down the role in Armageddon; "I really didn't want to do it at first and I turned it down a couple of times, but the biggest reason I changed my mind was because I was scared of it. I wanted to try it for that very reason. I mean, I'm not really in this to do amazing things in my career - I just want it to be special when I make a movie."

She was then cast in the drama Onegin (1999), a film based on the 19th century Russian novel of the same name by Alexander Pushkin, in which she portrayed Tatyana Larina and co-starred with Ralph Fiennes. Tyler was required to master an English accent, though Stephen Holden of the New York Times felt that her approximation of an English accent was "inert". The film was critically and financially unsuccessful. That same year, she appeared in the historical comedy film Plunkett & Macleane.

She later appeared in two films directed by Robert Altman, Cookie's Fortune (1999) and Dr. T & the Women (2000). In Cookie's Fortune, she was part of an ensemble cast tha